Transport Canada’s 2017-2020 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS)

From Transport Canada

The Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy reflects our efforts towards a more sustainable transportation system in Canada. It outlines the actions that the department will undertake over the next three years. The strategy supports the Government of Canada’s broader Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

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Executive summary

Transport Canada seeks to promote a safe, secure, efficient and environmentally responsible transportation system in Canada. Our departmental vision aligns closely with the social, economic and environmental pillars of sustainable development, which is defined as ‘our ability to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’Footnote 1.

Our national transportation system – by land, water and air – links Canadians to each other and Canada with the world. Transportation moves goods to markets and people to their destinations, provides jobs, and supports economic growth. However, transportation activities can sometimes have negative impacts on the environment, for example - through the release of air pollutants from vehicles which can contribute to poorer air quality or accidental oil spills in the marine environment which can affect water quality and marine species. Of increasing importance, climate change and extreme weather-related events can disrupt the movement of both freight and people, putting the economy and Canadians at risk. Given the complex nature of sustainable transportation issues and its shared jurisdiction, strong and effective partnerships are required with other federal departments, other levels of government, industry, other stakeholders and individual Canadians. A number of our departmental actions, as set out in Section 3, will be undertaken in partnership with others.

At the federal level, a whole-of government Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) is prepared every three years. The 2016-2019 FSDS is the federal government’s third strategy since the coming into force of the Federal Sustainable Development Act, and it serves as our primary vehicle for sustainable development planning and reporting – both to Parliament and Canadians. The 2016-2019 FSDS centres on thirteen new aspirational goals, with supporting targets and actions, which seek to promote clean growth, ensure healthy ecosystems and build safe, secure and sustainable communities. Furthermore, the FSDS demonstrates federal leadership towards implementing the environmentally-related global United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

Transport Canada remains committed to contributing to the FSDS and to supporting Canada’s vision for sustainable development. The 2017-2020 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) describes how Transport Canada will continue to contribute to the FSDS: our sustainable development context and vision; the actions we will undertake over the next three years to support the FSDS, and the ways we have integrated a sustainable development approach into our policies, plans and decision-making. Key areas of action presented within this DSDS include: initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions from the transportation sector, including in support of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change; programs such as the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative which will facilitate an improved understanding of the challenges and opportunities for a transportation system that is increasingly resilient to the changing climate;  actions under the newly announced Oceans Protection Plan to protect our coasts and oceans and keep them healthy for future generations; as well as activities to lead by example in improving our own operations through increasing efficiencies in how we do business and reducing the energy consumption of the facilities and fleet of vehicles that we own and operate.

Section 1: Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016-19 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to integrate environmental, social and economic considerations into decision-making, to make decisions more transparent and increase accountability to Parliament, Transport Canada supports the goals laid out in the FSDS through the activities described in this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

Section 2: Sustainable Development in Transport Canada

To preserve and strengthen Canada's transportation system, transportation policy must provide a framework that addresses the three elements of sustainability - social, economic and environmental. It must also give carriers the opportunity to adapt, innovate, compete and serve shippers and travellers in a way that takes into account each of these elements.

Transport Canada is responsible for the Government of Canada's transportation policies and programs.  While not directly responsible for all aspects or modes of transportation, the Department plays a leadership role to ensure that all parts of the transportation system work together effectively.

Our vision is ‘A transportation system in Canada that is recognized worldwide as safe and secure, efficient and environmentally responsible’.This vision of a sustainable transportation system reflects social, economic and environmental objectives. Its three guiding principles are to work towards:

  • the highest possible safety and security of life and property, supported by performance-based standards and regulations;
  • the efficient movement of people and goods to support economic prosperity and a sustainable quality of life, based on competitive markets and targeted use of regulation and government funding; and,
  • respect of the environmental legacy for future generations of Canadians, guided by environmental assessment and planning processes in transportation decisions and selective use of regulation and government funding.

In November 2016, the Minister of Transport announced his strategic plan for the future of transportation in Canada, ‘Transportation 2030 – A Strategic Plan for the Future of Transportation in Canada’. Transportation 2030 was prepared with views and ideas from Canadians, stakeholders, provinces and territories, and Indigenous groups across the country and reflects sustainable development in its vision of:

“…a safe, secure, green, innovative and integrated transportation system that supports trade and economic growth, a cleaner environment and the well-being of Canada’s middle class”.

Canadians are invited to visit our Transportation 2030 website to view our progress in advancing work under the following five key theme areas:

  1. Enhancing the experience of the Canadian traveller;
  2. Building a safer, more secure transportation system that earns the confidence of Canadians;
  3. Investing in a greener, more innovative transportation sector that embraces new technologies to improve Canadians’ lives;
  4. Protecting Canada’s waterways, coasts and the North; and
  5. Improving Canada’s transportation infrastructure and trade corridors to get products to global markets more efficiently.

Transport Canada continues to actively participate in and support the FSDS. Through this DSDS, the department directly contributes to six of the thirteen long-term goals identified in the 2016-2019 FSDS, as follows:

FSDS Goal: Low Carbon Government - Greening government operations and moving towards a low-carbon government is important to achieving Canada’s goals for environmental and sustainable development. Transport Canada is committed to demonstrating leadership in this area through greening our own operations and reducing energy consumption from our facilities and fleet. The Department continues to own and operate several facilities across the country, including some airports and ports, and is responsible for a fleet of vehicles ranging from aircraft, and marine vessels to on-road vehicles. Transport Canada has identified a number of measures under the Low-carbon government goal to support the Government of Canada’s target to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from federal operations by 40% by 2030. These measures include: conducting energy audits, renovating facilities to be more energy efficient, developing a plan to reduce emissions from our fleet, incorporating environmental considerations into our procurement processes, and engaging with employees to promote sustainable employee behaviour.

