Operational Evaluation Board Report for the ERJ175 and ERJ190

TRANSPORT CANADA CIVIL AVIATION OPERATIONAL EVALUATION BOARD REPORT

Embraer Regional Jets (ERJ)
Series ERJ 170-100 (ERJ170), ERJ 170-200 (ERJ175),
ERJ 190-100 (ERJ190)

APPROVED: /s/ DATE: 12/12/2005
Wayne Chapin
Chairman, ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 Operational Evaluation Board

Transport Canada Civil Aviation
Commercial and Business Aviation
Certification and Operational Standards (AARXB)

MANAGEMENT COORDINATION SHEET

/s/ 12/12/2005
Captain Tom Lindsey
Team Member
Airline Inspection Division
Date

/s/ 12/12/2005
Captain John McNamara
Team Member
Certification and Operational Standards Division
Date

/s/ 12/12/2005
Christopher Dann
Team Member
Cabin Safety Standards Division
Date

/s/ 12/12/2005
Wayne Chapin
Chief
Certification and Operational Standards Division
Date

/s/ 12/12/2005
Roman Marushko
Program Manager Flight Technical
Certification and Operational Standards Division
Date

/s/ 12/12/2005
Manzur Huq
Director,
General Aviationtion
Transport Canada Civil Aviation
Date

/s/ 12/12/2005
Michel Gaudreau
Director,
Commercial and Business Aviation
Transport Canada Civil Aviation
Date

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY
  2. BACKGROUND
  3. PILOT TYPE RATING REQUIREMENTS
  4. MASTER COMMON REQUIREMENTS (MCRs)
  5. MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS (MDRs)
  6. ACCEPTABLE OPERATOR DIFFERENCE
    REQUIREMENTS TABLES
  7. OEB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING
  8. OEB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING
  9. OEB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY
  10. AIRCRAFT COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST
  11. OEB SPECIFICATIONS FOR FLIGHT TRAINING DEVICES AND SIMULATORS
  12. APPLICATION OF OEB REPORT
  13. ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANCE
  14. MISCELLANEOUS

Acronyms

ACP Approved Check Pilot Manual
AQP Advanced Qualification Program
ATTCS Automatic Takeoff Thrust Control System
CAR Canadian Aviation Regulations
CJAA Central Joint Aviation Authorities
CASS Commercial Air Service Standard
CFIT Controlled Flight Into Terrain
CHO Certificate Holding Office
EGPWS Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System
EICAS Engine Indication and Crew Alerting System
FADEC Full Authority Digital Engine Control System
FAA Federal Aviation Administration
FBS Fixed Base Simulator
FMS Flight Management System
FSB Flight Standardization Board
HGS Heads-up Guidance System
OEB Operational Evaluation Board
FTD Flight Training Device
GPS Global Positioning System
IAW In Accordance With
JAA Joint Aviation Authorities
LOE Line Operational Evaluation
LOFT Line Oriented Flight Training
MCR Master Common Requirements
MDA Minimum Descent Altitude
MDR Master Differences Requirements
MFD Multi Function Display
NSEP National Simulator Evaluation Program
OEB Operational Evaluation Board
ODR Operator Difference Requirements
PFD Primary Flight Display
POI Principal Operations Inspector
PPC Pilot Proficiency Check
TCCA Transport Canada Civil Aviation
TSO Technical Standard Order

REVISION RECORD

REVISION NO. SECTION PAGE DATE
       
       
       
       

1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY

Purpose

Purpose Purpose Purpose Purpose Purpose

1.1 This Operational Evaluation Board report specifies TCCA master training, checking, and currency requirements applicable to crews operating ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft under CAR 705. Provisions of this report:

  1. Define pilot "type rating(s)" assigned to the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190,
  2. Describe any unique requirements applicable to initial, transition, upgrade, or recurrent qualification,
  3. Provide "Master Difference Program Requirements" for crews requiring differences qualification for mixed-fleet-flying or transition,
  4. Provide examples of acceptable "Operator Difference Requirement (ODR)" tables,
  5. Describe an acceptable training program and device characteristics where necessary to establish compliance with pertinent Master Difference Requirements (MDRs),
  6. Set checking and currency standards including specification of those checks that must be administered by TCCA or operators, and
  7. List regulatory compliance status (compliance checklist) for CAR 705 or other operationally related criteria reviewed by the OEB.

1.2 This report includes:

  1. Minimum requirements which must be applied by TCCA regional offices, (e.g. MDRs, Type Rating designations, etc.),
  2. Information which is advisory in general, but is mandatory for particular operators if the designated configurations apply and if approved for that operator (e.g. MDR footnotes, acceptable ODR tables), and
  3. Information that is used to facilitate TCCA review of an aircraft type or variant that is proposed for use by an operator (e.g. compliance checklist).

Various sections within the report are qualified as to whether compliance is required, considering the provisions of the Common Procedures Document for the conduct of an operational evaluation is recommended, or is advisory in nature.

1.3 Provisions of this report are effective until amended, superseded, or withdrawn by subsequent OEB determinations.

2.0 BACKGROUND

2.1 This report addresses the ERJ 170-100 (ERJ170), ERJ 170-200 (ERJ175), ERJ 190-100 (ERJ190) aircraft.

2.1.1 The EMBRAER 170/190 “Aircraft Family” is composed of aircraft variants with a design based on the EMBRAER 170. The EMBRAER 170 is the shorter family member and the first one certified and entered into commercial service. For the purposes of this report, the EMBRAER 170 is considered as the base aircraft against which all variants are evaluated.

The EMBRAER 175 and EMBRAER 190 are both EMBRAER 170 stretched fuselage derivative models. The EMBRAER 175 is certified as an EMBRAER 170 amended Type Certificate. The EMBRAER 190 is certified on its own Type Certificate.

The EMBRAER 170, EMBRAER 175 and EMBRAER 190 are commercial designations for the aircraft ERJ 170-100 (EMBRAER 170), ERJ 170-200 (EMBRAER 175) and ERJ 190-100 (EMBRAER 190).

2.1.2 Base Aircraft - EMBRAER 170 (ERJ170)

The ERJ170 has a certified maximum passenger-seating configuration of 78. It is equipped with GE CF34-8E5A1 and GE CF34-8E5 engines.

ERJ170 Dimensions:

  • Length = 98 ft 1 in (29.90 m)
  • Height = 32 ft 3 in (9.82 m)
  • Wing Spam = 85ft 4 in (26.00m)

2.1.3 Variant Aircraft - EMBRAER 175 (ERJ175)

The EMBRAER 175 has a certified maximum passenger-seating configuration of 86. The ERJ175 fuselage has the same cross section as the ERJ170 but is 70 inches (1.78m) longer than the EMBRAER 170. There is commonality in the hydraulics, flight controls, anti-ice, avionics, air conditioning and pressurization, electrical, fuel and APU systems. The basic EMBRAER 170 cockpit crew interfaces have been maintained in the variants. It is equipped with GE CF34-8E5A1 and GE CF34-8E5 engines.

ERJ175 dimensions:

  • Length = 103 ft 11 in (31.68 m)
  • Height = 32 ft 3 in (9.82 m)
  • Wing Span = 85ft 4 in (26.00m)

2.1.4. Variant Aircraft - EMBRAER 190 (ERJ190)

The ERJ190 has a certified maximum passenger-seating configuration of 108. It has the same ERJ170/ERJ175 fuselage cross-section but is 241.1 inches longer (6.33m). There is commonality in the hydraulics, flight control, anti-ice, avionics, air conditioning and pressurization, electrical, fuel and APU systems.

The ERJ190 engines (GE CF 34-10) are a more powerful version of the ERJ170/175 engines (GE CF 34-08).

Wing surface is increased in area when compared to the ERJ170/175. The ERJ190 main landing gear has a reinforced and enlarged shock structure to meet the increased load and geometric requirements, increased tire and wheel sizes to address heavier operating weights and increased brake energy capacity to accommodate the heavier operating weights and higher landing speeds. The ERJ190 horizontal stabilizer is an enlarged and reinforced version of the ERJ170/175 design.

The ERJ190 has two Type III over-wing emergency exits that are not present on the ERJ170/175. All the cockpit systems interfaces are maintained in line with the designs of the ERJ170/175.

ERJ190 Dimensions:

  • Length = 108 ft 11 in (36.23 m)
  • Height = 34 ft 8 in (10.57 m)
  • Wing Spam = 94ft 6 in (28.72m)

2.1.5 Flight Envelope

The flight envelopes for the base aircraft and variants are the same with differing operating speed limitations and design manoeuvring speeds as per the tables below:

Operating Speed Limitations:

  EMBRAER 170/175 EMBRAER 190
Extended - VLE - KIAS 250 265
Operation    
· VLO-extension 250 265
· VLO-retraction 250 250

Design Manouevering Speeds (VA):

EMBRAER 170/175
Altitude KIAS- Mach
0 m 240  
7800 m (25590ft) 260  
8805 m (28888ft) 270  
To 12497 m (41000ft)   0.82

EMBRAER 190
Altitude KIAS- Mach
0 m to 7800m (25590ft) 250  
7800 m (25590ft) 286  
9962 m (32683ft) 294  
To 12497 m (41000ft)   0.82

2.1.6 Approach Profiles and Speed:

The approach profiles are the same for the base and the variant aircraft. Approach speeds are dependent upon aircraft weight. Although the variant models operate at heavier weights than the base aircraft, critical speeds are presented to the pilot in a standardized manner for the base and the variant aircraft.

3.0 PILOT "TYPE RATING" REQUIREMENTS

3.1 Transport Canada Civil Aviation has accepted the findings of the Central Joint Aviation Authorities (CJAA) Joint Operational Evaluation Board Report dated March 17, 2005 for the Embraer 170 (ERJ170) and Embraer 175 (ERJ175), Federal Aviation Administration’s Flight Standardization Board Report Embraer ERJ170 and the ERJ175.

Note: A copy of the CJAA or the FAA evaluation report is available from the Chief Certification and Operational Standards (AARXB) Commercial and Business Aviation, Ottawa, Ontario Canada.

