Chapter 13 - Ultra-Light Aeroplanes (Basic and Advanced)

13.1  DEFINITIONS

Ultra-light aeroplanes include what are commonly referred to as both "basic ultra-lights" and "advanced ultra-lights". By definition ultra-lights are aeroplanes only. Helicopters do not qualify.

13.2  BASIC ULTRA-LIGHT AEROPLANE

An aeroplane can qualify as a basic ultra-light (UL) if it meets the following criteria:

  1. "single-seat place aeroplane" - power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft, designed to carry not more than one person, having a launch weight not exceeding 165 kg., and a wing area, expressed in square metres, of not less than the launch weight minus 15 divided by 10 and in no case less than 10 square metres.

  2. "two-seat instructional place aeroplane" - a power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft, designed to carry not more than two persons, having a launch weight not exceeding 195 kg., and a wing area, expressed in square metres, of not less than 10 square metres and a wing loading of not greater than 25 kg/m2 calculated using the launch weight plus the occupant weight of 80 kg. per person.

  3. "single or two seat place aeroplane" - an aeroplane having no more than two seats, designed and manufactured to have a maximum take-off weight not exceeding 544 kg (1200 lbs.) and a stall speed in the landing configuration (Vso) of 39 knots (45 mph) or less indicated airspeed at the maximum take-off weight.

NOTE: If registering a basic ultra-light aeroplane under option (c) it must meet the following minimum useful load (Mu or Wu) criteria:

For single place aeroplane:

Mu=80+0.3P, in kg. where P is the rated engine power in kilowatts

Wu=175+0.5P, in lb. where P is the rated engine power in brake horse power

For two place aeroplane:

Mu=160+0.3P, in kg. where P is the rated engine power in kilowatts

Wu=350+0.5P, in lb. where P is the rated engine power in brake horse power

For example: single seater, horse power 30; empty weight 310 lbs; max takeoff weight 530 lbs; useful load is 530-310 = 220 lbs

Wu = 175 + 0.5p (hp) = 175 + 15 = 190

Wu must be equal to, or less than, the difference between the max. weight and the empty weight.

Or for example: single seater, horsepower 30; empty weight 310 lbs., max takeoff weight 530 lbs; Max empty weight allowable is 530 - (Wu) 190 = 340

Wu - 175 + 0.5 (hp) + 175 + 15 = 190 lbs.

The aircraft empty weight must be equal to, or less, than the difference between the max weight and the Wu.

13.3  ADVANCED ULTRA-LIGHT AEROPLANE

An aeroplane can qualify as an advanced ultra-light aeroplane (AULA) if it is an aeroplane that has a type design that is in compliance with the standards specified in the manual entitled "Design Standards for Advanced Ultra-Light Aeroplanes" (TP 10141) and is on the "Listing of Approved Advanced Ultra-light Aeroplanes". (Note: The listing may be accessed from the Aircraft Registration & Leasing Web Site. It is subject to change.)

The manufacturer must also sign a Statement of Conformity that the owner submits with their application for registration. Aeroplanes that have already been registered as advanced ultra-lights must submit a Fit for Flight form (described in the Ultra-light Transition Strategy accessible from the Aircraft Registration and Leasing Web Site) when changing custody and control.

All ultra-lights are now identified with C-I marks. Prior to October 10, 1996, advanced ultra-light aeroplanes were identified with C-F or C-G marks. Ultra-lights can only be issued a Ultra-light Certificate of Registration with private "purpose". They are not inspected or issued any flight authority document by Maintenance & Manufacturing (see Chapter 8 for procedures on issuing a Certificate of Registration).

An AULA that no longer meets the requirements as outlined in the Ultra-light Transition Strategy would (if it met the basic ultra-light requirements) qualify to be registered as a basic ultra-light. The owner would have to apply to be issued a new Certificate of Registration. If registered with a C-F or C-G mark, they would need to change to a C-I mark. As Transport Canada requires the aircraft to change to the C-I mark, we would choose not to collect the fee. To make it easier from the owner’s perspective, if the owner wishes to retain the last 3 letters the same as they had with the C-F or C-G mark, and they are available as a C-I mark, no special mark fee is to be charged. If the owner specifically requests a special mark, then the special mark fee of $140 is to be charged (see Chapter 4.4 for information on changing marks).

AULAs that continue to meet the requirements of the Ultra-light Transition Strategy and are registered with a C-F or C-G do not have to change to a C-I registration. It is Transport Canada’s preference that they switch because it allows us to "clean up" the database but it is not mandatory. It is to the department’s advantage that all AULAs and ULs be identifiable through a C-I mark.

If an owner opts to change AULA marks from C-F or C-G to C-I, then we would choose not to collect the exemption fee. If the owner opts to change to C-I with the same mark, then we would choose not to collect both the exemption fee and the special mark fee.

TYPICAL QUESTIONS

Do I need to get a notice of non-registration or de-registration before registering an ultra-light or advanced ultra-light if the aeroplane is coming into Canada from a country where ultra-lights and advanced ultra-lights are not registered?

In the case of an ultra-light aeroplane or an advanced ultra-light aeroplane which is coming into Canada from a country which does not register ultra-light or advanced ultra-light aeroplanes, it is important to note that it may have been registered as some other category of aircraft in that country. As a result, you need to make sure that the aeroplane is not (or is no longer) on a foreign register. Notification of de-registration or non-registration from the foreign civil aviation authority should be obtained.

NOTE: If the bill of sale shows the aeroplane is still in the form of a kit, it could NOT have been registered.

Example:

In the United States, an aircraft may have been registered as an amateur-built and then be coming to Canada for registration as an ultra-light or advanced ultra-light. In this case, you would need to seek notification of de-registration or non-registration from the Federal Aviation Administration, prior to proceeding with registration in Canada.

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