FSDS Goal: Effective Action on Climate Change – The transportation sector is Canada’s second largest source of greenhouse gas emissions, accounting for 173 Mt or 24% of the national total. Reducing these emissions is a key priority of the federal government, as outlined in the set of ambitious and collaborative areas of action under the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. Transport Canada leads a suite of regulatory and voluntary measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation, marine, and rail sectors, and also supports emission reductions from the on-road sector. The department represents the Government of Canada at the International Civil Aviation Organization and the International Maritime Organization to develop approaches for the international aviation and marine sectors. We also test clean transportation technologies, so that they may be introduced in a safe, effective and timely manner.

FSDS Goal: Modern and Resilient Infrastructure – Impacts associated with a changing climate and extreme weather are already damaging and disrupting transportation systems, services and operations across all modes and in all regions of Canada. In Northern Canada in particular, climate impacts can threaten the efficiency, safety and resilience of transportation, and consequently, the ability of Northerners and industry to maximize social and economic development. Transport Canada’s National Trade Corridors Fund supports trade and transportation infrastructure investments that strengthen the efficiency and reliability of Canada’s trade corridors. Through the continuation of the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative, the department seeks to enable enhancement of the resilience of existing and future Northern transportation infrastructure and operations to a changing climate.

FSDS Goal: Healthy Coasts and Oceans – Transport Canada is committed to protecting Canada’s coasts and oceans and keeping them healthy for future generations. The department develops and administers policies, regulations and programs to protect the marine environment from ship source pollution. On November 7, 2016, the Prime Minister announced the Oceans Protection Plan (OPP): a whole-of-government, comprehensive strategy to build a world-leading marine safety system and protect Canada’s marine ecosystems. The OPP includes a number of innovative and transformative initiatives that have been developed in strong collaboration with other federal departments as well as with Indigenous and coastal communities. The OPP has four main priority areas, namely prevention and response measures related to marine safety, preservation and restoration of marine ecosystems and habitats, building and strengthening partnerships with Indigenous and coastal communities, and ensuring Canada’s marine safety system is built on a stronger evidence base that is supported by science and local knowledge.

FSDS Goal: Pristine Lakes and Rivers – Canada has one of the longest navigable coastlines in the world, from the St. Lawrence Seaway and Great Lakes to the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. A significant increase in worldwide shipping traffic and the corresponding amount of ballast water discharged by these vessels has resulted in an increase in alien species introductions. The introduction and spread of alien invasive species is a serious problem that has ecological, economic, health and environmental impacts, including loss of native biological diversity. Transport Canada’s key actions in this area include updating the current Ballast Water Regulations to reflect the recent worldwide coming into force of the Ballast Water Convention; and, ongoing inspections of all vessels entering the Great Lakes for compliance with ballast water management regulations.

FSDS Goal: Safe and Healthy Communities – Transport Canada is committed to doing its part to ensure that Canadians live in clean, safe environments that contribute to their health and well-being. Pollutant emissions from transportation have fallen significantly, largely due to regulatory changes introduced by the federal government. That being said, further action is required to ensure this trend continues in the transportation sector.  Key departmental initiatives under this goal include: regulatory, voluntary and complementary efforts to improve air quality through the reduction of air pollutant emissions from transportation sources; the prevention of environmental emergencies or mitigating their impacts if they do occur; and taking action to remediate our contaminated sites.

This DSDS builds on our accomplishments and lessons learned in previous strategies and charts our course of action for the next three years. In the spirit of the ‘evergreen’ approach of the 2016-2019 FSDS, we will update the interactive FSDS e-Strategy and this DSDS as new policy decisions, programs and initiatives that support the FSDS goals or broader United Nations’ Sustainable Development goals emerge. Detailed information about the initial commitments that Transport Canada has made to contribute to the 2016-19 FSDS can be found in Section 3 of this DSDS.

Section 3: Commitments for Transport Canada

Low-Carbon Government: The Government of Canada leads by example by making its operations low-carbon

Responsible Minister: All ministers

Low-Carbon Government

FSDS target(s)

FSDS Contributing Action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s) where available, and your choice of performance indicators for departmental actions

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

Reduce GHG emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve this reduction by 2025

Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings/operations

Reduce GHG emissions from Transport Canada buildings through renovations at identified facilities, which will include the following energy efficient upgrades:

  • Lighting upgrades (LED lighting)
  • Central heating/cooling
  • Effective space utilization
  • Reduce plug-load demand

Renovating facilities to include energy efficient upgrades will reduce the demand for energy usage, leading to a reduction in GHG emissions from Transport Canada’s real property portfolio

Performance Indicator:

  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2019 - 2020

Starting Point:

GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year) = 1.523 ktCO2e

GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2016-17 = 2.574 ktCO2e

Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2016-17 = 69% increase

Program 2.3
Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Modernize our fleet

Conduct a thorough review and analysis of the current on-road vehicle fleet to determine feasibility of including more low-emission vehicle options, including zero-emission vehicles, where operationally appropriate; and to align with government-wide efforts on zero-emission vehicle targets for future fleet acquisitions

Explore research and development options that aim to reduce the amount of fuel consumed for fleet operations will help the department to create a strong plan of action to reduce GHG emissions from our fleet inventory

Starting in 2019-2020, 100% of new light-duty administrative fleet purchases will be zero-emissions vehicles (ZEVs), where operational needs permit

