5.13. Instrument Approach Procedures - Initial/Intermediate

  1. General - This section provides guidance for instrument approach procedures up to and including the following (depending on the circumstance):
    1. the last vector to final approach, but not including the turn onto the instrument approach procedure final track or the last track to the FAF;
    2. the last heading prior to turning on to the instrument approach procedure final track or the last track to the FAF (from a procedure turn, arc, feeder/transition, or part of a STAR);

      This section is divided into subsections that discuss various actions and aircraft configurations for several types of arrival procedures. Where applicable, further distinction is made for different types of navigation equipment. It must be used with the section that deals with descent procedures.

This section is divided into subsections that discuss various actions and aircraft configurations for several types of arrival procedures. Where applicable, further distinction is made for different types of navigation equipment. It must be used with the section that deals with descent procedures.

  1. Standard Calls General - Other than as noted in this subsection and the next one that deals with altitude, no additional calls to those described in the "General" chapter are required during the Initial/Intermediate Approach phase. To reduce the likelihood of overshooting a desired track during any arrival procedure the PNF should warn the PF as follows:
    1. When approaching a track which will be followed using primarily the track bar display, on initial movement of the track bar away from full deflection with the warning flags out of view, the PNF should call "Track Bar is alive." The PF should confirm the movement and say "Check."
    2. When approaching a track which will be followed using primarily a bearing display, the PNF should warn the PF when the display indicates that the aircraft is 10o away from the desired track. For example the PNF would call "10 degrees to 140", where 140o is the desired track. The PF would confirm the bearing and call "Check."
    3. To reduce the likelihood of overshooting a desired vertical path during the Initial/Intermediate Approach phase, the PNF should warn the PF as follows:
      1. When approaching a VNAV computed descent path on initial movement of the vertical path indicator away from full deflection with the warning flags out of view, the PNF should call "VNAV is alive." The PF should confirm the movement and say "Check."
  2. Standard Calls - Altitude - For the most part, the directions for altitude related calls that are described in the "General " chapter apply. However, some additional situations are likely to occur during the Initial/Intermediate Approach phase. Guidance follows:
    1. Unless the Captain determines that extenuating circumstances dictate otherwise, when approaching a target altitude, a warning that the aircraft is 100 ft away is not to be given. The purpose of this restriction is to minimize the possibility of missing a critical communication during this phase of flight. This direction applies only to altitudes outside of the FAF/FAWP or prior to the final approach track if no FAF/FAWP exists. The altitude warning requirements for final approach are discussed later in this chapter.
    2. If ATC changes the target altitude before the aircraft reaches it, the crew should proceed as follows:
      1. The pilot who responds on the radio to an Air Traffic Control initiated altitude should make the applicable change to the Altitude Alert System. [Delete the next information if your aircraft is not appropriately equipped.] The pilot who responded on the radio shall also appropriately arm the Flight Guidance System. The pilot making the change shall then inform the other pilot; an example follows "New assigned altitude 5000, altitude select." The pilot making the change shall not do so if the Flight Guidance system is in the process of capturing an altitude. It is necessary to wait until capture is complete, then the new altitude is to be selected. The pilot other than the one making the selection shall acknowledge the change by stating "Check."
  3. STARs and Profile Descent Procedures - For STARs or Profile Descent Procedures ensure that ATC has specified a clearance limit or approach that terminates the procedure. This information is required in the event of a communication failure. If vectors are expected to transition to the approach see the subsection on ATC Vectors. If vectors are not expected (the STAR or Profile Descent terminates at the beginning of an approach) see the applicable subsection. The following are recommended for flying a STAR or Profile Descent.

