Section Two - Reviewing a Request for Approval

Applicability

The staff instructions contained in this document apply to all applications to conduct recurrent training programs under section 421.05(2)(c):

The previous standard stated:

"participation in a recurrent training program which is designed to update pilot knowledge of human factors, meteorology, flight planning and navigation, and aviation regulations, rules and procedures that has been approved by the Minister as being satisfactory for those purposes".

The amended standard states:

"successful completion of a recurrent training program designed to update pilot knowledge, which could include subject areas such as human factors, meteorology, flight planning and navigation, and aviation regulations, rules and procedures that has been approved by the Minister as being satisfactory for those purposes".

Confusion may exist among organizers between recurrent training programs under 421.05(2)(c) and 421.05(2)(b), namely “attendance at a safety seminar conducted by Transport Canada Aviation”. Subparagraph (2)(b) refers to seminars planned and conducted by Transport Canada, not to training programs where a presentation by Transport Canada is only part of the program.  In these cases, where a Transport Canada Inspector has been invited to conduct one segment of a recurrent training program, the program still has to be approved under paragraph 421.05(2)(c). 

There have been instances where a program organizer wishes to include a group review of the self-paced study program, produced annually in the Transport Canada Aviation Safety Letter, as part of the program agenda.  While the completion of this self-paced study program on its own is one of the options open to pilots in order to meet recency requirements, if it is incorporated into a program under 421.05(2)(c), the entire program still needs to be assessed in its entirety for adequacy and appropriateness.

Procedures

There is no specific application form for those wishing to have a recurrent training program approved, therefore, organizers are free to provide the information in any format they choose.  The Appendix at the end of this document does, however, provide a format outline that some organizers may find useful when submitting details of their program for approval.  Whether or not the organizer uses the Appendix, the information submitted should include:

  • Name, address and contact information of the training program organizer.  This could be an individual, an association, an aviation company, a club, a community group , a flight training unit or any other entity capable of developing and offering the program.
     
  • A detailed outline of the subjects to be covered.
     
  • The method of delivering the subject areas – i.e. presentations, lectures, practical training exercises.
     
  • A description of the qualifications of the person(s) delivering each subject.

  • The length of time allotted for each subject and the total time allocated for the program.

  • The location for the training program and associated facilities.

It will be necessary to understand where and when the course will be offered, details of the material that the organizer proposes to cover, the duration of the presentation on each subject area as well as the qualifications of those presenting the material.

There is no specific application form for those wishing to have a recurrent training program approved, therefore, organizers are free to provide the information in any format they choose. The Appendix at the end of this document does, however, provide a format outline that some organizers may find useful when submitting details of their program for approval. Whether or not the organizer uses the Appendix, the information submitted should include:

  • Name, address and contact information of the training program organizer. This could be an individual, an association, an aviation company, a club, a community group, a flight training unit or any other entity capable of developing and offering the program.
     
  • A detailed outline of the subjects to be covered.
     
  • The method of delivering the subject areas - i.e. presentations, lectures, practical training exercises.
     
  • A description of the qualifications of the person(s) delivering each subject.
     
  • The length of time allotted for each subject and the total time allocated for the program.
     
  • The location for the training program and associated facilities.

Application and Supporting Documentation

Confirm the information contained in the application submission is complete.

(a)  Organizer

The name, address, telephone number, facsimile number of the program organizer.

(b)  Program Agenda

The list of subject areas outlined in 421.05(2)(c), namely human factors, meteorology, flight planning and navigation and aviation regulations, rules and procedures used to be mandatory subject areas under the previous version of the standard.  Under the amended standard, these subject areas serve only as an example of subject content areas to be considered, therefore allowing more flexibility to those developing the training material to meet recency requirements.  Past experience approving submissions from those wishing to offer these programs has demonstrated that totally effective programs can be established without including every subject area listed in paragraph (2)(c).

For the Minister to approve a recurrent training program, the program must be designed to update pilot knowledge.  The key words are “recurrent” and “update”.  These are recurrent training programs and the topics should be based on knowledge areas that were required to obtain the initial permit or licence. These are not intended to be courses that provide knowledge towards a new rating, licence or other qualification such as high altitude chamber training, underwater egress training, emergency first aid /CPR training or winter survival training.  Additional topics that would be appropriate could include critical surface contamination, emergency procedures, air traffic control procedures, aerodynamics and theory of flight, knowledge of airframes, engines and systems, radio and electronic theory and pilot decision-making. 

The amended standard calls up the requirement for more than one subject area, so a proposal to conduct a recurrent training program should contain no less than two subject areas. What is lost from the previous standard in the requirement for four mandatory subject areas can be gained in the comprehensiveness of the subject areas under the amended standard.  In other words, where 3 hours or 3 days were used to cover four subject areas, there is now an opportunity to cover fewer subjects in the same length of time but in more depth. 

(c)  Method of Program Delivery

The standard does not outline how the material has to be covered, therefore, the program could consist of lectures, presentations or practical individual or collective exercises, such as planning a cross-country, on- line study and testing, or any combination of delivery methods.  Whatever the delivery method used, it should be consistent with the subject area being covered.

(d)  Presenter Qualifications

The standard does not outline the necessary qualifications of the person(s) conducting the training program. The persons conducting the presentations, however, should be subject matter experts qualified to do the job. For example, a Flight Service Specialist or a Flight Instructor would be a reasonable choices for persons conducting a presentation on meteorology over a student pilot who holds no other professional qualifications in the subject area.

(e)  Duration

The standard does not outline the duration of the training program.  An adequate program to update a pilot’s knowledge is likely going to take no less than an evening’s worth of time (i.e. approximately 3 hours).  Applications have been processed where the program duration ranged from 3 hours to 3 days.

(f)  Location

The standard does not outline any details with respect to where the programs are to be conducted.  The training program should, however, be conducted in an appropriate setting that will allow the information to be effectively presented.  The location must be identified clearly enough to permit Transport Canada staff members to find the location in case the program is to be monitored.

(g)  Successful Completion

The regulation states that no holder of a flight crew permit or licence shall exercise the privileges of the permit or licence in an aircraft unless the holder has successfully completed a recurrent training program.  The measure of “successful completion” is to be determined by those offering the program, so the course organizer will have to provide their criterion of what constitutes “successful completion” as part of their request for program approval. 

If a course is approved to be conducted entirely within a classroom setting, then it is expected that successful completion of the course would, in part, depend on attendance of the participant in the classroom.  However, this does not preclude the approval of a course, for example, where a person attends a classroom seminar and then continues “self-study” at home by reading specific material then completing an on-line examination.  “Participation” suggests that the person must share the entire program with others, while “successful completion” allows flexibility for something other than participation with others at a specific time/place.

Date modified: