Civil Aviation Safety Alert (CASA) No. 2015-02

ATTENTION:

AIR OPERATORS, FOREIGN AIR OPERATORS AND PRIVATE OPERATORS USING ENGINE-OUT DEPARTURE PROCEDURES (EODP) AND ENGINE-OUT MISSED APPROACH PROCEDURES (EOMAP)

Issuing Office: National
Aircraft Certification
Document
No.
:
CASA 2015-02
File Classification
No.:
Z 5000-35 Issue No.: 01
RDIMS No.: 10481137 Effective Date: 2015-04-01

SAFETY NOTICE TO AIR OPERATORS, FOREIGN AIR OPERATORS AND PRIVATE OPERATORS, USING ENGINE-OUT DEPARTURE PROCEDURES (EODP) AND ENGINE-OUT MISSED APPROACH PROCEDURES (EOMAP)

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this Civil Aviation Safety Alert (CASA) is to advise air operators, foreign air operators and private operators that some service providers may not be using the most current or the most accurate obstacle data for the development of:

  • engine-out departure procedures (EODP); and
  • engine-out missed approach procedures (EOMAP).

BACKGROUND:

Air operators, foreign air operators and private operators are subject to the following regulations and standards, which address engine-inoperative obstacle clearance requirements for takeoff:

  • Sections 704.47 and 705.57 of the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs), which require that the weight of an aeroplane be limited during take-off to ensure that obstacles are cleared by the prescribed margins and that engine-out departures are planned in accordance with the criteria provided in these regulations.
  • Standards for Take-off Minima, which require that the company operations manual, or applicable manual for a foreign state aircraft, shall contain guidance on how to determine one engine inoperative climb gradient and obstacle clearance. These requirements are stipulated in Sections 721.20, 723.30, 724.26, 725.34 of the Commercial Air Service Standards (CASS).
  • Section 604.49(a)(v) of the CARs – Take-off Minima, which requires a pilot in command to identify any obstructions that may be in the take-off path and determine—using the aircraft performance data and limitations specified in the aircraft flight manual—that the aircraft is, with the critical engine inoperative, able to safely clear those obstructions.
  • Regulations of foreign states, which typically reflect the requirements specified in Annex 6 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation – Operation of Aircraft,Chapter 5.

There is no specific regulatory requirement to ensure obstacle clearance with an inoperative engine during the missed approach. However, it is recognized that a higher level of safety can be achieved if engine-inoperative obstacle clearance is accounted for during the missed approach (for aircraft with an engine-inoperative climb capability). Some air operators have chosen to do this for terrain and obstacle critical aerodromes.

Transport Canada Advisory Circular (AC) 700-016, Compliance with Regulations and Standards for Engine-Inoperative Obstacle Avoidance, provides important safety information and guidance related to this subject. In particular, AC 700-016 addresses the development of EODPs and EOMAPs.

SAFETY CONCERN :

A recent review of the practices of a third party EODP/EOMAP service provider has revealed the use of inaccurate and/or incomplete obstacle data. Any EODPs or EOMAPs that are developed using inaccurate obstacle data will not guarantee the required engine-inoperative obstacle clearance—and will therefore not be suitable for this purpose.

Air operators, foreign air operators and private operators are expected to use the best, latest and most accurate obstacle data available for a particular aerodrome in order to comply with the engine-inoperative obstacle clearance requirements.

Any single source of obstacle data might not include all the pertinent information necessary to develop an accurate airport analysis; other references and sources of obstacle data may be necessary for this purpose.

Air operators, foreign air operators and private operators are responsible for the accuracy and effectiveness of their EODPs and EOMAPs, including those developed by third party providers. 

RECOMMENDED ACTION:

Transport Canada Civil Aviation recommends that all air operators, foreign air operators and private operators validate their EODP and EOMAPs to ensure they are designed with accurate obstacle data for each aerodrome.

Appropriate review cycles should be established to periodically review the suitability of obstacle data and performance information, and to ensure that engine-inoperative procedures are safe and effective. In addition, air operators should evaluate the effect of changes that occur outside of normal information or charting cycles, such as those that are contained in NOTAMs.

Particular care should be exercised with respect to determining the height and location of indeterminate objects such as trees, buildings, flagpoles, chimneys, and transmission lines. The aerodrome operator is a potential source of information about indeterminate objects.

If there is any doubt about the accuracy or completeness of obstacle data (correct, complete and current), an on-site validation should be conducted to ensure the safety of the EODPs and EOMAPs.

For further information and guidance, please refer to Transport Canada AC 700-016 – Compliance with Regulations and Standards for Engine-Inoperative Obstacle Avoidance.

CONTACT OFFICE:

For more information concerning this issue, contact
Robert Kostecka
Civil Aviation Inspector
Commercial Flight Standards – AARTFT
NCR, Ottawa, ON K1A 0N5
Phone: 613-990-7642
Email: robert.kostecka@tc.gc.ca

ORIGINAL SIGNED BY

Aaron McCrorie
Director, Standards Branch

The Transport Canada Civil Aviation Safety Alert (CASA) is used to convey important safety information and contains recommended action items. The CASA strives to assist the aviation industry's efforts to provide a service with the highest possible degree of safety. The information contained herein is often critical and must be conveyed to the appropriate office in a timely manner. The CASA may be changed or amended should new information become available.

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