3.2 Pilot Type Rating. Based on the findings in this report and in accordance with the “ICAO Type Designator” list the ERJ170, ERJ175 and ERJ190 are found to be a common type for the purposes of the issuance of a pilot type rating, training, checking and currency. A common type rating is a term used by the TCCA to indicate that a unique type rating applies to the aircraft evaluated and that differences training is required for the issuance of a type rating for the three aircraft. In conformity with the provisions of CAR Part IV, the Canadian pilot "Type Rating" assigned for aircraft in the series (ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190) is designated as "E170".

4.0 MASTER COMMON REQUIREMENTS (MCRs)

4.1 Common requirements for all ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 airplanes. The Master Common Requirements table specifies those items of crew qualification that apply to both the VARIANT MODEL(s) and the BASE MODEL.

4.1.1 Landing Minima Categories. All ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 airplanes are considered Category C aircraft for the purposes of determining "straight-in landing weather minima". The highest speed to be flown (speed category) during a circling maneuver must be used by the flight crew to determine the appropriate minimums.

4.1.2 Normal "Final Landing Flap Setting". The normal "final landing flap setting" is considered to be "Flaps 5" for all ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 airplanes.

4.1.3 Autopilot Engage/Disengage Altitudes. The autopilot must not be engaged below a minimum engage altitude of 400 feet AGL after takeoff. The autopilot must be disengaged before the airplane descends below 50 feet AGL when it is coupled to an ILS glideslope and localizer unless it is in the go-around mode.

4.1.4 No other special or unique requirements common to ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 are identified beyond those provided by the CAR.

5.0 MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS (MDRs)

5.1 Requirements for particular ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 Variant Combinations. Master Difference Requirements (MDRs) for variants of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 are shown in Appendix 1. These provisions apply when differences between variants exist which affect crew knowledge, skills, or abilities related to flight safety (e.g., Level A or greater differences).

. These provisions apply when differences between variants exist which affect crew knowledge, skills, or abilities related to flight safety (e.g., Level A or greater differences).. These provisions apply when differences between variants exist which affect crew knowledge, skills, or abilities related to flight safety (e.g., Level A or greater differences).

5.2 MDR Footnotes. Footnotes to MDR requirements define acceptable "required means" or "alternate means" of compliance. A footnote can indicate requirements that are less restrictive than the basic designation, or more restrictive than the basic designation, depending on the significance of the differences between particular variants.

5.3 Terminology. The term "must" is used in this report and certain MDR Footnotes even though it is recognized that this OEB report, and Common Procedures Document on which it is based, provides one acceptable means, but not necessarily the only means of compliance. Operators who choose this method must comply with each applicable MDR provision including footnotes. Partial, or selective application of the process or its provisions does not constitute an acceptable means of compliance.

6.0 ACCEPTABLE OPERATOR DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS TABLES

6.1 ODR Tables. ODR tables are used to show an operator's compliance method. Acceptable Operator Difference Requirements tables for operators conducting mixed fleet operations, using the particular combination of ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 variants evaluated, are shown in Appendix 2. The ODR tables represent an acceptable means to comply with MDR provisions, for the aircraft evaluated, based on those differences and compliance methods shown. The tables do not necessarily represent the only acceptable means of compliance for operators with aircraft having other differences, where compliance methods (e.g., devices, simulators, etc...) are different, or for combinations of aircraft not evaluated. For operators flying variants, which are the same as the aircraft used for the ODR table development, and using the same compliance methods, the ODR tables in Appendix 2 have been found acceptable, and therefore, may be approved by a POI for a particular operator.

6.2 Operator Preparation of ODR Tables. Operators flying "mixed fleet" variants with differences not shown on, or addressed by, the acceptable ODR tables attached in Appendix 2, or operators seeking different means of compliance, must prepare and seek TCCA approval of specific ODR tables pertinent to their fleet.

6.3 ODR Table Coordination. New ODR tables proposed by operators should be coordinated with the OEB prior to TCCA approval and implementation. Through this coordination, the OEB can ensure consistent treatment of variants between various operators’ ODR tables and compatibility of the MDR table with MDR provisions.

6.4 ODR Table Distribution. Originally the operator retains approved ODR tables. The POI retains copies of approved ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 ODR tables. Copies of all approved ODR tables should be forwarded to the OEB Chairman.

7.0 OEB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING

7.1 General.

7.1.1 Assumptions Regarding Flight Crew Previous Experience. The provisions of Section 7.0 of this report apply to programs for pilots who have experience in CAR 705 or CAR 704 air carrier operations and multi-engine transport turbojet or turboprop aircraft. For pilots not having this experience, additional requirements may be appropriate as determined by the POI, OEB, and Chief Certification and Operational Standards.

7.1.2 ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 - Full Course programs. POIs for operators initially introducing the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft type may approve programs consistent with programs previously approved. For information regarding previously approved programs, the POIs for other existing ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 operators may be consulted. In the event of uncertainty regarding the evaluation of a proposed program, the Chief, Certification and Operational Standards should be consulted.

7.2 Pilot Initial, Transition and Upgrade Ground Training

7.2.1 Pilots: Initial, Transition and Upgrade Ground Training, CAR 705.124. Initial, transition, or upgrade ground training for the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 is accomplished as specified by CAR 705.124(2) (iv) or an approved (Advanced Qualification Program) AQP program. No unique provisions or requirements are specified in this report; however, “special emphasis training” has been identified.

7.2.2 Crewmember Emergency Training. Crewmember emergency training should be conducted for the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 in accordance with CASS 725.124(14). The objective of emergency training for the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft is to provide crewmembers with the necessary knowledge concerning emergency equipment, situations, and procedures, to ensure implementation of the correct actions in the event of an emergency.

Emergency training consists of instruction on the location, function, and operation of emergency equipment that is different in each variant of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 and from other aircraft in the operator's fleet. Where emergency equipment is common, instruction may be adjusted for crewmembers qualified and current on this equipment, provided records are available which demonstrate that crewmembers meet CAR 705.124(2)(iv)(C) and CASS 725.124(14) requirements. For example, if the fire extinguishers are common to fire extinguishers on other aircraft in the operator's fleet, training may be simultaneously credited for both aircraft. Conversely, for equipment that is unique to the ERJ170, training on the emergency equipment for each variant is required.

Emergency training also consists of instruction in crewmember emergency assignments and procedures including crew coordination and communication, the handling of emergency or other unusual situations, and emergency performance and observation drills, that are specific to each variant of the ERJ170.

In accordance with CASS 725.124(14) and the Cabin Safety Inspector Manual TP 12854, emergency training requirements refer to two types of training: "general" emergency training and "aircraft-specific" emergency training. General emergency training is instruction on those emergency items that are common to the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 and all aircraft in the operator's fleet, e.g., instruction on fire extinguishers and firefighting procedures, if common to all aircraft. Aircraft-specific emergency training is training on those items that are specific to the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft. An example of aircraft-specific emergency training is instruction on the location of emergency equipment for each variant of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft.

As part of an approved training program, an operator may use many methods when conducting aircraft-specific emergency training, including classroom instruction, pictures, videotape, ground training devices, computer-based instruction, and static aircraft training.

There are no specified training program hours for Crewmember Emergency Training. The complexity of the different variants of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft and the complexity of the type of operation to be conducted should be considered when approving the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft-specific emergency training.

7.2.3 Areas of Emphasis. The following areas of emphasis should be addressed during ground and flight training:

  1. The engine indication and crew alerting system (EICAS), the primary flight displays (PFDs), and multifunction displays (MFDs). Altitude and airspeed are presented on vertical scale instruments in both digital and analog formats. Pilots need to be able to understand the multitude of information presented on these displays. Pilots transitioning from traditional round dial basic "T" instruments may require additional training and instrument scan practice to gain proficiency in manually flying by reference to the PFD. Recognition of reversionary modes and display failures and appropriate corrective action to be taken should be addressed.
  2. Flight Control System. An operational understanding of the basic modes of operation as well as an understanding of the fly-by-wire primary and secondary flight control systems and their associated system components.
  3. Flight Guidance System including the Autopilot, Autothrottle, and Flight Director. An understanding of the various lateral and vertical modes and the ability to select and arm the modes during different phases of flight is essential.
  4. Full Authority Digital Electronic Control (FADEC). An operational understanding of the FADEC and the engine thrust mode selection is required.
  5. System control panels using pushbuttons with integral light bars. Pilots should have an understanding of the switch position and system configuration as it relates to whether the light bar is illuminated or not. This understanding is required for both normal and abnormal system operation.
  6. Multiple derated thrust levels and reduced thrust. Pilots should have an understanding of the performance implications and operational procedures associated with multiple derated thrust levels, ATTCS, and reduced thrust settings.
  7. Heads-up Guidance System – Reserved.

7.2.4 Training for Seat Dependent Tasks. Accomplishment of certain tasks, procedures, or maneuvers requires training of a crewmember for a particular crew position (i.e. captain, first officer, check airman, etc.). Training programs should recognize and address the necessary seat/position related tasks for the applicable crewmember. Accordingly, training programs should address seat dependent tasks or maneuvers to the extent necessary to satisfy crew qualification objectives, and in accordance with ODR tables when applicable.

7.2.5 Features or Procedures that can have seat dependent elements (as determined by each operator and POI). These may include the following:

  1. Rejected Takeoff
  2. Emergency descent
  3. Manual gear extension
  4. HGS
  5. Low energy go-around

7.2.6 Special Event Training. Special event training is recommended for the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190. Such training should be conducted to improve basic crew member understanding and confidence regarding aircraft handling qualities, options and procedures as these relate to design characteristics and limitations.

Recommended special event training:

  1. Recovery from unusual attitudes
  2. High altitude stall recognition and recovery
  3. Handling qualities and procedures during recovery from an upset condition (e.g., wake vortex encounter).

7.2.7 Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT). Due to continued industry efforts to reduce exposure to CFIT accidents, special emphasis on this topic is appropriate. Emphasis on altitude awareness, EGPWS warnings, situational awareness and crew coordination is appropriate.

7.3 Differences Training.

7.3.1 Differences Training. Unless an initial or transition program is completed for each variant, differences training is necessary for qualification in each variant as shown in the MDR. A training program addressing pertinent differences described by individual operator ODRs, including normal and abnormal operations, if applicable, is required for each aircraft flown.

7.4 Recurrent Training

7.4.1 Recurrent Training, CAR 705.124(2)(a)(iv). Recurrent training for flight crews must include appropriate training in accordance with CASS 725.124 or an approved AQP program.

