Appendix 5 – Kollsman Enhanced Vision System (EVS)

EVS meets the requirements of EFVS (Enhanced Flight Vision System) as defined in FAR 91.175.

Within the United States, flight crewmembers holding a U.S. licence may use EVS to meet the visibility requirements of Title 14 CFR Section 91.175 provided that vertical guidance with reference to an obstacle-free path is used.

Flight crewmember training must include a review of Title 14 CFR Section 91.175 and a review of the associated EVS AFM system description, limitations, and procedures.

Note: The current Transport Canada Regulations CAR 602.128 does not allow this capability of using the EVS, while US operators may be permitted by FAR 91.175 to exercise this capability. An exemption to CAR 602.128 with appropriate conditions or an appropriate amendment to this regulation is necessary for a Canadian operator to exercise this capability.

Flight crewmember training must be accomplished using a level 'C' simulator, with a daylight visual display, or a level 'D' simulator that has been qualified by the National Simulator Program for EVS, or the aircraft. The OEB has determined that each pilot in command of an aircraft equipped with EVS shall receive a minimum of 4 hours of ground school training followed by a minimum of 2 hours of simulator training in the left seat of a level 'C', with a daylight visual display, or level 'D' simulator. An EVS equipped aircraft may also be used in lieu of a simulator for training. In-flight training shall consist of a minimum of 2 hours of flying in the left seat of the EVS equipped aircraft. The flight portion of the training shall consist of a minimum of two (2) day and two (2) night approaches each with vertical guidance.

The OEB recommends special training emphasis in the following areas:

Ground Training:

  1. Title 14 CFR Section 91.175 and a review of the associated EVS AFM system description, limitations, and procedures
  2. Transition from EVS imagery to non-EVS, visual conditions. Maximum use should be made of videotapes of actual EVS approaches as seen through the combiner.
  3. Crew briefings and callouts including annunciation of published minima and operation below the DA(H) or MDA(H) with EVS
  4. Duties of flying and non-flying pilots
  5. Crew coordination
  6. Visual anomalies such as “noise” parallax, and “blooming”
  7. Importance of cross checking the HUD instrumentation presentations against the EVS visual scene presentation to enable the pilot to recognize malfunctions of the ground based ILS equipment and improper presentation of elements in the visual scene during the approach
  8. Use of barometric altitude and/or radio altitude at low heights, including temperature correction if applicable.
  9. Importance of vertical guidance to enhance situational awareness with respect to the obstacle environment.
  10. Importance of ensuring descent on an obstacle-free glide path when operating below the MDA during non-precision approaches.

Flight/Simulator Training:

  1. Transition from EVS imagery to non-EVS, visual conditions and runway acquisition
  2. Crew briefings and callouts including annunciation of published minima and operation below the DA(H) or MDA(H) with EVS
  3. Importance of the “design eye position” in acquiring the proper EVS image
  4. Use of on/off switch “clear” mode
  5. Precision and non-precision instrument approaches in both day and night conditions
  6. Use of caged and uncaged modes in crosswind conditions
  7. EVS repeater (if installed) – Imagery quality and crew coordination.

Checking requires a pilot proficiency check conducted in a level 'C' simulator, with a daylight visual display, in a level 'D' simulator, that has been qualified by the National Simulator Program for EVS, or on an EVS equipped aircraft. The pilot proficiency check will include at least one instrument approach to published minimums and landing utilizing the EVS. This check can be accomplished concurrently with a pilot proficiency check under CASS 724.108 Schedule 1.

Note 1: These EVS requirements assume that a pilot entering an EVS training program is trained and proficient in the use of the aircraft’s HUD in accordance with the requirements of Appendices 3 and 5 of this report. If a pilot is not trained and proficient in the use of the aircraft’s HUD, the HUD training required by Appendices 2 and 4 of this OEB Report may be accomplished concurrently with the provisions of these EVS training requirements.

Note 2: The EVS is also certified for use as an aid during all phases of flight: taxi, takeoff, climb, cruise, descent and landing.

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