Flight Test Items

TP 12475

Ex. 2 - Aeroplane Familiarization and Preparation for Flight

A.  Documents and Airworthiness

Aim

To correctly assess the validity of documents required on board and, from these documents, determine that the aircraft is airworthy.

Description

The candidate must determine the validity of all documents required to be carried on board the aeroplane and determine that required maintenance certifications have been completed.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. determine if the documents required on board are valid;
  2. determine the number of flying hours remaining before the next service or maintenance task;
  3. determine if the maintenance release ensures aeroplane serviceability and currency of inspection for the proposed period of flight;
  4. ensure that any conditions or limitations on the maintenance release can be complied with; and
  5. determine the impact of deferred defects on aeroplane operations for the proposed flight.

B.  Aeroplane Performance

Aim

To understand the recommended operating procedures, performance capabilities and approved limitations of the aeroplane being used for the flight test.

Description

The candidate will be required to demonstrate practical knowledge of recommended operating procedures, performance capabilities and limitations for the aeroplane to be used on the flight test. Essential performance speeds will be quoted from memory. Other aeroplane performance data, such as static take-off power RPM, may be determined from the POH/AFM.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate’s competency to:

  1. state from memory and explain the practical application for the following speeds:
    1. best angle of climb speed (Vx);
    2. best rate of climb speed (Vy);
    3. manoeuvring speed (Va); and
  2. calculate, for the proposed flight the takeoff distance required to clear a 50 foot or existing obstacle; and
  3. the available flight time with the fuel load and power settings proposed for the flight.

C.  Weight and Balance, Loading

Aim

To correctly complete weight and balance calculations for the aeroplane used for the flight test.

Description

The candidate will be required, using actual weights, to apply the approved weight and balance data and complete accurate computations for an assigned practical load requirement that addresses all or most of the passenger and baggage stations applicable to the aeroplane to be used in the test, including take-off weight and landing weight. If a loading graph or computer is available with the aeroplane, it may be utilized.

Knowledge of weight and balance graphs and envelopes, and the effect of various centres of gravity locations on the aeroplane flight characteristics will be demonstrated. Practical knowledge of how to correct a situation in which the centre of gravity is out of limits or in which the gross weight has been exceeded will be demonstrated.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. determine if the take-off and landing weights and centres of gravity in each case are within permissible limits;
  2. demonstrate practical knowledge of how to correct a situation in which the centre of gravity is out of limits and/or in which the gross weight is exceeded; and
  3. explain the effect of various centre of gravity locations on aeroplane flight characteristics.

D.  Pre-flight Inspection (Air Item)

Aim

To determine that the candidate can complete internal and external checks in accordance with the POH/AFM and demonstrate practical knowledge of the aircraft.

Description

The candidate will determine that the aeroplane is ready for the intended flight.

All required equipment and documents will be located and, so far as can be determined by pre flight inspection, the aeroplane will be confirmed to be airworthy. Visual checks for fuel quantity, proper grade of fuel, fuel contamination and oil level will be carried out in accordance with the POH/AFM. If the aircraft design precludes a visual check, fuel chits, fuel logs or other credible procedures may be used to confirm the amount of fuel actually on board.

After the candidate has completed the pre-flight inspection, questions relating to the flight test aircraft will be asked. The candidate should be able to explain what appropriate action would be taken if an unsatisfactory item were detected or described by the examiner during the pre-flight inspection. The candidate should demonstrate knowledge of the consequences if such items were undetected.

Note:  The external and internal checks must at least cover all of the items specified by the manufacturer.

The candidate will conduct an oral passenger safety briefing. Should the candidate omit the passenger safety briefing the examiner will ask the candidate to provide one.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. use an orderly procedure to inspect the aeroplane including at least those items listed by the manufacturer or aeroplane owner;
  2. confirm that there is sufficient fuel and oil for the intended flight;
  3. verify that the aeroplane is in condition for safe flight;
  4. describe the appropriate action to take for any unsatisfactory item detected or described by the examiner;
  5. identify and verify the location and security of baggage and required equipment;
  6. organize and arrange material and equipment in a manner that makes the items readily available;
  7. perform an effective passenger safety briefing that will include:

    1. the location and use of emergency exits, emergency locator transmitter, fire extinguisher
    2. smoking limitations
    3. use of seat belts
    4. items specific to the aeroplane type being used
    5. action to take in the event of an emergency landing
    6. other items for use in an emergency.