For flight attendants, ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 recurrent training consists of instruction as necessary in accordance with CAR 705.124(2)(b)(iv)(A) and (B) the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft-specific emergency subjects in accordance with CAR 705.124(2)(b)(iv)(C).

As part of an approved training program, an operator may use many methods when conducting recurrent training, including classroom instruction, pictures, videotape, and ground training devices, computer-based instruction, and static aircraft training.

Recurrent training should include an examination to verify the state of the flight attendant's knowledge with respect to the duties and procedures required in routine, abnormal, and emergency situations for each variant of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft. In addition, recurrent training should include a verification of skills to determine flight attendant ability to perform assigned duties and responsibilities for the ERJ-170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft. The verification of skills should cover each piece of emergency equipment and each emergency procedure unique to each variant of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft.

7.4.2 Recurrent Flight Training. Recurrent flight training requires appropriate maneuvers and procedures identified in CAR 705 for the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 or an approved AQP. Appropriate emphasis should be placed on systems and procedures that may not have been used operationally, and are expected to be used prior to the next recurrent training event (e.g. FMS, GPS, HGS, etc.). As permitted by CAR 725.113 satisfactory completion of an approved training program or an approved AQP may be substituted for a PPC.

7.4.3 Recurrent Training Level Adjustments. (Reserved)

7.5 Other Training

7.5.1 LOFT Programs, CASS 725.124(20). When operators have LOFT programs, POIs should review those programs to assure their suitability.

7.5.2 Flight Attendants, Initial and Aircraft Specific Ground Training. Training should be conducted in accordance with CAR 705. 124(2)(b)(iv). The objective of aircraft ground training is to provide flight attendants with an understanding of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft. This knowledge is necessary for the flight attendant to perform the duties and procedures required in routine, abnormal, and emergency situations.

Aircraft ground training includes instruction in two distinct subject areas: ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 general operational subjects training and ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft-specific emergency subjects training. The ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft-specific emergency subjects training is addressed in "Crewmember Emergency Training: CAR 705. 124.(2)(a)(iv)(C) and (2)(b)(iv)(C)”.

ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 general operational subjects training consists of instruction in the general description of the aircraft, aircraft equipment, furnishings, and systems; routine crewmember communication and coordination procedures; routine crewmember duties and procedures during each phase of flight; and passenger handling responsibilities for each variant of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft.

As part of an approved training program, an operator may use many methods when conducting aircraft ground training, including classroom instruction, pictures, videotape, ground training devices, computer based instruction, and static aircraft training.

Initial and Aircraft Specific Ground Training must include a verification of skills portion to determine flight attendant ability to perform assigned duties and procedures on the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft. A verification of skills should cover each piece of emergency equipment and each emergency procedure unique to each variant of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft.

Training program hours for Initial and Aircraft Specific Ground Training: The complexity of the different variants of the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 aircraft and the complexity of the type of operation to be conducted should be considered when approving ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 Initial and Aircraft Specific Ground Training.

7.5.3 Aircraft Dispatchers, Initial and Transition Training should be conducted in accordance with CAR 705.124(2)(c).

8.0 OEB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING

8.1 General

8.1.1 Checking Items. Pertinent knowledge, procedures, and maneuvers specified by CAR 705 pertinent to fly-by wire multi-engine turbojet transport aircraft apply.

8.1.2 Areas of emphasis. The following areas of emphasis should be addressed during checks as necessary:

  1. Proficiency with manual and automatic flight must be demonstrated.
  2. Proper selection and use of PFD/MFD displays, raw data, flight director, and Flight Guidance System modes should be demonstrated, particularly during instrument approaches.
  3. Demonstration of FMS navigation (departures and arrivals) proficiency.
  4. Proper outside visual scan without prolonged fixation on FMS operation should be demonstrated, and failure of component(s) of the FMS should be addressed.

8.1.3 No Flap Landings. Demonstration of a No Flap approach and landing during a CAR 705 pilot proficiency check (PPC) is appropriate.

8.2 Type Ratings

8.2.1 Practical Tests. Practical tests may follow standard provisions of CAR 705.106, or approved Line Operational Evaluation (LOE) provisions of AQP. If AQP LOEs apply, suitable LOEs should be available that are pertinent to the intended operations expected (e.g. oceanic scenarios, etc.).

8.2.2 Application For and Issuance Of Type Ratings. Pilots completing pertinent CAR 401.40 requirements or AQP provisions in an ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 in accordance with OEB requirements described in this report, may apply to the TCCA for the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 type rating endorsement. Upon completion of required tests, and submission of an application, authorized TCCA inspectors or designees may issue the necessary pilot certificate with type rating.

8.3 Proficiency Checks

8.3.1 General. Proficiency Checks are administered as designated in CAR 705.106(1)(c) for the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 or in accordance with an approved AQP.

Under a traditional program, an authorized check pilot or TCCA inspector must administer these checks. Satisfactory completion of a PPC may be substituted for recurrent flight training as permitted in CAR 705. In mixed fleet operations, a PPC on one of the aircraft in the series validates the pilot’s proficiency on other aircraft variants operated in the series, provided variants alternate for every PPC, or if a single type simulator is being used, differences training is provided at least once during each training interval. Line indoctrination on one aircraft variant validates experience on the other variants in the series provided differences between the variants are addressed during line indoctrination. A line check on one aircraft variant validates proficiency on the other variants operated in the series.

Under an AQP, an approved AQP evaluator or TCCA inspector must administer the appropriate validation and evaluation events. In mixed fleet operations under AQP, validation and evaluation events, such as Maneuvers Training Validation/Line Operational Evaluation (MTV/LOE) events, held on one aircraft variant validates proficiency on the other variants operated in the series provided that variants alternate for every MTV/LOE, or if a single type simulator is being used, differences training is provided at least once during each training period. Initial Operating Experience (IOE) on one aircraft variant validates experience on the other variants operated in the series provided differences between the variants are addressed during the IOE. Online Evaluations (OE) on one aircraft variant validates proficiency on the other variants operated in the series.

9.0 OEB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY

9.1 Currency (Recency of Experience) is in accordance with CAR 705.106 and 705.113 or an approved AQP. In mixed fleet operations currency requirements (90-day) for aircraft in the series (ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190) may be met on any of the aircraft in the series. Operators must institute a pilot tracking system for establishing 90-day currency that records and stores the information required to satisfy the regulatory requirement.

9.1 Currency (Recency of Experience) is in accordance with CAR 705.106 and 705.113 or an approved AQP. In mixed fleet operations currency requirements (90-day) for aircraft in the series (ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190) may be met on any of the aircraft in the series. Operators must institute a pilot tracking system for establishing 90-day currency that records and stores the information required to satisfy the regulatory requirement.

10.0 AIRCRAFT COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

10.1 Compliance Checklist.

EMBRAER provided the OEB with a complete compliance checklist to identify those specific operating rules or policies for which the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 complies. It is the responsibility of the Certificate Holding Office (CHO) to review compliance with pertinent rules prior to approval for an operator to use the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 in commercial service. A copy of the compliance checklist is located in

13.0 ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANCE

13.1 Approval Level and Approval Criteria. Alternate means of compliance for differences requirements for the ERJ170/ERJ175/ERJ190 under CAR 705, other than as specified in provisions of this report, must be approved by Chief Certification and Operational Standards. If Alternate compliance is sought, operators will be required to establish that any proposed alternate means provides an equivalent level of safety to the provisions of Common Procedures Document and this OEB report. Analysis, demonstrations, proof of concept testing, differences documentation, or other evidence may be required.

13.2 Equivalent Safety. In the event alternate compliance is sought, training program hour reductions, simulator approvals, and device approvals, may be significantly limited and reporting requirements may be increased to assure equivalent safety. TCCA will generally not consider relief through alternate compliance means unless sufficient lead-time has been planned by an operator to allow for any necessary testing and evaluation.

13.3 Unforeseen Circumstances. In the event of clearly unforeseen circumstances in which it is not possible for an operator to comply with MDR provisions, the operators may seek an interim equivalent program rather than a permanent alternate compliance method. Financial arrangements, schedule adjustment, and other such reasons are not considered "unforeseen circumstances" for the purposes of this provision.

14.0 MISCELLANEOUS - (Reserved)

APPENDIX 1

Master Differences Requirements
AIRPLANE TYPE
RATING:
FROM AIRPLANE
EMBRAER 170
EMBRAER 175
EMBRAER 190
T
O

A
I
R
P
L
A
N
E
EMBRAER 170 Not Applicable A/A/A A/A/A
EMBRAER 175 A/A/A Not Applicable A/A/A
EMBRAER 190 A/A/A A/A/A Not Applicable

Note: The Embraer 170 is the base model.

APPENDIX 2

ACCEPTABLE ODR TABLES

EMBRAER 175 TO EMBRAER 170 DIFFERENCES - GENERAL

         Base Aircraft: EMBRAER 170
Difference Aircraft: EMBRAER 175
 
COMPLIANCE METHOD
 
TRAINING  Checking/Currency
DESIGN REMARKS FLT
CHAR
PROC
CHNG
Training
Level

Device

FLT
CHK
CURR
DIMENSIONS

Length increased in  5ft 10 in (1.78 m) 

Embraer 170  = 98 ft 1 in (29.90 m)

Embraer 175 = 103 ft 11 in (31.68 m)
 

No No A - - -
CABIN

Max passenger Capacity increased in 8 seats.

EMBRAER 170 = 78 seats
EMBRAER 175 = 86 seats  

No No A - - -
CARGOS

Cargo capacity increased in  2.92 cu.

EMBRAER 170=  14,33m.cu (total)
EMBRAER 175=  17,25m.cu (total)

No No A - - -
LIMITATIONS
Weight
Weight Limitations Increased.
 
  • STD
  • LR
MRW
  • + 1510 kg
  • + 1590 kg
MTOW
  • + 1510 kg
  • + 1590 kg
MLW
  • + 1200 kg
  • + 1200 kg
MZFW
  •  + 2100 kg
  • + 2100 kg
 
STD
  170 175
MRW 36150 kg 37660 kg
MTOW 35990 kg 37500 kg
MLW 32800 kg 34000 kg
MZFW 29600 kg 31700 kg
LR
  170 175
MRW 37360kg 38950 kg
MTOW 37200 kg 38790 kg
MLW 32800 kg 34000 kg
MZFW 29600 kg 31700 kg
No No A - - -
LIMITATONS
Center of Gravity

Limits for conditions of cruise with flaps and gear ups.

EMBRAER 170-STD = 7% to 27% at MTOW
4% to 27% at MZFW

EMBRAER 170 -LR = 8.8% to 27% at MTOW
4% to 27% at MZFW

EMBRAER 170 -SU = 8.8% to 27% at MTOW
4% to 27% at MZFW

EMBRAER 170 SE = 8.8% to 27% at MTOW
4% to 27% at MZFW

EMBRAER 175 STD = 10 to 25.6% at MTOW
4% to 30% at MZFW

EMBRAER 175 LR = 8.1 to 28.1% at MTOW
4% to 30% at MZFW
 

No No A - - -
LIMITATIONS
Speeds

VA is different according to AFM chart.

Refer to specific model AFM (CAFM) for VMCA and VMCG values.

No No A - - -

EMBRAER 175 to EMBRAER 170 DIFFERENCES - SYSTEMS

* There are no systems differences between EMBRAER 170 and EMBRAER 175 that require differences training. Systems operation is identical, and existing physical differences are minor and unnoticed by the pilots. There are no changes in flight characteristics and operational procedures

EMBRAER 175 to EMBRAER 170 DIFFERENCES - MANEUVERS

* There are no maneuvers differences between EMBRAER 170 and EMBRAER 175 that require differences training. There are no changes in flight characteristics and operational procedures.

EMBRAER 190 TO EMBRAER 170 DIFFERENCES - GENERAL

Base Aircraft: EMBRAER 170
Difference Aircraft: EMBRAER 190
COMPLIANCE METHOD
TRAINING Checking/Currency
DESIGN REMARKS

FLT
CHAR

PROC
CHNG

Training
Level

Device

FLT
CHK

CURR

DIMENSIONS

Increased Dimensions
Length = + 20 ft 10 in (6.33 m)
Height = + 2 ft 5 in (0.75 m)
Wing span =  + 8 ft 14 in (2.72 m)

EMBRAER 170

Length = 98 ft 1 in (29.90 m)
Height = 32 ft 3 in (9.82 m)
Wing span = 85 ft 4 in (26.00 m)

EMBRAER 190

Length = 118 ft 11in (36.23 m)
Height = 34 ft 8 in (10.57m)
Wing span = 94 ft 3 in (28.72 m)

           
CABIN

Max passenger Capacity increased in 30 seats.

EMBRAER 170 = 78 seats
EMBRAER 190 = 108 seats

The EMBRAER 190 has 02 Type 03 over-wing emergency exits.

No No A - - -
CARGOS

Increased cargo capacity in + 8.27 cu.

EMBRAER 170 =  14,33m.cu (total)
EMBRAER 190 =  22,60m.cu (total)

No No A - - -
ENGINES EMBRAER 190 engines (GE CF 34-10) are a more powerful version of the EMBRAER 170 engines (GE CF 34-08).

Takeoff modes:

EMBRAER 170

CF34-8E5A1: 
T/O-1: 13800 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 14200 lbf)
T/O-2: 13000 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 14200 lbf)
T/O-3: 11700 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 13000 lbf)

CF34-8E5
T/O-1: 13000 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 14200 lbf)
T/O-2: 11700 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 13000 lbf)

EMBRAER 190

CF34-10E6A1 (ISA + 20°C): 
T/O-1: 18500 lbf
T/O-2: 17100 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 18500 lbf)
T/O-3: 15450 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 17100 lbf)

CF34-10E5A1 (ISA + 20°C: 
T/O-1: 18500 lbf
T/O-2: 17100 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 18500 lbf)
T/O-3: 15450 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 17100 lbf)

CF34-10E6 (ISA + 20°C): 
T/O-1: 17100 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 18500 lbf)
T/O-2: 15450 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 17100 lbf)

CF34-10E6 (ISA + 15°C): 
T/O-1: 17100 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 18500 lbf)
T/O-2: 15450 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 17100 lbf)

No No A      - - -
LIMITATIONS
Weight

Weight Limitations Increased.

 
  • STD
  • LR
MRW
  • + 11800 kg
  • +13100 kg
MTOW
  • + 11800 kg
  • + 13100 kg
MLW
  • + 10200 kg
  • + 10200 kg
MZFW
  • + 11200 kg
  • + 11200 kg

STD

  170 190
MRW 36150 kg
  • 47950
MTOW 35990 kg
  • 47790
MLW 32800 kg
  • 43000
MZFW 29600 kg
  • 40800

LR

  170 190
MRW 37360kg
  • 50460
MTOW 37200 kg
  • 50300
MLW 32800 kg
  • 43000
MZFW 29600 kg
  • 40800
No No A - - -
LIMITATONS
Center of Gravity

Limits for conditions of cruise with flaps and gear ups.

EMBRAER 170

EMBRAER 170-STD = 9.6% to 27% at MTOW
7% to 27% at MZFW

EMBRAER 170 LR = 11.8% to 27% at MTOW
8.8% to 27% at MZFW

EMBRAER 170 SU = 11.8% to 27% at MTOW
7% to 27% at MZFW

EMBRAER 170 SE = 11.8% to 27% at MTOW
7% to 27% at MZFW

EMBRAER 190

EMBRAER 190 STD= 6% to 28.7% at MTOW
6% to 29% at MZFW

EMBRAER 190 LR = 8.8% to 27.5% at MTOW
6% to 29% at MZFW

No No A - - -
LIMITATIONS
Speeds

VLO, VLE according to the  table presented on page 09.

VA is different according to AFM chart.

Refer to specific model AFM (CAFM) for VMCA and VMCG values.

No No A - - -
NOISE LEVELS

Effective Perceived Noise Levels (EPNL´s) are different.

Refer to specific model AFM for noise levels measured in EPNdb.

No No A - - -
EICAS MESSAGES DOOR EMER LH (RH) OPEN presented only for the EMBRAER 190. Message associated to proper locking of the over-wing emergency door.
 
No No A - - -
               

EMBRAER 190 to EMBRAER 170 DIFFERENCES - SYSTEMS

        Base Aircraft: EMBRAER 170
Difference Aircraft: EMBRAER 190
 
COMPLIANCE METHOD
 
TRAINING Checking/Currency
SYSTEM
DIFFERENCES FLT
CHAR
PROC
CHNG
Training
Level
Device FLT
CHK
CURR
24 ELECTRICAL POWER Some differences presented on the following List of Relevant Inoperative Items :
  170 190
AC BUS 1 OFF   Loss of Pitch Trim indication
AC ESS BUS  OFF  
  • Loss of Pitch Trim indication
DC ESS BUS 2 OFF Loss of Pitch Trim indication
  •  
DC ESS BUS 3 OFF Loss of Pitch Trim indication and
Loss of AFT LAV SMOKE DETECTION
  •  
AVNX MAU 2B FAIL  
  • Loss of Mach Trim
No Yes A - - -
25 EQUIPMENT / FURNISHINGS 01 Liferaft not present on the EMBRAER 170. No No A - - -
26 FIRE PROTECTION 01 Additional smoke detector on the FWD Cargo Area. No No A - - -
27 FLIGHT CONTROLS

EMBRAER 190 has mach trim feature that is not presented on the EMBRAER 170.

Flaps 3 is available for takeoff.

No No A - - -
28 FUEL

Max usable quantity per tank increased in 1786 kg.

Unusable quantity per tank increased in 8 kg.

Fuel LO LEVEL message trigger point increased in 100 kg.

EMBRAER 170

Max usable quantity per tank = 4714 kg
Unusable quantity per tank = 34 kg
Fuel LO LEVEL message trigger  = 300 kg

EMBRAER 190

Max usable quantity per tank = 6550 kg
Unusable quantity per tank = 46 kg
Fuel LO LEVEL message trigger  = 400 kg

No No A - - -
32 LANDING GEAR
 
 
 
 
 
 

  EMBRAER 170 EMBRAER 190
Extended - VLE - KIAS
  • 250
  • 265
VLO-extension
  • 250
  • 265
VLO-retraction
  • 250
  • 235

Landing Gear Warning Inhibition reactivation TLA (Thrust Lever Angle) values changed.

EMBRAER 170

TL (Thrust Lever) are advanced beyond 45° TLA for two engines.
TL are advanced beyond 59° TLA for one engine inoperative.

EMBRAER 190

TL are advanced beyond 38° TLA for two engines.

TL are advanced beyond 57° TLA for one engine inoperative.

No No A - - -
33 LIGHTS

Three external emergency lights are installed close to the over-wing emergency exits.

Check will be included in the External Inspection task.

No No A - - -
52 DOORS 02 over-wing type 03 emergency exits that were not present on the EMBRAER 170. No     No A       - - -
70 POWER PLANT

EMBRAER 170

CF34-8E5A1

N1 = 99.5% (MAX)
N2 = 58.5 (MIN) ; 99.4 (MAX)
ITT:

  • START = 815°C (MAX)
    NORMAL T/O = 989°C (MAX)
    NORMAL G/A = 965°C
    MAX. T/O and G/A = 1006°C
    MAX. CONTINUOUS = 960°C

CF34-8E5

N1 = 99.5% (MAX)
N2 = 58.5 (MIN) ; 99.4 (MAX)
ITT:

  • START = 815°C (MAX)
    NORMAL T/O and G/A  = 965°C (MAX)
    MAX. T/O and G/A = 1006°C
    MAX. CONTINUOUS = 960°C

EMBRAER 190

CF34-10E51 and CF34-10E61

N1 = 100% (MAX)
N2 = 59.3 (MIN) ; 100 (MAX)
ITT:

  • START = 740°C (MAX)
    NORMAL T/O G/A  = 983°C (MAX)
    MAX. T/O and G/A = 983
    MAX. CONTINUOUS = 960°C

CF34-10E5 and CF34-10E6

N1 = 100% (MAX)
N2 = 59.27 (MIN) ; 100 (MAX)
ITT:

  • START = 740°C (MAX)
    NORMAL T/O G/A  = 947°C (MAX)
    MAX. T/O and G/A = 983
    MAX. CONTINUOUS = 960°C
No No A - - -

EMBRAER 190 to EMBRAER 170 DIFFERENCES – MANEUVERS

         Base Aircraft: EMBRAER 170
Difference Aircraft: EMBRAER 190
 
COMPLIANCE METHOD
 
TRAINING Checking/Currency
MANEUVERS
DIFFERENCES FLT
CHAR
PROC
CHNG
Training
Level

Device

FLT
CHK
CURR
PITCH ANGLES (TO) During Takeoff, in case of flight director is inoperative, the pilot must rotate the airplane according to following table:
. TAKEOFF PITCH
FLAPS POS EMBRAER 170 EMBRAER 190
1 11° 11°
2 10° 11°
3 -
4 12° 12°
No No A - - -
               

EMBRAER 190 TO EMBRAER 175 DIFFERENCES - GENERAL

Base Aircraft: EMBRAER 170
Difference Aircraft: EMBRAER 190
COMPLIANCE METHOD
TRAINING Checking/Currency
DESIGN REMARKS

FLT
CHAR

PROC
CHNG

Training
Level

Device

FLT
CHK

CURR

DIMENSIONS

Increased Dimensions

Length =  + 15 ft (4.55 m)
Height = +2 ft 5 in (0.75 m)
Wing span = + 8 ft 14 in (2.72 m)

EMBRAER 175

Length = 103 ft 11 in (31.68 m)
Height = 32 ft 3 in (9.82 m)
Wing span = 85 ft 4 in (26.00 m)

EMBRAER 190

Length = 118 ft 11in (36.23 m)
Height = 34 ft 8 in (10.57m)
Wing span = 94 ft 3 in (28.72 m)

No No A      
CABIN

Max passenger Capacity increased in 22 seats.

EMBRAER 175 = 86 seats
EMBRAER 190 = 108 seats

The EMBRAER 190 has 02 Type 03 over-wing emergency exits.

No No A      
CARGOS

Increased cargo capacity in + 5.35

EMBRAER 175=  17,25m.cu (total)
EMBRAER 190=  22,60m.cu

No No A      
ENGINES

EMBRAER 190 engines (GE CF 34-10) are a more powerful version of the EMBRAER 175 engines (GE CF 34-08).

Takeoff modes:

EMBRAER 175

CF34-8E5A1: 
T/O-1: 13800 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 14200 lbf)
T/O-2: 13000 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 14200 lbf)
T/O-3: 11700 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 13000 lbf)

CF34-8E5
T/O-1: 13000 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 14200 lbf)
T/O-2: 11700 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 13000 lbf)

EMBRAER 190

CF34-10E6A1 (ISA + 20°C): 
T/O-1: 18500 lbf
T/O-2: 17100 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 18500 lbf)
T/O-3: 15450 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 17100 lbf)

CF34-10E5A1 (ISA + 20°C) 
T/O-1: 18500 lbf
T/O-2: 17100 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 18500 lbf)
T/O-3: 15450 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 17100 lbf)

CF34-10E6 (ISA + 20°C): 
T/O-1: 17100 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 18500 lbf)
T/O-2: 15450 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 17100 lbf)

CF34-10E6 (ISA + 15°C): 
T/O-1: 17100 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 18500 lbf)
T/O-2: 15450 lbf (OEI ATTCS ON: 17100 lbf)

No No A      
LIMITATIONS
Weight

Weight Limitations Increased.

 
  • STD
  • LR
MRW
  • + 10290 kg
  • + 11510 kg
MTOW
  • + 10290 kg
  • + 11510 kg
MLW
  • + 9000 Kg
  • + 9000 Kg
MZFW
  •  + 9100 kg
  • + 9100 kg

STD

  175 190
MRW 37660 kg
  • 47950
MTOW 37500 kg
  • 47790
MLW 34000 kg
  • 43000
MZFW 31700 kg
  • 40800

LR

  175 190
MRW 38950 kg
  • 50460
MTOW 38790 kg
  • 50300
MLW 34000 kg
  • 43000
MZFW 31700 kg
  • 40800
No No A - - -
LIMITATONS
Center of Gravity

Limits for conditions of cruise with flaps and gear ups.

EMBRAER 175

EMBRAER 175 STD = 10 to 25.6% at MTOW
4% to 30% at MZFW

EMBRAER 175 LR = 8.1 to 28.1% at MTOW
4% to 30% at MZFW

EMBRAER 190

EMBRAER 190 STD= 6% to 28.7% at MTOW
6% to 29% at MZFW

EMBRAER 190 LR = 8.8% to 27.5% at MTOW
6% to 29% at MZFW

No No A - - -
LIMITATIONS
Speeds

VLO, VLE according to the table presented on page 09.

VA is diferent according to AFM chart.

Refer to specific model AFM (CAFM) for VMCA and VMCG values.

No No A - - -
NOISE LEVELS

Effective Perceived Noise Levels (EPNL´s) are different.

Refer to specific model AFM for noise levels measured in EPNdb.

No No A - - -
EICAS MESSAGES DOOR EMER LH (RH) OPEN presented only for the EMBRAER 190. Message associated to proper locking of the over-wing emergency door.
 
No No A - - -

EMBRAER 190 to EMBRAER 175 DIFFERENCES - SYSTEMS

         Base Aircraft: EMBRAER 175
Difference Aircraft: EMBRAER 190
 
COMPLIANCE METHOD
 
TRAINING Checking/Currency
SYSTEM
DIFFERENCES FLT
CHAR
PROC
CHNG
Training
Level

Device

FLT
CHK
CURR
24 ELECTRICAL POWER Some differences presented on the following List of Relevant Inoperative Itens :
  175 190
AC BUS 1 OFF   Loss of Pitch Trim indication
AC ESS BUS  OFF  

Loss of Pitch Trim indication

DC ESS BUS 2 OFF Loss of Pitch Trim indication  
DC ESS BUS 3 OFF Loss of Pitch Trim indication and
Loss of AFT LAV SMOKE DETECTION
 
AVNX MAU 2B FAIL  

Loss of Mach Trim

No Yes A - - -
25 EQUIPMENT / FURNISHINGS 01 Liferaft not present on the EMBRAER 170. 
 
No No A - - -
26 FIRE PROTECTION 01 Additional smoke detector on the FWD Cargo Area. No No A - - -
27 FLIGHT CONTROLS

EMBRAER 190 has mach trim feature that is not present on the EMBRAER 170.

Flaps 3 is available for takeoff.

No No A - - -
28 FUEL

Max usable quantity per tank increased in 1786 kg.

Unusable quantity per tank increased in 8 kg.

Fuel LO LEVEL message trigger point increased in 100 kg.

EMBRAER 170

Max usable quantity per tank = 4714 kg
Unusable quantity per tank = 34 kg
Fuel LO LEVEL message trigger  = 300 kg

EMBRAER 190

Max usable quantity per tank = 6550 kg
Unusable quantity per tank = 46 kg
Fuel LO LEVEL message trigger  = 400 kg

No No A - - -
32 LANDING GEAR
 
 
 
 
 
 
  EMBRAER 175 EMBRAER 190
Extended - VLE - KIAS

250

265

VLO-extension

250

265

VLO-retraction

250

235

Landing Gear Warning Inhibition reactivation TLA (Thrust Lever Angle) values changed.

EMBRAER 170

TL (Thrust Lever) are advanced beyond 45° TLA for two engines.

TL are advanced beyond 59° TLA for one engine inoperative.

EMBRAER 190

TL are advanced beyond 38° TLA for two engines.

TL are advanced beyond 57° TLA for one engine inoperative.

No No A - - -
33 LIGHTS

Three external emergency lights are installed close to the over-wing emergency exits.

Check will be included in the External Inspection task.

No No A - -
52 DOORS 02 over-wing type 03 emergency exits that were not present on the EMBRAER 175. No     No A       - -
70 POWER PLANT

EMBRAER 175

CF34-8E5A1

N1 = 99.5% (MAX)
N2 = 58.5 (MIN) ; 99.4 (MAX)
ITT:

  • START = 815°C (MAX)
    NORMAL T/O = 989°C (MAX)
    NORMAL G/A = 965°C
    MAX. T/O and G/A = 1006°C
    MAX. CONTINUOUS = 960°C

CF34-8E5

N1 = 99.5% (MAX)
N2 = 58.5 (MIN) ; 99.4 (MAX)
ITT:

START = 815°C (MAX)
NORMAL T/O and G/A  = 965°C (MAX)
MAX. T/O and G/A = 1006°C
MAX. CONTINUOUS = 960°C

EMBRAER 190

CF34-10E51 and CF34-10E61

N1 = 100% (MAX)
N2 = 59.3 (MIN) ; 100 (MAX)
ITT:

START = 740°C (MAX)
NORMAL T/O G/A  = 983°C (MAX)
MAX. T/O and G/A = 983
MAX. CONTINUOUS = 960°C

CF34-10E5 and CF34-10E6

N1 = 100% (MAX)
N2 = 59.27 (MIN) ; 100 (MAX)
ITT:

START = 740°C (MAX)
NORMAL T/O G/A  = 947°C (MAX)
MAX. T/O and G/A = 983
MAX. CONTINUOUS = 960°C

No No A - -

EMBRAER 190 to EMBRAER 175 DIFFERENCES – MANEUVERS

         Base Aircraft: EMBRAER 175
Difference Aircraft: EMBRAER 190
 
COMPLIANCE METHOD
 
TRAINING Checking/Currency
MANEUVERS
DIFFERENCES FLT
CHAR
PROC
CHNG
Training
Level

Device

FLT
CHK
CURR
PITCH ANGLES (TO) During Takeoff, in case of flight director is inoperative, the pilot must rotate the airplane according to following table:
. TAKEOFF PITCH
FLAPS POS EMBRAER 175 EMBRAER 190
1 11° 11°
2 10° 11°
3 -
4 12° 12°
No No A - - -

APPENDIX 3

ACCEPTABLE DIFFERENCES TRAINING PROGRAM

 

(Reserved)

APPENDIX 3

AIRCRAFT COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

CAR Title Response Comment
605.01 Application N/A  
605.02 Reserved N/A  
605.03 Flight Authority Operator responsibility  
605.04 Availability of Aircraft Flight Manual Embraer provides an AFM, which is a CTA (Brazilian certification authority) approved document. The TCCA approved AFM is the CTA AFM together with a TCCA Supplement, also provided by Embraer, specific for Canadian Requirements. In addition, Embraer will provide an AOM (which will be the primary source for crew consulting), which will serve as basis for the operator to produce and approve its own AOM (also known as FCOM) by operational authorities.  
605.05 Markings and Placards Operator responsibility  
605.06 Aircraft Equipment Standards and Serviceability Operator responsibility  
605.07 Minimum Equipment Lists Embraer provided TCCA with an approved supplement for the CTA approved MMEL. Both documents together compose the TCCA approved MMEL. The development and approval of an operator specific MEL based on the approved MMEL is an operator responsibility.  
605.08 Unserviceable and Removed Equipment - General Operator responsibility.  
605.09 Unserviceable and Removed Equipment - Aircraft with a Minimum Equipment List Operator responsibility.  
605.10 Unserviceable and Removed Equipment - Aircraft without a Minimum Equipment List N/A Operator will approve a MEL for this type of aircraft.
605.11 to .13 Reserved N/A  
605.14 Power-Driven Aircraft - Day VFR

All the related equipment is displayed in the PFD and standby indicator (Airspeed, Altitude, Magnetic Indicator) or at the EICAS (tachometer, oil pressure, oil temperature, fuel quantity, landing gear).

