1.2 Background

1.2.1  The "agreement on free trade," allows services to be provided by one FTA partner to clients in the territory of another. The following table outlines the Specialty Air Services (SAS) operations which are included in FTA.

Implementation Schedule
Service Category Mexico Canada and United States
Aerial Advertising January 1, 1997 January 1, 1997
Aerial Construction January 1, 1997 January 1, 1996
Aerial Inspection or Surveillance January 1, 2000 January 1, 1997
Aerial Mapping January 1, 2000 January 1, 1994
Aerial Photography January 1, 2000 January 1, 1994
Aerial Sightseeing January 1, 1997 January 1, 1997
Aerial Spraying January 1, 2000 January 1, 2000
Aerial Surveying January 1, 2000 January 1, 1994
Fire-Fighting January 1, 1994 January 1, 1994
Flight Training January 1, 1994 January 1, 1997
Forest Fire Management January 1, 1994 January 1, 1994
Glider Towing January 1, 1994 January 1, 1994
Heli-Logging and External Load January 1, 1994 January 1, 1994
Parachute Jumping January 1, 1994 January 1, 1994

Note:  Wild Life Management forms part of Aerial Inspection and Surveillance.

1.2.2  The following is a list of Specialty Air Services (SAS) operations identified under the Free Trade Agreement for Specialty Air Services (SAS) operations that share characteristics with those listed and specified by the appropriate Civil Aviation Authority (CAA):

  1. Aerial Advertising:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of skywriting, banner towing, displaying airborne signs, dispensing leaflets, or making public address announcements.
     
  2. Aerial Construction:  The operation of a helicopter for the purpose of conducting external-load operations in support of construction, hoisting of utilities, power line construction for erection of special purpose towers.
     
  3. Aerial Inspection and Surveillance:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of conducting aerial observation and patrols for surface events, objects and animals and wild life management. (see note 1 on Wild Life Management).
     
  4. Aerial Mapping:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of mapping by use of a camera or other measuring and recording devices.
     
  5. Aerial Photography:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of taking photographs, or recording information by use of a camera or other measuring and recording device.
     
  6. Aerial Sightseeing:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of providing recreation to passengers which originates and terminates at the same airport.
     
  7. Aerial Spraying:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of dispensing any chemicals, materials or substances for the benefit of agriculture, horticulture or forestry. The specific type of aerial spraying would include those applications intended for plant nourishment, soil treatment, propagation of plant life, aerial seeding, or pest control, but not including the dispensing of live insects.
     
  8. Aerial Surveying:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of surveying by use of a camera or other measuring and recording devices.
     
  9. Fire Fighting:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of dispensing water, (see note 2 on Fire Fighting).
     
  10. Flight Training:  Training which follows an approved ground and flight syllabus which permits students to meet all certification requirements for obtaining a flight crew licence or rating.
     
  11. Forest Fire Management:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of fire detection and control or dispensing any substance intended for forest fire suppression and prevention. This provided the flight is within the declared fire zone.
     
  12. Glider Towing:  The towing of a glider by a powered aircraft equipped with a tow hitch.
     
  13. Helicopter Operations
     
    1. Heli-logging:  The operation of a helicopter for the purpose of transporting timber as external load.
    2. External Load:  The carriage of a load externally by a helicopter.
       
  14. Parachute Jumping:  The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of allowing a person to descend from that aircraft in flight using a parachute during all or part of that descent.

NOTE 1Wild Life Management is the utilization of a helicopter for the capturing of animals, the slinging-carriage of animal to trailers for relocation, the collecting of samples from animals or the placing of telemetry equipment on animals; and the utilization of an aeroplane for the capturing of animals, the collecting of samples from animals or the placing of telemetry equipment on animals.

NOTE 2Fire Fighting. Movement of essential personnel and fire fighters from a base camp to the declared fire zone is not deemed to be air transportation; nor is movement of essential personnel from one base camp to another, to continue fire fighting, deemed to be air transportation. These are operational necessities included under SAS for fire fighting purposes.

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