Bombardier BD500 (CSeries) – Part 1

Initial Issue

APPROVED:


DATE:

Ron Tidy
Chairman BD500
TCCA Operational Evaluation Board

Transport Canada Civil Aviation
Commercial Flight Standards
Standards Branch
Place de Ville, Tower C, 330 Sparks Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0N8

MANAGEMENT CO-ORDINATION SHEET

Roman Marushko
Program Manager, Flight Technical and Operator Certification
Commercial Flight Standards Division
Standards Branch (AARTF)
Transport Canada, Civil Aviation

Deborah Martin
Chief, Commercial Flight Standards
Standards Branch (AARTF)
Transport Canada, Civil Aviation

Robert Sincennes
Director, Standards Branch (AART)
Transport Canada, Civil Aviation

David Turnbull
Director, National Aircraft Certification Branch (AARD)
Transport Canada, Civil Aviation

REVISION RECORD

Revision No. Sections Date
0 Original 2016-07-12

HIGHLIGHTS OF CHANGE

Reserved

Contents

  1. Purpose and applicability
  2. Pilot type rating designator
  3. BD500 Principal characteristics
  4. BD500 Operational evaluation
  5. Master difference requirements (MDRs)
  6. Acceptable "operator difference requirements" (ODRs)
  7. BD500 Specific pilot training requirements
  8. BD500 Specific checking requirements
  9. BD500 Specific currency requirements
  10. Mixed fleet flying (MFF) requirements
  11. Flight simulation training devices
  12. Operational suitability
  13. References

1. Purpose and applicability

1.1 OEB Report Content

This Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA) Operational Evaluation Board (OEB) report specifies the TCCA pilot qualification requirements (training, checking, and currency) and operational requirements for operating the Bombardier BD500 (marketed as the CSeries) aeroplane under CAR Part VII, Subpart 5 (CAR 705) Airline Operations, and CAR Part VI, Subpart 4 (CAR 604) Private Operators.

This OEB report follows the guidance provided by the JAA/FAA/TCCA Common Procedures Document for Operational Evaluation Boards (CPD) and FAA Advisory Circular AC120-53B. This report also follows Transport Canada guidance and policy contained in applicable Transport Canada Advisory Circulars, Policy Letters and Staff Instructions.

The guidelines and recommendations contained in this report apply to TCCA Inspectors including Principal Operations Inspectors (POIs), and Approved Check Pilots (ACPs) employed by Canadian air operators or private operators.

Provisions of the report:

  1. Definition of the pilot "type rating" assigned to the BD500;
  2. Description of acceptable training program content, training areas of special emphasis , and training device characteristics;
  3. Checking and currency requirements; and
  4. Operational Suitability of the BD500 including the regulatory compliance of the BD500 with the CARs, Advisory Circulars, and other operational requirements.

1.2 OEB Report Comprehensiveness

This report includes:

  1. Recommended minimum requirements for the pilot type rating and operational suitability;
  2. Information which is advisory in general, but should be considered mandatory for particular air operators or private operators, if the designated configurations apply and if approved for that operator; and
  3. Information that is used to facilitate TCCA review of the addition of a new aircraft type or related aircraft for operations by an air operator or private operator.

1.3  OEB Responsibility/Authority

The responsibility for the BD500 OEB resides in the Commercial Flight Standards (CFS) Division of the Standards Branch. The Program Manager of the Flight Technical and Operator Certification (FTOC) is the Office of Primary Interest (OPI) for this OEB. The Program Manager of Airline Standards is the Office of Technical Interest (OTI) for this OEB.

Determinations made in this report are based on the evaluations of specific BD500 aeroplane models and related aeroplanes made in accordance with current regulations, standards and guidance. Modifications and upgrades made to the models described herein, or introduction of new related aircraft, may require amendment of the findings in this report. The OEB reserves responsibility and authority to re-evaluate and modify sections of this report based on new or revised advisory material, amended CARs, aircraft operating experience, or the testing of new or modified aircraft under the provisions of the CPD or FAA AC 120-53B.

1.4 AQP/OEB Report Relationship

Where an air operator has an approved Advanced Qualification Program (AQP), differences between this report and an operator's proposed training, checking, and currency requirements under an AQP should be substantiated and documented as part of the operator's AQP approval process. Program approvals under AQP need to ensure the provisions and requirements of this report have been addressed, and where necessary, coordination with the OEB has been completed.

 1.5 OEB Report Effectiveness

Provisions of this report are effective until amended, superseded, or withdrawn by subsequent OEB findings. This OEB report will be amended and re-issued as further significant developments related to the BD500 and the BD500 training program occur and are evaluated.

1.6  Application of OEB Report

All relevant parts of this report are applicable on the effective date of this report.

1.7 Alternate Means of Compliance

The OEB Chairman, the Program Manager of FTOC and/or the Program Manager Large Aircraft Standards should be consulted when alternate means of compliance, other than those specified in this report, are proposed. An air operator or private operator will be required to submit a proposed alternate means that provides an equivalent level of safety to the provisions of the CARs and this OEB report. Analysis, demonstrations, proof of concept testing, differences documentation, and/or other substantiation may be required.

In the event that alternate compliance is sought, training program credits, simulator approvals, and device approvals may be significantly limited and reporting requirements may be increased to ensure equivalent levels of training, checking, and currency are maintained. TCCA will generally not consider relief through alternate compliance means unless sufficient lead-time has been planned by an operator to allow for any necessary testing and evaluation.

1.8 Regulatory Basis for Application of Pilot Qualification Credits

Reserved.

2. Pilot type rating designator

In accordance with the Personal Licensing and Training Standard 421.40, the Pilot Type Rating Designator assigned to all models of the BD500 is BD500.

The BD500 includes two models; the CS100 and CS300. The CS100 is the initial Entry into Service (EiS) model. The CS300 is similar to the CS100, with a stretched fuselage.

The initial issue of this OEB report applies to the CS100. The OEB report will be revised to document differences between the CS100 and CS300 after completion of the operational evaluation of the CS300.

Aircraft Certification Type Designator

The CS100 is certified by TCCA under Airworthiness Manual (AWM) Chapter 525 as the BD-500-1A10 and is defined in the Transport Canada Type Certificate Data Sheet (TCDS) A-236.

The aircraft certification type designators applicable to the BD500 are as follows:

OEB Report Designator Pilot Type Rating Designator Aircraft Certification Type Designator Models
BD500 BD500 BD-500-1A10 CS100
BD-500-1A11 CS300

3. BD500 Principal characteristics

3.1 BD500

The BD500 is a two-pilot, medium-range, twin-engine aircraft powered by two ultra-high bypass, wing-mounted, turbofan engines.

The CSeries features Fly-By-Wire (FBW) operation controlled by dual sidesticks, Pratt and Whitney PW15000G Geared Turbofan engines, and the widespread use of advanced-material surfaces and structures.

The cockpit incorporates a highly integrated Electronic Flight Instrument System (EFIS) with five large displays, an integrated Electronic Checklist (ECL), and dual Rockwell Collins Flight Management Systems (FMS). The BD500 can be equipped with an optional single or dual Head Up Display (HUD) installation.

The CS100 cabin accommodates 110 passengers in standard seating, a maximum of 125 passengers in high-density, single-class seating, and up to five flight attendant seats, depending on configuration. Two pressurized cargo compartments are located under the cabin floor.