Where ZEVs are not available or suitable for operational needs, new light-duty administrative fleet purchase will be the lower-emissions option

Transport Canada will examine if there are opportunities to broaden this approach to other departmental fleet purchases

Performance Indicators:

  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2019-2020
  • Percentage (%) of new light-duty administrative fleet vehicles that are ZEV

Starting Points:

GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = 60.758 ktCO2e

GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2016-17 = 57.132 ktCO2e

Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2016-17 = 5.96 % decrease

Zero percent (%) ZEV purchases in fiscal year 2016-2017

Program 2.3 Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement

Support the reduction of GHG emissions through procurement processes by undertaking the following activities:

  • Train specialists in procurement and acquisition cardholders on green procurement using the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course, or equivalent
  • Purchase copy paper from the Standing Offer that contains a minimum 30% recycled content and that is certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of its production

Training procurement specialists and acquisition cardholders on green procurement allows for more informed decision making on including green criteria in contracts for both commodities and services required by the department

Making use of standing offers with green criteria already in place is an efficient way for the department to reduce the impact of common purchases such as copy paper

Performance indicators:

  • Percentage of specialists in procurement and materiel management who have completed training on green procurement
  • By March 31, 2018, 100% of copy paper purchases will contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the impact of its production

Starting Point:

As of 2016-17, 135 procurement specialists and acquisition cardholders at Transport Canada have been trained on green procurement; and 100% of copy paper was purchased from the Standing Offer

Program 4.1
Internal Services

Promote sustainable travel practices

Address GHG emissions from business travel through the following activities:

  • Update and promote Transport Canada’s Green Meeting Guide and Green Meetings webpage to reduce the need for business travel
  • Update Transport Canada’s Green Commute webpage and promote sustainable commuting options for employees through various outreach initiatives such as:

- Lobby displays

- Publishing information articles on “myTC”

- Highlighting a commuter challenge

- Environment Week

Updating the Green Meeting Guide will encourage employees to take advantage of available green meeting options within the department, therefore reducing the overall need for business travel and GHG emissions

Updating the Green Commute Program webpage will help to encourage employees to consider sustainable commuting options, therefore lowering GHG emissions from employees’ daily commute

Performance Indicators:

  • By March 31, 2018, Green Meeting Guide and webpage updated
  • By March 31, 2018. Green Commute Program webpage updated and promotion of sustainable commuting options

Starting point:

In 2016, Transport Canada launched the Guide to Green Meetings, an easy how-to manual to help employees organize green meetings, and in turn help the department to reduce its GHG emissions from unnecessary business travel

Transport Canada has had a Green Commute Program in place for many years to encourage and promote sustainable commuting options (e.g. cycling, transit, walking, carpooling etc.) for departmental employees

Program 2.3
Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Understand climate change impacts and build resilience

  • Identify and understand climate change risks and vulnerabilities to Canada’s transportation system that could potentially affect Transport Canada’s mandate, policies, assets, programs, services and overall operations
  • Integrate climate change considerations into Transport Canada’s departmental planning, policies, programs, services and overall operations
  • Continue to incorporate climate change considerations into Transport Canada’s corporate risk planning process

The integration of climate change considerations into policies, programs, services and overall operations is one of the most important ways the government can adapt to a changing climate and is consistent with the government’s risk management approach of enhancing the protection of public assets and resources and strengthening planning and decision-making

Performance Indicators:

  • Transport Canada’s climate risk scan updated by March 31, 2018
  • Transport Canada’s next adaptation plan developed by Fall 2018
  • Corporate risk and business continuity plans integrate climate change considerations, on an ongoing basis

Starting Point:

In 2012, Transport Canada completed a climate risk scan which informed the development of the department’s first departmental adaptation plan (2013-16). This plan had a key focus on improving Transport Canada’s integration of climate change into decision making

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives

Starting point(s) where available, and applicable performance indicators for each departmental action

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

Departmental action: Improve the accuracy of GHG data collection through the following activities:

  • Analyze Transport Canada’s existing GHG inventory to ensure it is as comprehensive as possible with the most up-to-date facility and fleet information
  • Develop national guidance and a reporting template to simplify the process for collecting TC facility data to ensure accuracy and consistency across all regions

Performance Indicators:

  • By March 31, 2018, TC’s GHG inventory complete and up-to-date
  • By March 31, 2018, National guidance and reporting template developed and being used across all regions

Program 2.3
Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Effective Action on Climate Change: A low-carbon economy contributes to limiting global average temperature rise to well below two degrees Celsius and supports efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; supported by a whole-of-government approach to implementation

Effective Action on Climate Change

FSDS target(s)

FSDS Contributing Action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s) where available, and your choice of performance indicators for departmental actions

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2030, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels

Use regulations to limit GHG emissions

Address GHG emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) development of new international standards and recommended practices through the development and implementation of new domestic standards, the monitoring of Canada’s voluntary Action Plan in collaboration with the Canadian domestic aviation sector, and through targeted research

Through a range of regulatory, voluntary and research and development measures, Transport Canada supports the domestic and international reduction of GHG emissions from the aviation sector

Performance indicators:

  • Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Targets:

  • By March 31, 2018, 100% of instruments are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Starting point:

100% of instruments are currently aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Transport Canada actively leads the Government of Canada’s participation at ICAO on topics related to reducing the impact of aviation on the environment, including contributing to creation of a Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation, agreed to at ICAO in fall 2016

Building on the success of the world’s first voluntary agreement to address GHG emissions from aviation, the Government and the Canadian aviation industry released Canada’s Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Aviation. Progress is reported in an annual report

Program 2.1

Clean Air from Transportation

Address GHG emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations and targeted research and development (R&D)*

