Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Overview of the Federal Government’s Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–16 presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Transport Canada supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in this supplementary information table.

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy presents the results for Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, Theme II – Maintaining Water Quality and Availability, Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians, and Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government.

Transport Canada-led target
FSDS Goal FSDS Performance Indicator FSDS Target FSDS Performance Status
Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Availability Number of marine spills from identified vessels

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants

Protect the marine environment by an annual 5% reduction in the number of releases of harmful pollutants in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013–16.

The National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) identified 322 pollution sightings during 2014–15. 37 pollution sightings were confirmed as ship source spills (a 16% decrease from 2013–14) and 285 pollution sightings were reported as mystery spills because the origin of the incident could not be linked directly to a source (a 68% increase from 2013–14).

The total volume of pollutants observed during 2014–15 was estimated at 3,174 litres, which equates to a 29% decrease in the total volume of pollutants observed. These results are a function of improved sensitivity of NASP aircraft sensors and crews to detect very limited quantities of oil. 89% of the reported pollution incidents were under 10 litres, 9% were over 10 litres but below 100 litres and 2% were greater than 100 litres.

Furthermore, only 5 pollution sightings were observed in 2014–15 outside the 12 nm limit when compared to 11 in 2013–14. This equates to a 55% decrease in the number of pollution sightings offshore. This is a direct result of programs, such as the NASP, the Integrated Satellite Tracking of Pollution Program, and stricter legislation and regulations for ships transiting waters under Canadian jurisdiction.

Themes I–III: Implementation Strategies

Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Transportation is one of the largest sources of air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. In 2013, transportation accounted for 23% of Canada’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Transportation is also linked with the emission of air pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, sulphur oxide, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter. These pollutants contribute to the formation of smog and poor air quality. Pollutant emissions have fallen significantly, largely due to regulatory changes introduced by the federal government. However, more action is required to ensure this trend continues in the transportation sector.

Transport Canada's Commitments

In 2014–15, under Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, Transport Canada contributed to the FSDS through the 15 implementation strategies listed below under Goal 1 – Climate Change and Goal 2 – Air Pollution. These are drawn from Transport Canada’s initiatives under the federal Clean Air Agenda.

The Clean Air Agenda spans 11 departments and agencies managing 60 environmental initiatives over five fiscal years, from 2011–12 until 2015–16. The centrepiece of this approach is a regulatory agenda with complementary programming to support innovation and clean technologies, Canada’s international participation, and adaptation to a changing climate.

Transport Canada is responsible for the following nine initiatives under the Clean Air Agenda:

  • Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative;
  • Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative;
  • Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative;
  • Support for Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations;
  • Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative;
  • ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Program;
  • Truck Reservation System Program;
  • Shore Power Technology for Ports Program; and
  • Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada was in the fourth year of implementing its Clean Air Agenda initiatives under both the Clean Transportation and Adaptation themes. The initiative descriptions are those that were developed at the beginning of their implementation in 2011–12.

Transport Canada’s implementation strategies have been organized according to the appropriate Program or Sub-Program in the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. This means that Transport Canada’s Theme I implementation strategies are linked to two Sub-Programs - 2.1.1 - Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight and 2.1.2 - Clean Air Initiatives, and one Program - 2.3 - Environmental Stewardship of Transportation. 

Sub-Program 2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.36 - Address GHG emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO’s) development of new international standards and recommended practices through the development and implementation of new domestic standards, through the monitoring Canada’s voluntary Action Plan in collaboration with the Canadian domestic aviation sector, and through targeted research.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality 

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 17% by 2020.*

* Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.22 - Address air pollutant emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s development of new international standards and recommended practices through the development and implementation of new domestic standards and through targeted research.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020, thus reducing emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

Performance Summary in 2014–15

Transport Canada addressed GHG emissions and air pollutant emissions from aviation through the following actions:

  • Led the Government of Canada’s participation at the ICAO to reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. Transport Canada actively participated in a number of ICAO groups to address air pollutant and GHG emissions and provided advice and leadership. These groups include the following:
    • The Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection steering group and working groups, which are developing two new emissions standards for carbon dioxide (CO2) for airplanes and for particulate matter for aircraft engines;
    • The Alternative Fuels Task Force, which is evaluating the use of alternative fuels in aviation and the range of potential GHG emissions reductions from the use of alternative fuels in aviation to 2050;
    • The Global Market-Based Measures Task Force and its subgroups, which are assessing certain technical elements of market-based measures for aviation, and
    • The Environmental Advisory Group, which is developing a global market-based measure for international civil aviation.
  • Adopted a more stringent aircraft engine emissions standard for nitrogen oxides.
  • Collaborated internationally with other civil aviation regulators, manufacturers and academia to:
    • Characterize aircraft engine emissions to inform the development of a particulate matter standard, and
    • Characterize the emissions of biojet fuels at altitude.
  • Partnered with the Aviation Sustainability Center (ASCENT), which focusses on environmental goals for noise, air quality, climate change and energy. Some of the areas of study include new aircraft technologies and sustainable alternative aviation jet fuels. The affiliation with ASCENT will directly inform future international environmental standards for aviation at the ICAO. These standards, in turn, lead to improved domestic regulations in Canada.
  • Released the 2013 Annual Report under Canada’s Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation in December 2014.
  • Initiated a review of Canada’s Action Plan in January 2015 to assess progress towards goals and commitments, in accordance with the Action Plan’s commitment to undertake such a review and in line with guidance from ICAO.
  • Supported the creation of an Aviation Task Force as part of BioFuelNet Canada.
  • Continued to monitor the development of aviation biofuels in Canada and the United States.
  • Completed phase 1 (preliminary assessment) of a feasibility study of a Canadian biojet fuel supply study.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards 100% by March 31, 2015 100%
2014-15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014–15 Actual Expenditure
$2,411,455 $2,349,852
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.34 - Address GHG emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations, and targeted research and development. (Environment Canada, Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 17% by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.21 - Address air pollutant emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations, and targeted research and development. (Environment Canada, Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020, thus reducing emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada addressed GHG emissions and air pollutant emissions from maritime shipping through the following actions:

  • Continued to participate actively in the IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) to address air pollutant and GHG emissions from international maritime transportation, including contributing to relevant meetings and correspondence groups.
  • 82% of all research projects were either completed or on-track. Five research projects were completed this year, nine were on-track and three were delayed. Each project advanced a specific technology that can reduce marine emissions (both GHG emissions and criteria air contaminant) within five or 10 years.
  • Provided significant input, including a paper and lunchtime presentation at the MEPC’s sub-committee on Pollution Prevention and Response that led to a consensus on a single definition on black carbon, to be presented for decision at the next MEPC.
  • Supported the preparation of papers related to the development of operational energy efficiency measures.
  • As member of the Correspondence Group on further technical and operational measures for enhancing energy efficiency of international shipping, supported the development of legal text for a data collection system for the energy-efficiency (GHG emissions) of vessels engaged in international maritime shipping.
  • Submitted papers to MEPC68 on Canada’s Port Emissions Inventory Tool and on the definition and measurement of black carbon from ships.
  • The North American Emission Control Area standard for sulphur content in marine fuel of 0.1% entered into effect on January 1, 2015.
  • Safety provisions of the Polar Code adopted by IMO, environmental provisions were approved for adoption.
  • Transport Canada worked with other government departments, industry and academia to promote new technologies that have the potential to reduce emissions and improve ship energy efficiency. The Department leveraged approximately 1:1 in working with several partners on technologies that could have a major impact on emissions from ships within the next 5 to 15 years, such as underwater hull cleaning and new propulsion technologies. An important liquified natural gas study that focussed on the West Coast of Canada was expanded to include the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence Seaway and the East Coast. Five projects were completed and 11 projects are ongoing.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards 100% by March 31, 2015

100% for domestic legislation 80% for international standards (will meet 90% in 2020 as the fleet averaging will end in 2020 and all Canadian vessels will meet international requirements for sulphur content in fuel).

While the target is 100% to reflect our commitments to treaties ratified, there are some cases where unique Canadian requirements are set in place for both Clean Air and Clean Water objectives.

Compliance with vessel emissions regulations 100% by March 31, 2017 On track
2014–15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014-15 Actual Expenditure
$4,412,162 $3,841,608
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.35 - Address GHG emissions from the rail sector through the joint Canada–U.S. locomotive emissions initiative under the Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC), a voluntary agreement with the Canadian rail industry and research activities to enhance understanding of new technologies to reduce GHG emissions. (Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 17% by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.26 - Address air pollutant emissions from the rail sector through locomotive regulations aligned with U.S. standards and research activities to enhance understanding of new technologies to reduce air pollutant emissions. (Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020, thus reducing emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada addressed GHG emissions and air pollutant emissions from the rail sector through the following actions:

  • Continued to develop Locomotive Emissions Regulations that will help to reduce criteria air contaminant emissions from locomotives in Canada. Pre-publication in Canada Gazette, Part I is expected to occur in 2015–16.
  • Released the 2012 Locomotive Emissions Monitoring Program Report in December 2014.
  • Developed a new work plan for the RCC Locomotive Emissions Initiative following the release of the RCC Joint Forward Plan in August 2014. The Canada–United States Voluntary Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Locomotives is expected to be finalized in fall 2015. A technical meeting with key stakeholders was held in Washington, DC, on December 10, 2014, to undertake analysis of the most promising measures that could be included in the Canada–United States Action Plan.
  • Continued to develop Locomotive Emission Information System, which will be used to track railway emission data once Locomotive Emissions Regulations are in effect.
  • 100% of research projects on new and emerging technologies to address emissions from the rail sector were on track this year. Fourteen projects were funded this year. Four were completed and the remainder are multi-year projects ending in March 2016.
  • Continued to support the Clean Rail Academic Grant program, providing federal funding to academic research programs currently developing technologies and practices that aim to reduce air emissions from the rail sector. Some research projects include investigating emissions reduction with the use of biodiesel fuel, railway electrification and ultra-low sulphur diesel fuel.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards 100% by March 31, 2015 Not applicable – regulations are under development.
2014–15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014–15 Actual Expenditure
$2,845,518 $1,745,506
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.33 - Develop and implement GHG emission regulations for light-duty vehicles (for model years 2017–25) and heavy-duty vehicles (for model years 2014–18) under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, which will align with those of the United States (Environment Canada, Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 17% by 2020. *

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target. 

Performance Summary in 2014–15:

  • Worked with the National Research Council to review and test the safety aspects of vehicle electrical energy storage systems.
  • Worked with the provinces and territories to update and/or create new standards and/or codes to ensure the safe use of alternative fuels for motor vehicles.
  • Worked with the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the United Nations World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (UN WP.29) to develop and update international regulations related to tire and hydrogen safety, the safety of visually impaired pedestrians in relation to the use of electric and electric hybrid quiet vehicles and the safety of electrical energy storage systems for such vehicles.
  • Generated quarterly activity estimates for the heavy truck fleet since the fourth quarter of 2013. Data, including distance travelled and fuel consumption, are published approximately two months after the close of the quarter. The study draws an annual sample of over 12,000 heavy trucks in the following provinces: Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island.
  • Provided ongoing support to Environment Canada in pursuing the development of a new generation of standards for GHG emissions from heavy-duty vehicles for post-2018 model years and existing regulations, as needed.
  • Continued ongoing maintenance of the economic and emissions models and worked to improve access to light- and heavy-duty vehicles environment data.
  • Continued analysis of costs and GHG emissions implications of potential policies for light- and heavy-duty vehicles, as needed.
  • Reported progress on identified vehicle usage and fleet characteristic data gaps and associated projects.
  • Initiated work to further develop the heavy-duty vehicles model to improve ability to provide impacts analysis and policy advice related to emission reduction measures.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards 100% by March 31, 2015

100% - Environment Canada published the Regulations amending the Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations in September 2014.

The global technical regulation (GTR) on tires was voted on at the November 2014 meeting of the World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations WP.29, with Canada in support of GTR. The GTR will therefore be considered for future adoption by Canada.

2014–15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014–15 Actual Expenditure
$1,733,776 $1,747,593
Sub-Program 2.1.2 Clean Air Initiatives
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.31 - Quantify the carbon (GHG) footprint of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 17% by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

Through the Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative, Transport Canada quantifies the carbon footprint of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors by creating an inventory of existing information sources on production and energy consumption for the supply chains of Canada’s three gateway and corridor initiatives, developing and implementing data gathering and processing, and generating and organizing data to quantify the carbon performance of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors. Specific accomplishments in 2014–15 include the following:

  • Completed the pilot phase of the Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative in a cost-effective manner using internal resources to quantify the GHG footprint of Canada’s strategic gateways, starting with the Asia-Pacific gateway.
  • Reported on the findings of the pilot phase to participating stakeholders, including senior-level executives of the Asia-Pacific gateway, and discussed potential improvements and areas for further work on the carbon footprint of the gateways.
  • Continued discussions with stakeholders in order to understand data needs, availability, and improve access to and the quality of environmental data.
  • Continued development of an internal carbon footprint model to accommodate new data and knowledge and assess model expansion to cover other gateways.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Number of gateway, corridor segments and traffic for which emission intensity (e.g. kg of CO2 / unit of transportation activity) is assessed or monitored and for which carbon footprint is available Carbon footprint of all gateway and corridor segments quantified by the end of 2016 As of March 31, 2015, 2 of 3 gateways (Asia-Pacific and Port of Montreal) have been assessed for their carbon footprint.
2014–15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014–15 Actual Expenditure
$170,960 $80,530
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.26 - Address GHG emissions through testing and evaluation of advanced vehicle technologies to support the development of regulations and industry codes and standards, in order to ensure that new technologies that reduce GHG emissions can be introduced in Canada in a safe and timely manner.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 17% by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.6 - Address air pollutant emissions through testing and evaluation of advanced vehicle technologies to support the development of regulations and industry codes and standards, in order to ensure that new technologies that reduce air pollutant emissions can be introduced in Canada in a safe and timely manner.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020, thus reducing emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II program is an integrated technical assessment initiative that provides the knowledge base required to develop proactive safety and environmental regulatory approaches for new technologies.

The initiative also supports Transport Canada’s participation in efforts to align codes, standards and regulations nationally, continentally and internationally, as well as with non-regulatory authorities. Increased alignment will expand the market for Canadian vehicle technology innovations and allow technology developers to design a more predictable set of standards. Specific accomplishments in 2014–15 include the following:

  • Undertook five joint test programs with Environment Canada, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support the development and alignment of vehicle safety and environmental standards in Canada and the United States.
  • Conducted an annual review of the program’s multi-year testing and evaluation work plan, resulting in the addition of three new technology focus areas, including vehicle cybersecurity, heavy-duty truck automation and dimethyl ether as an alternative fuel for heavy-truck applications.
  • Successfully delivered 16 testing and evaluation activities to provide technical input, recommendations and advice or to provide technical papers to support the development of advanced technology vehicle codes, protocols, guidelines and related instruments.
  • This included two test programs to evaluate new aerodynamic technologies for passenger cars and heavy-duty trucks and trailers. Results directly supported Environment Canada’s regulatory framework to reduce emissions from the light duty vehicle and heavy duty vehicle sector and ongoing regulatory alignment efforts with the United States.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Number of technologies/vehicles tested/evaluated Greater than or equal to five by March 31, 2016 100% achieved: 16 testing and evaluation projects were delivered by the program in 2014–15
2014–15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014–15 Actual Expenditure
$6,656,511 $6,935,429
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.22 - Address GHG emissions by supporting the deployment of truck reservation systems at port and terminal facilities to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 17% by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.7 - Address air pollutant emissions by supporting the deployment of truck reservation systems at port and terminal facilities to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020, thus reducing emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

The Truck Reservation Systems Program looked at ways to innovate technology applications and improve operational practices that can help increase efficiency and environmental sustainability for port terminal and trucking fleet operators. Specific accomplishments in 2014–15 include the following:

  • Signed a multi-year contribution agreement with Port Metro Vancouver for the Common Data Interface System Implementation Project. This project is aimed at improving technologies and communications to better integrate operations across container terminals and better coordinate and schedule container trucking movements. The Department also continued to monitor the progress of a multi-year project to reduce emissions at the Port of Montreal. This project includes the installation of radio frequency identification technology to improve intermodal access and truck traffic flow, thereby reducing overall congestion and emissions at the Port.
  • In addition, Port Metro Vancouver completed the Container Drayage Truck Efficiency Full Implementation Program, which equipped the trucking fleet with Global Positioning System units to help track and communicate important routes and operational and congestion information with vehicle truck operators on a real-time basis, improving efficiency at the Port.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Clean transportation technologies implemented by users

10 technologies by March 31, 2016

(Target shared with the Shore Power Technology for Ports Program (implementation strategies 1.124 and 2.1.8)

Two major container ports (Port Metro Vancouver and Port of Montreal) have or are in the process of deploying and using transportation technologies supported through the Truck Reservation Systems Program.
2014–15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014–15 Actual Expenditure
$3,235,877 $3,462,522
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.24 - Address GHG emissions from the marine sector by funding the installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian ports.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 17% by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.8 - Address air pollutant emissions from the marine sector by funding the installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian ports. (Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020, thus reducing emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

The cost-shared funding for the deployment of marine shore power technology at Canadian ports allows ships access to the local electrical grid to power the vessel rather than using their auxiliary diesel engines when docked. Specific accomplishments in 2014–15 include the following:

  • Two additional projects were approved for funding, a project with the Montreal Port Authority for cruise ships at the Alexandra pier and a project with Port Metro Vancouver for the Centerm Container Terminal. These two projects bring the total up to six funded projects .These projects will provide shore power services at 10 locations. Depending on the location, cruise ships, container ships or ferries will be able to reduce their GHG emissions and improve air quality at ports by connecting to the electric grid and shutting down their engines. By the end of the program, most major Canadian cruise ship ports will offer shore power to their clients.
  • Ongoing management of three contribution agreements with the Port of Halifax, the Port of Montreal and British Columbia Ferries. In addition, the negotiation of three additional agreements is underway, including one with the Port of Quebec and two with Port Metro Vancouver.
  • The development of its management and monitoring tools was completed.
  • The program’s funding authority was extended to March 31, 2017, to provide sufficient time for the new projects added in 2014–15 to be completed.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Clean transportation technologies implemented by users

10 technologies by March 31, 2016

(Target shared with the Truck Reservation System Program for Ports Program (implementation strategies 1.122 and 2.1.7)

Two additional projects were approved for funding under the Shore Power Technology for Ports Program in 2014–15, which brings the total number of projects funded under the program to six projects. These projects will provide shore power services at 10 locations.

2014–15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014–15 Actual Expenditure
$15,952,426 $2,777,796
Program 2.3 Environmental Stewardship of Transportation
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.2.10 - Support the development and testing of innovative science-based tools and technologies to help improve the resiliency and adaptability of existing and future northern transportation infrastructure and Arctic marine operations. (Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce GHG emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.2.: Climate Change Adaptation - Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools.

Performance Summary in 2014–15:

  • Facilitated the development of collaborative engagements between government, northern transportation planners and practitioners, academia, and the private sector through the funding of three grants and 11 (new and ongoing) contribution agreements involving multiple partners and the organization of three workshops/meetings of the networks of expertise on permafrost and Arctic shipping.
  • Conducted and concluded 14 (new and ongoing) knowledge gap studies and needs assessments in consultation with provincial and territorial governments.
  • Supported territorial governments and academic institutions in completing large-scale research studies through the funding of three grants and 11 (new and on-going) contribution agreements.
  • A contract has been awarded to Université Laval in order to evaluate the performance of adaptation measures (installation of drainage trenches and measures of impacts of different colors of asphalt mix on the thermal regime below the runway at Kuujjuaq Airport). In addition, the collected data was used to produce a stormwater management plan. The results meet expectations since data obtained can be used in the future for the airport operations.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of Grant/Contribution Agreements Involving Multiple Collaborators (aside from federal government) 100% by March 31, 2015 100%
Number of individuals, organizations or sectors supported to participate in technical exchanges, including workshops, conferences, training seminars, and other related exchange activities 25 by March 31, 2015 19 individuals
Number of analyses, assessments and research reports performed on specific transportation infrastructure, technologies and operations Four by March 31, 2015 11 completed analysis, assessment and research
Number of tools and technologies evaluated and/or developed for the adaptation of transportation infrastructure and operations to climate change One by March 31, 2015 12 tools and technologies evaluated and/or developed
Number of meetings, workshops and conferences hosted or facilitated to support partnerships and networking activities Five by March 31, 2015 Four meetings, workshop and conferences
2014–15 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2014–15 Planned Spending 2014–15 Actual Expenditure
$2,862,950 $2,943,093

Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability 

Marine shipping is critical to Canada’s economy, and the movement of goods by sea is becoming increasingly important as trade with Asia and other international trading partners continues to grow. A dominant feature of marine transportation is its international dimension, which shapes policy and the regulatory and competitive environment. These conditions underpin the need for largely international governance of marine issues, in marine safety and environmental issues in particular, which is done mainly through the International Maritime Organization.

The movement of goods by sea carries with it a range of possible environmental consequences for the marine environment and water quality. For example, accidental oil spills in the marine environment are prominent in the public eye when they occur and have immediate and obvious negative consequences for the environment and the health of local communities. Water-borne spills of hazardous and noxious substances can also cause serious damage to human health and the environment.

Transport Canada develops and administers policies, regulations and programs to protect the marine environment, reduce the impact on the environment of marine pollution incidents in Canadian waters and promote the safety of the general public.

Transport Canada’s Commitments 

Under Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability, Transport Canada contributed to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy through Goal 3: Water Quality and Quantity, details of which can be found in the table below.

Transport Canada’s implementation strategies have been organized according to the appropriate Sub-Program in the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. This means that Transport Canada’s Theme II implementation strategies are linked to two different Sub-Programs – 2.2.1 - Clean Water Regulatory Framework and 2.2.2 - Clean Water Regulatory Oversight.

Sub-Program 2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
3.8.1 - Set the legal and regulatory frameworks through domestic legislation and international conventions that govern the protection of the marine environment from pollution and the introduction of invasive species and the environmental impact of pollution incidents, and advance Canadian positions on reducing and managing global marine pollution from ships. (Transport Canada)

Theme II. Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants - Protect the marine environment by an annual 5% reduction in the number of releases of harmful pollutants in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013–16.

Technology plays a key role in both preventing pollution and responding to incidents. By setting legal and regulatory frameworks domestically via international conventions and by administering regulations and carrying out research and development, Transport Canada aims to attain the highest possible levels of protection for the environment. Specific accomplishments in 2014–15 include the following:

  • Continued to provide pollution surveillance through its National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP). The NASP achieved its target as it relates to allocated patrol hours. NASP aircraft flew 3,842 patrol hours, overflew 19,551 vessels and identified 253,832 vessels through the Automated Identification System.
  • Detected or responded to 322 pollution incidents, of which 37 were of a known source and the remaining 285 were mystery spills, which means that the source could not be positively identified. All spills observed during NASP flights are reported to the appropriate authorities for further investigation.
  • Continued to act as a deterrent to potential polluters who transit waters under Canadian jurisdiction. Vessels are sometimes contacted via radio or flown over at low altitudes to ensure that the shipping community is aware of Transport Canada’s surveillance activities.
  • Surpassed its annual reduction of 5% in regards to the number of releases of harmful pollutants by 16%, when compared to the previous fiscal year.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation and/or adopted international standards 95% by March 31, 2017 On target
Compliance with regulations 100% by March 31, 2017 On target
Proposal of an update to the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations to fully implement the Ballast Water Management Convention Publication of proposed regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part I by March 31, 2015 Delayed to March 31, 2016, due to technical issues related to available treatment systems
Proposal of an update to the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations to reflect new international standards Release of discussion paper by March 31, 2015 Completed – November 2014
Sub-Program 2.2.2 - Clean Water Regulatory Oversight
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
3.8.2 - Contribute to reducing pollution from vessels by monitoring compliance of marine transportation firms with Canadian legislation, such as the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, through the National Aerial Surveillance Program, inspections, audits, monitoring, and enforcement. (Transport Canada)

Theme II. Maintaining Water Quality and Availability 

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants - Protect the marine environment by annually reducing the number of releases of harmful pollutants by 5% in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013–16.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada achieved the following:

  • Continued its commitment to protect the marine environment by contributing to the reduction of water pollution from transportation activity by maintaining its aerial surveillance.
  • Used NASP pollution surveillance aircraft to perform patrols over all waters under Canadian jurisdiction and continued to deter potential polluters who transit waters under Canadian jurisdiction.
  • Achieved its target as they relate to allocated patrol hours for the NASP. NASP aircraft flew 3,842 patrol hours, overflew 19,551 vessels and identified 253,832 vessels through the Automated Identification System. Surveillance officers detected or responded to 322 pollution incidents of which 37 were of a known source and the remaining 285 were mystery spills, which means that the source could not be positively identified. Please note that a large majority of these spills were less than 10 litres. Due to the capability of the sophisticated surveillance equipment, operators can detect spills less than a litre.
  • Observed a 54.5% reduction (five spills) in offshore spills, when compared to the previous fiscal year.
  • Assisted with 32 Search and Rescue incidents as a secondary resource to the Department of National Defence.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of vessels in compliance with the regulatory framework for environmental response regime 95% by March 31, 2017 100% compliance on the Great Lakes
Percentage of vessels in compliance with Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules 95% by March 31, 2017 On target
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
3.8.3. Implementation of the World-Class Tanker Safety initiatives announced in Budget 2012 and on March 18, 2013, to support Responsible Resource Development. This includes, but is not limited to, increased tanker inspection, aerial surveillance, navigational products and a new Incident Command System. (Transport Canada)

Theme II. Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants - Protect the marine environment by annually reducing the number of releases of harmful pollutants by 5% in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013–16.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada achieved the following:

  • Increased the effectiveness of the NASP by expanding its frequency of patrols and area of coverage across Canada. This was made possible by World-Class Tanker Safety System Initiative, which provided the NASP with long-term operational funding to improve its maritime surveillance activities.
  • Continued to overfly ships in waters under Canadian jurisdiction and achieved its target as it relates to allocated patrol hours. The NASP flew 3,842 patrol hours, overflew 19,551 vessels and identified 253,832 vessels through the Automated Identification System. In comparison to the hours flown in fiscal year 2012–13, there has been an increase in patrol hours by 85%.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation and/or adopted international standards 95% by March 31, 2017 95%
Percentage of foreign-flagged ships that are inspected 100% of tankers on their first visit to Canada each year by March 31, 2016 100% of tankers on their first visit to Canada each year (note: This indicator refers to foreign-flagged tankers that are inspected annually)
Increased aerial surveillance over Canadian waters 3,400 hours by March 31, 2018 3,842 hours for 2014–15
Tanker Safety Expert Panel Report on the Oil Spill Preparedness and response regime in the Arctic Report submitted in 2014 The Panel submitted its report to the Minister at the end of September 2014.

Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians

Canada has one of the longest navigable coastlines in the world, from the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Great Lakes to the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific oceans. A significant increase in worldwide shipping traffic and a corresponding amount of ballast water discharge has resulted in an increase in alien species introductions.

Modern commercial shipping cannot operate without ballast water, which provides balance and stability to ships. Water is pumped into the ballast tanks when the vessel is departing a port of origin and is released when it takes on cargo at another port. Over the past 30 years, there has been growing international recognition of potential problems associated with the discharge of ships’ ballast water.

The introduction and spread of alien invasive species is a serious problem that has ecological, economic, health and environmental impacts, including loss of native biological diversity. Species are considered alien if they are not native to a given ecosystem. Alien species are considered to be invasive when their introduction causes, or is likely to cause, harm to the environment, the economy or human health.

For more information on the Canadian Ballast Water Program, please visit Transport Canada’s website.

Transport Canada’s Commitment 

Under Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians, Transport Canada committed to contribute to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy through Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians. Details on performance against specific goals can be found in the summary table below.

Transport Canada’s implementation strategies have been organized according to the appropriate Program and Sub-Program in the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. This means that Transport Canada’s Theme III implementation strategies are linked to two different Sub-Programs - 2.2.1 - Clean Water Regulatory Framework and 2.2.2 - Clean Water Regulatory Oversight and two Programs - 2.3 - Environmental Stewardship of Transportation and 3.5 - Transportation of Dangerous Goods.

Sub-Program 2.2.1 - Clean Water Regulatory Framework
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
4.6.6 - Implement the vessel-related invasive species provisions of the 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement through policy, regulations, research and enforcement actions.

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so that Canadians can enjoy the benefits of natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.6 - Invasive Alien Species - By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introduction are identified and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada achieved the following:

  • Continued inspections of vessels for compliance with the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations.
  • Managed reports received from vessels.
  • Carried out inspections with the U.S. Coast Guard, the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation and the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation to inspect 100% of vessels entering the Seaway from overseas.
  • Consulted closely with U.S. agencies on ballast water under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of vessels in compliance with Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules 95% by March 31, 2017 Minimum of 95% compliance has been achieved
Canadian compliance with obligations for invasive species under 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement 95% by March 31, 2017 On target
Sub-Program 2.2.2 - Clean Water Regulatory Oversight
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
4.6.5 - Implement conventions and guidelines of the IMO related to reducing the risk of aquatic species invasions into domestic regulations.

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so that Canadians can enjoy the benefits of natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.6 - Invasive Alien Species - By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introduction are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada achieved the following:

  • Carried out inspections with the U.S. Coast Guard, the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation and the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation to inspect 100% of vessels entering the Seaway from overseas.
  • Carried out consultations with stakeholders and U.S. agencies on proposed approaches to update the regulations.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of vessels in compliance with Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules 95% by March 31, 2017 Minimum of 95% compliance has been achieved
Proposal of an update to the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations to fully implement the ballast water convention Publication of proposed regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part I by March 31, 2015 Delayed to March 31, 2016, due to technical issues related to available treatment
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

4.6.9 - Cooperate with U.S. and international regulators to inspect vessels to ensure compliance with Canadian regulations. (Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Transport Canada)

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so that Canadians can enjoy the benefits of natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.6 - Invasive Alien Species - By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada achieved the following:

  • Carried out inspections with the U.S. Coast Guard, the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation and the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation to inspect 100% of vessels entering the Seaway from overseas.
  • Carried out inspections in Canadian ports to verify compliance with the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and the Canadian requirements under the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of vessels in compliance with Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules 95% by March 31, 2017 Minimum of 95% compliance has been achieved
Percentage of vessels in compliance with regulatory framework for pollution prevention regime 95% by March 31, 2017 On target
Program 2.3 Environmental Stewardship of Transportation
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
4.8.1 - Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites. (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Correctional Services Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Department of National Defence, Environment Canada, National Research Council, Parks Canada, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Transport Canada)

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so that Canadians can enjoy the benefits of natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.8 - Chemicals Management - Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by the release of harmful substances.

Transport Canada reported on its 2014–15 contaminated sites effort through the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan annual reports, which can be found at:

http://www.federalcontaminatedsites.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=B15E990A-1.

Program 3.5 – Transportation of Dangerous Goods
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

4.7.4 - In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and provide advice in response to, the occurrence of events, such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather, and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable. (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Environment Canada, Health Canada, Infrastructure Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Safety, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Transport Canada]

  • In accordance with its mandated transport-related responsibilities, Transport Canada oversees regulatory programs and provides advice related to: preventing incidents; ensuring preparedness and response to incidents; and determining liability arising from incidents. Examples of actions include the operation of the 24/7 Canadian Transport Emergency Centre (CANUTEC) and provision of aerial surveillance of marine incidents (National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP)). (Transport Canada)

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians 

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so that Canadians can enjoy the benefits of natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.7 - Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies - Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated.

In 2014–15, Transport Canada achieved the following:

  • In July 2014, published several regulatory amendments in the Canada Gazette, Part II that were identified in the Departmental Regulatory Plan
  • In December 2014, published in the Canada Gazette, Part II the updated Schedules 1, 2 and 3 to the 18th revised edition of the United Nations Recommendations on the Transportation of Dangerous Goods.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved

Percentage of new or amended regulatory requirements that are made to seek harmonization with international regulations

70% by March 31, 2015 Although difficult to quantify, analysis suggests that harmonization of Canadian regulations with international regulations is well over the 70% target (currently estimated at 75%). This initiative is on-track in the second year of a three-year plan.

Theme IV: Targets and Implementation Strategies

Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy

Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce GHG emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% and below 2005 levels by 2020.

Departmental Target

21% below 2005 levels by 2020

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

Strategic Outcome 2: A Clean Transportation System; Program 2.3: Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Performance Measurement

Expected result

Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations.

Performance indicator Performance level achieved
Updated GHG reduction implementation plan in place by March 31, 2015. March 31, 2015
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005–06. 62.99 kt
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2014−15, not accounting for renewable power emission credits, if applicable 55.53 kt
Renewable power emission credits applied in current fiscal year (kt CO2 equivalent). -0.05 kt
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005–06 to fiscal year 2014–15, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable. 11.9% decrease
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions. No

Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management

Target 7.1: Real Property Environmental Performance

As of April 1, 2014, and pursuant to departmental Real Property Sustainability Frameworks, an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.

Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture

Strategic Outcome 2: A Clean Transportation System; Program 2.3: Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Performance Measurement

Expected result

An industry-recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.

Performance indicator Performance level achieved
A Real Property Sustainability Framework in place to improve the management of energy, waste and water in departmental real property assets by March 31, 2015. March 31, 2015
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings (over 1000 m2) and new lease or lease renewal projects (over 1000 m2) where the Crown is the major lessee, assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool, and associated floor space (m2). 0 Crown-owned buildings
0 m2
0 new lease or lease renewal projects
0 m2
Planned assessment tool to be used: BOMA BESt
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings, new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance and associated floor space (m2). 0 Crown-owned buildings
0 m2
0 new construction projects
0 m2
0 build-to-lease projects
0 m2
0 major renovation projects
0 m2
Planned environmental performance level to be achieved: LEED Silver
Number of fit-up and refit projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance. 0 fit-up and refit projects
0 m2
Planned environmental performance level to be achieved: LEED Silver or equivalent
Implementation strategy element or best practice Performance level achieved
7.1.1.1. Achieve a level of performance that meets or exceeds the custodian’s current commitment(s) to sustainable buildings using industry-recognized assessment and verification tool(s). Achieved
7.1.1.7. Develop an approach to training for building operators in Crown-owned buildings. Achieved

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Strategic Outcome 2: A Clean Transportation System; Program 2.3: Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Performance Measurement

Expected result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.

Performance indicator Performance level achieved
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place as of April 1, 2014. April 1, 2014
Number and percentage of procurement and/or materiel management specialists who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in fiscal year 2014–15. 31
100%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement in fiscal year 2014–15. 2
100%

Departmental green procurement target

By March 31, 2017, 93% of desktop computing equipment (personal computers and laptops/notebooks) purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the equipment.

Performance indicator Performance level achieved

Dollar value of desktop computing equipment (personal computers and laptops/notebooks) purchases that meet the target objective relative to the total dollar value of all purchases for desktop computing equipment in the year in question.

Annual amount spent on desktop computing equipment.

Baseline: As of 2012–13, 90% of desktop computing equipment purchases included criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the equipment.

$2,023,068 (93%)

$2,176,000

Departmental green procurement target

By March 31, 2017, 80% of annual clothing and textile purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the material.

Performance indicator Performance level achieved

Dollar value of clothing and textiles purchased that meet the target objective relative to the total dollar value of all clothing and textile purchases in the year in question.

Annual amount spent on clothing and textiles.

Baseline: As of 2013–14, 0% of annual clothing and textile purchases included criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the material.

$167,000 (55%)

$302,000

Departmental green procurement target

By March 31, 2017, 95% of copy paper purchases will contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of its production.

Performance indicator Performance level achieved

Dollar value of copy paper purchases that meet the target objective relative to the total dollar value of all copy paper purchases in the year in question.

Annual amount spent on copy paper.

Baseline: As of 2012–13, 93% of copy paper purchases contained a minimum of 30% recycled content and had Ecologo certification.

$153,583.00 (90%)

$171,308.04

Implementation strategy element or best practice Performance level achieved
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Achieved
Best Practice
7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.
Achieved

Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

Strategic Outcome 2: A Clean Transportation System; Program 2.3: Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Performance Measurement

Expected result

Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.

Performance indicator Performance level achieved
An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace in place by March 31, 2015. March 31, 2015
Implementation strategy element or best practice Performance level achieved
7.3.1.1. Engage employees in greening government operations practices. Achieved
7.3.1.2. Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles. Achieved
7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (e.g., printer ratios, paper usage and green meetings). Achieved
7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner. Achieved

Goal 8: Water Management

Target 8.1: Water Management

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture

Strategic Outcome 2: A Clean Transportation System; Program 2.3: Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Performance Measurement

Expected result

Water is managed sustainably in Government of Canada real property operations.

Performance indicator Performance level achieved
Approach to improving water management included in Real Property Sustainability Framework by March 31, 2015. March 31, 2015
Amount and percentage of floor space in buildings over 1000 m2 that includes water metering in the given fiscal year (where feasible).
0 m2 existing Crown-owned
0%
0 m2 new Crown built-to-lease
0%
0 m2 major renovations
0%
0 m2 leases
0%
Implementation strategy element or best practice Performance level achieved
8.1.1.4. Meter the water usage in new projects. Achieved

Sustainable Development Management System

Transport Canada’s Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy provides information on:

  • Sustainable development and transportation
  • What this means for Transport Canada
  • Departmental decision-making and sustainable development

Sustainable development and transportation 

Transportation takes place within a complex web of human and physical interactions and conditions. Trends in the environment, the economy and society affect the nature and scale of transportation activities, the impacts of those activities, and our responses to those impacts. The nature and volume of trade drives the demand for freight transportation. Similarly, the size of the population, its habits, income levels, the cost of energy and land use patterns affect passenger travel.

Transportation is fundamental to Canada’s economic prosperity and Canadians’ quality of life. To enhance our quality of life, we need to ensure that our system is safe, secure and environmentally responsible. To maintain and enhance our competitiveness, we must ensure our transportation system is efficient and able to adapt to new challenges as they arise.

To preserve and strengthen Canada’s transportation system, transportation policy must provide a framework that addresses the three elements of sustainable transportation - social, economic and environmental. It must also give carriers the opportunity to adapt, innovate, compete and serve shippers and travellers in a way that takes into account each of these elements. The fundamental policy challenge is to find the right balance among these three elements.

Canada’s size and dependence on international trade make transportation very important to Canadians. Transportation––by land, water and air––links Canadians to each other and Canada with the world. Transportation has a wide range of impacts on the economy, our society and the environment. While many of these impacts are positive (e.g., supporting economic growth; moving people to their destinations and goods to markets; providing jobs; supporting mobility; enabling human contact), there are negative impacts that need also need to be considered (e.g., emissions; materials and energy resource use; possibility of spills and leaks; impacts on land use).

What this means for Transport Canada 

Transport Canada is responsible for the Government of Canada’s transportation policies and programs. While not directly responsible for all aspects or modes of transportation, the Department plays a leadership role to ensure that all parts of the transportation system work together effectively. Transport Canada leads Canada’s efforts in addressing environmental issues from the rail, marine and aviation sectors. For example, under the legislative authority of the Railway Safety Act, the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and the Aeronautics Act, Transport Canada contributes to reducing air emissions from transportation by creating and implementing regulatory regimes.

Our Vision - A transportation system in Canada that is recognized worldwide as safe and secure, efficient and environmentally responsible.

The Department’s vision of a sustainable transportation system is one that integrates and balances social, economic and environmental objectives. This vision is guided by the following principles:

  • highest possible safety and security of life and property, guided by performance-based standards and regulations when necessary;
  • efficient movement of people and goods to support economic prosperity and a sustainable quality of life based on competitive markets and the targeted use of regulation and government funding; and
  • respect for the environmental legacy of future generations of Canadians, guided by environmental assessment and planning processes in transportation decisions and the selective use of regulation and government funding.

Transport Canada’s decision-making and sustainable development 

In line with the federal approach, Transport Canada’s sustainable development planning and reporting is linked with the federal government’s core expenditure planning and reporting system under the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. This integration occurs through two primary planning and reporting vehicles:

  • Report on Plans and Priorities - Objectives and plans that contribute to the FSDS are highlighted in Transport Canada’s annual Reports on Plans and Priorities.
  • Departmental Performance Report - Transport Canada reports progress against its FSDS implementation strategies in its annual Departmental Performance Reports.

The following are some other key examples of how Transport Canada is integrating sustainable development into its decision-making:

  • Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs);
  • Transport Canada’s National Environmental Management System.

Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2014–15 reporting cycle, Transport Canada considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. Through the strategic environmental assessment process, one departmental proposal, Advancing the Next Suite of Clean Transportation Initiatives Memorandum to Cabinet, was found to have important positive effects on the 2013–16 FSDS goals and targets for Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality.

Strategic Environmental Assessments evaluate the environmental effects of a proposed policy, plan or program and its alternatives and informs decision-making through a careful analysis of environmental risks and opportunities.

As required by the Guidelines for Implementing the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, all departments are required to consider FSDS goals and targets when undertaking Strategic Environmental Assessments and report on the results of their Strategic Environmental Assessments in their Departmental Performance Reports.

The Strategic Environmental Assessments guidelines are designed to improve the transparency of environmental decision-making in the following ways:

  • Departments and agencies describe the impact of their initiatives on the FSDS goals and targets in their Strategic Environmental Assessment public statements; and
  • Departments and agencies report on the extent and results of their Strategic Environmental Assessment in their year-end performance report, including how initiatives are expected to affect progress toward the FSDS goals and targets.

During the first FSDS period (2010–13), in order to reflect the abovementioned changes to the Guidelines, Transport Canada updated its internal SEA process and supporting materials, including the departmental Strategic Environmental Assessment Policy Statement, guidance and training documents, tools, website and correspondence products. All of these updates were completed by March 2011.

On April 1, 2013, Transport Canada introduced a new internal tool called the Sustainable Transportation Assessment Tool, which replaces the former Strategic Environmental Assessment preliminary scan. Transport Canada now requires all potential policies, plans or programs to consider possible effects on the economy, on society and on the environment. The Sustainable Transportation Assessment Tool also includes specific questions to assess possible impacts on FSDS goals and targets.

By asking these kinds of questions early in the design and development of proposals, it is anticipated that risks and opportunities will be better identified and managed, potential impacts across the Department’s strategic outcomes will be considered and economic, social and environmental considerations will be better integrated into departmental decision-making.

Transport Canada publishes the results of its SEAs when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors are integrated into the decision-making process.

Transport Canada will also continue to report on the following activities and performance measures in the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy:

  • Number of approved proposals submitted by Transport Canada to Cabinet or Treasury Board and subject to departmental Strategic Environmental Assessment requirements (Memorandum to Cabinet, Treasury Board Submissions, Regulatory Amendments);
  • Number of proposals for which a detailed SEA was completed and how it contributed towards Federal Sustainable Development goals and targets;
  • Transport Canada’s overall SEA compliance (%); subject to the departmental SEA requirements).
2014–15 Progress Number of approved proposals submitted by Transport Canada to Cabinet or Treasury Board, and subject to departmental Strategic Environmental Assessment requirements
Memorandum to Cabinet 19
Treasury Board Submissions 8
Regulatory Amendments 43
Number of proposals for which a detailed Strategic Environmental Assessment was completed and how it contributed towards Federal Sustainable Development goals and targets

1

A detailed Strategic Environmental Assessment was completed for Advancing the Next Suite of Clean Transportation Initiatives Memorandum to Cabinet.

This proposal responds directly to Transport Canada’s FSDS by addressing goals under Theme 1: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality. These include:

  • Goal 1: Climate Change – Reduce GHG emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change; and
  • Goal 2: Air Pollution – Clean air for Canadians to breathe and to support healthy ecosystems.
Transport Canada’s overall Strategic Environmental Assessment Compliance 87%
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