E.  Engine Starting and Run-up, Use of Checklists

Aim

To determine that the candidate can complete engine start, warm-up, run-up, correctness of control movements and system checks in accordance with the checklists or placards provided by the aircraft manufacturer or owner, completing at least those items in the POH/AFM.

Description

The candidate will use recommended procedures in engine starting, warm-up and run-up and check aeroplane systems and equipment to determine that the aeroplane is airworthy and ready for flight. The candidate will be asked to demonstrate or explain how to correct any unsatisfactory condition encountered or specified by the examiner.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. demonstrate an awareness of other persons and property before and during engine start;
  2. use the appropriate checklist provided by the manufacturer or aeroplane owner;
  3. accurately complete the engine and aeroplane systems checks;
  4. check flight controls for freedom of operation and correct movement; and
  5. take appropriate action with respect to unsatisfactory conditions.

Ex. 3 - Systems / Ancillary Controls

Aim

To determine that the candidate can operate aircraft systems in accordance with the POH/AFM.

Description

The candidate will be expected to demonstrate practical knowledge of the operation of systems installed on the aeroplane being used for the flight test. Use of these systems will be evaluated both on the ground and in the air.

Performance Criteria

The candidate will operate the aeroplane systems in accordance with the POH/AFM and explain the operation of at least one of the following systems, as specified by the examiner:

  1. primary flight controls and trim
  2. flaps
  3. powerplant, including carburetor heat and mixture controls
  4. fuel or oil system
  5. electrical system
  6. flaps
  7. avionics system
  8. pitot-static system, vacuum/pressure system and associated flight instruments
  9. environmental system
  10. any other systems unique to the aeroplane.

Ex. 4 - Taxiing

Aim

To determine that the candidate can manoeuvre the aeroplane safely and avoid unnecessary interference with movement of other traffic.

Description

The candidate will be expected to taxi the aircraft to and from the runway in use and as otherwise required during the test. Provided that traffic and other conditions permit, the candidate will be expected to taxi along taxiway centrelines where they exist. The candidate will be expected to position the flight controls appropriately for wind conditions. During calm wind conditions, the examiner will specify a wind speed and direction in order to test this ability.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. perform a brake check;
  2. safely manoeuvre the aeroplane, considering other traffic;
  3. use appropriate taxiing speeds;
  4. adhere to local taxi rules, procedures and ATC clearances and instructions;
  5. use flight controls and brakes correctly;
  6. identify and correctly interpret airport, taxiway and runway signs, markings and lighting;
  7. after landing, clear the runway area and taxi to suitable parking/ refuelling area; and
  8. park the aeroplane properly, considering the safety of nearby persons or property.

Ex. 11 - Slow Flight

Aim

To determine the candidate's ability to establish the aircraft in slow flight, maintain flight control, prevent a stall and recover promptly and smoothly to normal flight.

Description

At an operationally safe altitude that allows recovery at or above the altitude recommended by the manufacturer or 2,000 feet AGL, whichever is higher, the candidate will be requested to identify when the aeroplane is in the slow flight speed range and maintain flight control and transition to normal flight s peeds when requested by the examiner.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. complete appropriate safety precautions before entering slow flight;
  2. maintain an effective lookout;
  3. establish and maintain the aeroplane in flight near minimum controllable airspeed as indicated by intermittent stall warnings or aerodynamic buffeting, with an aircraft configuration appropriate for that speed range;
  4. demonstrate coordinated straight and level flight and a level turn, with an angle of bank of 15 degrees in flight near the minimum controllable airspeed;
  5. prevent a stall;
  6. maintain specified altitudes (±100 feet), headings (±10°) and angles of bank (±5°);
  7. roll out on specified headings (±10°); and
  8. recover promptly and smoothly to normal flight on command of the examiner.

Note: Avoid prolonged periods in slow flight to prevent possible overheating of some engine components.

Ex. 12 - Stall

Aim

To determine that the candidate can recognize indications of the approach to stalls, the full stall, and can accomplish a positive and smooth recovery with a minimum loss of altitude.

