Staff Instruction (SI) No. 700-002

Approved Check Pilot Monitoring Procedures

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Issuing Office: Civil Aviation    
Activity Area: Qualifying Document No.: 700-002
File No.: A 5240-9-1 Issue No.: 01
RDIMS No.: 4189414-V9 Effective Date: 2009-04-24

1.0  INTRODUCTION

1.1  Purpose

The purpose of this Staff Instruction (SI) is to provide Civil Aviation Safety Inspectors within Commercial and Business Aviation, guidance in monitoring Approved Check Pilots in accordance with the procedures outlined in ARASS task 13D045 – Approved Check Pilot Monitoring (Aircraft) and 13D044 – Approved Check Pilot Monitoring (Simulator) and the latest version of the Transport Publication TP 6533 – Approved Check Pilot Manual.

1.2  Applicability

This document is applicable to all Civil Aviation Safety Inspectors, Commercial and Business Aviation and National Operations.

1.3  Description of Changes

Not applicable.

2.0  REFERENCES AND REQUIREMENTS

2.1  Reference Documents

It is intended that the following reference materials be used in conjunction with this document:

  1. Aeronautics Act;
  2. Part VII, Subpart 02 of the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs)—Aerial Work
  3. Standard 723 of the Canadian Air Service Standards  (CASS)—Air Taxi - Aeroplanes;
  4. Standard 723 of the CASS—Air Taxi – Helicopters;
  5. Standard 724 of the CASS—Commuter Operations – Aeroplanes;
  6. Standard 724 of the CASS— Commuter Operations – Helicopters;
  7. Standard 725 of the CASS—Airline Operations – Aeroplanes;
  8. Transport Canada Publication, TP 6533E, 2007-11—Approved Check Pilot Manual;
  9. TP 14727E, 2007-11—Pilot Proficiency Check and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide (aeroplanes);
  10. TP 14728E, 2007-11— Pilot Proficiency Check and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide (helicopters);
  11. Transport Canada Form # 26-0387, 2007-11-05—Approved Check Pilot (ACP) Monitor Report;
  12. Records, Document and Information Management System (RDIMS) 4179408—Risk Indicator Table – Approved Check Pilots

2.2  Cancelled Documents

Not applicable.

2.3 Definitions and Abbreviations

The following definitions and abbreviations are used in this document:

  1. ACP—Approved Check Pilot;
  2. ARASS—Activity Reporting and Standards System;
  3. CASI—Civil Aviation Safety Inspector;
  4. CASS–-Commercial Air Service Standard;
  5. EMS–-Enforcement Management System;
  6. FTAE–-Flight Training and Aviation Education;
  7. Issuing Authority— means the Regional Manager, Commercial and Business Aviation, the Regional Superintendent for Aeroplanes, Rotorcraft or Certification, or the Chief, Airline Inspection, as appropriate.
  8. NACIS – National Aviation Company Information System;
  9. RDIMS – Record Document Information Management System;
  10. TCCA – Transport Canada Civil Aviation; and
  11. CRM – Crew Resource Management

3.0  BACKGROUND

  1. The objective of ARASS task 13D045 – Approved Check Pilot Monitoring (Aircraft) and 13D044 – Approved Check Pilot Monitoring (Simulator) is to ensure that minimum standards established by the ACP Manual with respect to ACP performance are met.
  2. Annually, CASIs are required to monitor each ACP performing a flight check to ascertain his/her ability to perform the delegated duties. The CASI verifies that a uniform standard is being met by ensuring the ACP applies the prescribed performance standards and methods of evaluating a candidate’s flight check. At the completion of the monitor, the CASI debriefs the ACP on his/her performance in conducting the flight check and completes the ACP Monitor Report (form 26-0387).
  3. The validity period of an ACP monitor expires on the first day of the thirteenth month following the month in which the ACP monitor was completed. Where an ACP monitor is renewed within the last 90 days of its validity period, the existing validity period is extended by 12 months.
  4. The Issuing Authority may extend the validity period of an ACP monitor by up to 60 days. Where the validity period of an ACP monitor has been extended and the ACP monitor is renewed after the initial expiry date, the new monitor expires on the first day of the thirteenth month following the month in which the ACP monitor was completed.
  5. ACPs are required to contact TCCA to undergo an annual monitor. Where an ACP is authorized to conduct PPCs on more than one aircraft type, the aircraft type upon which the monitor is conducted will be at the discretion of the Issuing Authority. One monitor will cover all types unless the CASI and Issuing Authority request otherwise.

4.0  PROCEDURES

4.1  History of Enforcement Action

Review the ACP’s file in relation to aviation, to ensure that the ACP has no personal record that includes any conviction under subsection 7.3(1) of the Aeronautics Act; or two or more punitive measures, as a result of separate unrelated events, under the Canadian Aviation Regulations. Contact the Regional Enforcement Branch and request an Enforcement Management System (EMS) check on the ACP.

