Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Transport Canada's 2016-2017 Departmental Results Report:
Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
Supplementary Table

Table of Contents

  1. 1. Overview of the federal government's approach to sustainable development
  2. 2. Our Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  3. 3. Departmental performance highlights
  4. 4. Report on Strategic Environmental Assessment

1. Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act, namelyto make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, we at Transport Canada support the implementation of the FSDS through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. Our Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) describes Transport Canada's actions in support of:

  • Theme I – addressing climate change and air quality;
  • Theme II – maintaining water quality and availability;
  • Theme III – protecting nature and Canadians; and
  • Theme IV –shrinking the environmental footprint – beginning with government.

The report for 2016-17 presents a high level overview of results and is the final report under the 2013-16 FSDS. Last year's DSDS report is available on our website.

3. Departmental Performance Highlights

Theme I: addressing climate change and air quality

Under Theme I - addressing climate change and air quality, Transport Canada contributed to the 2013-16 FSDS through 14 implementation strategies for Goal 1 – climate change and Goal 2 – air pollution.

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Implementation Strategy 1.1.34Footnote 1: Address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations, and targeted research and development; and

Implementation Strategy 2.1.21: Address air pollutant emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations, and targeted research and development.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategies, we:

  • Continued to participate actively in the IMO's Marine Environment Protection Committee and the Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR) to address air pollutant, GHG and short-lived climate pollutant emissions from international maritime transportation;
  • Led a Correspondence Group under the PPR with the objective of further refining the reporting protocol for voluntary measurement studies regarding the collection of black carbonFootnote 2 data;
  • Worked with IMO Member States to:
    • Agree to develop a comprehensive IMO strategy to reduce GHG emissions from international shipping as well as to confirm 2020 as the coming into force date of a more stringent cap on the maximum allowed sulphur content in marine fuel (0.50% mass/mass);
    • Agree on a timeline for the completion of the black carbon work plan; and
    • Adopt a mandatory ship fuel oil data collection system for international shipping;
  • Continued the implementation of:
  • Participated in:
    • A workshop with European and U.S. agencies on enforcement of emission control area standards for sulphur oxides, which fostered improved cooperation; and
    • Commission for Environmental Cooperation work with the United States and Mexico, to collaboratively address air pollutant emissions from maritime shipping in North America.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.35: Address GHG emissions from the rail sector through the joint Canada-United States locomotive emissions initiative under the Regulatory Cooperation Council, a voluntary agreement with the Canadian rail industry, and research activities to enhance understanding of new technologies to reduce GHG emissions; and

Implementation Strategy 2.1.26: Address air pollutant emissions from the rail sector through locomotive regulations aligned with United States standards, and research activities to enhance understanding of new technologies to reduce air pollutant emissions.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategies, we:

  • Published proposed air pollutant regulations for locomotives in Canada Gazette, Part I in June 2016, reviewed formal stakeholder comments, and prepared for the publication of final regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part II;
  • Prepared for the implementation of the regulations and the locomotive emissions information system, including the development of training and guidance material;
  • Released the 2014 Locomotive Emissions Monitoring Report prepared under the Memorandum of Understanding with the Railway Association of Canada;
  • Continued to work with the U.S. on the Locomotive Emissions Initiative under the Canada-U.S. Regulatory Cooperation Council;
  • Initiated evaluation and testing projects to examine the performance or safety of new clean transportation technologies (e.g., natural gas use in marine vessels, emissions measurement for aircraft, alternative fuels for trains and the safety of electric vehicles);
  • Worked with other government departments to initiate the development of an innovative multi-departmental tracking tool that will:
    • Allow us to monitor the development and uptake of technologies beyond the end of a project; and
    • Provide us with a more robust measurement of the long-term return on government Research, Development and Deployment investments;
  • Funded ten university projects through the Clean Rail Academic Grant Program, including:
    • Developing a wireless charging system for an electric rail system; and
    • Creating a more efficient hydrogen fuel cell.