*this departmental action also contributes to the reduction of air pollutant emissions, which supports the FSDS ‘Safe and Healthy Communities’ goal

Transport Canada actively participates in the International Maritime Organization’s Marine Environment Protection Committee and the Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response to develop a comprehensive strategy to reduce GHG emissions from ships, and agree on related measures

For example, in 2016-17:

Transport Canada continued to lead the Government of Canada’s participation at the IMO, and worked with member states to:

  • Agree to develop a comprehensive IMO strategy to reduce GHG emissions from international shipping as well as to confirm 2020 as the coming into force date of a more stringent cap on the maximum allowed sulphur content in marine fuel (0.05% mass/mass);
  • Agree on a timeline for the completion of the black carbon work plan; and
  • Adopt a mandatory ship fuel oil data collection system for international shipping

Transport Canada also undertakes research and development activities and implements new Canadian regulations, which contain measures that reduce the amount of GHG emissions directly from the source, the ships and their engines. These actions collectively contribute towards global efforts to limit average temperature rise

Performance Indicators:

  • Progress in negotiations at IMO
  • Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards
  • Compliance with vessel emissions regulations
  • Percentage of research and development projects that identify potential technological solutions or establish that technologies are not feasible
  • Percentage of industry/academia and government collaborations related to technology development

Targets:

By March 31, 2018:

  • 100% of instruments are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards
  • 100% of vessels comply with vessel emissions regulations
  • 90% of research and development (R&D) projects are undertaken to:
    • provide direction for further R&D,
    • establish a Technology Readiness Level (TRL)
    • advance to a higher TRL or
    • demonstrate that the technology is not feasible
  • 70% of projects have collaboration with other relevant stakeholders

Starting point:

During 2016-17:

85% of instruments were aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Vessels were 83% in compliance with vessel emissions regulations (based on minor deficiencies observed)

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Support Environment and Climate Change Canada’s development and implementation of GHG emission regulations for light-duty vehicles (for model years 2017–25) and heavy-duty vehicles (for model years 2014–18) under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, which will align with regulations in the United States

Transport Canada supports Environment and Climate Change Canada in the development of GHG emission regulations for light- and heavy-duty vehicles through work aimed at ensuring the safe introduction of new clean technologies in Canada. This includes a range of activities, such as:

  • analyzing initiatives and scenarios to assess the environmental benefits of complementary measures directed at reducing GHG emissions from on-road transportation; and
  • Continued involvement in national and global safety standards development for zero-emission vehicles (electric and hydrogen) and alternative fuel vehicles will ensure that a wide range of zero and low emissions vehicles are available for sale in the Canadian market

Performance Indicator:

  • Change in transportation emissions intensity as measured in grams per unit of activity (e.g.: tonnes-km, passenger-km)

Target:

  • Continuous improvement in emissions intensity by March 31, 2020

Note: it will only be possible to set an absolute value if the transportation sector’s share of the Government of Canada’s reduction targets are established and published

Starting point:

Environment and Climate Change Canada published the phase 2 Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations in Canada Gazette, Part I in March 2017

From 2005 to 2014 (latest year for which data is available):

  • GHG emissions intensity decreased by 13% for passenger transportation, not including off-road equipment
  • GHG emissions intensity increased by 6% for freight transportation, due mainly to the increasing use of trucks to move goods

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Address GHG emissions through testing and evaluations of advanced technologies to support the development of regulations and industry codes and standards in order to ensure that new technologies that reduce GHG emissions can be introduced in Canada in a safe and timely manner*

*this departmental action also contributes to the reduction of air pollutant emissions, which supports the FSDS ‘Safe and Healthy Communities’ goal

Test results from Transport Canada’s ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles program support the development of the codes and standards that are required by industry to commercialize new clean technologies in Canada

Performance Indicator:

  • Number of technologies/ vehicles tested/evaluated

Target:

  • Greater than, or equal to, five technologies/vehicles or evaluated by March 31, 2018

Starting Point:

  • In 2016-17, the program conducted 25 testing and evaluation activities, This included testing the fuel economy and aerodynamic benefits of connected and automated truck platooning technologies – a first of its kind test globally

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG emissions and adapt to climate change

Address GHG emissions from the rail sector through the joint Canada–U.S. locomotive emissions initiative under the Regulatory Cooperation Council, a voluntary agreement with the Canadian rail industry, and research activities to enhance understanding of new technologies to reduce GHG emissions

Transport Canada will address GHG emissions from locomotives by developing a new voluntary agreement with the rail industry for 2018 and beyond

Research and analysis on new technologies and practices that improve efficiency through the Regulatory Cooperation Council and Transport Canada’s Clean Rail Academic Grant Program support policy and regulatory development, thereby leading to reductions in GHG emissions or emission intensity

Performance Indicators:

  • Percentage of research and development projects that identify potential technological solutions or establish that technologies are not feasible
  • Percentage of industry/academia and government collaborations related to technology development

Targets:

By March 31, 2018:

  • 90% of research and development (R&D) projects are undertaken to:
    • provide direction for further R&D,
    • establish a Technology Readiness Level (TRL)
    • advance to a higher TRL or
    • demonstrate that the technology is not feasible
  • 70% of projects have collaboration with other relevant stakeholders

Starting point:

A Memorandum of Understanding with the rail industry covering the 2011-2016 was extended through to 2017

In 2016-2017, the Clean Rail Academic Grant Program funded 10 university projects, including work on developing a wireless charging system for an electric rail system, and 78% of projects had collaboration with other relevant stakeholders

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Under the Truck Reservation System Program, address GHG emissions by supporting the deployment of technology projects at port and terminal facilities to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling*

*this departmental action also contributes to the reduction of air pollutant emissions, which supports the FSDS ‘Safe and Healthy Communities’ goal

Improving efficiency in the movement of trucks and reducing truck idling at port and terminal facilities results in site specific reductions in the amount of GHG and air pollutant emissions released, as well as reductions in fuel consumption

Performance indicators:

  • Percentage of projects completed
  • Number of clean transportation technology projects implemented

Targets:

As of March 31, 2018:

  • 100% of Truck Reservation System Program projects will be completed
  • 10 clean transportation technologies implemented by March 31, 2018*

(*target shared with the Shore Power Technology for Ports Program)

Starting point:

The Truck Reservation System Program is currently in its last year and will end as of March 31, 2018

  • To date, seven technology projects have been implemented under this Program

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Under the Shore Power Technology for Ports program, address GHG emissions from the marine sector by funding the installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian ports*

*this departmental action also contributes to the reduction of air pollutant emissions, which supports the FSDS ‘Safe and Healthy Communities’ goal

Shore power installations will result in the reduced idling of ships’ auxiliary engines while docked at port – reducing GHG and air pollutant emissions

Performance indicators:

  • Number of clean transportation technology projects implemented

Target:

  • 10 clean transportation technologies implemented by March 31, 2018*

(*target shared with the Truck Reservation System Program)

Starting point:

Since the program launch in 2012, four projects have been completed, including:

  • Upgrades and enhancements of existing shore power systems at the Port of Vancouver's Canada Place Cruise Terminal;
  • Installation of a shore power system at Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal;
  • Installation of a cruise ship shore power system at the Port of Halifax; and,
  • Installation and upgrade of shore power systems at several British Columbia Ferry Services terminals

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Other

Transport Canada and Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada, with support from Environment and Climate Change Canada and Natural Resources Canada, are co-leading the development of a Canada-wide strategy to increase adoption of zero-emission vehicles, working with provincial and territorial government, industry, and other stakeholders. The strategy is to be completed in 2018

Reduce GHG emissions from the light-duty vehicle sector through increased adoption of zero-emission vehicles

Performance Indicator:

  • The development of a zero emission vehicles strategy

Target:

  • A strategy is developed by December 31, 2018

Starting point:

A commitment was made in the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change to develop a Canada-wide strategy for zero-emission vehicles

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Modern and Resilient Infrastructure: Modern, sustainable, and resilient infrastructure supports clean economic growth and social inclusion

Responsible Minister: Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Modern and Resilient Infrastructure

FSDS target(s)

FSDS Contributing Action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s) where available, and your choice of performance indicators for departmental actions

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

Other

Other

Implement the National Trade Corridors Fund and support trade and transportation infrastructure investments that strengthen the efficiency and reliability of Canada’s trade corridors. Two (2) national calls for proposals will be issued by 2021

The National Trade Corridors Fund provides funding to help transportation infrastructure owners and users invest in projects that:

  • Support the flow of goods and passengers by reducing bottlenecks, and address capacity and performance issues
  • Help the transportation system withstand the effects of climate change and make sure it is able to support new technologiesand innovation
  • Address the unique transportation needs in Canada's territorial North to improve safety and foster economic and social development
  • Build on investments made by a variety of public and private sector partners

Performance Indicators:

  • Number of program calls for proposals

Target:

  • Two national calls for proposals issued by 2021

Starting point:

The National Trade Corridors Fund program was launched by the Minister of Transport in July 2017. The first round of project proposals will be evaluated fall 2017

Program 1.2 Gateways and Corridors

Other

Through the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative, Transport Canada supports the research, development and testing of innovative adaptation technologies, and capacity-building efforts (for example, through adaptation outreach and engagement activities) with the goal of increasing the resilience of existing and future northern transportation infrastructure and operations to climate change

Through the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, the Government of Canada and the provinces and territories committed to five common objectives for resilience. Transport Canada’s Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative directly contributes to the “Supporting particularly vulnerable regions” (coasts and the North) commitment

Under the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative, Transport Canada will continue to lead federal engagement with the territories and certain provinces that have Northern regions (e.g., Quebec and Manitoba) to support the development and testing of innovative technologies and to advance knowledge and build capacity, with a view to strengthening the resilience of existing and future Northern transportation infrastructure and operations to climate change

Performance Indicators:

  • Percentage of projects that are on time, on scope and on budget
  • Number of transportation adaptation-related outreach and engagement activities (e.g., meetings, workshops, webinars and/or conferences) hosted, facilitated or supported

Targets:

  • 100% of projects are on time, on scope and on budget
  • A minimum of 2  transportation adaptation-related outreach and engagement activities hosted, facilitated or supported per year

Starting point:

Transport Canada has been implementing the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative since 2011

One of Transport Canada's key achievements under this initiative has been its engagement with other governments (provincial, territorial), academia and private industry

Program 2.1 – Clean Air from Transportation

Healthy Coasts and Oceans: Coasts and oceans support healthy, resilient and productive ecosystems

Responsible Minister: Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

Healthy Coasts and Oceans

FSDS target(s)

FSDS Contributing Action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s) where available, and your choice of performance indicators for departmental actions

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

Other

Other

Implement the Oceans Protection Plan – Pillar I: A State-of-the-Art Marine Safety System

Initiatives involved in enhancing the prevention of marine incidents include:

  • New information-sharing systems - the Government of Canada will work with Indigenous and coastal communities to design new information-sharing systems and platforms so they have access to real-time information on marine shipping activities to support safer navigation in local waters (TC and DFO/CCG).
  • Proactive Vessel Management - allow those involved in the marine safety system – governments, communities, Indigenous groups – to inform local traffic management (TC)
  • Safer resupply in Arctic communities – funding new tools and equipment to unload essential goods in northern communities (TC)
  • Stronger polluter-pay principle – remove the per-incident limit of liability on Canada’s domestic compensation fund for ship-source oil spill response (TC and DFO/CCG)

Initiatives involved in strengthening of responses to marine incidents include:

  • A stronger Canadian Coast Guard - The Canadian Coast Guard’s command systems will be strengthened where gaps have been identified. The Coast Guard will be given greater power to intervene directly to prevent marine incidents, such as where ship operators have been reluctant to act (TC and DFO/CCG)
  • Increased towing capacity - towing kits will be added to major Canadian Coast Guard vessels on the East and West to improve the capability to take swift action. Two new vessels will be leased with the ability to tow large commercial ships in distress (TC and DFO/CCG)
  • Risk-Based Response Planning – building upon the lessons learned from the Area Response Plan initiative pilot project that previously took place, this new initiative will support the development of a national approach to response planning (TC, DFO/CCG, ECCC)
  • Alternate response measures – research and policy on alternate response measures – such as dispersants and in-situ burning – that could be used only when there is an environmental benefit to do so (TC, DFO/CCG, ECCC)

The Government of Canada will create a world-leading marine safety system that improves responsible shipping and protects Canada’s waters. By world-leading, this means that the system will meet or exceed the best practices in the world

Initiatives under this pillar aim to better position Canada’s marine safety system to prevent and respond to marine safety and pollution incidents

Performance Indicator:

  • The number of marine safety incidents and spills from vessels in Canada’s waters

Target:

  • By 2022, a reduction in the number  of small oil spills and marine incidents relative to the number of vessel trips, compared with the average of the previous five years [specific target to be determined by April 2020 following establishment of baseline]

Starting point:

On November 7, 2016, the Prime Minister announced the Oceans Protection Plan: a whole-of-government, comprehensive strategy to build a world-leading marine safety system and protect Canada’s marine ecosystems

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Other

Implement the Oceans Protection Plan – Pillar II: Preservation and Restoration of Marine Ecosystems

Initiatives under this pillar include:

  • Collection of baseline data and cumulative effects assessment - working closely with Indigenous and coastal communities, the Government of Canada will create a pilot baseline program to better understand the cumulative effects of shipping on coastal ecosystems (TC and DFO/CCG)
  • Protect aquatic ecosystems - new measures will be funded that implement a real-time whale detection system to alert mariners to the presence of whales, which will help them avoid interactions and vessel strikes (TC and DFO/CCG)
  • Addressing abandoned vessels - The Government is implementing a national strategy that focuses on the prevention and removal of these problem vessels (TC, DFO/CCG)

Marine ecosystems will be preserved and restored using new tools and research, as well as taking measures to address abandoned and derelict vessels and wrecks

These measures will include: new legislation and strengthened owner accountability; improving owner identification; education and outreach; and, the Abandoned Boats Program

Initiatives under this pillar aim to protect and restore marine habitats and ecosystems in key strategic areas

Performance Indicators:

  • Introduction of new legislation
  • The number of vessels of concern addressed

Targets:

  • By December 31, 2017, new legislation that prohibits vessel abandonment, enables proactive action to deal with problem vessels, and includes the Nairobi Convention, will be introduced
  • By 2022, a reduction in the number of abandoned, derelict and wrecked vessels present in Canadian waters, compared with a 2019 baseline [specific target to be determined by April 2020 following assessment of vessels of concern]

Starting point:

On November 7, 2016, the Prime Minister announced the Oceans Protection Plan: a whole-of-government, comprehensive strategy to build a world-leading marine safety system and protect Canada’s marine ecosystems

On May 31, 2017, the new $6.85 million Abandoned Boats Program was launched. This Program will facilitate the removal of existing smaller high priority abandoned vessels and wrecks, assist in educating vessel owners about their responsibilities including end-of-life vessel management, and provide support for research on environmentally responsible vessel design and recycling of end-of-life vessels

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Other

Implement the Oceans Protection Plan – Pillar III: Indigenous Partnerships

Initiatives under this pillar include:

Active role - the Government will create opportunities for Indigenous communities to participate and play an active role in responsible shipping and the marine safety regime (TC and DFO/CCG)

The Government will look to build local capacity, and for Indigenous groups to play a meaningful role in emergency response and waterway management

Performance Indicator:

  • The number of Indigenous groups that participate in Canada’s marine safety system

Target:

  • By 2027, an increased number of interested Indigenous groups are active partners in Canada’s marine safety system [specific target to be determined by April 2018 following engagement with Indigenous partners]

Starting point:

On November 7, 2016, the Prime Minister announced the Oceans Protection Plan: a whole-of-government, comprehensive strategy to build a world-leading marine safety system and protect Canada’s marine ecosystems

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Other

Implement the Oceans Protection Plan – Pillar IV: A Stronger Evidence Base and Increased Community Participation and Public Awareness

The OPP includes important new work to ensure that Canada’s marine safety system is built on a stronger evidence base, supported by science and local knowledge

This includes investing in oil spill cleanup research and methods to ensure that decisions taken in emergencies are evidence-based

Initiatives under this pillar aim to increase knowledge of the behaviour and impacts of oil, and to engage local communities and increase public confidence in Canada’s marine safety system

Performance Indicator:

  • The percent of policies and operational response plans developed through the OPP that are supported by scientific, local/traditional, and other relevant information and knowledge

Target:

  • By 2022, 100% of policies and operational response plans are supported by scientific, local/traditional, and other relevant information/knowledge

Performance Indicator:

  • The percentage of Canadians who are confident in Canada’s marine safety system.

Target:

  • By 2022, an increased percentage of Canadians are confident in Canada’s marine safety system [specific target to be determined by April 2020 following establishment of baseline

Starting point:

On November 7, 2016, the Prime Minister announced the Oceans Protection Plan: a whole-of-government, comprehensive strategy to build a world-leading marine safety system and protect Canada’s marine ecosystems

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans

Set the legal and regulatory frameworks through domestic legislation and international conventions that govern the protection of the marine environment from pollution, and advance Canadian positions on reducing and managing global marine pollution from ships

For vessels in Canadian waters and Canadian vessels travelling internationally, the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations set restrictions on vessel pollution from emissions. These restrictions will be harmonized with IMO rules

Performance Indicator:

  • Proposal of an update to the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemical Regulations to reflect new international standards

Target:

By March 2020 :

  • Publication of proposed regulations in Canada Gazette, Part 1, to update the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations to reflect new international standards

Starting point:

Since 2006, and as amended in 2012, the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations implement standards set out under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) to prevent pollution from vessels

This includes pollution from oil, chemicals, sewage, garbage, air emissions and GHG emissions 

The Regulations also set controls for paints used to prevent marine growth on hulls that have been found to be harmful and greywater discharges from large passenger vessels

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans

Contribute to reducing pollution from vessels by monitoring compliance of marine transportation firms with Canadian legislation, such as the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, through the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP), inspections, audits, monitoring and enforcement

Transport Canada’s NASP deters pollution by providing a presence in the skies above potential polluters and collecting critical evidence from those who are caught polluting

Performance Indicator:

  • Rate of marine spills

Target:

  • The rate of spills into Canada’s oceans and marine environment is declining over time in relation to the level of activity

Starting point:

In 2016-17, NASP performed 2,068 patrol hours of aerial surveillance over waters of Canadian jurisdiction

Air crews detected or identified 246 marine pollution incidents, which consisted of:

  • 26 pollution incidents confirmed as ship source spills (a 48% decrease from 2015-16); and
  • 220 pollution sightings reported as “mystery”, which means the origin of the incident could not be linked directly to a source (a 33% decrease from 2014-15)

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Pristine Lakes and Rivers: Clean and healthy lakes and rivers support economic prosperity and the well-being of Canadians

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Pristine Lakes and Rivers

FSDS target(s)

FSDS Contributing Action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s) where available, and your choice of performance indicators for departmental actions

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

Other

Use legislation and regulations to protect lake and river ecosystems

Update the regulatory framework for protecting the marine environment from the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species by ships, including the relevant provisions of Annex V of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement

A strong regulatory framework will address the risk that ships will introduce and/or spread aquatic invasive species in Canada’s lakes and rivers as well as on Canada’s coasts. In the long-term, fewer invasive species will be released into Canadian waters

Performance Indicator:

  • Updated Ballast Water Regulations

Target:

  • In 2019, Canada will update the Ballast Water Regulations to ensure that they reflect the requirements of the Ballast Water Convention that came into force worldwide in September of 2017.
  • All vessels entering the Great Lakes will continue to be inspected for their ballast water management to protect the Great Lakes ecosystems

Starting point:

Transport Canada established ballast water requirements in 2006

Ballast tanks will be inspected on 100% of the ships entering the Seaway from outside Canada's exclusive economic zone for compliance with the agreed regulatory requirements

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Use legislation and regulations to protect lake and river ecosystems

Contribute to reducing the harmful effects of aquatic invasive species from vessels by monitoring the compliance of marine transportation firms and vessels with the invasive species provisions within Canadian legislation, such as the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, including cooperative enforcement with the U.S. in accordance with Annex V of the 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement

Transport Canada inspects vessels that are at risk of carrying foreign and invasive species into our waters

All vessels entering our waters must inform Transport Canada of their ballast water management processes, and Transport Canada validates this information through inspection

Transport Canada does not currently report on the number of viable organisms in samples of ballast water, however, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) does measure the number of viable organisms in samples of ballast water from a research and scientific advice point of view

Performance Indicator:

  • Compliance with the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations and ballast water management standards.

Target:

  • 100% of vessels will be compliant or they will be requested to manage their ballast water in a manner that is not a threat to the Canadian Ecosystem

Starting point:

Transport Canada receives completed ballast water reporting forms on methods used by ships to comply with ballast water management regulations (Ballast exchange or via a Ballast Water Management System)

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Safe and Healthy Communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Health

Safe and Healthy Communities

FSDS target(s)

FSDS Contributing Action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s) where available, and your choice of performance indicators for departmental actions

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

Other

Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites

Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high-priority federal contaminated sites

Transport Canada’s participation will contribute to reduced risk to the environment and human health from federal contaminated sites

Performance indicator:

On an annual basis, Transport Canada will continue to report on its efforts through the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan

Starting point:

Annual reports can be found at: 

http://www.federalcontaminatedsites.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=B15E990A-1

Program 2.3 Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Prevent environmental emergencies or mitigate their impacts

Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response - In accordance with its mandated transport-related responsibilities, Transport Canada oversees regulatory programs and provides advice related to: preventing incidents; ensuring preparedness and response to incidents; and determining liability arising from incidents

Ongoing regulatory, oversight and emergency response efforts under Transport Canada’s Transportation of Dangerous Goods Program will contribute to the prevention of environmental emergencies or mitigate their impacts

Performance Indicator:

  • Rate of reportable releases of dangerous goods per year

Target:

  • A 2% decrease from the previous year’s rate

Starting point:

  • Transport Canada’s data set lags by one year. As such, the Department is moving from fiscal year to calendar year reporting
  • For 2017-18, the Department will be using the reported annual rate of 166.0 from 2015 as a baseline against which to report on 2016 calendar year release rates

Program 3.5 Transportation of Dangerous Goods

Use legislation and regulations to address outdoor air pollutant emissions and harmful substances

Address air pollutant emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s development of new international standards and recommended practices through the development and implementation of new domestic standards, and through targeted research

Through a range of regulatory, voluntary and targeted research and development measures, Transport Canada supports the domestic and international reduction of air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation sector

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Targets:

By March 31, 2018:

  • 100% of instruments are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Starting point:

Transport Canada actively leads the Government of Canada’s participation at ICAO on topics related to reducing the impact of aviation on the environment

100% of instruments are currently aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Transport Canada advances research and development work in collaboration with others, including current work to transition to unleaded aviation gasoline for piston engine aircraft

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Use legislation and regulations to address outdoor air pollutant emissions and harmful substances

Address air pollutant emissions from the rail sector through locomotive regulations aligned with U.S. standards, and research activities to enhance understanding of new technologies to reduce air pollutant emissions

The Locomotive Emissions Regulations that entered into force in June 2017 will reduce the emissions of air pollutants from new locomotives. Reducing air pollutants will provide improve the health of Canadians living near rail lines and rail yards

The 2011-2017 Memorandum of Understanding with the rail industry also addresses Criteria Air Contaminant emissions.

Research and analysis on new technologies and practices through the Regulatory Cooperation Council and Transport Canada’s Clean Rail research and development program  support policy and regulatory development, thereby leading to reductions in air pollutant emissions or emission intensity

Performance indicators:

  • Percentage of federal railway companies in compliance with Locomotive Emission Regulations
  • Percentage of research and development projects that identify potential technological solutions or establish that technologies are not feasible
  • Percentage of industry/academia and government collaborations related to technology development

Targets:

By March 31, 2018:

  • 100% of federal railway companies comply with Locomotive Emission Regulations
  • 90% of research and development (R&D) projects are undertaken to:
    • provide direction for further R&D,
    • establish a Technology Readiness Level TRL
    • advance to a higher TRL or
    • demonstrate that the technology is not feasible
  • 70% of projects have collaboration with other relevant stakeholders

Starting Point:

Locomotive Emissions Regulations entered into force June 2017

A Memorandum of Understanding with rail industry covering the 2011-2016 was extended through to 2017

In 2016-2017, the Clean Rail Academic Grant Program funded 10 university projects, including work on developing a wireless charging system for an electric rail system, and 78% of projects had collaboration with other relevant stakeholders

Program 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Section 4: Integrating sustainable development

At Transport Canada, the successful integration of sustainable development into policies, plans and programs is supported by the use of our internal Sustainable Transportation Assessment Tool (STAT), which, since 2013, has been the cornerstone of the department’s Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Process. Replacing the former SEA preliminary scan, Transport Canada’s STAT requires all potential policies, plans or programs to consider possible effects on the economy, on society and on the environment. The STAT also includes specific questions to assess possible impacts on FSDS goals and targets. By asking these kinds of questions early in the design and development of proposals, it is anticipated that risks and opportunities will be better identified and managed, potential impacts across the Department's strategic outcomes will be considered and economic, social and environmental considerations will be better integrated into departmental decision making.

All Memoranda to Cabinet, Treasury Board Submissions and Regulatory Updates (and other proposals seeking Ministerial or Cabinet approval) are required to complete a STAT under departmental policy. Subject matter experts on the initiative complete the STAT in consultation with the Environmental Management Branch contact on SEA.

There are four possible outcomes of the STAT preliminary scan, each requiring written justification and director-level approval before submission to Minister/ Cabinet:

  1. Cabinet exclusion for situations where SEA is impractical or duplicative:
    • Urgent or emergency situations where time limitations prevent SEA from being completed;
    • Similar assessment has already been conducted:
      1. Assessment under CEAA 2012
      2. Treasury Board submission for an initiative already assessed under a previous proposal to Cabinet;
      3. Transport Canada is contributing to an initiative led and already assessed by another department.
  2. Departmental exemption for common types of proposals that do not have impacts on the environment:
    • Progress/performance reports to Cabinet or Treasury Board Secretariat;
    • Renewals or extensions of a program (no new elements being introduced);
    • Summaries of program objectives and achievements given through Government response to Standing Committees;
    • Communications strategies;
    • Changes that are administrative in nature; and
    • Changes to governance structure of a program.
  3. Full STAT and formal determination on the need for detailed SEA. The general areas of consideration are provided below. Impacts to FSDS goals and targets are also considered. Potential impacts are evaluated using Rating Guidelines within the STAT specific to each assessment criteria.

    STAT Areas of Consideration

    Economic

    Social

    Environmental

    Movement of goods

    Safety

    Air

    Movement of people

    Security

    Water

    Financial costs

    System access and accessibility

    Wildlife and habitat

    Trade and commerce

    Human health

    Soil

    Adaptive capacity

    Communities

    Natural resources

  4. Detailed SEA is required when there is potential for important impacts (positive or negative) on the environment.

Transport Canada’s Environmental Management Branch tracks data SEAs for initiatives going forward for Ministerial or Cabinet approval, including the number of approved initiatives for which an SEA has been completed, departmental compliance rate with SEA policy and public reporting on initiatives requiring detailed SEA.

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