4.2  Flight Training and Aviation Education (FTAE) Records

  1. CASIs will use the FTAE database to review, collect and print the ACP’s previous year performance. For comparison, CASIs may also collect and print regional and national statistics. Once data is collected, the CASI will look for possible trends in evaluation errors as outlined in Section 3.5 of the ACP Manual. In addition, the CASI will review the ACP’s Flight Test Report comments to ensure that they substantiate the mark awarded and are linked to the wording and performance criteria outlined in Appendix G - ACP Manual Grading Guide and the appropriate PPC and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide.
  2.  Launch FTAE and follow the steps below to extract the ACP’s Flight Test Record:

    1. Click “Flight Test” icon;
    2. Select “Analysis Search”;
    3. Select “Commercial and Business” tab;
    4. Under “Test Type(s)” menu in the upper left hand corner, select “Aeroplane – PPC” or “Helicopter – PPC”;
    5. Select the Range of Dates. FTAE defaults to the last year from the current date. Select as far back as required. Do not use dates before November 2004, as this was when the old marking scale (i.e. S/SB/U) was utilized. FTAE will not be able to generate accurate statistics if dates before November 2004 are used;
    6. For an “Air Operator,” enter the appropriate 5258 file number and select the aircraft type from the drop down menu. If you choose not to select the aircraft type, FTAE will generate a combined statistic for all aircraft within the company;
    7. For an “ACP” enter the appropriate 5802 file number within the “Check Pilot” dialog box and select the “and/or” radial button for aircraft and simulator, if required;
    8. From the “Reports” menu, select “Overall Statistics”. Then choose “Selected Test Type Only”. FTAE will then generate statistics from the queried criteria entered;
    9. Select the “Print” icon to print results;
    10. To print the comments that the ACP writes on the flight test reports when the candidate receives a mark of one or two, complete the following after step (g):  From the reports menu select ”Exercise Comments”. FTAE will then generate the comments. Select the “Print” icon to print the comments.

4.3  Risk Indicator Table – Approved Check Pilots

Complete the Risk Indicator Table – Approved Check Pilots (RDIMS 4179408). This is a tool CASIs will use in their ACP monitoring activity to determine their work plan and to identify ACPs of higher risk. The concept is for the CASI to enter numerical values for each known risk indicator and the spreadsheet will calculate a percentage translated into a risk level. Risk areas that are unknown can be left at zero; the spreadsheet will average out the remaining risk indicators. The higher the risk factor the more time the inspector allocates to monitoring the ACP. Presently, the risk levels translating into enhanced monitoring or remedial action are set at 51% and 66%. Up to a 50% risk level is acceptable. From a 51% to a 65% risk level, the box turns yellow to indicate that enhanced monitoring is required. Due to variables involved, the Issuing Authority and the CASI concerned will determine enhanced monitoring procedures. At a 66% or higher risk level, the box turns red to indicate remedial action is required. Remedial action can range from verbal debriefing to suspension of the ACP’s authority, as described in the ACP manual.

4.4  Pre-Monitor Briefing

  1. The CASI and ACP will meet before the flight check to explain the purpose of the ACP monitor. This will include the information on the ACP Monitor Report. The meeting will also establish the sequence of procedures to be demonstrated and to delineate the extent of the CASI input.
  2. ACP records are to be maintained for a period of at least two years and must be made available to the CASI for quality review. Review the ACP’s personal records to ensure the following is being maintained:

    1. The last date the ACP attended an ACP Course and when the next Recurrent Course is due;
    2. The last date the ACP was monitored conducting a PPC and when their next ACP Monitor is due;
    3. A list of flight checks conducted by the ACP; and
    4. ACP Letter of Delegation.
  3. Review current Advisory Circulars (AC) and Approved Check Pilot (ACP) Bulletins and discuss as applicable.
  4. Review the ACP’s previous year’s performance using printed data collected from the FTAE database and compare it with Regional and National FTAE statistics. Look for possible trends in evaluation errors as outlined in Section 3.5 of the ACP Manual. Review the ACP’s Flight Test Report comments to ensure that they substantiate the mark awarded and are linked to the wording and performance criteria outlined in Appendix G - ACP Manual Grading Guide and the appropriate Pilot Proficiency Check and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide.

