BOMBARDIER BD-700 1A10 and BD-700-1A11 Global Express and Global 5000

Revision 2

Bombardier Global 5000 and Global Express

APPROVED: ________________________ DATE: 18 July 2005

Roman A. Marushko
Chairman, Global Operational Evaluation Board

Transport Canada, Safety & Security
Commercial & Business Aviation, Operational Standards (AARXB)
Place de Ville, Tower C, 330 Sparks St.
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N5

Telephone: (613) 993-4692
Fax (613) 954-1602
e-mail: marushr@tc.gc.ca

MANAGEMENT COORDINATION SHEET

_________________________________________________
Wayne Chapin
Chief, Operational Standards
Commercial & Business Aviation
Date:
_________________________________________________
Michel Gaudreau
Director, Commercial & Business Aviation
Transport Canada, Safety & Security
Date:


Revision No. Section Page #s Date
Original All All 30 June 1999
1 All All 20 January 2005
2 All All 18 July 2005
2 Appendix 1 All 18 July 2005
2 Appendix 3 All 18 July 2005
2 Appendix 5 All 18 July 2005
CONTENTS
PART 1 – OEB REPORT
PURPOSE and APPLICABILITY

The primary purpose of this report is to specify Transport Canada master training, checking and currency requirements applicable to crews operating the Bombardier BD-700-1A10, Global Express (GEX) and the BD-700-1A11, Global 5000 (G5000).

Note: For simplicity and clarity, this report will refer to the Global Express as the GEX, the Global 5000 as the G5000, and use the term Global when referring to both variants.

The Global can be equipped with a THALES wide-angle HUD and a Bombardier Enhanced Vision System (BEVS), and is certified for Category II ILS approaches. Additionally, this report discusses operational suitability for private and commercial service in Canada, including regulatory compliance and crew composition. This report can help Canadian private and air operators in the development of training programs and Principal Operations Inspectors (POI) in the administration of the Pilot Proficiency Checks (PPC) required by CARs 604.66 and 704.108 (2) (c). Provisions of this report are effective until amended, superseded, or withdrawn by subsequent OEB determinations.

The guidelines and recommendations contained in this report apply to: Civil Aviation Inspectors, Principal Operations Inspectors (POI) and Company Check Pilots employed by Canadian air and private operators.

Relevant acronyms are defined as follows:

AEO All Engines Operating
AC Advisory Circular (FAA)
ACO Aircraft Certification Office (FAA)
AEG Aircraft Evaluation Group (FAA)
AFCS Automatic Flight Control System
AFM Aircraft Flight Manual
AP Autopilot
ATP Airline Transport Pilot
BA Bombardier Aerospace
BEVS Bombardier Enhanced Vision System
C&BA Commercial and Business Aviation
CAP Canada Air Pilot
CARs Canadian Aviation Regulations
CCQ Cross Crew Qualification
CFR Code of Federal Regulations (FAA)
EFIS Electronic Flight Instrument System
EGPWS Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System
EICAS Engine Indication and Crew Alerting System
EMS Electrical Management System
FDA Flight Director Annunciator
FCOM Flight Crew Operating Manual
FGP Flight Guidance Panel
FMS Flight Management System
FSB Flight Standards Board (FAA)
FTD Flight Training Device
GEX Bombardier BD-700-1A10, Global Express
G5000 Bombardier BD-700-1A11, G5000
Global Refers to both the GEX and G5000 variants
HAT Height Above Threshold
HDD Head Down Display
HUD Head Up Display
JOEB Joint Operational Evaluation Board (JAA)
LNAV Lateral Navigation
MDR Master Differences Requirements
MFF Mixed Fleet Flying
MTOW Maximum Take-off Weight
MZFW Maximum Zero Fuel Weight
NSEP National Simulator Evaluation Program (TCCA)
ODR Operator Differences Requirements
OEB Operational Evaluation Board (TCCA/FAA/JAA)
OEI One Engine Inoperative
OET Operational Evaluation Team (TCCA)
PF Pilot Flying
PFD Primary Flight Display
PIC Pilot in Command
PNF Pilot Not Flying
POI Principal Operations Inspector (TCCA)
PPC Pilot Proficiency Check
PTS Practical Test Standards (FAA)
QRH Quick Reference Handbook
RNAV Area Navigation
SIC Second in Command
TC Transport Canada
TCAS Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System
TCCA Transport Canada Civil Aviation
VNAV Vertical Navigation
OET COMPOSITION - GEX (Bombardier BD-700-1A10)
Ron MacEwen Team Leader TC HQ, (AARXB)
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N5
Ron Tidy Operations TC HQ, (AARXB)
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N5
Peter Vetere Regional Rep. Quebec Region, (NAXB)
Dorval, Quebec, H4Y 1G7
OET COMPOSITION (HUD)
Ron Tidy Team Leader TC HQ, (AARXB)
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N8
Peter Vetere Regional Rep. Quebec Region, (NAXB)
Dorval, Quebec, H4Y 1G7
OEB COMPOSITION - G5000 (Bombardier BD-700-1A11) and BEVS
Roman A. Marushko Chairman TC HQ, (AARXB)
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N5
Ron Tidy Operations TC HQ, (AARXB)
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N5
BACKGROUND