This Program has led to continued efforts to fund industry-led projects to encourage:

  • The commercialization of biofuel from wood pulp;
  • Electrical energy storage;
  • Lightweighting (i.e., building with less weight as a way to achieve better fuel efficiency and handling); and
  • Operation optimization.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.36: Address GHG emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization's development of new international standards and recommended practices, through the development and implementation of new domestic standards, monitoring Canada's voluntary Action Plan in collaboration with the Canadian domestic aviation sector, and through targeted research; and

Implementation Strategy 2.1.22: Address air pollutant emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization's development of new international standards and recommended practices, through the development and implementation of new domestic standards, and through targeted research.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategies, we:

Implementation Strategy 1.1.33: Develop and implement GHG emission regulations for light-duty vehicles (for model years 2017-2025) and heavy-duty vehicles (for model years 2014-2018) under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, which will align with those of the United States.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

  • Continued to support the GHG emission regulations for light- and heavy-duty vehicles through:
    • Work aimed at ensuring the safe introduction of new clean technologies in Canada;
    • Participating in national, continental, and global technical working groups to support and align safety regulations, codes, and standards; and
    • Analyzing initiatives and scenarios to assess the environmental benefits of complementary measures directed at reducing GHG emissions from on-road transportation;
  • In collaboration with other departments and provincial/territorial governments, made an important contribution to the development of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change by conducting analysis relating to the emissions and economic impacts of potential complementary measures to reduce emissions from the transportation sector, including light- and heavy-duty vehicles;
  • Signed a two-year collaborative contract with the National Research Council to review battery safety issues such as fire propagation safety;
  • Published updated requirements referenced in Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 305 – Electrolyte Spillage and Electrical Shock Protection. These new requirements for high voltage systems are seen as an important step in modernizing Canadian safety requirements, based on internationally developed standards;
  • Supported the development and completion of a phase I draft of the United Nations Global Technical Regulation for Electric Vehicle Safety that was submitted to the United Nations Working Party on Passive Safety, and is expected to be approved in the fall of 2017;
  • Continued to provide input to alternative fuel safety standards committees being managed by the CSA Group. The CSA Group standards are vital to the safety of natural gas and propane fuelled vehicles, and these standards are incorporated by reference into the Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations; and
  • Conducted ongoing work towards proposing a minimum sound level for electric and electric hybrid vehicles so that visually impaired persons are aware that these vehicles are operating nearby.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.24: Address GHG emissions from the marine sector by funding the installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian ports; and

Implementation Strategy 2.1.8: Address air pollutant emissions from the marine sector by funding installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian ports.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategies, we:

  • Provided funding for three projects that are currently underway under the Shore Power Technology for Ports Program, to install and upgrade shore power systems at Canadian ports, including for:
    • Two projects at the Port of Vancouver for container ships; and,
    • One project at the Port of Montreal for cruise ships.
    • Since its launch in 2012, four projects have been completed, including:

    • Upgrades and enhancements of existing shore power systems at the Port of Vancouver's Canada Place Cruise Terminal;
    • Installation of a shore power system at Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal;
    • Installation of a cruise ship shore power system at the Port of Halifax; and,
    • Installation and upgrade of shore power systems at several British Columbia Ferry Services (BC Ferries) terminals.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.26: Address GHG emissions through testing and evaluations of advanced technologies to support the development of regulations and industry codes and standards, in order to ensure that new technologies that reduce GHG emissions can be introduced in Canada in a safe and timely manner; and,

Implementation Strategy 2.1.6: Address air pollutant emissions through testing and evaluations of advanced vehicle technologies to support the development of regulations and industry codes and standards, in order to ensure that new technologies that reduce air pollutant emissions can be introduced in Canada in a safe and timely manner.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategies, we:

  • Conducted 25 testing and evaluation activities, through the ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles (eTV) Program, to assess the safety, environmental and performance of advanced vehicle technologies. This included testing the fuel economy and aerodynamic benefits of connected and automated truck platooning technologies – a first of its kind test globally.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.22: Address GHG emissions by supporting the deployment of truck reservation systems at port and terminal facilities to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling; and

Implementation Strategy 2.1.7: Address air pollutant emissions by supporting the deployment of truck reservation systems at port and terminal facilities to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategies, we:

  • Under the Truck Reservation System Program, the Port of Montreal completed its project to install radio frequency identification technology to improve truck traffic flow. The Port of Vancouver continued its project to integrate existing reservation systems to better measure truck transit times. As a result of these projects:
    • Truck wait times have been reduced by approximately 15-20%; and
    • Emissions have been reduced by approximately 400-600 tonnes per year at each port respectively.

Implementation Strategy 1.2.10: Support the development and testing of innovative science-based tools and technologies to help improve the resiliency and adaptability of existing and future northern transportation infrastructure and Arctic marine operations.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

  • Signed three contribution agreements with the Governments of Yukon and Northwest Territories under the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative, with scheduled completion in 2018-19 for a:
    • Project with the Government of Northwest Territories for a monitoring program and extension of research activities along established test sites;
    • Project with the Government of Yukon for the development of a climate-resilient functional plan for the Dempster Highway; and
    • Project with the Government of Yukon for the monitoring of test sections along the Campbell Highway to evaluate wicking geosynthetics, which can be used for the prevention of pavement cracking during annual spring thaws.

Theme II - Maintaining water quality and availability

Under Theme II - maintaining water quality and availability, Transport Canada contributed to the 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) through three implementation strategies for Goal 3: water quality and quantity - protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

The following table shows the FSDS target led by Transport Canada, the associated FSDS goal, performance indicator and performance results.

FSDS Goal

FSDS Target

FSDS Performance Indicator

FSDS Performance Results

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants

Protect the marine environment by an annual 5% reduction in the number of releases and volume of harmful pollutants in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013-16.

Number of marine pollution spills from identified vessels; volume of marine pollutants spills.

During fiscal year 2016-17, the National Aerial Surveillance Program observed or responded to 246 pollution incidents, of which 26 were of a known source and the remaining 220 were from sources that could not be positively identified.

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Implementation Strategy 3.8.1: Set the legal and regulatory frameworks through domestic legislation and international conventions that govern the protection of the marine environment from pollution, the introduction of invasive species and the environmental impact of pollution incidents, and advance Canadian positions on reducing and managing global marine pollution from ships.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

  • Published regulations to require the reporting of hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) received in Canada to prepare for the ratification of the 2010 HNS Convention; and
  • Continued to implement the regulatory regime under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act and the Marine Liability Act, which sets out:
    • Standards to control pollution in Canada to reduce the risks of introducing invasive species from the ballast water of ships arriving in Canada;
    • Additional measures to protect the Arctic; and
    • Requires ships carry insurance to cover costs arising from oil pollution incidents.

Implementation Strategy 3.8.2: Contribute to reducing pollution from vessels by monitoring compliance of marine transportation firms with Canadian legislation such as the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, through the National Aerial Surveillance Program, inspections, audits, monitoring and enforcement.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

  • Performed 2,068 patrol hours of aerial surveillance over waters of Canadian jurisdiction under the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP). The aircrews detected or identified 246 marine pollution incidents, which consisted of:
    • 26 pollution incidents confirmed as ship source spills (a 48% decrease from 2015-16); and
    • 220 pollution sightings reported as “mystery”, which means the origin of the incident could not be linked directly to a source (a 33% decrease from 2014-15);
    • A total estimated volume of pollutants observed of 2,878 litres (which equates to a 64% decrease versus 2015-16). Of the reported pollution incidents:
      • 86% were under ten litres;
      • 13% were over ten litres but below 100 litres; and
      • 1% were greater than 100 litres; and
    • 8 pollution sightings observed outside the 12 nautical mile limit, compared to 17 identified in 2015-16 (this equates to a 53% decrease in offshore pollution sightings). This positive result can be attributed to programs such as:

Implementation Strategy 3.8.3: Enhancing marine safety, including national ship-source oil spill preparedness and response regime. This includes increased tanker inspections and aerial surveillance, and the public port designation of Kitimat, British Columbia to enhance vessel traffic control.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

  • Did not take any actions at Kitimat due to the Prime Minister's announcement of the $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan to create a world-leading marine safety system, restore and protect marine ecosystems and habitats, strengthen partnerships and invest in oil spill research and methods. On November 29, 2016, the Government of Canada announced a moratorium on crude and persistent oil tankers on British Columbia's North Coast; and
  • In keeping with the Minister's mandate letter commitment, launched a review of the Navigation Protection Act as part of the Government of Canada's Review of Environmental and Regulatory Processes.

Theme III – Protecting nature and Canadians

Under Theme III – protecting nature and Canadians, Transport Canada contributed to the 2013-16 FSDS through five implementation strategies for Goal 4 - conserving and restoring ecosystems, wildlife and habitat, and protecting Canadians: resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Implementation Strategy 4.6.5: Implement conventions and guidelines of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) relating to reducing the risk of aquatic species invasions into domestic regulations.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

Implementation Strategy 4.6.6: Implement the vessel-related invasive species provisions of the 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement through policy, regulations, research and enforcement actions.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

  • Worked closely with counterpart agencies in the U.S. towards maximizing our respective ballast water policy, regulation, research and enforcement activities.

Implementation Strategy 4.6.9: Cooperate with U.S. and international regulators to inspect vessels to ensure compliance with Canadian regulations.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

Implementation Strategy 4.7.4: In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

  • Continued efforts to reduce reportable releases of dangerous goods per trillion dollars of gross domestic product (five year average). Based on accident data and nominal current dollar or gross domestic product of 2016. Targets = 193.5 and 2016-17 Actual Results = 182. This was achieved through initiatives under our Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Regulatory Framework, Oversight and Emergency Response Sub-Programs, for example, by:
    • Implementing a regulatory strategy and plan to anticipate and respond to the evolving issues faced during the transportation of dangerous goods;
    • Publishing amendments to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations on November 26, 2016, in Part I of the Canada Gazette, which include the following objectives that are meant to reduce the reportable risk of dangerous goods:
    • All of these amendments/updates are expected to be published in Canada Gazette, Part II and be adopted into the Regulations during the 2017-18 fiscal year; and

    • Publishing on June 1, 2016, final regulations in the Canada Gazette Part II, to:
      • Enable the efficient collection of data and improve risk analysis related to dangerous goods incidents; and
      • Harmonize with the United States the way incident data are collected. 
    • The regulations came into force on December 1, 2016;

  • Increasing the number of inspections for high-risk dangerous goods sites by:
    • Integrating the means of containment facilities inspections into the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Program's “National Oversight Plan” for transporting dangerous goods; and
    • Identifying, monitoring and addressing risks of previously-unknown transportation of dangerous goods operations;
  • Conducting collaborative research with the U.S. Departments of Transportation and Energy to assess crude oil sampling and testing methods, as well as hazard properties and flammability;
  • Addressing issues identified by the Emergency Response Task ForceFootnote 3 (ERTF) created to bring municipalities, first responders, railways and shippers together to strengthen public safety and emergency response in Canada; and
  • Releasing the ERTF Final Report where we provide 40 recommendations to improve the safety surrounding the transport of dangerous goods.

Implementation Strategy 4.8.1: Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites.

In 2016-17, to address the above-noted implementation strategy, we:

  • Reported on our 2016-17 contaminated sites efforts through the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan annual report.

Theme IV – Shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government

Under Theme IV, Transport Canada contributed to the 2013-16 FSDS through nine implementation strategies for:

  • Goal 6 – greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy;
  • Goal 7 – waste and asset management; and
  • Goal 8 – water management.

The following table shows Transport Canada's results against target 6.1 – GHG emissions reduction.

FSDS Goal

FSDS Target

FSDS Performance Indicator

FSDS Performance Results

Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy – reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations.

Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Departmental GHG emission reductions from buildings and fleets relative to fiscal year 2005-06, expressed as a percentage.

Departmental:

  • GHG emissions in fiscal year 2005-06 – 62.28 kt.Footnote 4
  • GHG emissions in 2016-17 fiscal year – 59.71 kt.
  • Renewable power emission credits applied in current fiscal year – 0.007 kt.
  • Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2016-17, inclusive of renewable power emission credits – 4.13% decrease.

Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management – reduce waste generated, and minimize the environmental impacts of assets throughout their life cycle.

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place.

Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service course, or equivalent, in the given fiscal year.

Number and percentage of functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year.

  • Yes
  • 29 (100%)
  • 2 (100%)

 

By March 31, 2017, 93% of Desktop Computing Equipment (personal computers and laptops/notebooks) purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of equipment.

Dollar value of Desktop Computing Equipment purchases that meet the target objective relative to the total dollar value of all purchases for Desktop Computing Equipment in the year in question.

Annual amount spent on Desktop Computing Equipment.

  • $7,227,423.00 (93%)
  • $7,771,423.00

 

By March 31, 2017, 80% of annual clothing and textile purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the material.

Dollar value of clothing and textiles purchased that meet the target objective relative to the total dollar value of all clothing and textile purchase in the year in question.

Annual amount spent on clothing and textiles.

  • $130,440.00 (83%)
  • $156,943.00

 

By March 31, 2017, 99% of copy paper purchases will contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of its production.

Dollar value of copy paper purchases that meet the target objective relative to the total dollar value of all copy paper purchases in the year in question.

Annual amount spent on copy paper.

  • $135,310.70 (100%)
  • $135,310.70

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Implementation Strategy 7.1.1.1: Achieve a level of performance that meets or exceeds the custodian's current commitment to sustainable buildings using industry-recognized assessment and verification tools.

  • We did not record any changes since last year for this strategy.

Implementation Strategy 7.1.1.7: Develop an approach to training for building operators in Crown-owned buildings.

  • We did not record any changes since last year for this strategy.

Implementation Strategy 7.2.1.5: Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible.

  • In 2016-17, we employed a minimum of 12 procurement instruments including both Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements, mainly under the category of professional services. By using procurement instruments that are already in place and have environmental considerations incorporated into them, we are contributing to Goal 7 in an effort to minimize the environmental impacts of the goods and services that we procure.

Implementation Strategy 7.2.3: Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.

  • In 2016-17, we trained 106 acquisition cardholders through the completion of the Canada School of Public Service course on green procurement. This training supports the objectives of the Policy on Green Procurement and Goal 7 (Waste and Asset Management) by ensuring that all employees with purchasing authority, have the ability to make informed decisions on the environmental impacts of the goods and services they are procuring on behalf of the department.

Implementation Strategy 7.3.1.1: Engage employees in greening government operations practices.

  • In 2016-17, we engaged with our employees in greening government operations practices on a number of fronts, including through:
    • The creation of a “Paper Reduction Program” to encourage employees to print less. Outreach activities in this area included:
      • The development of an internal webpage with paper reducing tips;
      • Publishing articles for our staff with useful paper reduction tips;
      • Analyzing printing numbers to present to management; and
      • Working closely with directorates to help reduce their printing habits.
    • Through these efforts, we have successfully reduced our Department's paper purchases by 25% compared to 2015-16; and

    • Producing a “Guide to Green Meetings” to encourage employees to take advantage of the services offered within our Department to green our meetings (e.g., through the use of teleconferencing, videoconferencing, WebEx) to for example, encourage the use of screen displays for presentations versus paper copies. Outreach activities to promote the guide included publishing articles, creating a lobby display and sending out targeted messages to employees.

Implementation Strategy 7.3.1.2: Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles.

  • We did not record any changes since last year for this strategy.

Implementation Strategy 7.3.1.3: Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e., printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings).

  • In 2016-17, our Department completed the final phase of the “Videoconferencing Services Expansion Project”. The project equipped more than 100 boardrooms across the country with videoconferencing capabilities and installed a significant number of desktop videoconferencing equipment. The installation of this equipment at Departmental facilities across the country allows employees to easily organize green meetings, thereby improving the sustainability of our workplace operations and reducing the need for business travel in some cases.

Implementation Strategy 7.3.1.6: Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

  • We did not record any changes since last year for this strategy.

The following table shows Transport Canada's results against Goal 8 – water management.

FSDS Goal

FSDS Target

FSDS Performance Indicator

FSDS Performance Results

Goal 8: Water Management – water is managed sustainably in Government of Canada real property operations.

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.

Approach to improving water management included within our Department's Real Property Sustainability Framework.

Amount and percentage of floor space in buildings over 1000 m2 that installed water metres in 2016-17.

Total amount and percentage of floor space in buildings over 1000 m2 that include water metering (including the metres installed in 2016-17 and those that were already in place before 2016-17.)

  • Yes
  • 1400 m2 (3%)
    *The additional 19,955.3 m2 that was committed to in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities was installed after the reporting period on June 21, 2017. When taken into account, the total metering installed is 20,955.3 m2 (46%).
  • 30,895.3 m2 (68%)

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Implementation Strategy 8.1.1.4: Meter the water usage in new projects.

  • We did not record any changes since last year for this strategy as our Department did not undertake any new construction projects in 2016-17.

4. Report on Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2016-17 reporting cycle, Transport Canada considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. Through the Strategic Environmental Assessment process, departmental proposals were found to have a range of effects on progress toward the 2013-16 FSDS goals and targets in Theme I: addressing climate change and air quality, Theme II: maintaining water quality and availability, Theme III: protecting nature and Canadians, and Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government.

Additional information on Transport Canada's Strategic Environmental Assessments for 2016-17 can be found in the table below. The department is currently developing a new webpage to capture its Strategic Environmental Assessment information.

Initiative Type

Total number of proposals approved by Minister/Cabinet

Departmental SEA Compliance Rate

Memoranda to Cabinet or Minister

15

87.6% (this is equivalent to 57 out of 65)

Treasury Board Submissions

13

Regulatory Initiatives

30

Other

7

TOTAL

65

Our 2016-17 departmental SEA compliance rate of 87.6% is an 11.6% improvement over 2015-16's compliance rate of 76%.

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