Avionics:

  • Rockwell Collins Fusion Avionics Suite with 5 adaptive LCD Display Units (DU's);
  • Dual FMS, including two GNSS/SBAS receivers providing RNAV and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) capability;
  • MultiScan™ Weather Radar;
  • Three Inertial Reference Systems (IRS) providing attitude heading reference and navigation information;
  • Engine Indication and Crew Awareness System (EICAS);

The maximum certified take-off weight at Entry Into Service (EIS) is134,000 lbs (60,781 kg).

3.2 System Definition and Operation

The following characteristics are incorporated into the BD500 cockpit design and operational philosophy:

  • An Electronic Display system including optional single or dual HUD that provide information, with similar symbology colour coding and display principles;
  • An Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) incorporating an autopilot, flight director, and Auto-Throttle (AT) that provides an integrated automatic flight control system;
  • Standard Normal and Non-Normal Procedures that minimize the impact of system dissimilarities, when dealing with normal and non-normal operations.  The crew responses to CAUTION and WARNING alerts incorporate the same philosophy; and
  • An integrated ECL for the completion of normal and non-normal procedures.

3.3 Related Aeroplanes

Reserved

3.4 Reduced and Low Visibility Operations – Taxi, Take-off and CAT II Approach Capabilities

The BD500 is capable of reduced and low visibility taxi and take-off operations in visibilities as low as 600 feet (175 meters) Runway Visual Range (RVR).   When equipped with a single or dual HUD installation using the LVTO function; the BD500 is capable of taxi and take-off in visibilities as low as 500 feet (150 meters) RVR. The BD500 is capable of CAT II approach operations using HDD, when flown autopilot coupled to the AFCS; or when manually flown using HUD flight director guidance.

Recommended training and checking requirements for reduced and low visibility operations, using head down displays (HDD) are provided in Appendix 5.

Recommended training and checking requirements for reduced and low visibility operations are contained in Appendix 6.

3.5 Head-Up Displays (HUD)

The BD500 can be equipped with an optional single or dual HUD. The Bombardier pilot type training program for the BD500 integrates HUD training through Computer Based Training (CBT), briefings and training in a Full Flight Simulator (FFS) equipped with dual HUD.

The HUD symbology, alerting, and Flight Mode Annunciations (FMAs) are consistent with the PFD.  Training in the FFS integrates the use of the HUD with the primary flight displays (PFD) for all phases of flight. Training, checking and currency requirements specific to the HUD are provided in Appendix 6 of this report.

3.6 Electronic Flight Bag (EFB)

The Bombardier training program incorporates the use of computer tablets as Class I EFBs for ground and flight training. The tablets were affixed to the side windows of the cockpit using suction cup mounts.

The tablet applications include:

  • Bombardier Flight Deck - All BD500 manuals and Jeppesen charts for navigation;
  • Bombadier eLearning - CSeries 100 Pilot Initial training including CBT;
  • Jeppesen Mobile FD – Jeppesen charts (FLIPs) for navigation.

3.7 Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM)

The BD500 Airplane Flight Manual at completion of the Operational Evaluation is AFM BD-500-3AB48-22200-00 (108); Issue No. 002, dated May 31/2016.

3.8 Normal Final Approach Flap Setting

The normal Final Approach Flap Settings for the BD500 (CS100) is Flap 4 or Flap 5.

4. BD500 Operational evaluation

4.1   Transport Canada Evaluation and Acceptance of Bombardier Training Program

The Bombardier BD500 initial pilot type rating training program applicable to the CS100 as described in this report has been determined by TCCA to be acceptable as the basis of an air operator's or private operator's training program. All additional CAR 705, and CASS 725, or CAR 604 pilot qualification, training and checking requirements must be met to qualify an operator's pilots using the Bombardier training program.

4.2 Operational Evaluation Activities of BD500

TCCA and EASA conducted a joint operational evaluation of Bombardier's BD500 (CS100) at Montreal, Quebec in April and May of 2016. This evaluation was conducted in accordance with applicable TCCA and EASA guidance and policy documents, including the JAA/FAA/TCCA CPD, and FAA AC120-53B.

The purpose of TCCA operational evaluation was to establish the pilot type rating, assess the Bombardier's BD500 (CS100) pilot type rating training program, and determine the operational suitability of the BD500 (CS100) for operations by Canadian air operators and private operators.

The BD500 (CS100) initial pilot type rating training program has a 19 training day footprint and includes:

  • Ten days of CBT and Systems Integration (SI) training: The CBT requires approximately 35.5 hours to complete, and includes a quiz after each lesson and an exam after each module. The SI training is conducted in a Level 6 Flight Training Device (FTD) and includes nine three-hour sessions for a total of 27 hours of FTD training.  FTD sessions are preceded by a briefing session followed by a debriefing session. Subject areas are first covered in CBT training followed by practical systems training in the FTD. (The final day of this phase of training can be allocated for written or oral examinations (EASA)).  
  • Nine days of flight training: Flight training is conducted in a CAE FFS qualified to TCCA Interim Level C. FFS training includes seven four hour training sessions for a total of 28 hours. FFS sessions are preceded by a briefing session followed by a debriefing session. The FFS training is followed by a four hour Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) session and then by a five hour Pilot Proficiency Check (PPC) for two Captains.

The OEB evaluated the pilot type rating training program and operational suitability of the BD500:

  • A base training and checking flight in a production representative BD500 (CS100) aircraft which included walk-around training, aircraft familiarization, engine start and shutdown, ground manoeuvres, take-offs, go-arounds, simulated one engine inoperative profiles, and landings.
  • A T5 test in the aircraft. T5 testing was conducted in the production representative BD500 (CS100) aircraft (S/N 50006(P1)). An additional T5 test was conducted in a HUD equipped BD500 (CS100) test aircraft (S/N 50003 (FTV3)) to evaluate the HUD and Direct Law FBW modes. (The production representative aircraft was not equipped with a HUD).
  • Short and long sector operational suitability flights. The short sector operational suitability flights included round robin flights originating from CYMX. The EASA routing for the short sector flight was CYMX-CYQG-CYYB-CYQB-CYHZ-CYHZ. The TCCA routing was CYMX-CYYZ-CYUL-CYHZ-CYMX. The operational suitability flights included use of a terminal gate and "jetway" at CYUL. The long sector flight routing was CYMZ-CYYC-CYMX. The CYYC-CYMX sector was flown at night.

4.3 Functionality Not Evaluated During the OE

Subsequent operational evaluations may require evaluation of functionality that was not available. This includes:

  • Autoland and Category III ILS approach;
  • Extended Range Twin Engine Operations (ETOPS);
  • Predictive Windshear (PWS) alerting;
  • Steep Approach capability;
  • Evaluation of differences from the configuration evaluated during the OE to the EIS configuration; and
  • Differences between the CS100 and CS300 models.

4.4 Bombardier Pilot Qualification Plan (PQP)

Bombardier developed a Pilot Qualification Plan (PQP) for the BD500, which was initially used to guide the process of establishing pilot qualification requirements for the BD500 in accordance with the applicable regulatory requirements for the FAA, EASA (JAA) and TCCA.

