Part III - Aerodromes, Airports and Heliports

Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) 2017-2

(amended 2007/06/30; previous version)

Standard 322 - Airports

Content last revised: 2006/05/054

(amended 2006/05/05; no previous version)

Division III - Airport Wildlife Planning and Management

322.302 Application

  1. The wildlife hazards referred to in paragraph 302.302(1)(e), subsection 302.304(3), subsection 302.305(6) and paragraph 302.306(a) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations include, in the following descending order of priority with respect to risk, the following hazards:
    1. deer;
    2. geese;
    3. gulls;
    4. hawks;
    5. ducks;
    6. coyotes;
    7. owls;
    8. rock doves and pigeons;
    9. bald and golden eagles;
    10. sandhill cranes;
    11. sparrows and snow buntings;
    12. shorebirds;
    13. blackbirds and starlings;
    14. crows and ravens;
    15. swallows;
    16. mourning doves;
    17. herons;
    18. turkey vultures;
    19. American kestrels;
    20. wild turkeys; and
    21. cormorants.
  2. The list of wildlife hazards referred to subsection (1) is not intended to be exhaustive.

Information Note:

The above list ranks wildlife hazards in descending order from the most hazardous to the least hazardous with respect to risk and as such, identifies the hazards that are of primary concern for the operator. All hazards contained in this list have the potential to cause an incident outlined in paragraphs 302.302(1)(d) and 302.305(6)(b) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

322.303 - Reserved

322.304 Risk Analysis

  1. The following constitutes the information to be collected by the operator of an airport pursuant to subsection 302.304(1) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations:
    1. wildlife strike data;
      Information Note:
      When reporting a wildlife strike, the Transport Canada form titled Bird/Wildlife Strike Report bearing the number #51-0272 may be used. Any information that the operator of an airport has that is outlined on that form should be included.
    2. aircraft movement statistics;
    3. aircraft types; and
    4. ecological studies and wildlife inventories.

Information Note:

An Airport Wildlife Management Plan template may be used to assist operators with the layout of risk assessments and management plans. This document, entitled Airport Wildlife Management Plan Template (2004), can be accessed on-line at Template for the Development of an Airport Wildlife Management Plan, or can be obtained by writing to Transport Canada, Aerodrome and Air Navigation Branch, Wildlife Control Specialists, 330 Sparks Street, Place de Ville, Tower C, Ottawa Ontario, K1A 0N8.

322.305 Airport Wildlife Management Plan

(1) Pursuant to section 302.305 of the Canadian Aviation Regulations, the operator shall, in developing an airport wildlife management plan, use for guidance the following documents, as appropriate:

  1. Land Use In The Vicinity of Airports (TP1247),
  2. Wildlife Control Procedures Manual (TP11500),
  3. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Various Deer Exclusion Devices and Deterrent Techniques for use at Airports,
  4. Sharing the Skies-An Aviation Industry Guide to the Management of Wildlife Hazards (TP 13549), and
  5. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Products and Techniques for Airport Bird Control and

Information Note:

The documents listed in paragraph (a) can be accessed on-line at Template for the Development of an Airport Wildlife Management Plan, or can be obtained by writing to Transport Canada, Aerodrome and Air Navigation Branch, Wildlife Control Specialists, 330 Sparks Street, Place de Ville, Tower C, Ottawa Ontario K1A 0N8.

(2) Pursuant to subsection 302.305 of the Canadian Aviation Regulations, the operator shall submit the airport wildlife management plan in the form of a manual and in duplicate to the Minister.

322.306 Content of Airport Wildlife Management Plan

Pursuant to paragraph 302.306(c) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations, the requirements that shall be contained in an airport wildlife management plan are:

  1. the acquisition of the appropriate firearm certificates and permits;
  2. the acquisition of wildlife control permits from federal, provincial, and local agencies;
  3. the identification of the species of any wildlife struck by aircraft;

Information Note:

In order to correctly identify the species of wildlife struck by aircraft as outlined in paragraph (c), place the feathers and other material in a clean plastic zip-lock bag, and send to:  Feather Lab, Smithsonian Institution, Division of Birds, NHB MRC 116, PO Box 37012, Washington, D.C. 20013-7012.

d. the regular maintenance of wildlife management logs indicating management activities, environmental changes; wildlife interactions and animal remains identified by species; and

e. the evaluation of habitats, land uses and food sources, located at or near the airport, that might attract wildlife which may affect the safe operation of the airport including, if needed, arrangements for assessments, studies and monitoring.

322.307 Training

Pursuant to section 302.307 of the Canadian Aviation Regulations, the following constitutes the matters in which the operator shall provide training to persons having duties in respect of the airport wildlife management plan:

  1. nature and extent of the wildlife management problem;
  2. regulations, standards and guidance material related to airport wildlife management programs;
  3. bird ecology and biology;
  4. bird identification, including the use of field guides;
  5. mammal ecology and biology;
  6. mammal identification, including the use of field guides;
  7. any matter covered in the Wildlife Control Procedures Manual (TP 11500);
  8. any matter covered in the Sharing the Skies-An Aviation Industry Guide to the Management of Wildlife Hazards document (TP 13549);
  9. rare and endangered species and species of special concern, including related regulations and policies;
  10. habitat management;
  11. off-airport land use issues;
  12. active wildlife control measures;
  13. wildlife removal techniques;
  14. firearm safety;
  15. wildlife management planning; and
  16. development of awareness programs.

Information Note:

The airport operator can subcontract a third party to deliver the training as required pursuant to paragraph 302.307(1)(a) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

322.308 Communication and Alerting Procedure

Pursuant to section 302.308 of the Canadian Aviation Regulations, the communication and alerting procedure to be used in order to alert pilots as soon as possible of the wildlife hazards at the airport and associated risks may include:

  1. where the airport has air traffic services (ATS), bilateral radio communications or broadcast of airport advisories;
  2. if an immediate alert is required, direct radio contact can be used through such means as a community airport radio station or universal communications (UNICOM); or
  3. publication of a NOTAM in respect of the airport, whether in combination or not with the procedure referred to in paragraph (a) or (b).
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