    [Insert the aircraft configuration that applies to your operation either as a requirement, a recommended profile, or an approximate configuration. If the profile is adequately described in the descent section then merely refer to it in this subsection. If STARs and Profile Descents require special procedures also detail them here. In developing them consider the following items:
    - Aircraft speed;
    - Engine and/or propeller settings;
    - Landing Gear position;
    - Flap setting;
    - Icing considerations;
    - Speed brake or spoiler setting.
    ]

    1. [insert applicable configurations]
  4. ATC Vectors - Ensure that ATC has included a clearance limit or approach that the aircraft is being vectored to. This information is required in the event of a communication failure. If vectors are to other than final approach (an IAF/IAWP, IF/IWP, Fix/Facility for a procedure turn) refer to the applicable subsection and configure the aircraft appropriately. Once advised that the aircraft is being vectored for approach carry out the following:

    [Insert the aircraft configuration that applies to your operation either as a requirement, a recommended profile, or an approximate configuration. If the profile is adequately described in the descent section then merely refer to it in this subsection. If operations during vectors require special procedures also detail them here. In developing them consider the following items:
    - Aircraft speed;
    - Engine and/or propeller settings;
    - Landing Gear position;
    - Flap setting;
    - Icing considerations;
    - Speed brake or spoiler setting.
    ]

    1. Carry out the In-Range Check at [insert the approximate point, distance from landing, or time from landing that the In-Range Check should be done.]
    2. During vectors, carry out the actions required so that the aircraft is appropriately configured when it turns on to final approach. Configure the aircraft as follows:
    3. [insert applicable configurations]
  5. Holding Patterns, Procedure Turns, Shuttles - The following applies for flying a Procedure Turn as part of an Instrument Approach. Holding Patterns and Shuttles when part of appro&aches can, for the most part, be treated a in manner similar to Procedure Turns. Additional guidance is available in a previous section that deals specifically with holds and shuttles.

    [Insert the aircraft configuration that applies to your operation either as a requirement, a recommended profile, or an approximate configuration. If the profile is adequately described in the descent section then merely refer to it in this subsection. In developing procedures for procedure turns consider the following items:
    - Aircraft speed;
    - Engine and/or propeller settings;
    - Landing Gear position;
    - Flap setting;
    - Icing considerations;
    - Speed brake or spoiler setting;
    - Timing procedures, including which crew member(s) should carry out timing.
    ]

    1. Complete the In-Range Check prior to beginning the Procedure Turn.
    2. When timing is used for navigation during a procedure turn, use any other equipment available (DME, RNAV/FMS/GPS) to assist in determination of aircraft position.
    3. During the Procedure Turn carry out the actions required so that the aircraft is appropriately configured when it turns on to final approach. Configure the aircraft as follows:
      1. [insert applicable configurations]
  6. Non-RNAV Initial/Intermediate Approach - Procedures other than Procedure Turns This subsection deals with Initial/Intermediate Approach Procedures that are not RNAV based, where a Procedure Turn will not be flown (whether a Procedure Turn is published or not). Further, this discussion is for pilot navigated procedures as opposed to ATC vectored procedures. The following guidance applies:

    [Insert the aircraft configuration that applies to your operation either as a requirement a recommended profile or an approximate configuration. If the profile is adequately described in the descent section then merely refer to it in this subsection. In developing procedures for Non-RNAV Initial/Intermediate Approaches without procedure turns or vectors, consider the following items:
    - Aircraft speed;
    - Engine and/or propeller settings;
    - Landing Gear position;
    - Flap setting;
    - Icing considerations;
    - Speed brake or spoiler setting;
    - Timing procedures (if applicable), including which crew member is to carry out timing.
    ]

    1. Complete the In-Range Check before crossing the first fix that is part of the Instrument Approach Procedure. This may be either the IAF or the IF.
    2. When timing is used for navigation during the procedure, use any other equipment available (DME, RNAV/FMS/GPS) to assist in determination of aircraft position.
    3. During the Initial/Intermediate Approach carry out the actions required so that the aircraft is appropriately configured when it turns on to final approach. Configure the aircraft as follows.
      1. [insert applicable configurations]
  7. RNAV Non-GPS Initial/Intermediate Approach Procedures [TO BE ADDED LATER]
  8. GPS Initial/Intermediate Approach Procedures [TO BE ADDED LATER]
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