There are 2 independent radio communication systems, contained at the MRCs (2). Controls are contained on the MCDUs (2) and on the MFDs (2). The communication system contains 2 independent VHF antennas. Aircraft also presents an ELT (electronic locator transmitter).

 
605.15 Power-driven Aircraft - VFR OTT  Check paragraph 605.18.  
605.16 Power-driven Aircraft - Night VFR  Check paragraph 605.18.  
605.17 Use of Position and Anti-collision Lights

Use of position and anti-collision lights under operation is an operator responsibility.

One forward red navigation light assembly is installed in the left wing tip; one forward green navigation light assembly is installed in the right wing tip and one rear white navigation light assembly is installed on the aft portion of each wingtip.

The forward navigation light assemblies, red and green, are installed inside a transparent cover and the rear navigation light assemblies, white, are mounted externally. Each navigation light assembly is composed of two lamps. Normally only one navigation lamp is on, while the second lamp is on standby. The lights can be operated by means of the "NAV" switch located in the cockpit overhead External Lights Panel. In case of failure the standby lamps are turned on through the NORMAL / STANDBY switch in the maintenance panel located in the cockpit.

The white strobe light system is considered as the main anti-collision lighting system, with high (white) luminous intensity and consists of two strobe power supplies and the associated strobe light-heads installed in each wingtip. Each strobe power supplies controls to 400 (minimum) effective candelas white strobe lamps installed on each wingtip in the same transparent cover of the navigation lights. The second white strobe light-head is located in the aft navigation light assembly, between the two with lamps, located on the trailing edge portion of each wing tip. The lights are operated by means of the STROBE switch located in the cockpit overhead External Lights Panel.

In case of failure the alternative system, one red beacon light in the upper and another in the lower fuselage provide illumination for visual recognition and collision avoidance during all flight and ground operations. These lights are operated through a labeled RED BCN switch located on the right of the STROBE switch.

 
605.18 Power-driven Aircraft - IFR

All the related equipment is displayed at the PFD and standby indicator (Airspeed, Altitude - 3 data from independent systems, Attitude and slip-skid, Magnetic Indicator, vertical speed, mach number) or at the MFD (SAT, clock). Air data comes from the smart probes, which have a heater system to prevent ice.

Aircraft has duplicate instruments and separate displays (e.g. flight and navigation instruments) for each pilot and separate selectors or other associated equipment where appropriate.

The dual Inertial navigation system and standby attitude operate 360 degrees of pitch and roll. The PFD and the standby display the rate of turn and the slip skid indicators.

Apart from the main dual attitude system, showed at the PFD1 and 2, the aircraft has a third attitude instrument called IES (Integrated Electronic Standby) which   is powered from Essential Bus 2 (supplied by batteries or RAT -Ram Air Turbine), lasting much more than 30 minutes) whereas the PFD1 and 2 are powered from DC buses. Failures on the buses are either self-evident or monitored by the EICAS.

Regarding data sources, the standby receives air data and inertial (self-contained) from independent sources of the main system.

The electrical system has a synoptic display on the MFD showing its status and some of its faults are monitored by the EICAS. The displays are powered from different sources, ranging from battery (e.g. standby), passing to essential (e.g. MFD -DU2) and reaching DC bus (e.g. PFD - DU1) and a power fault often is self-evident (e.g a display turnoff).

There is a dual nav/ comm system. The dual MRC (Modular Radio Cabinet) contains all the radios modules, and, as a consequence there are also 2 ILS and MB.

There are no spare fuses in the ERJ 170.

The landing light system consists of three light assemblies. One lamp is installed in each wing leading edge close to the fuselage and one on nose landing gear strut.

 
605.19 Balloons - Day VFR  N/A Not Applicable for Transport Category Airplane.
605.20 Balloons - Night VFR  N/A Not Applicable for Transport Category Airplane
605.21 Gliders - Day VFR  N/A Not Applicable for Transport Category Airplane
605.22 Seat and Safety Belt Requirements

Pilot and co-pilot seats are qualified by TSO C127a.

These seats are provided with safety belt and shoulder harness that will prevent the head from contacting any injurious object. The passenger, flight attendant and observer seats are qualified by TSO-C127.Each first row seat has safety belts qualified to TSO-C22g. All other passenger seats will have TSO-C22f safety belts.

TSO C127a – Rotorcraft, Transport Airplane, and Normal and Utility Airplane Seating Systems

TSO-C22g – Safety Belts

605.23 Restraint System Requirements  N/A Aircraft will operate equipped in accordance with seat and safety belt requirements of Section 605.22
605.24 Shoulder Harness Requirements

 The pilot, copilot and observer seats in the cockpit will have a single-point release combined safety belt and shoulder harness restraint approved to TSO-C114. There will be a retriever device that retracts the upper seat harness to the unused and stowed position. The seat restraint will not impede the observer to perform their duties or prevent rapid stowage of the seat (observer) and egress of the flight deck in an emergency.

The restraint system for each flight attendant seat will be a TSO-C114 approved combined standard safety belt and shoulder harness unit with a strap over each shoulder. The system will have a single point release buckle. The shoulder harness will have an inertia reel that will retract the harness to the stowed position when not in use. In the stowed position, the excess strap is coiled in the mechanism of the inertia reel so that it does not create a hazard that could trip or snag evacuees during an emergency egress.

TSO-C114 – Torso Restraint Systems
605.25 General Use of Safety Belts and Restraint Systems Operator responsibility.  
605.26 Use of Passenger Safety Belts and Restraint Systems  Operator responsibility.  
605.27 Use of Crew Member Safety Belts  Operator responsibility.  
605.28 Child Restraint System A supplementary loop belt or other restraint device will be provided for each infant, according to specifications. Not authorized in Canada.
605.29 Flight Control Locks  N/A. The specified Flight Control Locks are not presented in the aircraft.
605.30 De-icing or Anti-icing Equipment  Aircraft is transport category type certificated for operation under icing conditions, equipped with means for the prevention or removal of ice on windshields, wings, empennage, engine nacelles, and other parts of the airplane where ice formation will adversely affect the safety of the flight.  
605.31 Oxygen Equipment and Supply

Crew Oxygen System:
The sweep on full face mask with approved TSO´s provides adequate protection to the flight crew from smoke and harmful gases while on flight deck duty; The flight crew full face mask provides oxygen for a 2-hour operation; the flight crew oxygen system is segregated from the cabin oxygen system and the quantity is indicated in the cockpit; the crew oxygen system comprises sweep on full face pressure demand masks TSO approved above 40,000 ft and up to 45,000 ft; the regulator featured on the crew oxygen  mask is certified in accordance with TSO C89, providing 98% of oxygen when breathing 20 LPM BTPS above 35,000 ft; the cockpit is equipped with three independent demand-type oxygen regulators, masks and mask stowage boxes; it can be donned, with one hand, properly secured and sealed and provide adequate oxygen flow up to 41,000 ft within 5 seconds; it features a communication system which enables external and internal communication; its design does not interfere with eyeglasses;

Passenger Oxygen System:

The oxygen flow rate for the passenger oxygen system is approved by Certification Authority through design review and laboratory tests to operate above 40,000 ft; the passenger cabin is provided with supplemental oxygen for the occupants; there are flow indicators on both the passenger and the portable oxygen cylinders to indicate sufficient flow; the passenger oxygen masks will be certified to TSO C64a; individual chemical generators are used to provide oxygen for the passenger and flight attendants in their seated positions; portable oxygen cylinders of continuous flow type is provided for use by the crew and for passenger therapeutic use; the oxygen dispensing units are automatically presented and immediately available to each occupant before the cabin pressure altitude exceeds 15,000 ft; oxygen flow from the mask starts automatically only after the mask is pulled to the face for donning; the total number of dispensing outlets exceeds the number of seats by 10% , with the excess number distributed uniformly along the cabin; dispensing units are provided in the galley areas, cabin attendants seats and lavatories;

The amount of supplemental oxygen, as described above, takes in consideration (in case of a cabin pressurization failure) the emergency procedures specified at the AFM.

TSO C116 (PBE), TSO C58a; TSO C78; TSO C89; TSO C99 (Crew oxy Mask) 
TSO C64a (Pax Mask), TSO C116 (PBE)
605.32 Use of Oxygen Operator responsibility.  
605.33 Flight Data Recorder and Cockpit Voice Recorder Requirements

 The DVDR (Digital Video and Data Recorder) system combines an FDR (Flight Data Recorder) and a CVR (Cockpit Voice Recorder) into a single DVDR unit.

There are two DVDR units installed in the aircraft. The DVDR unit is capable of recording the most recent 120 minutes (2 Hours) of Audio information from 4 input channels, 1 from the cockpit area microphone and 3 from the primary crew microphones. Audio information includes voice communication transmitted from or received by the flight deck, attached radios, audio signals from each boom or mask microphone in use, voice communication of flight-crew members using the interphone system, voice or Nav ident signals introduced into the headset or speaker, and voice communication of flight-crew members using the Passenger Address system.

The DVDR operates continuously for 25 hours for data.
The DVDR will automatically start recording CVR data as soon as power is applied to the unit, and will continue until power is removed from the unit.

Each DVDR includes an underwater locating beacon.

 
605.34 Use of Flight Data Recorders and Cockpit Voice Recorders

Aircraft is provided with an approved DVDR system, as stated on Section 605.33 above.