4.5  The ACP Monitor

  1. During an ACP monitor, the CASI will ensure that:

    1. The ACP’s script, if applicable, follows all guidelines outlined in Section 6.0 of the ACP Manual. The use of a scripted PPC is mandatory for all CAR 705 PPCs conducted in a simulator. Although not required, CAR 703 and 704 ACPs are encouraged to use scripts for PPCs conducted in a simulator. Ensure scripted PPCs include all mandatory sequences identified in the appropriate PPC schedule published in the Commercial Air Services Standards (CASS). CASIs shall ensure the script provides consistent, fair and effective flight crew assessment scenarios, positive and realistic experiences, uses available technology to the maximum, enhances and encourages effective crew coordination, and encourages effective training through a standardized evaluation process;
    2. The ACP tests the required PPC sequences as per the appropriate PPC schedule;
    3. The ACP conducts the PPC fairly and in compliance with the standards and procedures prescribed in the ACP Manual;
    4. Where applicable, the ACP’s administrative procedures with regards to the issuance of a type and/or instrument rating conform with requirements specified in the Authorized Person’s Training Program for ACPs;
    5. The ACP’s Flight Test Reports are complete, accurate and meaningful; and
    6. The ACP is acting within the limits of his/her authority.
  2. Upon completion of the flight check, the CASI and ACP will meet privately to review and concur on the results of the flight check. Should a disagreement arise between the CASI and ACP on the outcome of the evaluation, the CASI's evaluation will take precedence over the ACP. The CASI’s evaluation will be used to debrief the candidate.

4.6  Completion of Transport Canada Form 26-0387 – Approved Check Pilot Monitor Report

  1. During the ACP monitor, the CASI will complete a TC form # 26-0387 - Approved Check Pilot (ACP) Monitor Report and will ensure that a copy of the report is provided to the ACP and a copy placed on the ACP’s TC Regional or National Operations file.
  2. The ACP Monitor Report is divided into 5 Categories:  Pre-Flight Briefing, Scope of Flight Check, Conduct of Flight Check, Post Flight Briefing and Flight Check Report. Each category is also subdivided into a number of elements. Each element has a behaviour example, which is used in the assessment with the 1 to 4 marking scale.
  3. The objective of the “Pre-Flight Briefing” is to assess the ACP’s responsibilities regarding preparation and readiness of the candidate. The elements assessed will include content adequacy, clarity and rapport with candidate.

    1. “Content Adequacy” refers to the ACP’s ability to complete all applicable pre-flight briefing items thoroughly and in a timely manner as outlined in Section 4.5 (Pre-Flight Briefing) of the ACP Manual. This includes a complete review of all pertinent licences, certificates, manuals, training records, application forms, etc. required of the flight check.
    2. “Clarity” refers to the ACP’s ability to ensure that the candidate is aware of what is expected of him or her and includes the flight check profile and the items to be covered and their relationship to the appropriate CASS Schedule and the Pilot Proficiency Check and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide.
    3. “Rapport with Candidate” refers to the ACP’s ability to seek candidate participation and involvement by fostering open communication and a positive environment by displaying energy and enthusiasm. The ACP will address concerns openly and directly with those involved and maintain a friendly and approachable demeanour at all times. ACPs are expected to be excellent communicators and must exhibit appropriate speaking skills including the appropriate use of voice, volume, pace, expression and vocabulary. It is imperative that profanity and slang be avoided at all times. The ACP will be well versed in the assessment of non-verbal communication including posture, eye contact and other body language. It is expected that all candidates be treated fairly, cordially and with respect and that sensitivity will be shown towards social, cultural and gender issues.
  4. The objective of the “Scope of Flight Check” is to assess the ACP’s ability to adhere to Chapter 4.0 (Conducting the Flight Check) of the ACP Manual. The elements assessed will include use of oral questions, required items covered and relative to briefing.

    1. “Use of Oral Questions” refers to the ACP’s ability to recognize effective questioning techniques. This includes ensuring his/her questions are easily understood, clear and concise, composed of common words, thought provoking, practical, operationally relevant and appropriate to the situation. The ACP will allow adequate time for answers. In addition the ACP will exhibit appropriate listening skills such as: avoiding interrupting, listening attentively, prompting for additional information and paraphrasing for understanding as needed. The ACP will use reference material to ensure the accuracy of answers where applicable.
    2. “Required Items Covered” refers to the ACP’s ability to cover all applicable flight check items in accordance with the appropriate CASS Schedule and the applicable Pilot Proficiency and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide. In addition, the ACP will be required to ensure the flight check is conducted in a logical flow.
    3. “Relative to Briefing” refers to the ACP’s ability to stay on track as briefed and to avoid teaching on the flight check.
  5. The objective of the “Conduct of Flight Check” is to assess the ACP’s ability to gain the candidate’s commitment to performing to the best of their ability and to maintain the realism of the flight check. The elements assessed will include standard procedures, relative to briefing, and rapport with candidate.

    1. “Standard Procedures” refers to the ACP’s ability to organize a well-designed scenario including both technical and CRM concepts. ACPs shall initiate the scenario and allow it to take its natural course in the flight check. Ideally, scenarios will be flown to completion. Abrupt endings will be avoided.
    2. “Relative to Briefing” refers to the ACP’s ability to properly manage and conduct the flight check in accordance to the briefing provided. ACPs will use a “plan-of-action” and/or script to ensure the flight check stays on schedule and is conducted in a realistic logical flow and in accordance with the briefing provided to avoid candidate confusion.
    3. “Rapport with Candidate” refers to the ACP’s ability to seek candidate participation and involvement by fostering an open communication and positive environment and keeping the candidate at ease. This includes addressing concerns openly and directly with those involved and applying techniques for building and maintaining rapport.
  6. The objective of the “Post Flight Debriefing” is to assess the ACP’s ability to determine the root cause of performance errors and illustrate the findings with performance criteria outlined in the applicable Pilot Proficiency Check and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide. Using discussion and/or facilitation, within a reasonable time frame, the ACP will lead the candidate to discover for himself, his errors and methods available to correct his errors and enhance future performance. The ACP will assist the candidate to focus on his actions on the flight check by limiting extraneous discussions. The elements assessed will include content adequacy, relative to flight check and coverage – strengths/weaknesses.

    1. “Content Adequacy” refers to the ACP’s ability to cover all applicable post-flight briefing items outlined in Section 4.9 (Post Flight Debriefing Method) of the ACP Manual.

    2. “Relative to Flight Check” refers to the ACP’s ability to conduct a comprehensive debriefing of reasonable length corresponding to the performance of the candidate.
    3. “Coverage – Strengths/Weaknesses” refers to the ACP’s ability to conduct the debriefing in a non-confrontational manner while highlighting the strengths first, then transition to the weaknesses of the candidate. The debriefing will promote learning and increase the knowledge and confidence of the candidate.
  7. The objective of the “Flight Check Report” is to assess the ACP’s ability to complete the flight check report and all other administrative duties thoroughly and in a timely manner in accordance with the procedures outlined in the ACP Manual. This includes the ACP’s administrative procedures with regards to the issuance of a type and/or instrument rating as specified in the Authorized Person’s Training Program for ACPs. The elements assessed will include coverage-errors/weakness, content-general and assessment-validity.

    1. “Coverage – Errors/Weakness” refers to the ACP’s ability to accurately structure clear supporting comments when a mark of one or two is awarded. The comments must be directly linked to Appendix G - ACP Manual Grading Guide labels and elements as well as the performance criteria outlined in the applicable Pilot Proficiency Check and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide.
    2. “Content – General” refers to the ACP’s ability to accurately fill out the flight check report for scanning into FTAE. The ACP’s final copy of the flight check report will be legible and contain no white-out or strike-through lines to make the document unreadable.
    3. “Assessment – Validity” refers to the ACP’s ability to make accurate and timely grades by applying established performance standards for measurement and enforcing the minimum acceptable performance, identifying relationships between performance and standards and comparing the candidate’s performance to established criteria.

4.7  CASI Administrative Procedures

  1. The CASI will ensure that the ACP’s electronic files located within NACIS are updated with the latest ACP monitor report date.
  2. If an ACP fails to meet the required skill assessment during the monitor, the ACP’s monitor will be deemed to have lapsed in accordance with Section 1.7.5 of the ACP Manual.  ACP privileges will be suspended until remedial training as determined by the Issuing Authority is completed and a subsequent monitor successfully completed.  If the ACP is refused issuance he/she must be advised of the right to appeal the CASI’s decision under Section 1.7.6 of the ACP Manual.
  3. The Issuing Authority may take appropriate action, and document that action, if an ACP is:

    1. not complying with the ACP Manual and the Pilot Proficiency Check and Aircraft Type Rating Flight Test Guide(s), which may include, but is not limited to:

      1. Pass rates consistently well above or below the national averages;
      2. PPC flight times that are consistently much shorter or longer than the national averages; and
      3. PPC remarks that do not support the mark awarded.
    2. The subject of a substantiated public complaint regarding their competence or their conduct of a PPC; or
    3. Involved in an accident, incident or a violation under the Aeronautics Act or Canadian Aviation Regulations.
  4. If a monitor indicates a deficiency in the conduct of PPC or application of standards, the CASI will note the deficiency and document educational or remedial action taken to remedy the matter. Suspension of the ACP’s authority, if considered, must have the concurrence of the Issuing Authority.

5.0  CONTACT OFFICE

For more information, please contact the:
A/Program Manager Approved Check Pilot Program (AARTF)

Phone: 613-990-1044
Facsimile: 613-954-1602
E-mail: michel.pare@tc.gc.ca

Suggestions for amendment to this document are invited, and should be submitted via the Transport Canada Civil Aviation Issues Reporting System (CAIRS) at the following Internet address:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/opssvs/secretariat-cairs-menu-209.htm

or by e-mail at: CAIRS_NCR@tc.gc.ca

D.B. Sherritt
Director, Standards
Civil Aviation

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