GEX.

The GEX is a high altitude, ultra long-range business jet certified under CAR 525/FAR 25. It is listed on Transport Canada Type Certificate Data Sheet, A-177, issued July 5, 1998, as model BD-700-1A10. In 1999, the Transport Canada (TC) Commercial and Business Aviation (C&BA) Operational Evaluation Team (OET) conducted a joint evaluation of the GEX with an FAA team formed under the authority of the Long Beach AEG resulting in this report concurrent with an FAA Flight Standards Board (FSB) report. The FAA team was comprised of three operations inspectors and a certification flight test pilot. This was the first time that the FAA and TCCA have completed a combined operational evaluation.

From May 4 to May 26, 1999, the GEX OET received an initial pilot type rating training course provided by Bombardier Aerospace (BA) at its Training Centre located at Dorval, Quebec. Facilities and equipment used were: classrooms, a level 7 Flight Training Device (FTD), and an interim level C flight simulator both of which were qualified by the TC National Simulator Evaluation Program (NSEP). The development of this aircraft included the simultaneous placing into service of synthetic training devices for the purpose of software testing and in-house manufacturer training for initial customers. The OET task in assessing key training areas was facilitated by having had access to these training devices. The OET then conducted FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 120-53 test T5, which is essentially an evaluation of all the FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS) manoeuvres required for a person to receive a U.S. pilot type rating. The flight test profile met all the requirements of CAR 421.40 (3) (a) (iii). The profiles were flown in the simulator and then accomplished in GEX, registrations C-FKGX (serial #9004) and C-FJGX (serial #9003), in Wichita, KS, from June 2-4, 1999. The OET then conducted seven flight legs, totalling approximately 20 flight hours to determine if the GEX is suitable for operation in the Canada under CAR Parts VI and VII. In the time available on those flights, the OET evaluated a majority of the proposed AFM normal, non-normal, and emergency procedures. Low visibility takeoffs and CAT II approaches were not evaluated.

HUD.

The TCCA OET along with the FAA FSB conducted an evaluation of the THALES HUD System during its certification in 2001, using a GEX Level C Full Flight Simulator and a GEX aircraft. The OEB and FSB also evaluated the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) Supplement for HUD Operations. The OEB found the HUD operationally acceptable for all phases of flight. Low visibility takeoff and CAT II approach operations were not evaluated. Appendix 3 details the Global aeroplane THALES HUD training, checking and currency requirements.

G5000.

The G5000 is a reduced range and length variant of the GEX. The G5000 has a shorter fuselage, reduced fuel capacity (no aft tank and reduced centre tank capacity), and relocated avionics components. The GEX and the G5000 share the same limit weights except for MTOW, maximum taxi and ramp weight, and minimum operating empty weight. The G5000 was added to Transport Canada Type Certificate Data Sheet, A-177, issued March 12, 2004 as model BD-700-1A11.

During September 2004, the Operational Evaluation Board (OEB) conducted a combined operational evaluation of the G5000 with the FAA and JAA. The FAA’s FSB was formed under the authority of the Long Beach AEG, and the JAA’s JOEB was formed under the authority of the Central JAA. The original TCCA OEB report was amended concurrently with the FAA’s (FSB) report, as well as the JAA’s publishing of their first report that covers both variants. The FAA team was comprised of one operations inspector, and the JAA team was comprised of two contracted delegates.

From September the 7th to 10th, 2004, the OEB received a GEX recurrent pilot training and TCCA simulator PPCs at the Bombardier Aerospace (BA) at its Training Centre located at Dorval, Quebec. Facilities and equipment available included: classrooms, a level 5 Flight Training Device (FTD), and two level D full flight simulators, which were qualified by the TCCA National Simulator Evaluation Program (NSEP). One of the full flight simulators is equipped with the THALES HUD. The OEB task in assessing key training areas was facilitated by having had access to these training devices. The OEB then conducted a T1 test as defined in the Common Procedures Document for Operational Evaluation Board (OEB) FAA -JAA –TCCA dated 10 June 2004.

The T1 test is essentially an evaluation of all the TCCA pilot type rating/pilot proficiency check requirements using a flight test profile that met all the requirements of CAR 421.40 (3) (a) (iii). To establish a baseline for comparison, aeroplane PPCs were flown on GEX registration N700GB (serial #9124) at Wichita, KS, on September 14, 2004. The T1 test was flown the next day on G5000 registration C-GLRM (serial # 9130). The combined OEB made a pilot type rating determination that the GEX and the G5000 qualify for the same type rating. The OEB then completed differences training from the GEX to the G5000, and made a determination of the difference levels and the resulting training/checking/and currency requirements. The OEB then conducted six flight legs, totalling 12.5 flight hours to determine if the G5000 is suitable for operation in the Canada under CAR Parts VI and VII. Operations were conducted at minimum and maximum weights over various sector lengths and cruise altitudes. In the time available on those flights, the OET evaluated selected MEL dispatch conditions, the CARs compliance checklist and specific AFM normal, non-normal, and emergency procedures. The OEB received a briefing on the THALES HUD and selectively employed the HUD throughout the training, check rides and operational suitability flights. CAT II approach operations (with and without the HUD) were not evaluated.

Global Technical Developments

In January of 2005, Bombardier introduced changes in cabin pressurization controls that effectively lower the cabin altitude during the cruise phase of flight. The change affects all new production line Globals.

To extend the operating range of new production Global Express aircraft certified to 98,000 lb. MTOW, the center fuel tank capacity was increased by approximately 1,500 lbs, and some optional equipment became standard equipment. The improved version of the Global Express becomes the new production model and is marketed, as the Global Express XRS.

Bombardier Enhanced Vision System (BEVS)

The BEVS is a THALES HUD, which integrates an Infra-Red (IR) image onto the HUD from a sensor mounted on the nose of the aircraft. The BEVS is certified for use as an aid during all phases of flight: taxi, takeoff, climb, cruise, descent and landing. The IR image is intended to provide increased situational awareness of surrounding terrain, obstacles and traffic and with appropriate authorizations to conduct instrument approaches below published minima to 100 feet Height Above Threshold (HAT). The IR image may also be displayed on the co-pilot’s FMS Control Display Unit (CDU). For the purpose of this appendix, the BEVS refers to the integrated HUD symbology and IR image.

