Horizontal Initiative - Marine Security

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

Marine Security

Name of lead department

Transport Canada

Federal partner organizations

Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canadian Coast Guard, Public Safety, Canada Border Services Agency, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, National Defence

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

2001

End date of the horizontal initiative

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars)

Not applicable

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

Marine Security is a horizontal initiative that is linked to the government’s key priority of a safe and secure Canada. It aims to improve the security of Canada’s maritime domain, including territorial waters, inland waterways and ports. Elements of this initiative include:

  • Increased domain awareness, surveillance and tracking of marine traffic;
  • Improved coordination of and cooperation on marine security, including the development of Marine Security Operations Centres;
  • A security clearance program for marine-sector employees;
  • New detection equipment at Canadian ports to monitor containers;
  • Additional resources for emergency and law enforcement response capacity in the marine domain;
  • International initiatives that will ensure Canada meets current international standards and obligations, including those being developed by the International Maritime Organization; and
  • Efforts to increase resilience and ensure that Canada’s maritime transportation system prepares for and can recover in a timely manner from major disruptions due to a significant supply chain disruption. Resilience includes the steady and expedient recovery from the effects of threats to maritime activities.
Shared outcomes

The following are planned shared outcomes and activities. Key areas include:

  • Domain awareness: Canada’s surveillance and awareness efforts within marine areas;
  • Responsiveness: enforcement efforts in cooperation with all relevant police forces and security agencies;
  • Safeguarding: efforts to enhance the physical security of marine infrastructure or other critical infrastructure in or around marine areas; and
  • Collaboration: efforts in support of all other activities to ensure the various federal and provincial departments, agencies, police forces, and other groups with a responsibility for marine security work together.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Increased surveillance and awareness of the marine security environment;
  • Increased on-water presence;
  • Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;
  • Increased capability to respond to marine threats;
  • Increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;
  • Increased stakeholder ability to meet marine security requirements; and
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Effective domain awareness;
  • Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents;
  • A security-conscious culture among stakeholders;
  • Stakeholder compliance with security regulations; and
  • Increased collaboration: internationally, with industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Ultimate Outcomes:

  • An effective and efficient marine security system;
  • High public confidence in Canada’s marine security system; and
  • A marine security system that facilitates the efficient and legitimate flow of people and goods.

Strategic Outcome:

  • The expected strategic outcome will be a marine system that contributes to the security, safety and prosperity of Canadians and our allies.
Governance structure

The Government of Canada created the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group, chaired by Transport Canada, to identify and coordinate federal actions in support of Canada’s objectives with regard to public security and anti-terrorism in the marine domain, as well as its international marine security obligations. Transport Canada’s Director General of Marine Safety and Security chairs the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group. Members are Director General-level representatives from 17 federal departments and agencies with mandates for different aspects of marine security. The Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group meets as needed, but at least four times a year. Three standing committees (Policy, Operations, and Legal Issues) support Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group decision-making. Members are at the Director and/or Senior Analyst level. Most committees meet on a monthly basis. The Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group may also strike ad hoc working groups as needed.

Performance highlights

Overall, the Government of Canada increased its awareness of the marine domain through shared initiatives such Automatic Identification and Long-Range Identification and Tracking Systems. Inspections of vessels also increased, and emergency preparedness and incident response procedures continued to be strengthened.

Comments on variance

Variance explanations have been included with the performance information by each federal partner.

Results achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

Tim Meisner
Director General
Marine Safety & Security
Transport Canada
(613) 998-0610

Performance Information

Federal organizations Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2014–15 Planned spending (dollars) 2014–15 Actual spending (dollars) 2014–15 Expected results 2014–15 Actual results against targets
Transport Canada

3.7 Marine Security

3.7.1 Marine Security Regulatory Framework

5,000,000

1,400,000

1,400,000

ER 1.1

AR 1.1

3.7.2 Marine Security Oversight

54,000,000

6,700,000

6,700,000

ER 1.2

AR 1.2

3.7.3 Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs)

24,700,000

5,300,000

5,300,000

ER 1.3

AR 1.3

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Safe and Secure Waters

a) Increased On-Water Patrols

10,000,000 (annually and ongoing)

10,000,000

10,000,000

ER 2.1

AR 2.1

b) Automatic Identification System (AIS) and Long Range Identification and Tracking

2,000,000 (ongoing funding, excluding capital portion)

2,000,000

2,000,000

ER 2.2

AR 2.2

c) Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre

3,000,000 (annually and ongoing)

3,000,000

3,000,000

ER 2.3

AR 2.3

d) Marine Security Enforcement Teams

13,100,000 (annually and ongoing)

13,100,000

9,900,000

ER 2.4

AR 2.4

e) Construction of Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels

100,900,000

15,600,000

0

ER 2.5

AR 2.5

f) Increased Surveillance Flights

7,000,000 (annually and ongoing)

7,000,000

7,000,000

ER 2.6

AR 2.6

g) Coastal Marine Security Operations Centre

3,300,000 (annually and ongoing)

3,300,000

3,300,000

ER 2.7

AR 2.7

Canada Border Services Agency

Admissibility Determination

a) Radiation Detection Equipment initiative

47,100,000

2,300,000

2,300,000

ER 3.1

AR 3.1

Internal Services

2,900,000

2,900,000

Admissibility Determination

b) Crew Ship Operations

99,500,000

5,800,000

5,800,000

ER 3.2

AR 3.2

Public Safety

Government Operations Centre (Exercises)

Marine-Based Counterterrorist (Exercises)

127,000 (less Corporate hold back)

115,000

115,000

ER 4.1

AR 4.1

Government Operations Centre (no funding)
National Security

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Operations Centre

2008–09 to 2012–13: $1,250,000 and $250,000 ongoing

227,000

220,000

ER 4.2

AR 4.2

Internal Services

 

2008–09 to 2012–13: $350,000 and $50,000 ongoing

45,000

45,000

National Defence

Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces –

Generate and Sustain Forces Capable of Maritime Effects – Operational Units

a) Coastal Marine Security Operations Centres

118, 480, 000
 

 

119,520,000

20,700,000
 

 

17,980,000

14,900,000
 

2,100,000

ER 5.1

AR .5.1

Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces -Generate and Sustain Forces Capable of Maritime Effects -Operational Units

b) Interdepartmental Maritime Integrated Command Control and Communication

31,600,000

5,900,000

3,800,000

ER 5.2

AR 5.2

Conduct Operations -Domestic and Continental Operations -Conduct Ongoing Operations and Services to Canadians

c) Increased On-Water Presence/ Coordination (Marlant and Joint Task Force)

5,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

ER 5.3

AR 5.3

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Marine Security

a) National Ports Project

12,500,000

1,000,000

Included in the actual for b). See below.

ER 6.1

AR 6.1

b) National Port Enforcement Teams

40, 100,000

4,500,000

5,900,000

 

c) Marine Security Emergency Response Team Training

6,200,000

600,000

800,000

ER 6.2

AR 6.2

 

d) Marine Security Emergency Response Teams

55,200,000

5,600,000

4,600,000

ER 6.3

AR 6.3

Scientific Identification

e) Marine Transportation Clearance Program

2,900,000

200,000

100,000

ER 6.4

AR 6.4

Marine Security

f) Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre

38,800,000

8,700,000

5,200,000

ER 6.5

AR 6.5

 

Coastal Marine Security Operations Centres

17,000,000

2,400,000

2,400,000

ER 6.6

AR 6.6

 

National Waterside Security Coordination Team

8,200,000

800,000

400,000

ER 6.7

AR 6.7

Marine Security

Marine Security Enforcement Teams

53,800,000

6,300,000

4,600,000

ER 6.8

AR 6.8

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Public Works and Government
Services Canada - Accommodations

 

8,000,000

500,000

500,000

Total for all federal organizations

Not applicable

158,967,000

110,280,000

 

Expected results and results achieved for 2014–15:

ER 1.1 Further development of policies, standards and procedures, including the coming-into-force of amendments to the Marine Transportation Security Regulations in accordance to the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council initiative.

AR 1.1: Work is underway to finalize the development of the permanent Security Measure Respecting Designated Tall Ships Events; work is also underway to finalize the development of the permanent Security Measure for Tall Ships and Marine Facilities interfacing with Tall Ships.

ER 1.2: Effective security measures at ports and marine facilities; continued stakeholder awareness and understanding; stakeholder compliance with security regulations; security conscious culture among stakeholders; continued security measures at ports and marine facilities; further development of policies, standards and procedures, including the coming-into-force of an administrative monetary penalty system; Marine Security policy and interdepartmental coordination; advancement of Marine Security Strategic Framework and its various sub-components; increased security conscious culture among stakeholders; increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and increased collaboration internationally and with industry partners, multilateral organizations and other levels of government.

AR 1.2: Nationally, the program conducted 672 inspections of all regulated entities and 78 security assessments of marine facilities. Under the Marine Transportation Security Regulations and the Domestic Ferry Security Regulations, 114 inspections of Canadian vessels, 196 inspections of marine facilities and Ports, and 362 inspections of foreign-flagged vessels were conducted.

Guidance material was produced related to the amendments to the Marine Transportation Security Regulations for inspectors and external stakeholders. This included Marine Security Operations Bulletins in December 2014 to highlight changes in procedures regarding occasional-use marine facilities and domestic voyages undertaken by Canadian vessels.

Building upon the success of the Maritime Event Response Protocol/ Maritime Operational Threat Response Strategic Protocol, Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand drafted a Five Eyes (international intelligence sharing network) Strategic Protocol that serves to enhance international level communication and coordination to support response efforts to significant maritime threats or events that could have national level implications to more than one nation. The Strategic Protocol is currently awaiting endorsement by all participating countries.

Marine Security supported the achievement of the Beyond the Border Action Plan deliverables for an Enhanced Domain Awareness Integrated Cargo Security Strategy and a Pre-clearance Agreement.

ER 1.3: Coastal: continued surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; continued cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; effective domain awareness; and continued collaboration internationally and with industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway: increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; effective domain awareness; and increased collaboration internationally and with industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

AR 1.3: Secure network established for Coastal and Great Lakes Marine Security Operation Centres. Amendments to the pre-arrival information reports to respond to the changes in the Marine Transportation Security Regulations have been completed and are awaiting approval to begin distribution.

ER 2.1: Increased on-water presence; improved domain awareness; and visible demonstration of Canada’s sovereignty over its waters.

AR 2.1: The funding received from the Public Security and Anti-Terrorism Initiative contributed to the operations and on-water presence of 119 vessels in 2014–15.

ER 2.2: Increased awareness of and ability to identify vessels transiting Canadian waters; and improved domain awareness.

AR 2.2: Terrestrial-Automatic Identification System shore-based infrastructure has been integrated within all Marine Communications and Traffic Services centres.

In an effort to increase domain awareness in the Arctic, two additional terrestrial- Automatic Identification System sites were established in Resolute Bay and Iqaluit, Nunavut and are now operational. Equipment for a third terrestrial- Automatic Identification System site in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, has been procured, and installation is planned for fiscal year 2015–16. It should be noted that operational requirements may take precedence and if so, installation may be pushed to fiscal year 2016–17. This project is now considered complete. The original scope for the project was to procure equipment and install 80 remote Automatic Identification System sites and develop a satellite communication solution. Ultimately, the project was able to deliver 113 remote Automatic Identification System sites (the 80 planned plus an additional 33 sites) with the funding allocated.

In addition, this funding facilitated the development of Canada’s satellite communication solution to track Safety of Life at Sea class vessels, the Long Range Identification and Tracking system, which has been operational since 2009–10. Further, Canada led international efforts to establish the international Long Range Identification and Tracking regime and currently the majority of Safety of Life at Sea Contracting Governments to the International Maritime Organization are Long Range Identification and Tracking compliant and operational.

Percentage availability of the Automatic Identification System and Long Range Identification and Tracking systems:

  • Automatic Identification System target: 99.7%
  • Results: 99.75%. An in-service support contract has been signed with the provider to ensure ongoing support of the system until March 31, 2018.
  • Long Range Identification and Tracking target: 99.7%
  • Results: 99.7%

ER 2.3: Increased surveillance and awareness of maritime environment; increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with maritime security; improved domain awareness; and increased collaboration internationally and with industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

AR 2.3: Target percentage availability of the consolidated maritime picture versus advertised level of availability for clients: 99.7%.

Results: The percentage of availability of Fisheries and Oceans/Canadian Coast Guard information to enhance the awareness of the federal law enforcement and intelligence communities of vessel movements and response to maritime activities corresponds to the percentage availability of the Long Range Identification and Tracking and Automatic Identification System systems, as well as the National Information System on Marine Navigation.

2.4 Comments on variance: The Canadian Coast Guard continues to refine its forecasting for operations on the new Marine Security Enforcement Team vessels (i.e., mid-shore patrol vessels).

ER 2.4: Increased on-water presence; increased awareness of maritime environment; increased capability to respond to maritime threats; improved domain awareness; rapid and effective response to maritime threats and incidents; and provision of dedicated vessels and crew to support activities of Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers on board. For the 2014–15 fiscal year, 1001 days were planned for the Marine Security Enforcement Team program on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway on four vessels.

Note: Royal Canadian Mounted Police will report on the enforcement results of the Marine Security Enforcement Teams program.

AR 2.4: These vessels delivered approximately 933 elapsed days for the program. The 68-day variance between the planned and delivered days can be attributed to approximately 15 days of unplanned maintenance on board one of the vessels, and approximately 59 days of client delays on two of the vessels (i.e. clients not on board as scheduled).

Note: These numbers are captured in elapsed days (or non-weighted days). Elapsed operational days are calculated by the number of days as if each client were the only client on board. The sum of elapsed days recorded on a vessel may exceed the total number of calendar days available. (e.g. a vessel with two similar programs on board during one operational day will each be attributed up to a maximum of one elapsed day).

2.5 Comments on variance: There were no expenses for the four mid-shore patrol vessels under the Public Safety Initiative in 2014–15 due to warranty incompletion. These expenses are now expected in fiscal year 2015–16.

ER 2.5: The Canadian Coast Guard will acquire and put into service a total of nine new mid-shore patrol vessels. Four of these vessels were funded under the Public Safety Initiative for maritime security purposes.

AR 2.5: The contract for the design and construction of nine mid-shore patrol vessels was awarded in August 2009 to Irving Shipbuilding Inc. Construction of the vessels commenced in September 2010 and is ongoing. Four Marine Security Enforcement Team vessels were delivered in July 2012, November 2012, February 2013, and May 2013 respectively. Two conservation and protection vessels were delivered in October 2013 and a third in March 2014. The two remaining conservation and protection vessels were delivered in the fall of 2014.

ER 2.6: Increased surveillance and awareness of maritime environment; improved domain awareness.

AR 2.6: Additional marine security funds were provided to enhance the National Aerial Surveillance Program. The program provides situational awareness through fisheries patrols that identify the location and activities of foreign and domestic fishing vessels, both inside and outside the 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zone. The additional funding increased the existing program and provided a collateral benefit to maritime security and the recognized maritime picture. The program also provides aerial surveillance services including digital photography and real-time video to the Marine Security Operations Centre partner agencies when required.

For example, the department provided aerial surveillance coverage in the search of vessels of interest. All operations were successful, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada flew approximately 4443 hours in 2014–15. There is no variance or surplus/deficit as flying hours are adjusted monthly directly related to expenditures incurred (i.e. fuel costs).

ER 2.7: Increased surveillance and awareness of maritime environment; increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with maritime security; improved domain awareness; and increased collaboration internationally and with industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

AR 2.7: Target percentage availability of the consolidated maritime picture versus advertised level of availability for clients: 99.7%.

The percentage of availability of Fisheries and Oceans/Canadian Coast Guard information to enhance the awareness of the federal law enforcement and intelligence communities of vessel movements and response to maritime activities corresponds to the percentage availability of the Long Range Identification and Tracking and Automatic Identification systems, as well as the National Information System on Marine Navigation.

3.1 Comments on variance: For 2014-15 money spent for this initiative were under the Science & Engineering Division of the Information Science and Technology Division. The amount spent was $2,901,730. The results achieved are listed below.

Amounts that were previously coded under Internal Services for Information Science and Technology Branch are now coded under the direct program activity Admissibility Determination.

ER 3.1: Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities; screening 100% of all containerized marine cargo; screening 100% of all vessels entering Canadian waters; and boarding selected vessels identified as high-risk.

AR 3.1:

  • Provided 24/7 operational, technical and engineering support for the CBSA’s Radiation Detection Program, including continuous availability of radiation experts.
  • Conducted corrective and preventative maintenance of regionally deployed detection equipment.
  • Procured next generation Portal Radiation Detection Systems (PRDS) for marine facilities.
  • Installed, and tested two next generation PRDSs in the Port of Saint John.
  • Designed, installed and commissioned a temporary PRDS in the Port of Montreal to accommodate an expansion of the Termont terminal.
  • Procured, tested and delivered of 11 replacement Carborne Radiation Detection Systems for marine facilities.
  • Conducted annual inspections of Large Scale Imaging (LSI) sites to ensure the CBSA’s LSI program is compliant with Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission regulations.
  • Conducted factory and site acceptance testing of one additional Mobile LSI system, including radiation detection.
  • Provided engineering support for an upgrade to the CBSA’s Mobile LSI fleet.
  • Developed the technical specifications for the procurement of the CBSA’s first Fixed-site LSI system, including radiation detection.
  • Provided radiation safety services to the Agency.
  • Used applied science and engineering studies to advance radiation detection: degradation of radiation portal sensitivity with time, and alternatives for the detection of special nuclear material.
  • Represented the CBSA at national and international fora related to radiation detection.
  • Continued to work with Canadian Port Authority partners to screen 100% of all containerized marine cargo.
  • Responded to 23,908 radiation alarms and mitigated all but two containers that had legitimate commercial goods, but were contaminated with radioactive material.

3.2 Comments on variance:

Note: Passenger and Crew Screening and Cruise Ship Inspections are now one initiative – Cruise Ship Operations -the planned spending number for 2014–15 after Deficit Reduction Action Plan reductions is $5,837,000 with the entire amount under Admissibility Determination.

ER 3.2: Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities; screening 100% of all containerized marine cargo; screening 100% of all vessels entering Canadian waters; and boarding selected vessels identified as high-risk.

AR 3.2:

  • Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.
  • Screened 100 percent of all containerized marine cargo.
  • Screened 100 percent of all vessels entering Canadian waters.
  • Board selected vessels identified as high-risk.
  • Processed 417 cruise ships (826,004 passengers and 343,409 crew, which total 1,169,413 cruise ship travelers).

ER 4.1: Improve domain awareness in the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway region; lead to increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; increase stakeholder awareness and understanding; increase stakeholder ability to meet marine security requirements; enhance security measures at ports and marine facilities; and increase capability to respond to marine threats.

Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre Exercise Planning/Conduct Exercise: improve domain awareness in the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway region; lead to increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; increase stakeholder awareness and understanding; increase stakeholder ability to meet marine security requirements; enhance security measures at ports and marine facilities; and increase capability to respond to marine threats.

During this time period (2015-16) exercise activity will be focused on planning for marine security exercise(s) related to the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre. This presumes a sufficiently mature operations centre and related operations documentation. Both east and west coasts have seen exercise activity since the commencement of the initiative. The Marine Security Exercise Program uses a building block approach to prepare the region for a functional (or full-scale exercise) in future years, which could also involve key marine partners. Such an exercise approach would include orientation(s), workshop(s) and tabletop exercise(s) at appropriate times in order to assist in the ongoing development of operations concepts specific to the operational realities of the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway marine environment.

AR 4.1: In 2014, Public Safety Canada underwent an internal restructuring effort, which resulted in the National Exercise function being transferred under the leadership of the Government Operations Centre. Owing to an intense transition period and fewer staff resources, the Government Operations Centre was unable to deliver the planned exercise but still managed to achieve the overarching results expected under this horizontal initiative. Three information sharing sites within the Operations Centre Interconnectivity Portal were created for the Canadian Coast Guard component of the Maritime Security Operations Centres. The Operations Centre Interconnectivity Portal sites will allow the Canadian Coast Guard Maritime Security Operations Centres to better communicate with each other and with headquarters. This will eventually lead to better cooperation between the government departments and agencies involved with marine security since the Operations Centre Interconnectivity Portal already includes over 28 federal organizations. The Government Operations Centre also invested funding to increase the resilience of the Operations Centre Interconnectivity Portal to accommodate for additional users and surge capacity during events affecting the national interest. The improved capability will improve the ability to respond to maritime threats. With additional organizations scheduled to join the Operations Centre Interconnectivity Portal in 2015–16, the Portal is increasingly positioning itself as the all-hazard Government of Canada event management system.

Exercise Planning, Conduct and Evaluation – Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre: Public Safety National Exercise Division coordinated an orientation session in December 2013 and a table-top exercise in February 2014.  Goals and objectives were established respectively for the orientation and the table-top exercise and approved by key marine security partners through a broad consultation to ensure appropriate support to the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre program.  An After Action Report (AAR) was developed, including recommendations from the exercise, and a Capability Improvement Process Matrix based on these recommendations was prepared for implementation discussion. It is anticipated that Public Safety Canada will provide a presentation to Marine Security Operations Centre Directors on the After Action Report and the Capability Improvement Process to support discussion regarding the way forward for the Marine Security Operations Centre.

4.2 Comments on variance: The variance in how funding was spent is due to an organizational change, which resulted in the National Exercise function being transferred under the leadership of the Government Operations Centre. The intense transition period that followed allowed for a new interim National Exercise Program being approved by the Director General, Event Response Committee. The realignment also resulted in fewer staff resources that need to focus their efforts on Director General, Event Response Committee-approved exercise priorities.

4.2 Note: Total allocation amounts include employee benefits plan premiums of 20% and Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation premiums of 13%. Planned spending amounts exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation premiums.

ER 4.2: Improved domain awareness in the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway region. While not an operational member of the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre, Public Safety Canada provides overall policy coordination of the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre, which includes providing advice to senior management and the Minister of Public Safety. Public Safety Canada resources support, coordinate and oversee the overall implementation and direction of the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre; oversee the development and administration of evaluations of the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre; and ensure that linkages and synergies between the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre and other Portfolio-led maritime security and border initiatives are maximized.

AR 4.2: Transport Canada participated in the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre National Representatives Working Group, as well as senior level fora, including the Marine Security Operations Centre Directors’, Directors General and Assistant Deputy Ministers’ Working Groups, in order to provide overall policy coordination and support in implementing the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre and addressing legal, policy and operational challenges within both the Great Lakes and Coastal Marine Security Operations Centres.

Specifically, the Department worked with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and interdepartmental partners to develop and finalize the formal impact evaluation for the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre program, as required by the Treasury Board Secretariat. In an effort to respond to recommendations stemming from the evaluation report, the Department also worked with partners to develop the Management Response Action Plan. Further, the Department co-chaired a Marine Security Operations Centre Policy Working Group, tasked by Assistant Deputy Ministers with developing options that would allow the Marine Security Operations Centres to “operate with maximum effectiveness, within a clear legal framework with broad routine information sharing authority and with appropriate governance and accountability structures to provide accurate, timely, relevant situational awareness to Marine Security Operations Centre partners and other clients.” The Department also contributed to the development and implementation of Marine Security Operations Centre information sharing memorandum of understanding.

5.1 Comments on variance: Challenges in the completion of the information technology solution (largely due to difficulties in contracting for Microsoft services) resulted in the delay of transferring financial responsibility for in-service support from the Marine Security Operations Centre Project to the Capability Management Organization. This, coupled with delays in staffing of all the Capability Management Organization positions, resulted in significant under spending of the Department of National Defence’s Marine Security Operations Centre Program funds for fiscal year 2014–15. The situation will be rectified once the Project declares Full Operational Capability and the Capability Management Organization achieves ‘steady state’ operations.

ER 5.1: Surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and effective domain awareness.

AR 5.1: The Marine Security Operations Centres Project declared Full Operational Capability in the Protected B environment on December17, 2014, and is forecasting overall Full Operational Capability in September 2015.

Core partners initiated the staffing of the Marine Security Operations Centres Capability Management Organization to fully support the Marine Security Operations Centres capability upon project close-out (December 2015). On behalf of the core partners, the Royal Canadian Navy (represented by the Department of National Defence Capability Management Organization technical staff) will assume technical responsibility for the Marine Security Operations Centres information technology solution in the fall of 2015.

Marine Security Operations Centres continued to provide effective domain awareness and support to core partner departments and agencies.

5.2 Comments on variance: The variance is due to contractual slippages and reduced Satellite communications, in-service support and engineering change work resulting from slippage.

ER 5.2: Improved surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and more effective domain awareness.

AR 5.2: The first article for the harbor and sea acceptance test program was completed. In addition, the subsystem achieved a qualification review, which was a contractual milestone for the initiative. This approval allowed for recurring article acceptance testing. In 2014-15, the Interdepartmental Maritime Integrated Command, Control and Communications received 40 sub-systems and began their installation on board the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Coast Guard’s vessels and in-shore facilities. Sixteen sub-systems were fully installed and set to work. A plan is in place to set to work all other sub-systems by the end of fiscal year 2016–17.

Produced an interdepartmental memorandum of understanding for Installation, Operation and Maintenance for the Interdepartmental Maritime Integrated Command, Control and Communications Project (as of August 5, 2015, pending the Department of National Defence’s signature for full ratification).

ER 5.3: Surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; on-water presence; and effective domain awareness.

AR 5.3: The Royal Canadian Navy continued to execute dedicated sovereignty patrols with Canada’s coastal approaches. The Department provided additional sea day funding to the Royal Canadian Navy to enable the Canadian Forces to further contribute to maritime surveillance/maritime domain awareness within Canada’s coastal approaches. Of note, maritime security functions are conducted whenever a Royal Canadian Navy ship proceeds to sea, whether this is a dedicated patrol or as a secondary function of normal operations.

Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

ER 6.1: National Port Enforcement Teams are integrated and intelligence-led teams that conduct federal investigations in four major Canadian ports (Halifax, Montreal, Hamilton and Vancouver). National Port Enforcement Teams will continue to detect, prevent, interdict and investigate organized criminal activity, contraband smuggling, and people who may pose a threat to the safety and security of Canada and other countries. Further, National Port Enforcement Teams will continue to detect, prevent, interdict and investigate corruption and internal conspiracies at the four major Canadian ports. This program includes the National Ports Project.

AR 6.1: The National Port Enforcement Teams maintains a strong relationship with core partners such as the Canada Border Services Agency and local law enforcement agencies. National Port Enforcement Teams recovered 364 stolen vehicles that were being exported from the Port of Montreal (326) and the Port of Halifax (38). The approximate value of the recovered stolen vehicles is in excess of $10 M. While several investigations are being pursued, long-term investigations have resulted in five individuals being charged for conspiracy and exportation of stolen vehicles under the Criminal Code. In collaboration with the Canada Border Services Agency, National Port Enforcement Teams also seized a total of 1436 kg of cocaine, 828 kg of hashish, 72 kg of ketamine, 3.5 kg of opium, and 23 kg of norephedrine that were imported into Canada. While several investigations are being pursued, long-term investigations have resulted in six individuals being charged for conspiracy and importation of drugs under sections 465 of the Criminal Code and section 6 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. It should also be noted that National Port Enforcement Teams Montreal participated in the arrest of about 20 other subjects for various crimes such as importation of drugs, exportation of stolen vehicles and possession for the purpose of trafficking. In June 2014, the Pacific Integrated Marine Security Working Group was established in order to address any issues affecting the marine port environment in British Columbia, to assess the level of risk associated with these issues, and to develop an appropriate action plan in accordance with the collective mandates of its partner agencies. The group will serve as an administrative (non-operational) forum in which to address concerns related to the port environment.

6.2 Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

ER 6.2: Marine Security Emergency Response Team Training is responsible for the development of the training for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and its law enforcement partners to provide a tactical on-water response to board ships in Canadian waters and apprehend persons that pose a security risk to Canada. Training initiatives will take place both at the national and regional level, ensuring members are trained in a tactical police response to critical events within the domestic marine environment.

AR 6.2: The Emergency Response Team Marine Intervention training course is delivered once a year. Emphasis is placed on tactical proficiency while operating safely in a marine environment. The course was held in January 2015, and Marine Security Emergency Response Team members attended. Support is being provided by the Critical Incident Program and the National Tactical Training Section to Marine Security Emergency Response Team through continuous research and tactical innovation. Required improvement and evolution of equipment remains ongoing and is necessary to ensure safe and efficient policing operations.

6.3 Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

ER 6.3: Marine Security Emergency Response Teams are integrated teams with provincial and municipal partners that will continue to provide a tactical police response to critical threats and events within the domestic marine environment of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region, and elsewhere in Canada when required.

AR 6.3: Marine Security Emergency Response Teams were involved in one operation over the past year, which occurred in the maritime environment. Members (divers, drivers, assaulters, snipers) are well trained, equipped and ready to respond as per the mandate. While attrition remained a challenge (especially in the command group), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has established a mentorship program to mitigate the issue. Consequently, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has been able to attract several new members to its Marine Security Emergency Response Teams.

6.4 Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

ER 6.4: Continue to contribute security measures at ports and marine facilities.

AR 6.4: The Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program was initiated in January 2003 with a commitment to introduce background checks of workers at marine facilities and ports. The purpose of the Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program is to reduce the risk of security threats by preventing unlawful interference with the marine transportation system by conducting background checks on marine workers who perform certain duties or who have access to certain restricted zones. Those who fail to obtain their restricted zone passes will be permitted to work in non-restricted areas. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police performed law enforcement record checks on new marine ports employees and security updates for the renewal of current employees’ Restricted Area Identification Cards.

6.5 Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

ER 6.5: The Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre consists of five core federal government departments responsible for marine safety and security in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region. Through cooperation and collaboration, the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre will produce actionable intelligence, concentrating on national security, organized crime and other criminality, and provide this intelligence to the appropriate agency or service in a timely fashion. The Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre will continue to work with partners to increase the sharing of information and intelligence as legally permitted, in order to combat illegal activities in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region. Partners also include provincial and municipal authorities contributing to the safety and security of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will enhance domain awareness and the security of the border in collaboration with domestic and U.S. partners by deploying technology to address identified bi-national gaps and increasing border integrity intelligence investigators capacity through the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre. These objectives will enhance domain awareness contributing significantly to the security of both Canada and the United States. Specific actions planned include the development and implementation of a technology strategy for the Great Lakes and contributing to the Beyond the Border Action Plan for the prioritization of initiatives and procurement. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will lead the completion of the new Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre permanent facility to be delivered in April 2014.

AR 6.5: The implementation of intelligence collection plans and the increased participation of core partners, including the United States Coast Guard, as well as provincial and municipal law enforcement agencies within the Great Lakes Marine Security Operation Centre, contributed to obtaining an improved domain awareness picture within the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway. Through 2014 Great Lakes Marine Security Operation Centre collaboratively produced one comprehensive Annual Report on Trends and Patterns within the Great Lakes. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police in the Great Lakes produced/opened 55 intelligence reports, as well as 66 Police Report Occurrence System files. Royal Canadian Mounted Police at the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operation Centre are two centres that provided over 81 outreach presentations to internal and external clients. The enhanced use of sensor technology at the Great Lakes Marine Security Operation Centre in 2014 assisted the deployment of the “Shiprider” resource, and analysis of sensor data has provided an improved situational awareness and resulted in increased law enforcement interdictions. The Great Lakes Marine Security Operation Centre provided information and actionable intelligence to several government departments and/or agencies, as well as law enforcement on the east and west coasts and within the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region. The Great Lakes Marine Security Operation Centre building project was substantially completed by December 2014 and partners moved into the new facility at the end of January 2015.

ER 6.6: Through cooperation and collaboration, the coastal Marine Security Operations Centres produce actionable intelligence, concentrating on national security, organized crime and other criminality, and provide this intelligence to the appropriate agency or service in a timely fashion. The coastal Marine Security Operations Centres will continue to work with domestic and international partners, increasing the sharing of information and intelligence as legally permitted, in order to combat illegal activities on Canada’s three coasts and the St. Lawrence Seaway. Partners also include provincial and municipal authorities. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will provide leadership through active participation in the Capability Management Organization. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will enhance domain awareness and the security of the border in collaboration with domestic and U.S. partners by identifying and addressing bi-national gaps. These objectives will enhance domain awareness, contributing significantly to the security of both Canada and the United States. Specific actions planned include contributing to the Beyond the Border Action Plan for the prioritization of initiatives and procurement. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will enhance the coastal Marine Security Operations Centres’ capacity to identify threats early by increasing its intelligence capacity, developing technology to support intelligence and operations in key locations, and taking an active role in the national and international marine security intelligence network in view of gathering and sharing marine security information and intelligence as legally permitted.  This will result in a significant increase in coastal marine domain awareness.

AR 6.6: Marine Security Operations Centre East-Halifax: Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security Operations Centre East:

  • Received 45 Requests for Information from Royal Canadian Mounted Police units/departments.
  • As a whole created 30 collaborative Threat Assessments.
  • Disseminated 13 Intelligence bulletins for small vessels
  • Collaborated with the Canada Border Services Agency within a Joint Enforcement Operation, resulting in 21 vessels of interest being identified and requiring further scrutiny.
  • Provided 21 outreach presentations to internal/external clients.
  • Produced an intelligence product relating to deep hides located in small vessels.
  • Implemented of a National Survey Code for marine-related events.
  • Implemented a vessel Observe, Record, Report form.
  • Coordinated and led two Maritime Surge Operations.
  • Created 133 collaborative reports/products, including Atlantic Canada Seal Harvest Report, Arctic Cruise and Adventurer Activity and Weekly Civil Maritime Reports.
  • Currently evaluating over 300 Maritime Interest files, many of which have multiple vessels.
  • In short, Marine Security Operations Centre East has active files on over 300 vessels and provided information and actionable intelligence to several government departments and/or agencies. The Marine Security Summaries are produced and disseminated on a monthly basis.

Marine Security Operations Centre West- Esquimalt:

  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security Operations Centre West has provided strategic and operational direction divisionally and nationally, as well as assisted in numerous files to provide actionable intelligence to government departments and or/agencies. A number of documents have been collaboratively produced: 510 Vessel of Interest nominations and 11 Maritime Intelligence Summary Reports, 7 Priority Interest Tracks and 27 Intelligence Reports. Situation Reports are tactical products and are not tracked or logged.
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security Operations Centre West has produced in excess of 50 Situation Reports, which are produced hourly/daily/weekly and often pertaining to the same event.
  • Marine Security Operations Centre West has monitored 3734 vessel arrivals. This number is based on pre-arrival information reports filed with Transport Canada and represents vessel entries to Canada.
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security Operations Centre West specific investigations have resulted in two observe/record/report briefs, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security Operations Centre has investigated 54 Police Records Information Management Environment files.
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security Operations Centre West has taken on the responsibilities of the Coastal/Air Watch Program. There have been two presentations to private/public partner groups over this fiscal year and material on the Coastal/Air Watch Program provided to coastal Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachments and port facilities in British Columbia.

6.7 Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

ER 6.7: Transport Canada, partnering with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, will reach out to the Association of Canadian Port Authorities and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to establish a policy forum/framework that will coordinate the development and implementation of national policies on waterside security and waterside policing at ports through the establishment of a National Port Security Committee.

AR 6.7: The National Waterside Security Coordination Team (NWSCT) is responsible for the development of operational policies, directives and best practices, through the provision of research and studies, advice, and analysis in support of marine security programs. The National Waterside Security Coordination Team contributed to the development of the Port Waterside Security Action Plan and the National Port Security Committee.

6.8 Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various federal and protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

ER 6.8: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Coast Guard have combined their expertise and strengths to further enhance national security and strengthen Canada’s response to potential marine threats and events in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region. Marine Security Enforcement Teams are integrated and intelligence-led teams that are deployed to safeguard and address federal on-water enforcement requirements and provide an armed fast-response capacity to address potential threats and events. Marine Security Enforcement Teams will continue to detect, prevent and interdict organized criminal activity, contraband smuggling, and people who may pose a threat to the safety and security of Canada and Canadian interests. The Canadian Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Mounted Police will increase the capability of Marine Security Enforcement Teams to provide maritime security and border integrity with the deployment of the new “hero class” mid-shore patrol vessels in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway, including the enhancement of maritime security training, in alignment with the Government's commitment to the 2011 Canada-U.S. Beyond the Border Declaration. Specific actions planned include continuous support to the Canadian Coast Guard law enforcement familiarization training, the development and implementation of Marine Security Enforcement Teams law enforcement specialized training, and the deployment of four new “hero class” mid-shore patrol vessels with combined training for vessel operations.

AR 6.8: The Marine Security Enforcement Teams held several hundred outreach activities (including approximately 300 visits to marinas) and police community relation events (including operating a booth at the Toronto International Boat Show, one of biggest boat shows in Canada, attended by thousands of people) to increase public awareness and the reporting of suspicious activities. Marine Security Enforcement Teams participated in several Marine Security Emergency Response Teams training exercises (including a number of joint training sessions with Canadian Armed Forces, Joint Task Force 2). Partnerships with municipal marine units have been developed and enhanced by providing assistance to training activities utilizing the mid-shore patrol vessels. The Canadian Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Mounted Police law-enforcement personnel worked effectively as a team. The teams/Marine Security Enforcement Teams vessels have continued to increase maritime domain awareness through partnership with the Canadian Coast Guard and with other law enforcement agencies, and by providing the Marine Security Operations Centers with timely information and intelligence. This is the first full season that two of the four mid-shore patrol vessels were used to their full capacity in conducting patrols along the border. Throughout the summer, Marine Security Enforcement Teams engaged other Royal Canadian Mounted Police units, federal departments and agencies as well as international partners. As a result of their operations and interdictions, 44 Liquor Licence Act, Criminal Code, Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and Controlled Drugs and Substances Act charges were laid, and 129 warnings were issued. Emphasis has been put on education and prevention rather than enforcement. Marine Security Enforcement Teams participated in several large-scale operations with many U.S. partners (U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and Homeland Security). Marine Security Enforcement Teams conducted patrols and visual inspections of critical infrastructure within their area of responsibility during the on-water season. More than 150 critical infrastructure patrol/inspections were made. Marine Security Enforcement Teams were able to generate intelligence through the development of human sources and participation in intelligence-focused operations. The unit proactively conducted investigations based on intelligence received from other units and agencies. During the on-water operations, 726 vessels were subject to formal checks.

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