The PQP incorporated the content of Operational Evaluation Issue Papers and Operational Review Items (ORIs) into the PQP document. As such, TCCA did not submit ORI's to Bombardier. Any issues arising during the course of the OE were agreed to be addressed by issue papers applicable to the specific issue. The PQP was revised periodically prior to the actual OE activity as various stages were completed.

4.5 Bombardier Manuals, Training Material and Flight Training Devices

4.5.1 Manuals and Training Material:

The following manuals and training materials were evaluated:

  1. BD500 Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) BD-500-3AB48-22200-00 (108); Issue No. 002, dated May 31/2016;
  2. Model BD-500-1A10 Flight Crew Operating Manual Volume 1 at Issue 002, April 07/2016;
  3. Model BD-500-1A10 Flight Crew Operating Manual Volume 2 at Issue 008, April 08/2016;
  4. Model BD-500-1A10 Operational Evaluation Quick Reference Handbook QRH at Issue 8, April 08/2016;
  5. Pilot Reference Manual Volume 1 (BD-500-1A10) draft; and
  6. Pilot Reference Manual Volume 2 (BD-500-1A10) draft.

4.5.2 Training Devices

Training was conducted on fixed base and full motion training devices.

  1. 1. Flight Training Device (FTD);

The FTD is a fixed base training device using aircraft hardware and software for the purpose of systems integration and limited procedures training. The FTD is qualified by Transport Canada as a Level 6 FTD.

  1. 2. Full Flight Simulator (FFS);

The full motion FFS is a CAE manufactured device qualified by Transport Canada to Interim Level C. The FFS is equipped with dual HUD.

5. Master difference requirements (MDRs)

Reserved.

6. Acceptable "operator difference requirements" (ODRs)

Reserved.

7. BD500 Specific pilot training requirements

7.1 Prerequisites and Assumptions Regarding Previous Experience

The provisions of this section apply to training programs for pilots who have experience in CAR 705 airline, CAR 604 private operator or equivalent operations in multi-engine transport turbojet aeroplanes. Pilots undergoing the initial type training program will benefit from prior experience with the systems such as AFCS, AT, FMS, EICAS, HUD, ECL and EFBs; and highly integrated avionics systems with electronic flight displays. Additional training requirements may be necessary as determined by the POI and the OEB, for pilots not having this experience.

7.2 Bombardier BD500 Initial Pilot Type Training

The basic training footprint for the initial type training course is provided in Appendix 7. TCCA retains the Bombardier course syllabus on file.

The use of the dual HUD is integral to the flight training portion of the initial type training program and was evaluated.  Appendix 6 provides specific pilot qualification requirements for the HUD.

The initial type training program covers the use of Jeppesen charts and aircraft manuals provided on the tablet computers used as Class I EFBs.

7.3 Transport Canada Regulatory Training Requirements

In addition to the content of the Bombardier BD500 type rating training program, Canadian operators of the BD500 seeking an approved Level D training program must meet all of the applicable training requirements of CAR 705 and CASS 725, or CAR 604. Operators should develop a compliance matrix to ensure all required training requirements, in addition to the Bombardier BD500 initial pilot type rating training course are provided:

7.4 Recurrent Training

The OEB has not evaluated recurrent training developed by Bombardier for the BD500.

Recurrent training should include appropriate training in accordance with CAR 705 and CASS 725, or CAR 604, and should include the Training Areas of Special Emphasis.

Appropriate emphasis should be placed on systems and procedures that may not have been used frequently.

Emphasis should also be placed on manual flight with minimum use of automation, to refresh basic manual flying skills, because of the l extensive use of automation during normal operations. Manual flight should include exposure to flight with the FBW flight control system in Normal Law and Direct Law, and should include recovery from stall and airplane upset.

For those operators utilizing the optional HUD, recurrent training and operations should take into account operation with and without the use of HUD on a regular basis, to maintain proficiency for flight without HUD.

7.5 Differences Training - General

Reserved

7.6 Training Areas of Special Emphasis

Training areas of special emphasis are intended to provide increased focus on areas of training specific to the BD500. Training areas of special emphasis also apply to the highly integrated avionics and systems of the BD500, and the high altitude operating environment of the BD500.

Note: Checking Areas of Special Emphasis are provided in Section 8.3

The following areas should receive special emphasis in all BD500 training programs as identified during:

  • Ground training (G) such as CBT;
  • Systems Integration (SI) training such as in the FTD, and
  • Flight training (F) in the FFS or aeroplane.

7.6.1 Automation and Flight Guidance

  • AFCS and AT speed protections – AFCS vertical modes that do not provide speed protections and conditions for auto-throttle activation to provide speed protections (G,SI,F);
  • Visual Approaches - Appropriate Flight Director Pitch Modes, Flight Director Selections and AT modes for conducting visual approaches or conducting visual approaches where flight guidance is not intended to be followed (F);
  • AT on and manual operations (including maintenance of commanded speeds) (G, SI,F);
  • Appropriate use of approach guidance applicable to a type of instrument approach procedure; e.g. appropriate lateral and vertical AFCS mode selections; (G,SI,F);
  • Selection of appropriate level of automation for phase of flight (F);
  • Confirmation and monitoring of AFCS and AT mode selections through Head Down Displays (HDD) and/or HUD FMAs (SI,F);
  • Flight Director cannot be deselected during an ILS approach when below approximately 1500 feet AGL (F).

7.6.2 Avionics and Flight Displays

  • Electronic displays, normal, reversionary modes and degraded operations (G, SI, F);
  • Proper selection and use of map displays, raw data, flight director, and AFCS during instrument approaches (SI,F);
  • Procedures for use of alternate navigation and communication using the Control Tuning Panel (CTP) or the Multi-Function Window (MFW) CNS-Tune and MFW Map pages (G,SI,F);
  • Appropriate use of airport moving map during ground manoeuvring, if applicable (F);
  • Optional IFIS and optional HUD, if applicable (G,F);
  • ACARS and CPDLC functionalities, if applicable (F);
  • Flight Path Vector, Flight Director, aircraft symbol, airspeed trend vector, acceleration cue, and speed error tape (G,SI,F);.
  • Integrated use of EICAS messages, switch positions and synoptic pages to determine aircraft system status (SI,F);
  • TAWS loss of terrain mode when making MFW selections (SI,F).

7.6.3 Electronic Check List (ECL)

  • Use of Electronic Checklists (ECL) during normal, non-normal and emergency procedures and crew coordination (SI,F);
  • Appropriate use of ECL Notes and deferred checklist items (SI,F);
  • Determination of deferred items that are applicable in the event of multiple non-normal checklists that each have different deferred items (SI,F);
  • Appropriate use of back-up checklists for specific checklists or in case of loss of ECL (SI,F);
  • Confirmation of correct checklist when conducting a checklist from the backup checklists to the ECL (SI,F);
  • Requirement for confirmation of a system response to an ECL checklist item on the EICAS, as the ECL only senses switch position (SI,F).

7.6.4 Flight Control Systems

  • Functionality and use of the side stick controllers with special emphasis on the relationship between the two controllers, dual inputs, priority switching, transfer of control, and AP engagement (G,SI,F);
  • FBW normal and direct modes, associated flight envelope protections/degradations (G,SI,F);
  • Aircraft handling and manoeuvres (including manual flight, high altitude, high and low speed flight characteristics) (F);
  • Pitch trim functionality, aircraft response to trim and side stick control inputs and interaction with AP engagement ((G,SI,F);
  • Procedures for resetting the Primary Flight Control Computers (PFCCs) during a FLT CTRL DIRECT Caution EICAS message resulting from an airplane upset (SI,F).