A joint Operational Evaluation comprising Transport Canada, the FAA and the JAA was assembled to evaluate the BEVS for operational use. Two Transport Canada (TC) BEVS Operational Evaluation Board (OEB) members along with two members from the FAA participated in the certification flight tests of the BEVS on the Global aircraft from July 2004 to February 2005. A JAA member participated in similar activities in March 2005. These flights included ground manoeuvres, take-offs, en-route transitions, failure cases and numerous approaches at various airports during day, night Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) as well as low visibility weather conditions.

The OEB found the BEVS to be operationally acceptable for all phases of flight and for descent to 100 feet HAT below published minima when operated in accordance with the applicable regulations. Section 2 of Appendix 3 provides the training, checking and currency requirements for the BEVS.

Future Evaluations.

The OEB is responsible for conducting evaluations of future changes to the Global (such as engines, system instrumentation, or other new systems) and their derivatives. The OEB will determine the impact of those changes on training, checking and currency, and will amend this report accordingly.

PILOT "TYPE RATING" REQUIREMENTS

After the evaluation of the GEX in 1999 (in accordance with CAR 421.4) the pilot type rating for the BD-700-1A10 Global Express, in Canada, was designated as "GEX”. After the evaluation of the G5000 in 2004, the pilot type rating for both the GEX and the G5000 was designated as "GEX”.

Training, checking and currency requirements for pilots who convert from the GEX to the G5000, and vice versa, are discussed below.

“MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS" (MDRs)

MDRs for the GEX and G5000 are shown in the table below. These apply to operators whose crews operate both variants, or apply for conversion between variants. The Difference Level Definitions (A/A/A etc.) are specified in accordance with the criteria contained in, Common Procedures Document for Operational Evaluation Board (OEB) FAA -JAA –TCCA where the first letter refers to training requirements, the second to checking requirements, and the third to currency requirements.

AIRPLANE TYPE RATING
GEX
FROM AIRPLANE
GEX
(BD-700-1A10)
G5000
(BD-700-1A11)
T
O

A
I
R
P
L
A
N
E
GEX
(BD-700-1A10)
--- A / A / A
G5000
(BD-700-1A11)
A / A / A ---
ACCEPTABLE "OPERATOR DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS" (ODR) TABLES

ODR tables are used to show an operator's compliance method. Acceptable ODR tables for operators conducting Mixed Fleet Flying (MFF) operations, or convert between the GEX and G5000 are shown in Appendix 1. MFF is defined as operations in which crews alternately fly the GEX and G5000 within a bid period or between PPC /training events.

The ODR tables represent an acceptable means to comply with MDR provisions, for the aircraft evaluated, based on those differences and compliance methods shown. The tables do not necessarily represent the only acceptable means of compliance for operators with aircraft having other differences, where compliance methods (e.g., devices, simulators, etc) are different, or for combinations of aircraft not evaluated. For operators flying variants, which are the same as the aircraft used for the ODR table development, and using the same compliance methods, the ODR tables in Appendix 1 have been found acceptable by TCCA. Equivalent tables, therefore, may be approved by POI for a particular operator.

Operators flying variants with differences not shown on, or addressed by, the acceptable ODR tables attached in Appendix 1; or operators seeking a different means of compliance, must prepare and seek TCCA approval of specific ODR tables applicable to their fleet. New ODR tables proposed by operators should be coordinated with the Program Manager, Flight Technical in Commercial &Business Aviation, Operational Standards (AARXB) to ensure consistent treatment of variants between various operators’ ODR tables and compatibility of the MDR table with MDR provisions. The operator retains the originals of the approved ODR tables. The Program Manager Flight Technical will retain copies of approved Global aircraft ODR tables.

SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING

The OEB has identified several aircraft systems and/or procedures that must receive special emphasis in a Global aircraft training program:

Ground Training:

  1. High altitude physiology;
  2. Fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption
  3. International operating procedures for special use airspace such as: MNPS, RVSM, RNP-10, and RNP-5 operations;
  4. Flight Management System (FMS);
  5. Fuel characteristics and fuel temperature management at high altitudes and cold temperatures;
  6. Wing leading edge contamination and its effect on clean (slats IN/flaps UP) stall speed;
  7. DC power failure modes with emphasis on loss of all DC electrical power, including the relationship and significance of thermal circuit breakers in the Cockpit Circuit Breaker Panel;
  8. Inconsistent terminology (terms used in documentation related to systems such as power plant, FMS and performance);
  9. Fuel recirculation inhibit; and
  10. FMS landing field length.

Systems Integration Training (Flight Training Device - Level 5):

  1. Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS);
  2. Primary Flight Display (PFD) Flight Director Annunciator (FDA);
  3. Flight Management System (FMS);
  4. Electrical Management System (EMS);
  5. Guidance Panel Indications/Selections for autopilot, yaw damper, and coupling; and
  6. Fuel System and detection and procedures for fuel leakage.

Flight Training (Full Flight Simulator - Level C or D and/or aircraft):

  1. Aileron/elevator disconnect (jammed controls in each axis);
  2. Primary Flight Display (PFD), Multifunction Display (MFD), and EICAS reversionary modes;
  3. Integrated use of EICAS messages, switch positions and synoptic pages to determine aircraft system status;
  4. Delayed engine response to full power applications at high altitudes. (especially high altitude stall recovery);
  5. Low energy rejected landing from idle thrust;
  6. High altitude (above 45,000 ft.) handling characteristics with the autopilot and yaw damper inoperative;
  7. AFCS pitch (PIT) mode characteristics (flight path vs. pitch angle);
  8. EGPWS (including the loss of terrain mode when conducting the DC override test, and making MFD selections);
  9. Traffic Collision and Avoidance System (TCAS);
  10. Windshear;
  11. Loss of all DC Power;
  12. Stall warning advance; and
  13. Loss of Autothrottle during One Engine Inoperative (OEI) Flight

The OEB also found that early exposure to the AFCS, auto-throttles, and FMS is important, especially for pilots with no previous EFIS, auto-throttle or FMS experience. Establishing early confidence in manually flying the aircraft, converting from manual to automatic (FMS controlled) flight mode and back is equally important due to heavy reliance on the AFCS. In the event of a flight path deviation due to input error or system malfunction, the flight crew must be able to comfortably transition from automatic to manual mode and back in an orderly fashion.

Similarly, exposure to the use of VNAV in the terminal environment including SIDs, STARs and LNAV/VNAV approaches is important. Establishing confidence in converting from basic autopilot modes to FMS VNAV controlled flight modes and back is equally important in order to cope with ATC clearance amendments to speed and altitude constraints.

Flight crew must be made aware of a potential CFIT issue during a go-around from an RNAV LNAV/VNAV approach. The potential for CFIT is related to the requirement to set the altitude selector to TDZE. Until such time as modifications are made such that the altitude selector setting procedures are similar to procedures used during an ILS approach, RNAV LNAV/VNAV, approaches to a go-around must stress:

  1. FDA awareness; and
  2. The requirement to reset the altitude selector after the go-around to the go-around altitude before engaging FLC and autopilot.

Landing and Takeoff Minima.

In accordance with the Canada Air Pilot (CAP), the GEX and G5000 approach category and the resultant approach minima and specified takeoff minimum visibility (SPEC VIS) are determined by the airspeed at which the aircraft is manoeuvred.

Global Aircraft Initial Training.

The Bombardier Aerospace Training Centre’s Global initial course syllabus has been amended to include all Global variants. The differences between variants are highlighted throughout the course. This course meets the requirements of CARs Subpart 401, 604 and 704, for the initial training of Canadian pilots to be type rated on the Global aircraft, and to operate Global aircraft in private and commercial service.

GEX to G5000 Conversion Training.

The Bombardier Aerospace Training Centre has prepared a GEX to G5000 differences course for pilots who are already qualified on the GEX. This course exceeds the minimum requirements assigned by the OEB as training differences level “A”. (Level A difference training is applicable to aircraft with differences that can adequately be addressed through self-instruction.) This course meets the requirements of CAR 401, 604 and 704, for the initial training of Canadian pilots to operate the G5000 aircraft in private and commercial service.

G5000 to GEX Conversion Training.

The OEB did not evaluate the Bombardier Aerospace Training Centre G5000 to GEX differences course for pilots who are qualified on the G5000. The level of differences assigned by the OEB for conversion from the G5000 to the GEX is training differences level “A”. (Level A difference training is applicable to aircraft with differences that can adequately be addressed through self-instruction.)

Mixed Fleet Flying - Recurrent Training.

Air operators with flight crews operating the GEX and G5000 should ensure that recurrent training covers the aircraft differences at a minimum of level “A”. (Level A difference training is applicable to aircraft with differences that can adequately be addressed through self-instruction.)

Air Operator Training Program Approval.

It is incumbent upon the Air Operator to submit to Transport Canada for approval, a detailed syllabus for ground and flight training. CARS 704 Air Operators shall indicate the level of training program they opt for, Level C or Level D and follow the minimum pilot flying time predetermined in CASS 724.115.

SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING

Testing, Checking, and Evaluations specified by the CARs Subpart 401, 604 and 704 apply.

No Flap Approach.

Checking in “SLATS OUT/ FLAPS 0” approaches and landings is required for the successful completion of an initial PPC for CAR Subparts 401, 604 and 704.

Specific Flight Characteristics (per PPC schedules CAR Part VII and Part VI, subpart 4).

None

GEX to G5000 Conversion Checking.

The level of differences assigned by the OEB for checking when converting from the GEX to the G5000 is checking differences level “A”. (Level A checking indicates that no check related to differences is required at the time of differences training.) A crewmember is, however, responsible for knowledge of each variant flown, and differences items may be included as an integral part of subsequent recurring proficiency checks.)

G5000 to GEX Conversion Checking.

The level of differences assigned by the OEB for checking when converting from the G5000 to the GEX is checking differences level “A”. (Level A checking indicates that no check related to differences is required at the time of differences training. A crewmember is, however, responsible for knowledge of each variant flown, and differences items may be included as an integral part of subsequent recurring proficiency checks.)

Mixed Fleet Flying – Checking.

The level of differences assigned by the OEB for checking for operators with flight crews operating both the GEX and G5000 is checking differences level “A”. (Level A checking indicates that no check related to differences is required at the time of differences training. A crewmember is, however, responsible for knowledge of each variant flown, and differences items may be included as an integral part of subsequent recurring proficiency checks.)

SPECIFICATIONS FOR LINE INDOCTRINATION

Line indoctrination as specified by the CARs Subpart 704 applies.

SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY

All applicable currency requirements contained in CARs Part VI and CAR Part VII apply.

Mixed Fleet Flying – Currency.

The level of differences assigned by the OEB for currency for operators with flight crews operating both the GEX and G5000 is currency differences level “A”. (Level A currency is considered to be common to each variant.) Thus, assessment or tracking of currency for separate variants is not necessary or applicable. Maintenance of currency in any one variant suffices for the other variant.

ADDITIONAL OEB FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Commercial Air Services CAR Subpart 704 – Commuter Operations.

After several training flights and function &reliability flying of over sixteen hours in GEX, C-FKGX (serial #9004) equipped with a typical twelve passenger interior, the OET found that by applicability the GEX should fall under the CAR Subpart 705 – Airline Operations, due to a MZFW of over 50,000 lbs. However, by reason of its planned operational role and maximum number of passengers, the Minister has authorized the Global under a Letter of Authorization (at Appendix 4) pursuant to paragraph 704.01(c) to be operated under CAR Subpart 704 - Commuter Operations. The latest version of this authorization is available from the Program Manager, Flight Technical in Commercial &Business Aviation, Operational Standards (AARXB). This authorization is accompanied by a requirement to have an additional crew member* on all passenger carrying flights for the following reasons:

  • Nature of the interior - The interior of s/n 9004 as well as ten other representative interiors presented by the manufacturer show that the forward 12 to 14 feet immediately behind the cockpit to be occupied with passenger service area, crew rest area, main entrance, and forward lavatory between the main passenger cabin bulkhead and the cockpit bulkhead. This arrangement prevents the flight crew from exercising supervisory control over passengers during flight by visual and aural means.
  • Length of the aircraft - The length of the main cabin precludes visual supervision of passengers from a cockpit seat. This is compounded in those configurations where there are additional bulkheads forming passenger sleeping compartments and/or office areas.
  • Mission duration and over-water legs - The optimum utilisation of the GEX is in the long range transoceanic area. Typical 12 to 14 hour inter-continental missions as compared to the usual commuter inter-city flying highlights the need for an additional crew member to assure passenger safety.

With respect to commercial operations, the evaluation of G5000, C-GLRM (serial # 9130) configured with an interior (Drawing L7002500003 Rev 2003-11) resulted in the same finding as stated above. Therefore, G5000 operations under the CARs 704 shall have an additional crew member* on all passenger carrying flights.

*Note: CARs 704 does not contain any regulations and standards relating to an additional crew member/flight attendant assigned cabin safety duties. CARs 705 (Airline Operations) and CARs 604 (Private Passenger Transportation) contain regulations and standards relating to “flight attendants”. To avoid the inappropriate application of the full spectrum of CARs 705 flight attendant regulations and standards and to signify a difference from CARs 604 regulations and standards, the term “additional crew member” is used to describe the crew member assigned cabin safety related duties on the Global aircraft when it is operated under CARs 704.

Additional Crew Member* Cabin Safety Requirements

The Letter of Authorization (Appendix 4) requires an air operator to demonstrate compliance with the additional regulatory compliance list that is provided as Annex A to the authorization. This list includes a complete list of provisions, including the invocation of certain sections of CARs Subpart 705 that are pertinent to the additional crew member*. The latest version of this authorization is available from the Program Manager, Flight Technical in Commercial &Business Aviation, Operational Standards (AARXB).

Private Passenger Transportation.

For CAR 604 Private Operators, the requirement for a flight attendant* starts at thirteen passengers, in those aeroplanes that cannot provide for flight crew supervision of the passengers by visual and aural means. If the flight crew have the ability to supervise passengers, a flight attendant* is required at 20 passengers. Thus, for the foregoing reasons, GEX operations under CAR 604 shall carry a flight attendant for thirteen passengers or more. If an operator feels that their particular aircraft interior configuration is such that a flight attendant* should not be a requirement, an evaluation shall be requested from TC Headquarters, Commercial &Business Aviation, Operational Standards (AARXB).

The evaluation of G5000, C-GLRM (serial # 9130) configured with an interior (Drawing L7002500003 Rev 2003-11) resulted in the same finding as stated above for the GEX. Therefore, G5000 operations under CAR 604 shall carry a flight attendant* for thirteen passengers or more. If an operator feels that their particular aircraft interior configuration is such that a flight attendant* should not be a requirement, an evaluation shall be requested from TC Headquarters, Commercial &Business Aviation, Operational Standards (AARXB).

Public Address (PA) System.

The distance from the cockpit to the passenger cabin is too far for the flight crew to effectively communicate with passengers without assistance. Any arrangement of curtains, dividers or mid-cabin doors compounds this problem. Evaluation of the cabin interior for G5000, C-GLRM (serial #9130) (Drawing L7002500003 Rev 2003-11) confirmed the need for a PA system when carrying passengers.

Crew Rest Facilities &Forward Observer Seat

With respect to the GEX, the OET did not evaluate the observer seat or flight crew rest quarters on aircraft C-FKGX (#9004) for operational suitability as they were not production representative.

The FAA evaluated the observer seats installed in GEX, N700GB (serial #9124) and G5000, C-GLRM (serial # 9130) and found that they met the requirements of U.S. regulations and policy as stated in their Issue Paper O-2 dated April 18, 2002. TCCA accepts the findings of the FAA.

Canadian operators (CAR 604 and 704) who require inflight crew checking by an authorized check pilot shall equip a Global aircraft with an approved forward observer seat that meets FAA requirements. It was determined that a person occupying the crew rest or passenger seat, due to the aircraft configuration, cannot accomplish an inflight proficiency or monitor.

AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

For the GEX, the manufacturer has not produced a regulatory compliance checklist for CARs Subparts 605, 604 or 704. A review of the compliance checklist for FAR 91/135 shows that a majority of items are left for the operator to show compliance since the manufacturer’s choice is to market “green aircraft” leaving the options and interior completion to the purchaser. Thus, it will be incumbent on each prospective Canadian operator to demonstrate to the applicable Transport Canada regional C&BA office, that each individual aircraft that the operator plans to put into service, complies with Canadian operating rules and standards.

For the G5000, the manufacturer has produced a regulatory compliance checklist for CARs 605, 604 and 704. The G5000 is being marketed with several standard interiors. G5000, C-GLRM (serial # 9130) with an interior configuration according to (Drawing L7002500003 Rev 2003-11) was assessed by the OEB. The regulatory compliance checklist for this aircraft is attached at Appendix 2.

SPECIFICATIONS FOR DEVICES AND SIMULATORS

Device and simulator characteristics are designated in Aeroplane and Rotorcraft Simulator Manual (TP 9685). The acceptability of differences between devices, simulators, and aircraft must be addressed by the POI. Requests for device approval should be made to the POI. The POI may approve those devices for that operator if their characteristics clearly meet the established TCCA criteria and have been qualified by the National Simulator Evaluation Program (NSEP).

ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANCE TO THIS REPORT

The OEB team leader should be consulted by the POI when alternate means of compliance, other than those specified in this report, are proposed. Transport Canada, Commercial &Business Aviation, Operational Standards (AARXB), shall approve alternate means of compliance. If an alternate means of compliance is sought, operators will be required to submit a proposed alternate means for approval that provides an equivalent level of safety to the provisions CARs and this OEB report. Analysis, demonstrations, proof of concept testing, differences documentation, and/or other evidence may be required.

In the event that alternate compliance is sought, training program hour reductions, simulator approvals, and device approvals may be significantly limited and reporting requirements may be increased to ensure an equivalent level of training, checking, and currency. TCCA will generally not consider relief through alternate compliance means unless sufficient lead-time has been planned by an operator to allow for any necessary evaluation.

Part II – Supplemental Report

Part II of the OET report contains historical development information and Appendices used to develop Part I. This information is kept on file at the Transport Canada, Safety and Security, Commercial &Business Aviation (AARXB), Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N5

Attachments:

  • Appendix 1 – Acceptable ODR tables example (available by request only)
  • Appendix 2 – Compliance Checklist (available by request only)
  • Appendix 3 – THALES Head Up Display (HUD) and Bombardier Enhanced Vision System (BEVS) Training, Checking and Currency Requirements (available by request only)
  • Appendix 4 – Letter of Authorization Pursuant to CAR 704.01 (c), including the Cabin Safety Requirements – Regulatory Compliance List (available by request only)
  • Appendix 5 – Compliance Checklist for BEVS (available by request only)

Other documents kept on file are as follows:

Global Master Minimum Equipment List
Global Operational Manuals
Global Training syllabus of OEB members
Global Aircraft Flight Manual
Global Operational Issue Papers

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