Guest Editorial

Judy Rutherford
Judy Rutherford

Management Services Branch

Have you ever gone to a restaurant on two separate occasions and had completely different dining experiences? Maybe during your first visit you had a friendly waiter and a delicious meal, while the second time perhaps you ordered the exact same dish and it arrived late and overcooked. What you might have once thought to be an excellent establishment is now tainted by this one experience. This example illustrates the importance of consistency in not only the restaurant industry but also in business in general. As Director of Management Services, I help my branch ensure consistency throughout Civil Aviation and in its processes both at headquarters and at the regional offices across Canada. Ensuring consistency and efficiency is but one of the many functions of the Management Services Branch, as it acts like a glue, holding together the various components of the Civil Aviation Program.

The Branch is responsible for developing and implementing the shared management processes and systems used by Civil Aviation staff across Canada. Management Services is essential to ensuring these shared processes not only meet the needs of the entire Civil Aviation Program but also facilitate a strong working relationship with our stakeholders and demonstrate results for Canadians. While some of you may not deal with Management Services directly, you have certainly on some level dealt with policies, frameworks or practices that have been developed and maintained by the Branch.

“Ensuring consistency and efficiency is but one of the many functions of the Management Services Branch, as it acts like a glue, holding together the various components of the Civil Aviation Program.”

The Management Services Branch has a lot on its plate, which is all tied together by the Civil Aviation Integrated Management System (IMS) Standard. As the aviation industry moves towards fully implementing safety management systems (SMS), Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA) is implementing its own accountability framework that we refer to as IMS. In many aspects, IMS mirrors SMS. Through IMS, we aim to increase communication, enhance work planning, and establish improvement processes through quality assurance and risk management. Key areas of focus in the IMS standard include: measurement and analysis, management responsibility, resources, and program design and delivery.

In the field of measurement and analysis, we have established standards for services both with fees and without—a document outlining these changes will be published in the spring of 2010. The Branch will also implement a mechanism to monitor its service delivery, allowing us to invest resources in areas that require more attention.

Communication between employees and stakeholders is a critical management responsibility and one on which we have already started to improve. One example is the Civil Aviation Issues Reporting System (CAIRS), which allows anyone to raise issues through an accessible, confidential, and timely means of direct communication. More information on CAIRS can be found at www.tc.gc.ca/CAIRS. Management Services has also launched the Online Reference Centre (http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/opssvs/managementservices-referencecentre-menu-113.htm), which houses the most up-to-date Civil Aviation documents and publications. There you will find our Aviation Safety Program Manual. This document is an excellent reference for Civil Aviation employees as well as industry professionals looking for a thorough overview of the Program.

“Communication between employees and stakeholders is a critical management responsibility and one on which we have already started to improve.”

Resource management is a major priority for the Branch. We oversee the planning and allocation of financial resources and support managers with the most important resource: our employees. This includes designing and delivering learning activities for successful competency and career development.

One of the goals of IMS is to consider stakeholders during planning stages prior to the design and delivery of a program or service. This has led to a more robust and integrated method of business planning in the Civil Aviation Directorate as a whole, which leads to improved program delivery for all Canadians. Our new five-year strategic plan, titled Flight 2015, is the product of an elaborate planning process heavy on employee and stakeholder perspectives.

These are but a few examples of the crucial role the Management Services Branch plays in TCCA’s continuous improvement.

Judy Rutherford
Director, Management Services Branch
Transport Canada Civil Aviation

2009 David Charles Abramson Memorial (DCAM) Flight Instructor Safety Award

Left to right: Harvey Penner; Jane Abramson; Rikki Abramson; Wayne Gouveia, Board of Directors, ATAC

Left to right: Harvey Penner; Jane Abramson; Rikki Abramson; Wayne Gouveia, Board of Directors, ATAC

The recipient of the 2009 DCAM Flight Instructor Safety Award is Harvey Penner, President and Chief Flight Instructor at Harv’s Air, in Manitoba. The award was presented to Harvey on November 16, 2009, by award founders Jane and Rikki Abramson at the Air Transport Association of Canada (ATAC) Annual General Meeting and Tradeshow in Québec, Que. Mrs. Abramson was delighted to point out that this is the first DCAM award for the rotary wing community.

“Harvey’s passion for aviation and for helping the younger generation of pilots have created a wonderful legacy for the future of aviation in our country. He has established a facility capable of maintaining that heritage,” said Martin Eley, Director General, Civil Aviation, Transport Canada, who gave congratulatory remarks to Mr. Penner during the tradeshow dinner.

New this year, the award administrators are recognizing the achievements of a deserving nominee with a three-day instructor refresher course, courtesy of Seneca College. Deanna Wiebe, Assistant Chief Flight Instructor at Mount Royal University, is the 2009 recipient of this special recognition.

The annual DCAM Award promotes flight safety by recognizing exceptional flight instructors in Canada and has brought much recognition and awareness to the flight instructor community. Recognition of excellence within this segment of our industry upholds a safety consciousness that will hopefully be passed on for many years to come.

Update on the rudder stops for Cessna 150 and 152 series airplanes

The 1998 stall-recovery training accident that took the life of David Charles Abramson involved a locked rudder in a Cessna 152. In 2000, Transport Canada issued an airworthiness directive (AD) requiring the replacement of a number of rudder stop components in Cessna 150 and 152 series airplanes. The occurrence has not been repeated in Canada since then.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently issued AD 2009-10-09R1, effective December 11, 2009, on the same issue. It is clear to us that Mrs. Abramson’s efforts in the aftermath of this tragic accident have played a significant role in the safety actions taken by both Transport Canada and the FAA.

The deadline for nominations for the 2010 award is September 14, 2010. For details, please visit http://www.dcamaward.com/.

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