Engines


GENERAL ELECTRIC, CF34-10E5A1
SDR # 20100927013


CF 34-10E Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) Stage 4 Blade Failures

SDR submitted:

The flight crew reported on top of descent that the #2 engine low-pressure vibration (N2) was indicating 4.0 units.

The rest of the engine parameters were indicating normally.

On the ground during visual inspection the last stage turbine was found severally damaged.

The engine was replaced and the aeroplane made serviceable.

Transport Canada Comments:
General Electric (GE), the manufacturer of this engine, has completed a root cause analysis of this industry problem and has determined that it is due to low-pressure turbine (LPT) stage 4 blade tip shroud interlock wear, which causes vibration and high cycle fatigue of the blade.

It is expected that GE will issue a service bulletin for an on-wing repeat inspection with pass/fail criteria for the blade tip interlock wear.

Transport Canada Civil Aviation would like to emphasize the importance of a complete maintenance inspection for all cases of engine vibration exceedances, with particular attention to the last turbine stage for this engine type. Hammer and wrench in X formation indicating end of article

CF 34-10E Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) Stage 4 Blade Failures


PRATT & WHITNEY-CAN, PT6A-28
SDR # 20090113002


Wrong labeling of PT6A oil filter

SDR submitted:

The engine oil filter was removed for cleaning and inspection. The Aircraft Maintenance Engineer noticed that the filter was labeled incorrectly. It had “This end out” on both ends of the filter. The filter had been installed correctly however with that labeling, someone who did not realize, could have installed the filter backwards.

Transport Canada Comments:
Transport Canada Civil Aviation recommends checking this at the next oil filter inspection and to always refer to the Maintenance Manual and to the Illustrated Part Manual. Hammer and wrench in X formation indicating end of article

Wrong labeling of PT6A oil filter 

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