7.6.5 Flight Deck Design

  • Tactile characteristics of switch-lights on the electrical overhead panel to confirm switch position when the respective generators are unpowered (SI,F);
  • Indications and logic for the EXT PWR switch-light for connecting and disconnecting external power (G,SI,F);
  • Lifting the EDM guard may result in inadvertent selection of the Flight Direct XFR switch on the FCP(SI,F);
  • Two hundred foot radar altitude aural could result in a delay of the baro "Minimums" aural during a Category I ILS approach with a two hundred foot DA (SI,F).

7.6.6 Flight Management Systems

  • Appropriate use of speed selection modes and intervention (manual vs FMS Speed), (SI,F);
  • FMS logic for commanding airspeeds for flap configuration and mitigations to avoid speed commands below the maneuver speed for a specific flap configuration (G,SI,F);
  • Procedures to resolve an FD FAIL(C) message when selecting TOGA after programming FMS performance for take-off (SI,F);
  • Verification of waypoints for approach procedures specific to area of operation (SI,F);
  • Verification of waypoint altitude and speed constraints during STAR and approach procedure and possible adjustment of constraints for closely spaced waypoints (SI,F);
  • Procedures for applying cold temperature corrections and compensation to FMS waypoints for all instrument approach operations (SI,F);
  • Procedures specific to the different type of approaches loaded from the FMS (SI,F);
  • Procedures to change a destination airport when in close proximity to the departure airport (SI,F);
  • Alternate procedures to set climb thrust for an NADP1 noise abatement profile (SI,F);
  • FMS AFM limitations including:
    • Manual selection of Vref (G,SI,F);
    • Sending of takeoff speeds from both FMS's prior to takeoff (SI,F);
    • Sending of approach speeds from the coupled side FMS (SI,F);
    • Prohibition to use certain FMS functions (such as VSD, MAN speed set to V2 on FCP NADP, TACAN and L/V approaches, LRC speed schedule, PERF-CRZ-STEP cost index ECON, descent CONTINUOUS, etc.) (SI,F).
  • Computerized AFM Data (CAFM), weight and balance, QRH performance dispatch data in conjunction with FMS calculated aircraft performance data; (G,SI,F);
  • Approach functionality and limitations (e.g. regarding circling approaches / sidestep landings initiated below 2000ft AGL from ILS approach) (G,SI,F);
  • LPV approach, if applicable (G,SI,F).

7.6.7 Maneuvers / Operations

  • Manual flight of the aircraft with the minimal use of automation during take-off and landing, and FBW demonstrations (F);
  • Recommended flap retraction/extension in accordance with F speeds posted on the PFD/HUD and possibility the F speeds may not be correctly posted or displayed where expected (SI,F);
  • Low altitude level-offs after an All-Engine-Operative (AEO) take-off or go-around (F);
  • Stall and Upset Prevention and Recovery Training in normal and direct modes (including handling qualities and procedures from wake vortex encounter and loss of control incidents) (G,SI,F);
  • Commonality between stall and upset recovery procedures (F);
  • Appropriate use of the aircraft symbol vs. the Flight Path Vector (FPV) during stall and airplane upset recoveries (SI,F);
  • Windshear recovery with and without windshear recovery guidance (including predictive and reactive wind shear guidance) (G,SI,F);
  • TAWS / EGPWS modes and functionality (including Look-ahead Terrain function, the loss of terrain mode when making MFD selections, and airports not contained in the database) (G,SI,F);
  • TCAS functionality and procedures (G,SI,F);
  • Procedures for establishing an engine inoperative drift-down (F);
  • Monitoring of braking and performance and deceleration devices during Rejected Take-off (RTO) and landing and appropriate interventions (F);
  • Operation in icing conditions (including awareness for Vspeed adjustments in case of ice encounters) and cold soak ground procedures and limitations (G,SI,F).

7.6.8 Non-Normal Procedures

  • AT failure operations (including maintenance of commanded speeds) (SI,F);
  • Immediate actions to follow in the event of unreliable airspeed and use of unreliable airspeed checklist (F) ;
  • ADS system (including ADS probe failures and PFD/ISI indications)
  • Slat / flap failures (reduced high alpha protection and pitch authority) (SI,/F);
  • Appropriate use of alternate checklists for of smoke/fire/fumes, smoke or fumes removal and emergency evacuation procedures (SI,F);
  • Differences between NORMAL BRAKE FAIL(C) and BRAKE FAIL(C) procedures on ground. Both procedures require immediate actions to stop the aircraft when on ground (SI, F);
  • Appropriate application of three different checklists associated with an emergency descent (SI,F);
  • EICAS messages associated with engine failures, including associated systems, and sequencing and priority of messages (SI,F);
  • Recognition and handling of EICAS messages that are deemed to be "nuisance" messages (SI,F);
  • A clear understanding of the criteria for a precautionary shutdown during an engine shutdown procedure (SI,F).

7.6.9 Thrust Management

  • Thrust management and demonstration of delayed engine thrust response to engine thrust commands from idle thrust setting at low and high altitudes (F);
  • Adherence to maximum N2 RPM values to comply with engine cool-down time limits during taxi after landing and in particular for single engine taxi (F);
  • Verification of required N1 values on the EICAS after engine start when the programmed bleed configuration is established (SI,F);
  • Restricted take-off thrust setting procedure (incl. FLEX take-off limitation) (F);
  • Derated and FLEX thrust procedure (incl. contaminated runway / runway width limitations) (F);
  • Start malfunctions on the ground (SI,F).

7.7 Operator Specific Training

Operators should provide training applicable to the operating environment and capabilities of the BD500 and Special Authorizations granted to the operator:

  • Training associated with long range operations (Fatigue, sleep loss and circadian disruption) (G);
  • Specific operating requirements applicable to Performance Based Navigation (PBN) authorized types of airspace and operations including  FANS CPDLC and Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) operation (G,SI,F)
  • Fuel characteristics and fuel temperature management at high altitudes and cold temperatures, such as operations over polar routes (G);
  • All instrument approach types authorized to be flown (SI,F);
  • CAT II instrument approaches (SI,F);
  • Low-visibility take-offs (LVTO) (SI,F).

8. BD500 Specific checking requirements

8.1 Checking Items – General

The checking of knowledge, procedures, and maneuvers specified by CAR 705 and CASS 725 and pertinent to multi-engine turbojet transport aircraft apply to the BD500.

8.2 Regulatory Requirements for Gaining Checking Credits

Reserved.

8.3 Checking Areas of Emphasis

Reserved.

8.4 Non-normal Slat Flap Configurations

The BD500 has redundant slat/flap system features. The demonstration of a slats and/or flap failures for approach and landing during a PPC is not required.

8.5 Steep Turns and Approaches to Stalls

Steep Turns and approaches to stalls are not required to be checked if the specific criteria of Standard 725 Schedule I – Pilot Proficiency Check, Synthetic Training Device are met.