Description

At an operationally safe altitude that allows recovery at or above 2,000 feet AGL or the minimum height recommended by the manufacturer, whichever is higher, the stall manoeuvre will be entered from a reduced power situation. The examiner will specify the aeroplane configuration for the stall demonstration.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. complete appropriate safety precautions before entering a stall;
  2. establish the specified configuration;
  3. transition smoothly to a pitch attitude that will induce a stall;
  4. recognize the onset of the stall by identifying the first aerodynamic buffeting or decay of control effectiveness;
  5. stall the aeroplane;
  6. maintain directional control;
  7. promptly and smoothly recover using control application in the proper sequence; and
  8. avoid secondary stall, excessive airspeed, or excessive altitude loss.

Ex. 14 - Spiral

Aim

To determine that the candidate can recognize a spiral dive and effect a smooth, safe recovery to straight and level flight.

Description

The examiner will initiate this manoeuvre from an over-banked steep turn or an incorrect spin entry. Control will be given to the candidate when the spiral is established. On assuming control the candidate will be expected to commence recovery immediately.

Recovery will be completed at a height specified by the manufacturer, or no less then 2,000 feet above ground, whichever is greater.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. promptly and smoothly recover using control application in the proper sequence; and
  2. return smoothly to straight and level flight without excessive loss of altitude and without exceeding any operating limitation of the aeroplane.

Ex. 15 - Slipping

Aim

To determine that the candidate can demonstrate a slipping manoeuvre safely and effectively to lose altitude.

Description

The candidate will be required to demonstrate a forward slip or a slipping turn to lose altitude. Slipping may be assessed during any of the landing approaches, including the precautionary or forced landing approaches.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. smoothly establish an effective slip;
  2. maintain a slip appropriate to the flight profile and crosswind conditions, where they exist;
  3. in the case of a forward slip, maintain the intended flight path; and
  4. recover smoothly to coordinated flight;

NOTE:  Any significant skidding manoeuvre is unacceptable.

Ex. 16 - Takeoff

The candidate will demonstrate:

  1. a normal takeoff; and
  2. a short-field takeoff, or a soft-field takeoff.

Where practicable, at least one of the takeoffs will be based on the previously calculated performance. If possible at least one of the takeoffs should be completed under crosswind conditions.

For the purpose of this exercise, the examiner may specify simulated conditions for the takeoff such as surface conditions, obstacles to be cleared and available runway length. ATC instructions and clearances must be complied with, where they are applicable.

Note 1:  The candidate must be able to explain the operational necessity for any variation from recommended speeds, e.g. gusty or crosswind conditions.

Note 2:  Prior to take-off, in the interest of better cockpit co-ordination, the candidate will complete a crew briefing with the examiner on the intended departure procedure, takeoff considerations and procedures to be used in the event of an actual engine failure during takeoff and initial climb.

A.  Normal Takeoff

Aim

To determine the candidate's ability to safely conduct a normal take off using the correct procedure and technique for the actual or simulated wind conditions, runway surface and length, and to assess the possibility of further conditions such as wind shear and wake turbulence.

Description

The candidate will conduct a takeoff. from a prepared surface and will apply the recommended techniques and procedures for a normal takeoff.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. complete appropriate checklists;
  2. position the flight controls and configure the aeroplane for the existing conditions;
  3. check for traffic, taxi into the take-off position, and align the aeroplane on the runway centreline;
  4. advance the throttle smoothly to take-off power;
  5. confirm that take-off power has been achieved;
  6. rotate at recommended airspeed (+10/-5 knots);
  7. accelerate to and maintain recommended climb speed (+10/-5 knots);
  8. maintain take-off power to a safe height, then, where applicable, set climb power;
  9. eliminate drift and track along runway centreline and extended centreline; and
  10. complete appropriate checks.

B.1  Short-field Takeoff

Aim

To determine the candidate's ability to safely take off from a short field, using the correct procedure and technique for the actual or simulated wind conditions, runway length and obstacles to be cleared, and to assess the possibility of further conditions such as wind shear and wake turbulence.

Description

For the purpose of this exercise, the examiner will specify simulated conditions, available runway length and obstacles to be cleared for the short-field takeoff.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. complete appropriate checklists;
  2. specify a GO/NO GO decision point to the examiner;
  3. position the flight controls and flaps for the existing conditions;
  4. check for traffic, taxi into position for maximum utilization of available take-off distance;
  5. advance the throttle smoothly to take-off power while holding brakes, or as specified by the manufacturer;
  6. confirm static take-off power has been achieved;
  7. maintain directional control during the take-off roll;
  8. rotate at the recommended airspeed (+10/-5 knots);
  9. accelerate to and maintain recommended climb speed (+10/-5 knots);
  10. retract flaps, where applicable, at a safe height;
  11. maintain take-off power to a safe height, then, where applicable, set climb power;
  12. maintain proper drift correction in the climb; and
  13. complete appropriate checks.

B.2  Soft-field Takeoff

Aim

To determine the candidate's ability to safely take off from a soft or unprepared surface using the correct procedure and technique for the actual or simulated wind conditions, runway surface and length, and to assess the possibility of further conditions such as wind shear and wake turbulence.

Description

For the purpose of this exercise, the examiner will specify simulated conditions for the soft-field takeoff such as surface conditions, obstacles to be cleared and available runway length.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. complete appropriate checklists;
  2. position the flight controls and flaps for the existing conditions;
  3. specify a GO/NO GO decision point to the examiner;
  4. check for traffic, taxi onto the take-off surface at a safe speed and align the aeroplane, without stopping, while advancing the throttle smoothly to take-off power;
  5. confirm take-off power has been achieved;
  6. establish and maintain a pitch attitude that will effectively and efficiently transfer the weight of the aeroplane from the wheels to the wings;
  7. maintain directional control during the take-off roll;
  8. lift off at minimum possible airspeed;
  9. remain in ground effect after takeoff while accelerating to recommended climb speed;
  10. maintain recommended climb speed (+10/-5 knots);
  11. retract flaps, where applicable, at a safe height;
  12. maintain take-off power to a safe height, then, where applicable, set climb power;
  13. maintain proper drift correction in the climb; and
  14. complete appropriate checks.

Ex. 17 - Circuit

Aim

To determine that the candidate can operate the aeroplane in a safe manner in the vicinity of an aerodrome.

Description

The candidate will demonstrate correct circuit procedures for the aerodrome where the test is conducted, including departure and joining while maintaining separation from other aircraft.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. fly an accurate circuit maintaining correct position and separation from other aircraft;
  2. comply with published circuit entry and departure procedures;
  3. comply with published and established traffic patterns;
  4. correct for wind drift to maintain proper ground track;
  5. remain oriented with the runway/landing area in use;
  6. maintain circuit altitude (±100 feet) and an appropriate airspeed; and
  7. complete appropriate checklists.

Ex. 18 - Approach and Landing

The candidate will be required to demonstrate:

  1. a normal landing;
  2. a short field landing or soft field landing; and
  3. an overshoot.

Assessment of approaches and landings will be based on the candidate's ability to select the proper approach profile for the actual or simulated conditions. Where practicable, at least one of the landings will be based on the previously calculated performance. If possible, at least one of the landings should be completed under crosswind conditions.

Note:  The candidate must be able to explain the necessity for any variation from recommended speeds, e.g. gusty or crosswind conditions.

A.  Normal Approach and Landing

Aim

To determine the candidate's ability to execute a normal approach and landing as recommended by the POH/AFM or published best practices.

Description

The candidate is expected to conduct a normal approach and landing using the correct recommended procedure and technique for the actual wind conditions, landing surface and length or those specified by the examiner, to assess the possibility of further conditions such as wind shear and wake turbulence.

A.  Normal Approach and Landing

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. consider the wind conditions, landing surface and obstructions;
  2. establish the recommended approach and landing configuration;
  3. maintain a stabilized approach at the recommended airspeed, or in its absence, 1.3 Vso (+10/-5 knots);
  4. maintain crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing;
  5. make smooth, timely and correct control applications during the approach and landing;
  6. touch down, in the first one third (1/3) of the runway, in accordance with the POH/AFM or best accepted practice for the aeroplane type;
  7. touch down with no drift and with the longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway centreline/landing path.
  8. apply brakes as necessary, without excessive lockup or skidding; and
  9. complete appropriate checks.

B.  Short-field and Soft-field Landings

Aim

To determine the candidate's ability to execute a short-field approach and landing or a soft-field approach and landing as recommended by the POH/AFM or published best practices.

Description

For the short or soft-field approach and landing, the examiner will clearly specify the simulated surface conditions, obstacles on approach, landing threshold and length of surface available to the candidate. Should the candidate realize, prior to the landing flare, that a short-field landing couldn't be achieved in the intended touchdown zone, an overshoot for a second attempt is acceptable.

B.1  Short-field Approach and Landing

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. perform an effective passenger safety review;
  2. consider the wind conditions and actual or simulated landing surface and obstructions;
  3. select the most suitable touchdown zone and specify a touchdown point;
  4. execute the initial approach using recommended airspeeds and configurations;
  5. fly a final approach profile that clears any actual or simulated obstacle, and results in the appropriate configuration and one of the following speeds at a height of 50 feet:

    1. the recommended final approach speed (+10/-5 knots); or
    2. 1.3 Vso (+10/-5 knots); or
    3. the minimum safe speed for existing conditions e.g. gusty or crosswind conditions.

F. maintain crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing;

G. make smooth, timely and correct control applications during the landing flare and touchdown;

H. touch down at the specified touchdown point (+200/-50 feet) in accordance with the POH/AFM or best accepted practice for the aeroplane type;

I. touch down with no side drift and with the longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway centreline/landing path;

J. apply brakes, without excessive lockup or skidding and stop safely in the shortest distance; and

K. complete appropriate checks.

B.2  Soft-field Approach and Landing

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. perform an effective passenger safety review;
  2. consider the wind conditions, obstructions and actual or simulated landing surface;
  3. select the most suitable touchdown zone;
  4. execute the initial approach using recommended airspeeds and configurations;
  5. fly a final approach profile that clears any actual or simulated obstacle, and results in the appropriate configuration and one of the following speeds at a height of 50 feet:

    1. the recommended final approach speed (+10/-5 knots); or
    2. 1.3 Vso (+10/-5 knots); or
    3. the minimum safe speed for existing conditions e.g. gusty or crosswind conditions;

F. maintain crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing;

G. touch down softly using power as necessary to achieve the landing attitude for the slowest possible touch down on the main wheels, while preventing nose wheel or tail cone contact with the ground;

H. touch down in the first one third (1/3) of the runway, with no side drift and with the longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway centreline/landing path;

I. maintain the required nose-up control during the landing roll; and

J. complete appropriate checks.

C.  Overshoot

Aim

To determine the candidate's ability to execute an overshoot as recommended by the POH/AFM or published best practices.

Description

The overshoot may be called for by the examiner and assessed from any of the landing approaches, the forced landing or precautionary landing.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. respond upon command to overshoot or make a timely decision to discontinue the approach to landing;
  2. promptly and smoothly apply maximum allowable power and establish the pitch attitude that will stop the descent;
  3. retract flaps in stages or as recommended by the manufacturer;
  4. retract the landing gear (where applicable) after a positive rate of climb is established, or as recommended by the manufacturer;
  5. accelerate to and maintain the recommended climb speed
    (+10/-5 knots);
  6. maintain maximum allowable power to a safe manoeuvring altitude then, where applicable, set climb power; and
  7. complete the appropriate checks.

Ex. 21 - Precautionary Landing

Aim

To determine the candidate's ability to carry out the procedure for evaluating an unfamiliar airstrip or a landing area where the suitability of the landing surface is unknown.

Description

The examiner will assign a suitable landing area. The candidate will determine the landing path and the suitability of the landing surface and use a planned procedure to fly an accurate approach. While an actual landing may not be required, the final approach flown should be such that a successful landing could have been accomplished in the pre-selected touchdown zone.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. brief the passenger for landing;
  2. select the most suitable touchdown zone considering wind conditions, landing surface and obstructions;
  3. comply with circuit procedures;
  4. establish circuits at an appropriate distance from the runway or airstrip;
  5. establish the recommended approach and landing configuration;
  6. maintain a stabilized approach and recommended airspeed
    (+10/-5 knots);
  7. overfly the landing area in stabilized flight that will permit an effective assessment of surface conditions and maintain a safe obstacle clearance altitude;
  8. indicate the type of landing to be used and perform a final approach in a manner that would permit touch down within the selected touchdown zone;
  9. maintain crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing; and
  10. complete appropriate checks.

Note:  The candidate must be able to explain the operational necessity for any variation from recommended speed, e.g. gusty or crosswind conditions.

Ex. 22 - Forced Landing

Aim

To determine that the candidate can, in the event of an engine failure, select a suitable landing area, and fly a successful approach.

Description

Engine failure will be simulated without advance warning by the examiner in accordance with the method recommended by the manufacturer. The candidate will be expected to select a suitable area and, by using an organized procedure, fly a successful approach to that field, while accomplishing the required emergency procedures. The overshoot will be carried out when requested by the examiner at an operationally safe altitude.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. initiate the approach at the best glide airspeed (+10/-5 knots);
  2. select a suitable landing area;
  3. plan the approach, considering aircraft altitude, wind conditions, terrain, obstructions and other factors;
  4. select a touchdown zone;
  5. vary airspeed, descent and flight profile, as necessary, to safely achieve a successful approach to the selected touchdown zone;
  6. attempt to determine the cause of the simulated malfunction;
  7. simulate an emergency radio call;
  8. prepare the passenger for landing;
  9. complete appropriate checks; and
  10. prepare for landing, or overshoot, as specified by the examiner.

Note 1:  The candidate will be expected to demonstrate good airmanship by clearing the engine at appropriate intervals during the descent. In very cold conditions, the practice of leaving some power on and achieving a normal descent angle and airspeed by using flaps is acceptable.

Note 2:  A change of field is acceptable from an altitude or point in the approach where a landing could still have been made on the original landing site.

Ex. 23 - Pilot Navigation

Aim

To determine that the candidate can use an aeronautical chart to effectively navigate from one place to another.

Description

When requested by the examiner, the candidate will demonstrate ability to navigate from a known position to a position assigned by the examiner. This is an assessment of ability to navigate using pilotage (map reading) and geographic features such as roads, railways, and rivers, if they are available. Rulers, notched pencils, protractors, and computers will not be used for this procedure.

The exercise will be continued at least to the stage where the aeroplane is established on the proposed track or is following a suitable geographic feature in a manner that will ensure arrival at the destination is predictable.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to:

  1. identify landmarks by relating surface features to chart symbols;
  2. establish the aeroplane on a track or follow a geographic feature that will lead to the assigned destination;
  3. provide an estimated time of arrival that is sufficiently accurate to ensure that the exercise can be conducted as planned; and
  4. maintain the selected altitude (±200 feet).

Ex. 29 - Emergency Procedures/Malfunctions

Aim

To determine that the candidate can react promptly and correctly to emergencies and system or equipment malfunctions.

Description

The examiner will assess the candidate's knowledge of emergency procedures or abnormal conditions. Assessment may be carried out during any portion of the flight test.

Performance Criteria

Assessment will be based on the candidate's ability to analyze the situation, take appropriate action and follow the appropriate memory items, emergency checklists or procedures, for any one (1) of the following simulated emergencies/malfunctions, as specified by the examiner:

  1. partial power loss;
  2. rough engine operation or overheat;
  3. loss of oil pressure;
  4. fuel starvation;
  5. electrical fire;
  6. vacuum system failure;
  7. pitot or static blockage;
  8. cabin fire;
  9. icing;
  10. electrical failures;
  11. flap failure;
  12. brake failure or seizure;
  13. door opening in flight;
  14. spin recovery;
  15. emergency descent;
  16. any other emergency unique to the aeroplane.

Tips on How to Pass the Flight Test

Instructors prepare their students for the flight test with every training trip. They do this by helping the student master all the flight exercises, but they also let the student take more and more responsibility for decision-making with each lesson, so the student will be fully ready to make all the decisions during the flight test.

Here are some tips on how to pass the flight test:

  1. Review the flight test guide with your instructor before the flight test.
  2. An instructor will do a pre-test evaluation, a simulated flight test, before recommending you for the real test.
  3. Be rested.
  4. Arrive early.
  5. The test measures your skill, item by item. If you think you did poorly on one item, try very hard to focus on the immediate task and don't let yourself be pre-occupied with an item you already completed. Besides, you may have done better than you thought.
  6. (f) Avoid misunderstandings and ask for clarification if unsure about anything. Don’t be afraid to ask the examiner if you are unsure what is expected of you. The examiner will either tell you what you need to know or tell you that you have to work with the information you have.
  7. Tell the examiner what you are planning to do before you do it.
  8. The flight test is not a race. Don't put additional pressure on yourself by rushing.
  9. "Visualize" the flight test in advance by thinking through all the manoeuvres you will perform and developing mental pictures of what you are going to be doing.
  10. Difficult as this may be, try to think of the examiner as your very first passenger with your new licence. Keep the examiner informed, as you would keep a passenger informed.
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