Correct use of this DVDR is an operator responsibility.

Aircraft has an approved MMEL, which specifies the DVDR dispatchability conditions that request a minimum of one operating DVDR.

 
605.35 Transponder and Automatic Pressure-Altitude Reporting Equipment

ATC transponder installed on the aircraft is mode S and compliant with TSO C-112.

The dual Mode S XPDR system enables secondary surveillance by transmission of aircraft identification information, altitude (barometric, used for altitude keeping) and coded message data to Air Traffic Control (ATC) ground stations and Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) installations on other aircraft.

 
605.36 Altitude Alerting System or Device The aircraft has an altitude alert monitor that compares the current barometric altitude with the pre-selected altitude. When the difference is below a certain range the aural (aural message) and visual alert (selected altitude blinks) is active.  
605.37 Ground Proximity Warning System

EGPWS has a functional TSO compatible with C92c and C151b (class A).

The EGPWS uses aircraft position information, aircraft configuration information, and terrain database information to provide the flight crew with increased awareness of the terrain along the projected flight path.

EGPWS consists of a Forward Looking Terrain Awareness Function, a Terrain Clearance Floor Function, Ground Proximity Warning Function Modes 1 through 6, and a Terrain Awareness Display.

The system provides the flight crew with sufficient information and alerting to detect a potentially hazardous terrain situation that would permit the flight crew to take effective action to prevent a Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) event.

The Forward Looking and Terrain Clearance Floor functions of the EPGWS compares the aircraft current position using both lateral and vertical positional information and flight path with the terrain database to determine if there is a potential threat of collision with terrain, as defined by the alerting algorithm.

The EGPWS provides appropriate visual and aural discrete signals for alerting. The EGPWS also provides terrain information to be presented on a display system, which depicts the terrain of interest.

The Terrain Awareness function is always enabled.


TSO C151a (Terrain Awareness and Warning System).
605.38 ELT

The aircraft ELT system transmits a standard emergency swept tone on the 121.5/243MHz transmitter and the aircraft identification code or serial number of the transmitter, country code and I.D code on the 406MHz transmitter.

The 406MHz transmitter transmits for 24 hours every 50 seconds for 520 milliseconds and then is automatically shut down. The 121.5/243 MHz transmitter transmits continuously until the battery is drained which takes approximately 72 hours.

The ELT/NAV Interface unit is optional and has the capability to send position data (latitude & longitude) to the ELT unit for transmission to the satellite when activated. The ELT is located in the aft part of the aircraft.
Canadian registration for each ELT is an operator responsibility.

 
605.39 Use of ELT Operator responsibility.  
605.40 ELT Activation Operator Responsibility.  
605.41 Standby Attitude Indicator

A PFD (Primary Function Display) will be installed at each pilot station to provide an indication of bank and pitch. An integrated standby instrument will be installed between the flight crew stations to provide bank and pitch indication.

A PFD will be installed at each pilot station to provide an indication of direction (gyroscopically stabilized, magnetic, or nonmagnetic).

Apart from the main dual attitude system, showed at the PFD1 and 2, the aircraft has a third attitude instrument called IES (Integrated Electronic Standby).

 
605.42 to .83 Reserved  N/A Requirement reserved.
605.84 Aircraft Maintenance - General Operator responsibility.
It is an operator responsibility to comply with type design airworthiness limitations and applicable airworthiness directives (AD).
 
605.85 Maintenance Release and Elementary Work Operator responsibility.  
605.86 Maintenance Schedule

Operator responsibility.

In order to support the operator, Embraer issues a Maintenance Program Data - MPD, for the aircraft. The MPD is based on the CTA approved Maintenance Review Board - MRB, with additional Embraer recommended maintenance instructions.

The MPD will have a dedicated P/N for each customer.
MRB-1621
605.87 Transfer of Aeronautical Products between Maintenance Schedules  Operator responsibility.  
605.88 Inspection after Abnormal Occurrences  Operator responsibility.  
605.89 to .91 Reserved  N/A Requirement reserved.
605.92 Requirement to Keep Technical Records  Operator responsibility.  
605.93 Technical Records - General  Operator responsibility.  
605.94 Journey Log Requirements  Operator responsibility.  
605.95 Journey Log - Carrying on Board  Operator responsibility.  
605.96 Requirements for Technical Records Other Than the Journey Log  Operator responsibility.  
605.97 Transfer of Records  Operator responsibility.  
605.98 to .110 Reserved  N/A Requirement reserved
705.01 Application N/A  
705.02 Aircraft Operation Operator responsibility.  
705.03 Operations Manager Operator responsibility.  
705.04 Holder of More Than One Certificate Operator responsibility.  
705.05 and .06 Reserved N/A  
705.07 Issuance or Amendment of Air Operator Certificate Operator responsibility.  
705.08 Contents of Air Operator Certificate Operator responsibility.  
705.09 General Conditions of Air Operator Certificate Operator responsibility.  
705.10 to .15 Reserved N/A  
705.16 Exceptions N/A Not applicable for Embraer transport category aircraft.
705.17 Operating Instructions Operator responsibility.  
705.18 General Operational Information Operator responsibility.  
705.19 Scheduled Air Service Requirements Operator responsibility.  
705.20 Operational Control System Operator responsibility.  
705.21 Flight Authorization Operator responsibility.  
705.22 Operational Flight Plan Operator responsibility.  
705.23 Maintenance of Aircraft Operator responsibility.  
705.24 Checklist Operator responsibility.  
705.25 Fuel Requirements Operator responsibility.  
705.26 Extended Range Twin-engined Operations Operator responsibility. Aircraft is not yet certified for ETOPS.
705.27 Admission to Flight Deck Operator responsibility.  
705.28 Seats for Cabin Safety Inspectors Operator responsibility.  
705.29 Flight Crew members at Controls Operator responsibility.  
705.30 Simulation of Emergency Situations Operator responsibility.  
705.31 Crew Member Briefing Operator responsibility.  
705.32 VFR Flight Obstacle Clearance Requirements Operator responsibility.  
705.33 VFR Flight Weather Conditions Operator responsibility.  
705.34 Take-off Minima Operator responsibility.  
705.35 No Alternate Aerodrome - IFR Flight Operator responsibility.  
705.36 VFR OTT Flight Operator responsibility.  
705.37 Routes in Uncontrolled Airspace Operator responsibility.  
705.38 Instrument Approach Procedures Operator responsibility.  
705.39 Weight and Balance Control Operator responsibility.
Embraer provides weight and balance limitations in the approved AFM and W&B manuals.
 
705.40 Passenger and Cabin Safety Procedures Operator responsibility.  
705.41 Flight Attendant Stations

The flight attendant and observer seat is qualified by TSO-C127.

These seats are provided with safety belt and a TSO C114 qualified shoulder harness that will prevent the head from contacting any injurious object.

TSO C127a – Rotorcraft, Transport Airplane, and Normal and Utility Airplane Seating Systems 

705.42 Carry-on Baggage The aircraft passenger cabin provides adequately and securely stowage compartments for hand baggage. All baggage and cargo on board, which might cause injury or damage, or obstruct aisles and exits if displaced, can be properly placed in stowages designed to prevent their movement. Each overhead bin and stowage compartments was tested and analysed being placarded for the maximum approved content weight.  
705.43 Briefing of Passengers Operator responsibility.  
705.44 Safety Features Card Operator responsibility.  
705.45 Closing and Locking of Flight Deck Door

Operator responsibility.

The flight crew compartment door has a locking system that supports compliance with this requirement.

 
705.46 Night VFR Flight - Aeroplane Operator responsibility.  
705.47 to .53 Reserved N/A Requirement reserved.
705.54 Exceptions Operator responsibility.  
705.55 General Requirements Operator responsibility.
Embraer provides a TCCA approved AFM, which contains all data related to the aircraft approved performance.
 
705.56 Take-off Weight Limitations Operator responsibility.  
705.57 Net Take-off Flight Path Operator responsibility.  
705.58 Enroute Limitations with One Engine Inoperative Operator responsibility.  
705.59 Enroute Limitations with Two Engines Inoperative N/A Embraer aircraft is twin engine equipped.
705.60 Dispatch Limitations: Landing at Destination and Alternate Aerodromes
 
Operator responsibility.  
705.61 Dispatch Limitations: Wet Runway - Turbo-Jet-Powered Aeroplanes Operator responsibility.  
705.62 to .66 Reserved N/A Requirement reserved.
705.67 General Requirements

(a) The aircraft complies with the requirement for static pressure system, being equipped with externally vented static pressure system (4 ADSP smart probes). The Static Pressure sensors (ADSP) are certified in accordance with TSO-C16/A1 (Airspeed Tubes (Electrically Heated)) and TSO C88a (Automatic Pressure Altitude Reporting Code Generating Equipment). Aircraft is designed to have 3 independent air data systems.
(b) Aircraft is provided with required windshield wiper system.

Each pilot station is equipped with airworthiness approved windshield wipers designed to provide a clear landscape view under precipitation conditions.

(c) The inlet anti-ice system is capable of limiting the ice build up to less than the critical size defined in the engine certification requirements.

(d) Aircraft has no doors along the access between the passenger compartment and the emergency exits. There are provisions for installation of a moveable class divider curtain in the cabin, which must be stowed during taxi, take-off and landing conditions. With the curtains in the stowed position, the exit locator signs in the ceiling are readily visible.

(e) This requirement is applicable to the aircraft lavatories. Each lavatory door has a locking mechanism that can be unlocked by the flight attendant from the cabin. The mechanism is hidden behind a small hinged cover in front of the lavatory door and can be accessed and unlocked by the flight attendant without using any tools. The height of the lock is approximately at chest level to allow ease of operation.

TSO-C16/A1 (Airspeed Tubes (Electrically Heated))
 
TSO C88a (Automatic Pressure Altitude Reporting Code Generating Equipment),
 
705.68 Landing Lights The landing light system consists of three light assemblies. One lamp is installed in each wing leading edge close to the fuselage and one on nose landing gear strut. These lights can be operated by means of independent switches “LEFT, NOSE and RIGHT” located in the overhead External Lights Panel.  
705.69 Operations of Aircraft in Icing Conditions Aircraft is TCCA certification validated as a transport category airplane, therefore complying with icing certification requirements. This includes means to illuminate/detect formation of ice.  
705.70 Weather Radar Equipment Aircraft is equipped with an airborne weather radar, compliant with TSO C63c.  
705.71 Protective Breathing Equipment (PBE)

The aircraft is provided with TSO-C116 qualified Protective Breathing Equipment. There are at least 2 PBE's located in the passenger cabin and one in the cockpit for the flight crewmembers. All locations are easily accessible to the flight crew. The protective breathing equipment will provide 15 minutes minimum of oxygen per crewmember at a pressure altitude of 8000 feet with a respiratory rate of 30 liters per minute BTPD.

The cockpit is equipped with three independent demand-type oxygen regulators, masks and mask stowage boxes; it can be donned, with one hand, properly secured and sealed and provide adequate oxygen flow up to 45,000 ft within 5 seconds; it features a communication system which enables external and internal communication; its design does not interfere with eyeglasses.

The Crew Oxygen System consists of a sweep on full-face mask with approved TSO C-99, which provide adequate protection to the flight crew from smoke and harmful gases while on flight deck duty. The mask regulator features the EMER (Emergency) Mode which provides 100% oxygen regardless of cabin altitude and the oxygen is delivered at a slight positive pressure, purging the lens for visual and respiratory protection from smoke and fumes.

The flight crew full face mask provides oxygen for a 2-hour operation, the flight crew oxygen system is segregated from the cabin oxygen system and the quantity of oxygen sufficient for cockpit smoke is indicated in the cockpit; the crew oxygen system comprises sweep on full face pressure demand masks TSO C-89 approved up to 45,000 ft.

TSO C64a (Pax Mask), TSO C116 (PBE)
TSO C116 (PBE), TSO C58a; TSO C78; TSO C89; TSO C99 (Crew oxy Mask)  

 
705.72 First Aid Oxygen The aircraft is equipped with oxygen dispensing units for all occupants and an undiluted supply of first aid oxygen sufficient to provide two per cent of the occupants for the entire flight after cabin de-pressurization at cabin pressure altitudes above 8,000 feet.  
705.73 Interphone System The Interphone between the flight crew in the cockpit and the cabin crew in the passenger cabin is independent of the Passenger Address System  
705.74 Public Address System Aircraft is equipped with a Public Address system that functions independently of the interphone system, is accessible for immediate use for both crew members and is installed at each flight attendant station.  
705.75 Crew Member Shoulder Harnesses Pilot, copilot, observer and flight attendant seats are TSO C127a approved. These seats are provided with safety belt and a TSO C114 qualified shoulder harness that prevents the head from contacting any injurious object.

TSO C127a – Rotorcraft, Transport Airplane, and Normal and Utility Airplane Seating Systems

TSO-C114 – Torso Restraint Systems – FA seat / Observer Seat

705.76 Lavatory Fire Protection

Aircraft lavatories are equipped with a smoke detection system, as required.

Each lavatory waste compartment is fully enclosed, self contained and constructed with approved material that resist fires likely to occur under its normal use. The lavatory waste compartment is adopted of fire extinguisher system, as required.

There is a placard on both the inside and the outside of the lavatory door indicating that smoking is not allowed. Each aircraft lavatory has one self-contained removable ashtray outside and inside the lavatory. A "NO SMOKING" placard will be located near the ashtrays located outside and inside the lavatory.

 
705.77 Flammability Requirements for Aeroplane Seat Cushions

All aircraft interior features are qualified and show fully compliance with flammability requirements.

Materials used for seats showed to comply with flammability requirements during equipment qualification (TSO)

 
705.78 Floor Proximity Emergency Escape Path Markings

An independent emergency lighting system is installed consisting of illuminated exit signs, general cabin and exit area illumination, floor proximity escape path marking and exterior emergency lighting. The signs will consist of exit locator signs in the main aisle ceiling panels, and exit markers located in the ceiling panels above each door. The general cabin and exit area illumination will not be part of the main cabin lighting system.

The power supply for the emergency lighting system will be from rechargeable batteries installed in the structure and batteries in the emergency escape slide pack. The battery will be recharged from the aircraft main electrical system, but power to the emergency lighting system is independent.

 
705.79 Flashlight Stowage There is a flashlight stowage provision adjacent to each flight attendant station.  
705.80 Doors and Locks

The flight crew compartment door has a locking system that assures compliance with this requirement. Also, both PA system and the reinforced cockpit door cabin crew control panel assure the requested means of notification for the flight crew.

The flight deck door panels are ballistic resistant, the decompression devices maintain the ballistic resistance characteristics even when deployed. The flight deck door will be demonstrated to resist to a 9mm full metal jacket projetile and a .44 Magnun jacketed hollow point bullet.

 
705.81 Cargo and Baggage Compartment Fire Protection

The cargo compartment is qualified as, and comply with, class C cargo requirements.

There is a separate approved smoke and fire detector system installed for each cargo compartment that is integrated with the master caution/warning system in the cockpit to provide indication to the pilot. The detectors are qualified according to TSO C-1c.
There is an approved built-in fire suppression system installed, which is controlled from the cockpit by discharge switches on the overhead panel.

The cargo compartments are designed to exclude hazardous amounts of smoke, flames, or extinguishing agent from entering into any compartment occupied by passenger or crew. The fwd cargo compartment ventilation system automatically close the ventilation valves in case of fire or smoke detection.

When a fire or smoke condition is detected, the ventilation system in the forward cargo compartment will automatically close the valves that allow air circulation for live animal transportation. For the aft cargo compartment there is no ventilation system available. In both condition there the effectiveness of the fire-extinguisher agent is ensured. Halon concentration test performed demonstrate that any drafts within the compartment does not affect the ability of the agent to control any fire that may occur.

The cargo compartments are lined with fire resistant material.

 
705.82 to .88 Reserved N/A Requirement reserved.
705.89 Megaphones

There are provisions for installation of two megaphones in the passenger cabin: One located on the Aft RH Bulkhead (Doghouse) and another one located on the G2 Galley (Stowage Compartment). A restraint means consisting of a bracket and strap fixed to an interior structure panel is provided. Both megaphones will be readily accessible to the cabin crew in an emergency evacuation situation.

Although EMBRAER 170 and EMBRAER 190 have provisions for 02 megaphone installations depending on its interior configuration, the CAR 705 requires just one megaphone for airplanes from 61 up to 99 PAX seats. Therefore, Canadian operators are required to comply with just one megaphone.

It is an operator responsibility to elect its location of megaphone installation and to show adequate compliance with operational requirements for its national authority, according to each aircraft interior configuration.

 
705.90 First-Aid Kits Operator responsibility.
Aircraft has provisions for installation of adequate first-aid kits, readily accessible and clearly indicated by placards.
 
705.91 Emergency Medical Kit N/A
 
Aircraft has a seat configuration of less than 100 passengers. 
705.92 Crash Axe Aircraft has one crash axe in the cockpit, not accessible to the passengers.  
705.93 Hand-Held Fire Extinguishers

There will be four fire extinguishers located and evenly distributed in the passenger compartment. The extinguishers will be located in the cabin for use in the galleys. Two will be located in the forward cabin and two in the aft. There will be one portable fire extinguisher on the cockpit for the flight crew, which can be easily accessible in all flight phases. The quantity of extinguishing agent will be appropriate for the kinds of fires likely to occur in the cockpit and passenger cabin.

 The hand fire extinguisher used in the aircraft has a standard configuration equipped with 2.5 lbf Halon 1211/1301. These extinguishers will have a Underwriters Laboratory rating of 5-B:C and are appropriate for grease or electrical fires.

5 lbf of Halon in the forward cabin and 5 lbf in the aft cabin will be sufficient and suitable to combat Class A paper or plastic fires in the galleys areas. 

Hand fire extinguishers are installed in appropriate quick operating stowage provisions, which are readily accessible and clearly indicated by placards, therefore not interfering with the safe operation of the airplane.

No hand-held fire extinguisher is installed in the cargo compartments since they are class C and are not accessible in flight.

 
705.94 Portable Oxygen

The passenger cabin is provided with supplemental oxygen for the occupants. There are flow indicators on both the passenger and the portable oxygen cylinders to indicate sufficient flow. Portable oxygen cylinders of continuous flow type are provided for use by the crew and for passenger therapeutic use.

The amount of supplemental oxygen takes in consideration (in case of a cabin pressurization failure) the emergency procedures specified at the AFM.

Also according to AFM procedures, during an emergency descent due to cabin decompression, the cabin attendants will not leave their seats until the plane has levelled off at a reduced altitude. At that time, the attendant may leave her (his) seat and access the portable oxygen cylinders. The protective breathing equipment will provide 15 minutes minimum of oxygen per crewmember at a pressure altitude of 8000 feet with a respiratory rate of 30 liters per minute BTPD.

 
705.95 Survival Equipment N/A  
705.96 Inspection Requirements Operator responsibility.  
705.97 Flashlights Operator responsibility.  
705.98 to .102 Reserved N/A Requirement reserved.
705.103 Designation of Pilot-In-Command and Second-In-Command Operator responsibility.  
705.104 Flight Attendant Requirements Operator responsibility.  
705.105 Designation of In-Charge Flight Attendant Operator responsibility.  
705.106 Pilot Qualifications Operator responsibility.  
705.107 Flight Engineer and Second Officer Qualifications Operator responsibility.  
705.108 Crew Pairing Operator responsibility.  
705.109 Flight Attendant Qualifications Operator responsibility.  
705.110 Flight Dispatcher Qualifications Operator responsibility.  
705.111 Route and Aerodrome Qualifications Operator responsibility.  
705.112 Check Authority Operator responsibility.  
705.113 Validity Period Operator responsibility.  
705.114 to .123 Reserved N/A Requirement reserved.
705.124 Training Program Operator responsibility.  
705.125 Conditional Approval of Training Program Operator responsibility.  
705.126 Cabin Emergency Evacuation Trainer Operator responsibility.  
705.127 Training and Qualification Records Operator responsibility.  
705.128 to .133 Reserved N/A Requirement reserved.
705.134 Requirements Relating to Company Operations Manual Operator responsibility.  
705.135 Contents of Company Operations Manual Operator responsibility.  
705.136 Distribution of Company Operations Manual Operator responsibility.  
705.137 Aircraft Operating Manual Operator responsibility.  
705.138 Standard Operating Procedures Operator responsibility.  
705.139 Flight Attendant Manual Operator responsibility.  
705.140 to .150 Reserved N/A  
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