8.6 MMEL/MEL Use

Special attention should be given during flight checking to ensure adequate training is provided to address dispatch with systems operated in alternate/degraded modes. Checking should emphasize the crewmembers' ability to cope with subsequent failure of the next most critical system failure.

8.7 Pilot Proficiency Check (PPC) or Line Operation Evaluation (LOE)

Aircraft knowledge tests should be conducted prior to any proficiency checks. Any procedures and limitations that must be committed to memory should be evaluated by closed book examination for all initial, differences and recurrent training. Aircraft systems and operational knowledge should be evaluated by open book questions corrected to 100%.

The PPC should comply with Standard 725 Schedule I – Pilot Proficiency Check, Synthetic Training Device. The LOE should be conducted in accordance with an approved AQP program for the BD500.  

8.8 Head Up Display (HUD)

Proficiency in the use of HUD (if a single or dual HUD is installed,) should be demonstrated during checking for modes and phases of flight equivalent to those for non-HUD operations. Checking standards for HUD are equivalent to those for non-HUD operations. Required maneuvers should be demonstrated without use of HUD to assess non-HUD skills. (Refer to Appendix 6 for specific checking requirements for HUD).

9. BD500 Specific currency requirements

No additional or specific currency requirements have been identified for BD500, other than those identified in 12.3 and Appendix 6.

10. Mixed fleet flying (MFF) requirements

Reserved

11. Flight simulation training devices

11.1 Standard Devices and Simulators

Device and Simulator characteristics pertinent to BD500 are as designated in TP9685.

11.2 Special Requirements

The POI, the Program Manager FTOC, Program Manager Large Aircraft Standards, the OEB and/or the TTL National Simulator Evaluation Program (NSEP) should be consulted when an operator proposes use of a simulator that has differences from the operator's fleet.

12. Operational suitability

12.1 General

The BD500 has been determined to be operationally suitable for Canadian operations.

TCCA retains on file, compliance checklists with the applicable provisions of CARs 604, 605 and 705.

The BD500 without the optional HUD is capable of take-off in visibilities as low as 600 feet (175 meters) RVR. When using the HUD Low Visibility Take-off (LVTO) function, the BD500 is capable of take-off in visibilities as low as 500 feet (150 meters) RVR. The BD500 is capable of HDD CAT II approach operations, when flown AP coupled to the AFCS; and either manually flown or AFCS coupled using HUD flight director guidance.

The BD500 is capable of FANS (Link 2000+, CPDLC and ADS-C); RNP APCH using LNAV, LNAV/VNAV, or LPV minima; and RVSM operations. The regulatory authorization for these capabilities is available through the applicable Transport Canada Special Authorizations.

12.2 Adverse Weather and Cold Temperature Operations

The BD500 FCOM Vol.2 and PRM Vol. 2 provides guidance for adverse weather operations which includes guidance for operations in cold and hot weather, ground and airborne icing, severe turbulence and windshear.

12.3 Future Air Navigation (FANS)

Flight Crews operating aircraft with FANS capability should receive appropriate instruction in its general operating functions, and appropriate uses for areas of operation, routes or procedures to be flown.

The operator's training program should address Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) functions covered by FANS and Performance Based Navigation (PBN) including RNAV and RNP.  The training program should also provide training in the use of controller pilot data link communication (CPDLC) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) to ensure adequate knowledge and proficiency for flight crews to operate the above systems in typical daily operations. Pilots should maintain currency by using CPDLC functionalities within a 12 month period, either during normal operations, training or checking.

12.4 Forward Observer Seat and Associated Systems

TCCA has determined that the forward observer's seat and associated systems as being suitable for use by TCCA inspectors.

12.5 Aircraft Approach Category and Circling Minima:

The BD500 may be considered to be a Category C aircraft for the purposes of determining "straight-in" landing approach minima. This approach category is assumed by the maximum certified landing weight approach speed in the Flap 4 or Flap 5 landing configuration.

The Bombardier training syllabus includes instrument approaches using a circling procedure to land on another runway. Circling approaches are flown with landing gear down, Flap 4 or Flap 5, and at Vref +10. The approach category and associated approach minima will be determined by the approach/circling speed flown.

The autopilot is available and its use is recommended during circling procedures. The autopilot may be engaged in accordance with all applicable AFM Limitations. An operator's training program for circling procedures should include training in a FFS and include landings and go-arounds from the circling procedure.

13. References

  1. Model BD-500-1A10 Operational Evaluation Airplane Flight Manual at Issue 008, April 8/2016 or later revision;
  2. Model BD-500-1A10 Flight Crew Operating Manual Volume 1 at Issue 002, April 07/2016 or later revision;
  3. Model BD-500-1A10 Flight Crew Operating Manual Volume 2 at Issue 008, April 08/2016 or later revision;
  4. Model BD-500-1A10 Operational Evaluation Quick Reference Handbook QRH at Issue 8, April 08/2016 or later revision;
  5. Pilot Reference Manual Volume 1 (BD-500-1A10);
  6. Pilot Reference Manual Volume 2 (BD-500-1A10);
  7. FAA Advisory Circular AC120-53B, Guidance for Conduction and Use of Flight Standardization Board Evaluations, dated May 11, 2013;
  8. JOEB OPS/FCL Common Procedures For Conducting Operational Evaluation Boards, dated June 10, 2004;
  9. Transport Canada Policy Letters PL 136 ,Operational Evaluations, dated January 29, 2001;

Appendix 1 - Acronymns

The following acronyms are used or relevant to this report:

AARD

(TCCA) National Aircraft Certification Branch

AART

(TCCA) Standards Branch

AARTF

(TCCA) Commercial Flight Standards

AC

Advisory Circular

ACAS

Aircraft Collision Avoidance System

ACP

Approved Check Pilot

ADS

Automatic Dependent Surveillance

AFCS

Automatic Flight Control System

AFM

Aircraft Flight Manual

AP

Autopilot

AT

Auto-Throttle

AWM

Airworthiness Manual

CAR

Canadian Aviation Regulations

CASS

Commercial Air Service Standard

CBT

Computer Based Training

CFS

Commercial Flight Standards

CNS

Communication, Navigation and Surveillance

COM

Company Operating Manual

CPD

JAA/FAA/TC Common Procedures Document for Operational Evaluation Boards

CPDLC

Controller Pilot Data Link Communication

CTP

Control Tuning Panel

DU

Display Unit

EASA

European Aviation Safety Agency

ECL

Electronic Checklist

EFB

Electronic Flight Bag

EFIS

Electronic Flight Instrument System

EGPWS

Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System

EICAS

Engine Indication and Crew Awareness System

EIS

Entry into Service

ETOPS

Extended Range Operations with Two-Engine Airplanes

FAA

Federal Aviation Administration

FANS

Future Air Navigation System

FBW

Fly-by-Wire

FCOM

Flight Crew Operating Manual

FFS

Full Flight Simulator

FMA

Flight Mode Annunciator

FMS

Flight Management System

FPV

Flight Path Vector

FTD

Flight Training Device

FTOC

Flight Technical & Operator Certification

GNSS

Global Navigation Satellite System

GPS

Global Positioning System

HDD

Head Down Display

HUD

Head Up Display

IFIS

Integrated Flight Information System

ILS

Instrument Landing System

IMC

Instrument Meteorological Conditions

IRS

Inertial Reference System

IRU

Inertial Reference Unit

IOE

Initial Operating Experience

JAA

Joint Aviation Authorities

JOEB

Joint Operational Evaluation Board

LCD

Liquid Crystal Display

LOE

Line Operation Evaluation

LOFT

Line Oriented Flight Training

LPV

Localizer Performance with Vertical Guidance

LVTO

Low Visibility Take-Off

MDR

Master Differences Requirements

MFF

Mixed Fleet Flying

MFW

Multi-Function Window

NSEP

National Simulator Evaluation Program

ODR

Operator Differences Requirements

OEB

Operational Evaluation Board

OEI

One Engine Inoperative

OPI

Office of Primary Interest

ORI

Operational Review Item

OTI

Office of Technical Interest

PBN

Performance Based Navigation

PF

Pilot Flying

PFCC

Primary Flight Control Computer

PFD

Primary Flight Display

PL

Policy Letter

PM

Pilot Monitoring

POI

Principal Operations Inspector

PPC

Pilot Proficiency Check

PQP

Pilot Qualification Plan

PRM

Pilot Reference Manual

PWS

Predictive Windshear

QRH

Quick Reference Handbook

RDIMS

Records, Documents and Information Management System

RNAV

Area Navigation

RNP

Required Navigation Performance

RTO

Rejected Take Off

RVO

Reduced Visibility Operations

RVR

Runway Visual Range

SBAS

Satellite Based Augmentation System

SI

Systems Integration

SOP

Standard Operating Procedure

STAR

Standard Terminal Arrival Routing

TAWS

Terrain Awareness and Warning System

TCAS

Traffic Collision Avoidance System

TCCA

Transport Canada Civil Aviation

TCDS

Type Certificate Data Sheet

V1

Take-off decision speed

VMC

Visual Meteorological Conditions

VNAV

Vertical Navigation

Vref

Landing Reference Speed

Appendix 2 - Difference levels


Note: Difference levels are summarised in the table below for training, checking, and currency. (Reference AC 120-53B; Appendix 2, Figure 2)

DIFFERENCE LEVELS
DIFFERENCE LEVEL TRAINING CHECKING CURRENCY
A SELF INSTRUCTION NOT APPLICABLE
(OR INTEGRATED WITH NEXT PROFICIENCY CHECK)
NOT APPLICABLE
B AIDED INSTRUCTION TASK OR SYSTEM CHECK SELF REVIEW
C SYSTEMS DEVICES PARTIAL PROFICIENCY CHECK USING DEVICE DESIGNATED SYSTEM
D MANOEUVRE DEVICES * PARTIAL PROFICIENCY CHECK USING LEVEL 6 OR HIGHER FSTD DESIGNATED MANOEUVRE(S)
E LEVEL C OR D FFS OR AIRCRAFT # PROFICIENCY CHECK USING LEVEL C OR D FFS OR AIRCRAFT DESIGNATED MANOEUVRE(S)

# = A New Type Rating is normally assigned
* = FFS or aircraft may be used to accomplish specific manoeuvres

Appendix 3 – Master difference requirements (MDR) tables

Reserved

Appendix 4 – Example operator difference requirements (ODR) tables

Reserved

Appendix 5 – Reduced and Low Visibility Operations

1.0 Reduced and Low Visibility Takeoff, and Category II Approach

Bombardier has developed a BD500 HDD training program for taxi and take-off during reduced and low visibility operations in visibilities as low as 600 (175 m) RVR, and for HDD CAT II approach operations..

In addition, training can include taxi and take-off in visibilities as low as 500 RVR (175m) using the optional HUD LVTO function, and CAT II approaches using the HUD. The requirements for HUD reduced and low visibility operations, LVTO function, and HUD CAT II approach are provided in Appendix 6.

1.2 Ground Training

Ground training for reduced and low visibility operations, and CAT II approaches are a component of the Bombardier reduced and low visibility operations training. This ground training comprises CBT training followed by an instructor led briefing.

The CBT training is comprised of three lessons which cover the requirements for:

  • Flight Crew and Aircraft;
  • Aerodrome and ground facilities;
  • Procedures and Limitations.

1.3 Flight training

1.3.1 Reduced and Low Visibility Taxi and Take-off Flight Training

Flight training should be conducted to the lowest authorized take-off minima and requires:

  • Taxi and ground maneuvering during reduced and low visibility operations;
  • Normal take-off;
  • Crosswind take-off;
  • Rejected take-off;
  • Engine inoperative take-off.

1.3.2 CAT II Approach Flight Training

Flight training for HDD autopilot coupled CAT II ILS approaches to the lowest authorized minima requires:

  • Descent and approach set-up and preparation;
  • All-engine operative and engine inoperative approaches to a landing and missed approach;
  • Crosswind landings;
  • Continued or discontinued approaches in response to applicable system failures.

2.0 Operator Specific Training

In addition to the initial training described in the preceding, initial and recurrent ground training should include an operator's policies and procedures concerning reduced and low visibility operations including a reporting process, MEL issues, operational considerations following an RTO or missed approach, IOE and currency requirements. Training should be provided on the operational characteristics, capabilities, and limitations of the aerodrome and ground facilities (e.g. Surface Movement Guidance Control System).

Appendix 6 – Head up display (HUD) qualification program

1.0 General

The BD500 may be equipped with an optional single or dual HUD installation. This appendix provides the training, checking and currency requirements for the operational use by operators of a single or dual HUD in all phases of flight.

Additional training and checking is required for operators conducting taxi and take-off operations using the HUD during reduced and low visibility operations, LVTO function, and using the HUD for Category II ILS approaches.

2.0 HUD Training - General

The HUD qualification requirements of this appendix are necessary to meet the requirements of CAR 705 or CAR 604, for the initial type training of Canadian pilots to operate the BD500 using a single or dual HUD in a commercial air service or by a private operator.

2.1 General Requirements

2.1.1 The operator should develop procedures in its Company Operating Manual (COM) for the guidance of its personnel; including:

  1. Normal, non-normal and emergency procedures for all phases of flight for which the HUD is intended to be used;
  2. Procedures for use of the HUD should include crew Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), duties and responsibilities that are specific to each crew position.

2.1.2 Ground and Flight Training should be provided in the operation of the aeroplane using the HUD in all phases of flight and weather conditions for which the operator is certified in its operator certificate and the HUD system is certified in the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM);

2.1.3 Flight training and checking of HUD maneuvers conducted in a flight training device should require the use of a TCCA approved level C or higher BD500 full flight simulator (FFS) equipped with the operator's HUD configuration with day and night visual displays.

2.1.4 HUD training other than the training specified in 2.1.3 should be conducted in a TCCA approved level C or higher BD500 FFS or a Level 4 or higher Flight Training Device (FTD), equipped with the operator's HUD configuration with day and night visual displays.

3.0 HUD Initial Ground Training

3.1 General Requirements

Training for air operators should be conducted in accordance with the applicable provisions of CAR 705.124. Training for private operators should be conducted with the applicable training requirements for CAR 604.

The initial ground training program should include the following elements:

3.1.1 Classroom or CBT instruction covering HUD operational concepts, crew duties and responsibilities and operational procedures including preflight, normal and non-normal operations, and associated indications.

3.1.2 Classroom or CBT instruction on the HUD symbology set and it's inter-relationship with airplane aerodynamics, inertial factors, and environmental conditions and non-normal maneuvers; including comparison to the HDD.

3.1.3 SOPs including, all normal, non-normal and emergency operations applicable to the use of the HUD

3.1.4 AFM, FCOM, PRM or equivalent training material which explains the limitations, all modes of operation, the use of various HUD controls, and a clear description of HUD symbology, including limit conditions and failures.

3.1.5 Flight Crew duties and responsibilities specific to each pilot position including a clear delineation of Pilot Flying (PF) and Pilot Monitoring (PM) duties, responsibilities, procedural call-outs and responses during all phases of flight for which HUD operations are anticipated;

3.1.6 Function and operational use of HUD controls;

3.1.7 Characteristics of HUD unique symbology and indications of limit conditions and failures;

3.1.8 Inter-relationship of HUD symbology with aeroplane aerodynamics and environmental conditions;

3.1.9 All modes of HUD operation during normal, abnormal and emergency operations;

3.1.10 HUD indications and alerts for low airspeed and high angle of attack, excessive airspeed, windshear, TCAS, EGPWS/TAWS and other indications and alerts;

3.1.11 Aircraft system and navigation failures and Minimum Equipment List (MEL) items affecting HUD operation;

4.0 HUD Initial Flight Training

The following flight training program is generic in nature and should not be construed to dictate or limit what the scope or content of the course of instruction. Each operator has their own unique requirements, route structure, fleet composition and operations policies to consider in developing their training program. Therefore, what follows is to be considered a guide to operators who are tailoring a HUD training program to fit their own needs.

4.1 Ground Operations

Flight training for ground operations using HUD should include:

4.1.1 HUD deployment, set up and stowage;

4.1.2 Proper pilot eye reference position;

4.1.3 HUD Pre-flight checks including selection of HUD Take-off Guidance;

4.1.4 Setting of appropriate HUD brightness levels using manual and automatic controls;

4.1.5 Appropriate and effective use of HUD during ground operations and maneuvers;

4.1.6 Taxi using HUD under day, night, reduced and low visibility conditions.

4.2 Airborne Training

Flight Training for in-flight use of HUD should include:

4.2.1 Incorporation of HUD into instrument scan and integration of conventional displays into scan;

4.2.2 Demonstration and explanation of unique HUD symbology and commonality with head down displays;

4.2.3 Demonstration of effects of cross-wind including indications of drift and non-conformal displays;

4.2.4 Manual control of the aircraft including climbs, descents, turns, steep turns, accelerations and decelerations;

4.2.5 Recognition and recovery from an excessive angle of attack including stall warning and low airspeed;

4.2.6 Recognition and recovery from flight at excessive airspeed;

4.2.7 Recognition and recovery from an aeroplane upset/unusual attitude;

4.2.8 Use of HUD with an approved sunvisor or sunscreen under various daytime lighting conditions

4.3 Visual Take-offs, Circuits, Approaches and Landings

Sufficient maneuvers should be flown in visual conditions to demonstrate HUD symbology and use in relation to glide path, centerline control and crosswind conditions. All visual approaches should be flown from no closer than approximately 1,000 feet AGL (3 - 4 NM) to the runway threshold. Flight Training for Visual Take-offs, Circuits, Approaches and Landings using HUD should include:

4.3.1 Take-off, Circuit, Approach and landing in headwind and maximum authorized crosswind conditions;

4.3.2 Take-off, circuit, approach and landing on a moonless or overcast night, over water or over dark featureless terrain where the only visual stimuli are lights on and/or near the airport (black hole effect);

4.3.3 Appropriate use of HUD symbology to establish desired descent angle;

4.3.3 Rejected landing and/or Low Energy Go-around

4.4 Instrument Procedures and Approaches:

Sufficient precision and non-precision instrument approaches, missed approaches and landings with appropriate weather minimums should be flown to gain proficiency in these maneuvers.   All required approaches should be flown from no closer than the final approach fix (FAF). Use of the HUD for circling approaches should be trained (for those operators conducting circling approaches.)

Flight Training for instrument procedures incorporating the use of HUD should include:

4.4.1 Take-off with and without crosswind at the lowest authorized minima;

4.4.2 Holding procedures,

4.4.3 Transition from en-route to instrument approach;

4.4.4 Straight-in, Precision and circling approaches

4.4.5 Setting of appropriate HUD brightness for different approach lighting systems.

4.4.6 Landings from Straight-in, Precision and circling approaches to lowest authorized IFR landing minimums with and without crosswind;

4.4.7 Missed approaches from IFR minimums in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) flown using published Missed Approach;

4.5 Non-Normal/Emergency Operations

Flight Training for Non-Normal and Emergency Conditions using HUD should include:

4.5.1 Recognition and recovery from an aeroplane upset/unusual attitude;

4.5.2 Recognition and recovery from Windshear alerts and indications;

4.5.3 Recognition and recovery from EGPWS/TAWS Warning alert,

4.5.4 Recognition and recovery from TCAS Resolution Advisory (RA)

4.5.5 One Engine Inoperative Take-off with engine failure at or above V1 at the lowest authorized take-off visibility

4.5.6 Rejected Take-off with an engine failure prior to V1 at the lowest authorized take-off visibility

4.5.7 One Engine Inoperative Instrument approach and missed approach

4.5.8 Aircraft system and navigation failures affecting HUD operation;

4.5.9 Loss or degradation of approach capability or automatic landing capability during final approach and appropriate use of HUD;

4.5.10 Failure of HUD used by Pilot Flying during take-off roll at the lowest authorized minimums;

4.5. 11 Failure of HUD used by Pilot Flying during visual approach and landing.

4.6 HUD Training Areas of Special Emphasis

4.6.1 The differences between PFD and HUD displays and functionalities (e.g. HUD pitch scales, the size of the HUD Flight Path Vector (FPV) compared to the HDD PFD )) (G,SI,F);

4.6.2 HUD Operating Limitations (G,F);

4.6.3 Similarity in characteristics of FPV and Guidance Cue in shape and colour, and the possibility of confusion between the two symbols; (G,SI,F);

4.6.4 Appropriate use of the aircraft symbol vs. the FPV during stall and airplane upset recoveries. (G,SI,F).

5.0 HUD Initial pilot proficiency check

5.1 Minimum Checking Manoeuvres

A pilot should complete a check that samples the use of the HUD following initial type training. The HUD should be used to the maximum extent possible during the initial Pilot Proficiency Check (PPC).

The following manoeuvres using the HUD should be specifically evaluated during the PPC:

5.1.1 Engine failure on take-off (V1 cut);

5.1.2 Instrument approach and missed approach with One Engine Inoperative (OEI); and

5.1.3 Failure of HUD during instrument approach.

6.0 HUD Initial Line Training

6.1 General

HUD initial line training should be under the supervision of a line qualified training or Approved Check Pilot (ACP).

HUD line training should include the Pilot Flying using the HUD to complete:

6.1.1 Three HUD assisted takeoffs;

6.1.2 One visual approach; and

6.1.3 Two instrument approaches in Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC).

7.0 HUD Consolidation Period

7.1 Requirements

Air operator's pilots require line training and consolidation after initial qualification on the HUD. A consolidation period should apply prior to utilizing the HUD for instrument approach operations in IMC. Upon completion of the consolidation requirements, the pilot should be qualified to conduct HUD takeoffs and approaches to the approach minima authorized for the air operator.

During consolidation training, the HUD should be used by the Pilot Flying to complete:

7.1.1 Five takeoffs;

7.1.2 Five manually flown approaches and landings. (The approaches may be flown in VMC.)

8.0 HUD Recurrent Training and Checking Requirements

8.1 Recurrent Ground Training

Recurrent HUD ground training should be completed as part of recurrent training or as part of the continuing qualification curriculum, as applicable.  Selected HUD related ground training subjects should be reviewed on a recurrent basis.

8.2 Recurrent Flight Training

Recurrent flight training should be completed as part of recurrent training or as part of the continuing qualification curriculum, as applicable. Recurrent flight training should be in accordance with the procedures established in the operator company operations manual and should include:

8.2.1 Review of HUD system and normal operation;

8.2.2 Review of HUD operating limitations;

8.2.3 Review of selected non-normal and emergency procedures;

8.2.4 One Take-off with crosswind at the lowest authorized take-off minima using HUD Take-off guidance;

8.2.5 Engine Inoperative Take-off with engine failure at V1;

8.2.6 Rejected take-off;

8.2.7 Straight-in, Precision and Non Precision approach and landing with crosswind to the lowest authorized landing minimums;

8.2.8 Approach and Missed Approach with crosswind at the lowest authorized landing minimums in IMC;

8.2.9 One Engine Inoperative Approach and Landing;

8.2.10 Selected non-normal and emergency procedures;

8.2.11 Failure of HUD used by Pilot Flying during visual approach and landing.

8.3 HUD Recurrent PPC

The HUD should be used to the maximum extent possible during the recurrent PPC. The required manoeuvres on recurrent PPCs should include a sample of operations requiring the use of the HUD.

Recurrent PPCs should include an evaluation of PM duties related to the use of the HUD in accordance with SOPs, and in consideration of whether the aircraft is equipped with a single or dual HUD.

The following manoeuvres using the HUD should be specifically evaluated during the recurrent PPC:

8.3.1 Engine failure on take-off (V1 cut); and

8.3.2 Instrument approach and missed approach with OEI.

9.0 HUD Currency Requirements

An air operator's 90-day takeoff, approach and landing currency requirements apply to each pilot position occupied.

A PF should have completed at least three takeoffs, approaches and landings using the HUD, in a BD500 aeroplane or a TCCA approved level C (or higher) BD500 full flight simulator with day and night visual displays, within the previous 90 days before acting as PF using the HUD.

10.0 HUD Reduced and Low Visibility Taxi, Take-off and CAT II Approach

The BD500 HUD is capable of providing take-off guidance in visibilities as low as RVR 500 ft (150m). The HUD may be used to monitor autopilot coupled Category II ILS approaches. The HUD is capable of providing guidance to Category II ILS manually flown instrument approaches.

Bombardier has developed a training program for reduced and low visibility operations for the BD500. This training includes reduced and low visibility taxi and take-off training using the HUD, and CAT II ILS approach using the HUD for manually flown approaches or using the HUD to monitor autopilot coupled approaches.

The initial qualification for reduced and low visibility operations and CAT II approach requires ground and flight training as described in the following:

10.1 Ground Training

Ground training for reduced and low visibility operations, and CAT II approaches are a component of the Bombardier reduced and low visibility operations training. This ground training comprises CBT training followed by an instructor led briefing.

The CBT training is comprised of three lessons which cover the requirements for:

  • Flight Crew and Aircraft;
  • Aerodrome and ground facilities;
  • Procedures and Limitations.

Instructor led training applicable to the HUD includes:

  • Use of the HUD during reduced and Low visibility taxi and take-off;
  • The arming and activation of the LVTO function including all normal and non-normal indications;
  • Use of the HUD for manually flown approaches to Category II ILS minimums including all normal and non-normal indications;
  • All applicable normal and non-normal procedures and limitations.

10.2 Flight training

10.2.1 HUD Reduced and Low Visibility Taxi and Take-off Flight Training

Flight training should be conducted to the lowest authorized take-off minima with and without the use of the LVTO function, and requires:

  • Taxi and ground maneuvering during reduced and low visibility operations;
  • Normal take-off;
  • Crosswind take-off;
  • Rejected take-off;
  • Engine inoperative take-off;
  • The arming and activation of the LVTO function including all normal and non-normal indications;
  • Use of LVTO guidance and actions to follow in the event of system failures or excessive deviation;
  • Procedures to set climb thrust for an NADP 1 noise abatement profile after a take-off using the LVTO function.
10.2.2 HUD CAT II Approach Flight Training

Flight training using the HUD to manually fly CAT II approaches to the lowest authorized minima requires:

  • Descent and approach HUD set-up and preparation;
  • All-engine operative and engine inoperative approaches to a landing and missed approach;
  • Crosswind landings;
  • Continued or discontinued approaches in response to applicable system failures.

10.3 HUD Reduced and Low Visibility Operations Areas of Special Emphasis

The following items should receive special emphasis in reduced and low visibility operations, and CAT II operations, as applicable:

  • Demonstrated wind components, operational equipment requirements and limitations; (G)
  • LVTO functionality, including EXCESS DEV / NO LVTO HUD/HDD indications, RVR limits, dual HUD use (G, F)
  • CAT II Approaches with HUD with AP coupled or manually flown using the FD (F);
  • CAT II Approach Annunciations (G,F).

10.4 Operator Specific Training

In addition to the initial training described in the preceding, initial and recurrent ground training should include an operator's policies and procedures concerning reduced and low visibility operations including a reporting process, MEL issues, operational considerations following an RTO or missed approach, Initial Operating Experience (IOE) and currency requirements. Training should be provided on the operational characteristics, capabilities, and limitations of the aerodrome and ground facilities (eg. Surface Movement Guidance Control System).

Appendix 7 – Sample BD500 Initial Type Rating Training Footprint

Day 1

CBT – Systems
Classroom
(8:30)

Day 2

CBT – Systems
Classroom
System Integration 1
(7:30)

Day 3

CBT – Systems
System Integration 2
(6:30)

Day 4

CBT – Systems
Classroom
System Integration 3
(7:30)

Day 5

CBT – Systems
Classroom
System Integration 4
(7:30)

Day 6

CBT – Systems
Classroom
System Integration 5
(7:30)

Day 7

CBT – Systems
Classroom
System Integration 6
(7:30)

Day 8

CBT – Systems
Classroom
System Integration 7
(7:30)

Day 9

CBT – Systems
Classroom
System Integration 8
(8:30)

Day 10

CBT – Systems
Classroom
System Integration 9
(4:00)

Day 11

Theoretical Knowledge Exam
(2:00)
FFS 1 1)
(4:00)

Day 12

FFS 2
(4:00)

Day 13

FFS 3
(4:00)

Day 14

FFS 4
(4:00)

Day 15

FFS 5
(4:00)

Day 16

FFS 6
(4:00)

Day 17

FFS 7
(4:00)

Day 18

FFS 8 - LOFT
(4:00)

Day 19

Pilot Proficiency Check (PPC)
FFS
(4:00)

All FFS must be completed in a Level C or D simulator
FFS times do not include time for briefing and debriefing

Date modified: