Section IV: Supplementary Information on Lower-Level Programs

Table of Contents

Section IV: Supplementary Information on Lower-Level Programs

Transport Canada has three Strategic Outcomes that reflect long-term and enduring benefits to Canadians that stem from its raison d’être and vision. As we strive towards these outcomes, Transport Canada can report progress in relation to expected resultsFootnote 1, performance indicators Footnote 2 and targetsFootnote 3 in line with the Program Alignment Architecture (PAA). What distinguishes the different levels of a PAA is the scope and reach of the Programs at those levels. The Program level has a broad scope and area of societal intervention, while the lower-level Sub-Programs (SP) and Sub-Sub-Programs (SSP) have a more limited and specific focus on a smaller target group and area of intervention.

This section presents the financial and non-financial resources dedicated to each Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program, as well as their results.

Strategic Outcome 1: An Efficient Transportation System

An efficient transportation system supports trade, economic prosperity and a better quality of life through low costs, high productivity, the best use of all modes and innovation in transportation. Transport Canada promotes an efficient transportation system in Canada by: modernizing marketplace frameworks so that the transportation sector can adapt, innovate and remain competitive; implementing gateways and corridors initiatives; ensuring the renewal of federal transportation infrastructure; encouraging innovation in the transportation sector; and partnering with provinces, territories, municipal governments, and public and private sector entities in various transportation initiatives.

The following Programs’ Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 1.1: Transportation Marketplace Frameworks

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Air Marketplace Framework

Description: The Air Marketplace Framework Program encourages transportation efficiency by fostering a competitive and viable air industry, including airlines, airports and NAV CANADA. It provides opportunities for Canadian airlines to grow and compete successfully in a more liberalized global environment and sets the governance regimes of national air infrastructure providers. Program activities include: establishing laws and regulations (e.g. Canada Transportation Act, Air Canada Public Participation Act) governing the economic behaviour of air carriers and air infrastructure providers; encouraging competition and the development of new and expanded international air services to benefit travellers, shippers, and the tourism and business sectors by managing bilateral and multilateral air service relations; working collaboratively with other government departments and industry stakeholders to promote air transport facilitation policies and initiatives in support of broader Government of Canada industry, trade, travel and tourism objectives, such as Gateways and Corridors Initiatives and the Blue Sky International air policy; fostering greater cooperation in the area of civil aviation to support economic activity; and representing the interests of the Canadian aviation sector at the International Civil Aviation Organization.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Marine Marketplace Framework

Description: The Marine Marketplace Framework Program encourages transportation efficiency by ensuring the appropriate economic policy and legislative frameworks in order to foster a competitive and viable Canadian marine industry. The Program is responsible for: developing policies, legislation, and regulations such as the Canada Marine Act and its regulations and the Marine Liability Act; monitoring the Canadian marine industry and ports system; establishing the rules of governance for Canada port authorities; negotiating/adopting international conventions and agreements; establishing the economic regimes governing market entry to both the Canadian marine marketplace and Canadian international marine trade; representing the interest of Canada’s marine sector in international forums such as the International Maritime Organization; and setting the marine transportation liability regime.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Surface Marketplace Framework

Description: The Surface Marketplace Framework Program encourages transportation efficiency by fostering healthy and competitive rail and motor carrier industries in Canada and by fulfilling certain federal responsibilities with regard to the Canada Transportation Act, the International Bridges and Tunnels Act (IBTA) and other international bridge legislation. The Program: develops, oversees and implements policy frameworks, legislation, regulations and international agreements such as the Canada Transportation Act (Part 3 - Railway Transportation); establishes economic regimes governing access to the rail industry; oversees freight rail services and the relationships between railways and shippers and passenger rail operations; administers the grain hopper car operating agreements with Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP) railways and the Grain Monitoring Program; reviews mergers and acquisitions involving surface modes; reviews conditions of entry into the commercial trucking and bus marketplace; works with provinces, territories and North American partners to harmonize rules affecting surface transportation, such as North American Free Trade Agreement trucking standards; provides analysis and advice regarding the movement of freight in the surface mode, and related issues (e.g.: congestion, road pricing, urban rail, urban encroachment); conducts ongoing national freight transportation system analysis in consultation with key stakeholders; and addresses relevant international bridge and tunnel issues, such as implementing regulations under the IBTA.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: International Frameworks and Trade

Description: The International Frameworks and Trade Program ensures that policy objectives and stakeholder interests regarding transportation system efficiency are advanced at the international level and considered in the formulation of Government of Canada foreign policy and trade negotiation initiatives. It contributes to a coherent, government-wide approach to managing international priorities (such as the Global Markets Action Plan and Canada’s Strategy for Engagement in the Americas, as well as the broader trade, jobs and economic growth agenda, in order to bring maximum benefit to Canadians.

Canada’s transportation system is integral to achieving the Government’s objectives with respect to international trade. This function is necessary in order to respond to the Government’s rapidly expanding trade negotiation agenda, and to seize opportunities for Canadian businesses and transportation stakeholders.

Activities are geared to establishing relationships and partnerships, domestically and internationally, that will benefit Canada’s medium- and long-term economic development goals and advance the interests of transportation industry stakeholders. As a result of these activities, transportation stakeholders will be provided with further trade/commercial opportunities. Note: Bilateral air agreements and Canada’s Mission to the International Civil Aviation Organization are addressed under Air Marketplace Framework.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Transportation Analysis and Innovation

Description: The Transportation Analysis and Innovation Program conducts research and analysis to advance the understanding of key drivers for change in transportation and inform policy decisions, with a view to increasing efficiency and promoting innovation and technological advances in the transportation sector. To that end, the Program: manages transportation data collection efforts; monitors and reports on performance of the supply chain as well as related trends and outlooks in the transportation system; conducts economic, exploratory and applied research, to identify and foster the adoption of promising technologies; and provides advice regarding that manner.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollarsFootnote 4) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
1.1.1 Air Marketplace Framework 3,642,589 3,776,258 (133,669)
1.1.2 Marine Marketplace Framework 3,524,986 2,511,119 1,013,867
1.1.3 Surface Marketplace Framework 1,989,074 3,911,267 (1,922,193)
1.1.4 International Frameworks and Trade 3,308,763 2,911,719 397,044
1.1.5 Transportation Analysis and Innovation 12,008,478 13,858,607 (1,850,129)
2015-16 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
1.1.1 Air Marketplace Framework 32 32 0
1.1.2 Marine Marketplace Framework 19 19 0
1.1.3 Surface Marketplace Framework 12 32 (20)
1.1.4 International Frameworks and Trade 28 22 6
1.1.5 Transportation Analysis and Innovation 69 68 1
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
1.1.1 Air Marketplace Framework
A competitive air transportation sector Revenue Passenger Kilometres by air 233.9 billion 256.6 billion
1.1.2 Marine Marketplace Framework
a) A competitive marine transportation sector Tonnage handled by Canadian carriers (domestic) 64.4 million tonnes 61.9 million tonnes
b) A competitive marine transportation sector Tonnage handled by Canadian carriers (transborder) 38 million tonnes 39.1 million tonnes
c) A competitive marine transportation sector Total international traffic handled by Canadian ports as a percentage of total international traffic handled at North American ports (in metric tonnes) 18.0% 18.7%
1.1.3 Surface Marketplace Framework
a) An efficient surface transportation sector Total Factor Productivity (quantity of outputs divided by a weighted aggregate of all inputs indexed to 1986) 224.8 billion 226.4 billion
b) An efficient surface transportation sector Motor carrier traffic volume (in tonnes-km) Motor carriers:
148 billion
166.6 billion
1.1.4 International Frameworks and Trade
International trade agreements create opportunities for the transportation industry Types of commercial opportunities provided through agreements for Canadian transportation stakeholders Improved commercial opportunities for transportation stakeholders See below
1.1.4’s Actual Results:
  • We participated in all of the government’s priority trade and investment negotiations to advance the interests and priorities of Canadian transportation stakeholders. Participation was recorded in the:
    • Negotiation and analysis of positions;
    • Legal review of the texts of the agreements;
    • Implementation process;
    • Drafting of instructions of legislative amendments; and
    • Ongoing consultations with stakeholders.
    • Negotiations and/or ongoing post-negotiation work of the:
      • Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement;
      • Trans-Pacific Partnership;
      • Trade in Services Agreement; and
      • Agreement on Internal Trade.
  • We also:
    • Undertook an extensive outreach program within the department and with key transportation stakeholders to identify and help facilitate resolution of potential trade barriers facing Canadian transportation goods, services and investments; and
    • Began developing the next phase of a trade and transportation corridor initiative, given the importance of trade-related transportation infrastructure, to help get Canadian goods to global markets, which was consistent with the Minister’s mandate letter.
1.1.5 Transportation Analysis and Innovation
a) Research and analysis to inform Canadians on the state of transportation in Canada and advance innovation and technological advances in the transportation sector Industry is compliant to their data reporting obligations in conformity with the Canada Transportation Act (CTA) and its companion data regulations. Degree of compliance of airlines operating in Canada vis-à-vis the CTA data regulations 85% 92%
b) Research and analysis to inform Canadians on the state of transportation in Canada and advance innovation and technological advances in the transportation sector Ratio of research, development and technology investment leveraged from external sources 1:1 investment ratio 1:1.68
c) Research and analysis to inform Canadians on the state of transportation in Canada and advance innovation and technological advances in the transportation sector Percentage of Grant/Contribution agreements involving multiple collaborators (aside from Federal government) 100% 100%

Explanation of Variance

For 1.1.1: 2015 data: Revenue Passenger Kilometres (km) grew in both sectors, however it was somewhat unbalanced growth with only a 0.5% increase domestically, with a much stronger 6.1% increase internationally.

For 1.1.2:

  1. a) Estimated for 2014 using 2011 data as the baseline: The target was missed due to an estimated decrease in domestic tonnage of 0.6%.
  2. b) Estimated for 2014 using 2011 data as the baseline: The target was exceeded slightly even after an estimated decrease in transborder tonnage of 0.6%.
  3. c) Canada is keeping pace with our North American Free Trade Agreement partners in terms of tonnage growth, mainly due to liquid and dry bulk commodity exports. 2011 Canadian data was used as a basis for estimation, whereas 2014 U.S. and 2013 Mexican tonnage data were available.

For 1.1.3:

  1. a) 2013 data: Results exceed the established target.
  2. b) 2014 data: There was strong year-over-year growth in both tonnage moved (+8.3%) and distance travelled (+5.4%) by for-hire trucks in the domestic market, leading to a large increase in tonne-kilometres.

For 1.1.5:

  1. a) 2015 data: The target was exceeded and in line with results from previous years.
  2. b) 2015 data: The ratios for the following programs are as follows:
    • Rail Safety – 1:0.5
    • Clean Transportation Initiative – 1:0.6
    • Rail Safety – 1:6.8

    Variances for programs are dependent on projects either being carried out to support regulatory initiatives or projects with industry and academic stakeholders that will modernize the transportation sector

  3. c) From 2005 to 2013 (latest year for which data is available) for:
    • Passenger transportation, excluding off-road equipment: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity decreased by 11% from 142 grams to 126 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per passenger-km. By mode, GHG emissions intensity for:
      • On-road passenger decreased by 8% from 139 grams to 128 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per passenger-km;
      • Rail passenger decreased by 15% from 142 grams to 122 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per passenger-km; and
      • Aviation passenger decreased by 24% from 156 grams to 118 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per passenger-km.
    • Freight transportation: GHG emissions intensity increased by 11% from 84 grams to 93 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per tonne-km. By mode, GHG emissions intensities for:
      • On-road freight increased by 4% from 207 grams to 216 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per tonne-km;
      • Rail freight increased by 2% ( from 18 grams to 19 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per tonne-km;
      • Aviation freight decreased by 21% from 242 grams to 191 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per tonne-km; and
      • Marine freight decreased by 12% from 38 grams to 33 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per tonne-km.
    • Overall, the increase in GHG emissions intensity from freight transportation is mainly due to the increasing use of trucks to move goods.

    NOTE: GHG intensities reported here are calculated from Natural Resources Canada’s Comprehensive Energy Use Database Tables, and due to different methodologies and coverages, may differ from some publicly available industry reports.

Program 1.2: Gateways and Corridors

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative

Description: The rapid economic growth of China and other Asia-Pacific countries is reshaping global trade flows. China is now Canada’s second largest trading partner and the growth in Canada-Asia trade traffic is expected to continue. The Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative Program works to make Canada the best trade link between Asia and North America. This Program coordinates and manages an integrated set of investments (through direct delivery and contributions) and policy measures to: boost Canada’s commerce with the Asia-Pacific region; increase the share of North America-bound container imports from Asia; and improve the reliability of the Gateway and Corridor.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Gateways and Border Crossings Fund

Description: The Gateways and Border Crossings Fund Program works to improve the flow of goods between Canada and the rest of the world by enhancing infrastructure at key locations, such as major border crossings between Canada and the United States.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
1.2.1 Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative 42,464,288 45,287,671 (2,823,383)
1.2.2 Gateways and Border Crossings Fund 534,105,002 360,693,971 173,411,031
2015-16 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
1.2.1 Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative 17 11 6
1.2.2 Gateways and Border Crossings Fund 28 22 6
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
1.2.1 Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative
a) Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor is efficient and attracts international trade Landside fluidity for British Columbia ports: Total average transit time (number of days) of international containerized freight using the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor from the BC ports to Toronto Average of 8.5 days with standard deviation of 0.5 days. Average of 9.7 days, standard Deviation of 1.3 days
b) Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor is efficient and attracts international trade Canadian share of the North American West Coast trade based on the change in volume of Twenty Foot Equivalent Unit imports and exports. Twenty Foot Equivalent Unit (TEU)Footnote 5 12% 14%
c) Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor is efficient and attracts international trade Value of imports using strategic gateways and trade corridors (Millions of CND $) Import: $42,100 $48,817
d) Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor is efficient and attracts international trade Value of exports using strategic gateways and trade corridors (Millions of CND $) Export: $69,200 $76,420
1.2.2 Gateways and Border Crossings Fund
a) Canada’s strategic Gateways and Corridors are efficient and are used for international trade Total average landside transit time (number of days) of international containerized freight using the Continental and Atlantic Gateways and Trade Corridors Average of 4 days with standard deviation of 0.3 days. Average of 4.9 days, standard deviation of 0.7 days
b) Canada’s strategic Gateways and Corridors are efficient and are used for international trade Value of imports using the Continental Gateway and Trade Corridors in Ontario (Millions of CND $) $265,000 $324,720
c) Canada’s strategic Gateways and Corridors are efficient and are used for international trade Value of exports using the Continental Gateway and Trade Corridor in Ontario (Millions of CND $) $206,200 $256,322
d) Canada’s strategic Gateways and Corridors are efficient and are used for international trade Value of imports using the Continental Gateway and Trade Corridor in Quebec (Millions of CND $) $75,800 $78,409
e) Canada’s strategic Gateways and Corridors are efficient and are used for international trade Value of exports using the Continental Gateway and Trade Corridor in Quebec (Millions of CND $) $65,600 $73,871
f) Canada’s strategic Gateways and Corridors are efficient and are used for international trade Value of imports using the Atlantic Gateway and Trade Corridor (Millions of CND $) $25,700 $22,360
g) Canada’s strategic Gateways and Corridors are efficient and are used for international trade Value of exports using the Atlantic Gateway and Trade Corridor (Millions of CND $) $30,800 $26,943
h) Canada’s strategic Gateways and Corridors are efficient and are used for international trade Atlantic Gateway (Halifax) and Continental Gateway (Montreal) market share of North America East Coast traffic in Volume of Twenty Foot Equivalent Unit (TEU) imports and exports. 9.5% 9.7%

Explanation of Variance

For 1.2.1:

  1. a) Exceptionally poor winter weather conditions and congestion from cargo diverted from U.S. ports caused a degradation in performance in the first half of 2015. System performance returned to within normal operating parameters in the second half of the year.
  2. b) Canada’s share of West Coast container traffic exceeded the target due in large part to the ports Vancouver and Prince Rupert greatly benefitted from additional cargo diverted from U.S. West Coast ports that occurred during labour work stoppages. It remains to be seen how much of that cargo will be retained in 2016.
  3. c) Growth in the value of imports from China, Taiwan and the Philippines fuelled an overall increase of 4.6%.
  4. d) There was 1.4% growth in exports to the United States and 5.8% growth in exports to China, resulting in an aggregate year-over-year increase of 3.1%.

For 1.2.2:

  1. a) Operational issues at the Montreal Port Authority in the second and third quarters of 2015 caused landside transit time performance to degrade. Issues have since been resolved.
  2. b) Strong growth in imports from the United States and the United Kingdom led to an increase of 9.9% in the value of imports to Ontario.
  3. c) Strong growth in exports to the United States and the United Kingdom led to an 8.8% increase in the value of Ontario exports.
  4. d) A reduction in imports from the United States and the United Kingdom was partially offset by an increase in imports from China to provide a 0.9% reduction in imports to Quebec.
  5. e) Strong growth in exports to the United States, United Kingdom and Germany led to a 5.6% increase in the value of exports from Quebec.
  6. f) An almost 12% reduction in imports from the United States fuelled an overall reduction of 12.8% in Atlantic corridor imports.
  7. g) A year-over-year decrease in exports to the United States and the United Kingdom mitigated the increase in exports to other regions from Atlantic Canada.
  8. h) Canada’s Eastern Canadian ports were slightly above target as both the Port of Montreal and the Port of Halifax posted strong growth in 2015.

Program 1.3: Transportation Infrastructure

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Airport Infrastructure

Description: In keeping with the National Airports Policy, the Airport Infrastructure Program looks after airport services under federal purview for the benefit of Canadian travellers and businesses. The Program: provides stewardship of airport authorities with the goal of protecting the government’s interests as the landlord and ensuring compliance with lease terms; operates federally owned regional/local and remote airports; provides financial support to non-federal eligible airports to maintain the ongoing operation and safety of airside infrastructure; and manages other airports’ infrastructure legacy commitments by providing financial support to twelve Labrador communities, through the provincial government, to maintain airstrips built under federal/provincial agreements.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.1.1: Airport Authority Stewardship

Description: The National Airports System (NAS) is a vital transportation system with significant ties to the Canadian economy. To protect the interests of the federal government as the landlord and to ensure compliance with the terms of their leases, the Airport Authority Stewardship Program provides oversight and real property management services for airports whose operation has been transferred to local airport authorities. It also manages residual responsibilities with respect to the commercialized Air Navigation System (ANS). Program activities include: making sure that airport authorities respect the terms of their leases; addressing lease management issues promptly; completing the environmental remediation of ANS lands; managing ongoing liaison with NAV CANADA on property matters; and collecting airport rent revenue.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.1.2: Airport Operations

Description: In keeping with the National Airports Policy (NAP) and for the benefit of the communities concerned, the Airport Operations Program operates 18 regional, local and remote Transport Canada-owned airports.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.1.3: Small Aerodrome Support

Description: The Small Aerodrome Support Program provides support for airside capital projects through the Airports Capital Assistance Program (ACAP) and also manages legacy commitments that make airport infrastructure and services available to some communities. In keeping with the National Airports Policy, ACAP provides support to eligible non-federally owned airports. Funding is provided for airside safety-related capital projects, which may also extend to non-airside asset protection. It targets airports with a demonstrated financial need to fund the capital expenditures necessary to maintain safety. Legacy commitments are supported by providing financial assistance to: the provincial government through the Labrador Coast Airstrip Restoration Program to maintain airstrips in twelve Labrador communities; and four airports in Québec to cover a portion of operating deficits through the Airports Operations and Maintenance Subsidy Program.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Marine Infrastructure Program

Description: The Marine Infrastructure Program operates from a commercially-based policy framework, and supports Canadian trade by making marine assets available for commercial use. The Program: oversees the stewardship of assets operated by third parties, by providing direct public sector delivery; manages contribution agreements; acts as steward of Canada Port Authorities and the land they manage; operates and divests Transport Canada’s public ports; acts as steward of, and provides support to, remote, regional and constitutionally-mandated ferry services; and acts as steward of, and provides support to, the Canadian portion of the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.2.1: Canada Port Authority Stewardship

Description: The Canada Port Authority Stewardship Program oversees the 18 Canada Port Authorities (CPAs) that manage properties that are federally-owned or subject to federal law. Its goal is to foster a commercially based regime that supports Canadian trade within policy and legislative frameworks. The Program: reviews and approves requests for property acquisitions/dispositions to make sure that they comply with relevant acts and policies and address environmental and Aboriginal concerns; oversees the appointment process that must comply with the Canada Marine Act; and reviews and approves requests for amending Canada Port Authority activities, borrowing limits, terms of leases, or for establishing subsidiaries, and compliance with gross revenue charge requirements.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.2.2: Seaway Stewardship and Support

Description: Pursuant to the Canada Marine Act, Transport Canada is responsible for protecting the long-term operation and viability of the St. Lawrence Seaway as an integral part of Canada’s national transportation infrastructure. The Seaway Stewardship and Support Program oversees the good management, operation and maintenance of the Canadian portion of the St. Lawrence Seaway by the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation (the Seaway Corporation), for the benefit of seaway users and the businesses and communities that depend on it. The Program: administers, negotiates and monitors the federal government’s twenty-year agreement with the Seaway Corporation; provides statutory payments; negotiates and monitors the five-year business plans that sets specific operating and asset renewal cost targets; and oversees the management of non-navigational assets including the transfer of ownership of surplus Seaway properties.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.2.3: Ferry Services Stewardship and Support

Description: The Ferry Services Stewardship and Support Program serves Canadians, communities and businesses that depend on ferry services. The Program oversees federal government funding for, and involvement in, ferry services across the country. This includes: Crown Corporation Marine Atlantic service that links Newfoundland to the rest of Canada, as per constitutional mandate; three private sector inter-provincial services in Atlantic Canada and Eastern Quebec – including one to the remote community of Îles-de-la-Madeleine under the Ferry Services Contribution Program; and an annual grant to support services in British Columbia.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.2.4: Port Operations

Description: The Port Operations Program makes marine facilities at Transport Canada-owned ports available to port users and the communities they serve. It manages and maintains Transport Canada-owned ports including setting and collecting national public port fees at those ports.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Surface and Multimodal Infrastructure

Description: The Surface Infrastructure Program supports Canada’s trade and mobility by fostering efficient and economic access to surface transportation networks while furthering transportation safety. The Program: develops, designs, negotiates, and manages federal funding for highways, borders, railways, transit, and federal bridges; works with provinces, territories and other partners on infrastructure programs and policies, with a particular focus on the National Highway System; acts as steward for VIA Rail Canada and federal bridges; and manages regional rail service legacy commitments.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3.1: Rail Passenger Stewardship and Support

Description: The Rail Passenger Stewardship and Support Program makes national, regional and remote rail passenger services available throughout Canada. The Program also: acts as steward over, and administers the annual subsidy to, VIA Rail Canada; monitors and provides policy advice on passenger railway services; administers contributions to private sector companies or First Nations bands operating remote passenger rail services; and provides funding for capital projects that support rail services.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3.2: Federal Bridge Stewardship

Description: Guided by the International Bridges and Tunnels Act and other legislation, the Bridge Stewardship Program addresses capacity issues of bridges and tunnels under Transport Canada’s authority to safely meet current and future transportation needs. Specific Program responsibilities include: implementing and managing federal contributions and initiatives that address the needs of bridges under federal authority; overseeing international bridge and tunnel operators’ compliance with relevant regulations; establishing and implementing the laws and regulations governing international bridge operators; providing stewardship oversight of the Confederation Bridge as per a constitutional obligation; and making statutory payments to Canadian National (CN) Railway Company for the roadway portion of the Victoria Bridge in Montreal.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3.3: Highway and Other Transportation Infrastructure Support

Description: The Highway and Other Transportation Infrastructure Support Program benefits road users, stakeholders, and communities through improved highways, bridges, transit systems, and technology systems for transportation and borders, which reduces traffic congestion, accidents and stakeholder/user operating costs. This multimodal Program: provides Program design guidance; manages federal contributions for improvements to the National Highway System (NHS), Canada-United States border infrastructure, transit system initiatives and other transportation infrastructure; develops, oversees and implements federal policy and coordinates infrastructure issues; assesses Building Canada Plan transportation projects; and helps monitor the performance of transportation infrastructure in partnership with stakeholders.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs
Sub-Program / Sub-Sub-Program Name

 
Planned
Spending

 
Actual
Spending

 
Difference
(planned minus
actual)
1.3.1 Airport Infrastructure 76,056,318 101,083,403 (25,027,085)
1.3.1.1 Airport Authority Stewardship (3,801,229) (4,065,849) 264,620
1.3.1.2 Airport Operations 30,745,578 42,784,796 (12,039,218)
1.3.1.3 Small Aerodrome Support 49,111,969 62,364,456 (13,252,487)
1.3.2 Marine Infrastructure 237,120,819 227,950,077 9,170,742
1.3.2.1 Canada Port Authority Stewardship 1,419,942 3,661,558 (2,241,616)
1.3.2.2 Seaway Stewardship and Support 137,602,057 136,955,429 646,628
1.3.2.3 Ferry Services Stewardship and Support 82,274,295 78,248,341 4,025,954
1.3.2.4 Port Operations 15,824,525 9,084,749 6,739,776
1.3.3 Surface and Multimodal Infrastructure 86,317,864 83,221,187 3,096,677
1.3.3.1 Rail Passenger Stewardship and Support 12,208,763 11,761,717 447,046
1.3.3.2 Federal Bridge Stewardship 68,124,219 66,181,969 1,942,250
1.3.3.3 Highway and Other Transportation Infrastructure Support 5,984,882 5,277,501 707,381
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs
Sub-Program / Sub-Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus actual)
1.3.1 Airport Infrastructure 144 139 5
1.3.1.1 Airport Authority Stewardship 10 10 0
1.3.1.2 Airport Operations 111 112 (1)
1.3.1.3 Small Aerodrome Support 23 17 6
1.3.2 Marine Infrastructure 55 79 (24)
1.3.2.1 Canada Port Authority Stewardship 7 12 (5)
1.3.2.2 Seaway Stewardship and Support 8 9 (1)
1.3.2.3 Ferry Services Stewardship and Support 10 8 2
1.3.2.4 Port Operations 30 50 (20)
1.3.3 Surface and Multimodal Infrastructure 43 33 10
1.3.3.1 Rail Passenger Stewardship and Support 3 1 2
1.3.3.2 Federal Bridge Stewardship 3 2 1
1.3.3.3 Highway and Other Transportation Infrastructure Support 37 30 7
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
1.3.1 Airport Infrastructure
Airport infrastructure is available to users Percentage of federally supported airport infrastructure that is operational 100% 100%
1.3.1.1 Airport Authority Stewardship
National Airports System Airports comply with leases Percentage of National Airports System airports that are in substantive compliance with their lease terms 100% 100%
1.3.1.2 Airport Operations
Airports are operational and available to users Percentage of airports that are operational 100% 100%
1.3.1.3 Small Aerodrome Support
Airports are operational and available to users Percentage of funded airports certified operational 100% 100%
1.3.2 Marine Infrastructure
Marine infrastructure is operational for users Percentage of marine infrastructure operational 100% 100%
1.3.2.1 Canada Port Authority Stewardship
Compliance with Acts, regulations and letters patent Percentage of transactions in compliance with federal Acts, regulations and policies 100% 100%
1.3.2.2 Seaway Stewardship and Support
Seaway is open and available to commercial traffic Percentage of system availability 99% 99%
1.3.2.3 Ferry Services Stewardship and Support
Constitutional, regional and remote ferry services are available to users Percentage of scheduled trips completed 100% 100%
1.3.2.4 Port Operations
Transport Canada-owned ports are operational and available to users Percentage of active ports operational 100% 100%
1.3.3 Surface and Multimodal Infrastructure
Federally funded surface infrastructure projects are completed and available to users as per/consistent with agreement date with recipient Percentage of federally funded surface infrastructure operational 100% 94.5%
1.3.3.1 Rail Passenger Stewardship and Support
Federally funded inter-city and remote passenger rail services have the capacity to meet existing commitments Percentage of planned passenger rail trips (measured by train-kilometres) delivered by federally-supported inter-city and remote passenger rail carriers 98% 99%
1.3.3.2 Federal Bridge Stewardship
Federal bridges are capable of meeting existing and future demand Percentage of federal funding obtained and delivered so the project can start within approved timelines 100% N/AFootnote 6
1.3.3.3 Highway and Other Transportation Infrastructure Support
Federally funded highway and border surface infrastructure is available to users Percentage of highway and border projects that meet funding objectives 100% 100%

Strategic Outcome 2: A Clean Transportation System

Transport Canada promotes a clean transportation system in Canada. This Strategic Outcome: advances the federal government’s environmental agenda in the transportation sector and complements other federal programs designed to reduce air emissions to protect the health of Canadians and the environment for generations to come; protects the marine environment by reducing the pollution of water from transportation sources; and fulfills Transport Canada’s responsibilities in working towards a cleaner and healthier environment with regard to its own operations.

The following Programs’ Sub-Programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 2.1: Clean Air from Transportation

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight

Description: Deriving its authority from the Railway Safety Act, the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, and the Aeronautics Act, Transport Canada’s Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight Program contributes to reducing the air emissions from transportation by creating and implementing regulatory regimes. The Program: sets the legal and regulatory frameworks that govern air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from the air, marine and rail sectors; oversees transportation firms’ compliance with their regulatory obligations; represents Canada in discussions to set international standards for air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions in these sectors; provides support to Environment and Climate Change Canada in developing road vehicle greenhouse gas emission regulations; and contributes to developing and implementing instruments to reduce air emissions from Canada’s transportation sector.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Clean Air Initiatives

Description: The Clean Air Initiatives advance the federal government’s environmental agenda in the transportation sector by: promoting and demonstrating ways to reduce transportation greenhouse gas emissions and other air pollutants; promoting, testing and demonstrating advanced vehicle technologies to reduce transportation greenhouse gas emissions and other air pollutants from motor vehicles; creating partnerships; and designing, negotiating and managing initiatives for transportation emissions reductions.

Specific initiatives include: the ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Initiative, the Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative, the Shore Power Technology for Ports Program and the Truck Reservation System Program.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight 11,420,657 8,209,143 3,211,514
2.1.2 Clean Air Initiatives 17,997,020 8,397,065 9,599,955
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight 55 38 17
2.1.2 Clean Air Initiatives 31 26 5
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight
Clean air regulatory framework (and policies) that align with international standards Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards 100% 100% for Aviation and Marine sectors

Not applicable for Rail sector

2.1.2 Clean Air Initiatives
Clean Transportation technologies are available to users Number of sites using clean transportation technologiesFootnote 7 10 17

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Clean Water Regulatory Framework

Description: Guided by the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act, the Marine Liability Act and international conventions, the Clean Water Regulatory Framework Program sets the legal and regulatory frameworks that govern the protection of the marine environment from pollution, the introduction of invasive species, and the environmental impact of pollution incidents.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Clean Water Regulatory Oversight

Description: The Clean Water Regulatory Oversight Program contributes to reducing pollution from vessels by monitoring compliance of marine transportation firms with the Marine Safety regulatory framework through surveillance, inspections, audits, monitoring and enforcement.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework 17,857,453 15,001,063 2,856,390
2.2.2 Clean Water Regulatory Oversight 14,044,947 11,685,538 2,359,409
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program and Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework 36 47 (11)
2.2.2 Clean Water Regulatory Oversight 58 49 9
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework
Legislation, regulations and policies that are harmonized with adopted international standards Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation and/or adopted international standards 95% N/A (see variance explanation below)
2.2.2 Clean Water Regulatory Oversight
a) Industry is compliant with the regulatory framework Percentage of vessels in compliance with regulatory framework for environmental response regime 95% N/A (see variance explanation below)
b) Industry is compliant with the regulatory framework for ballast water discharges in waters under Canadian jurisdiction Percentage of vessels in compliance with Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules 95% 99%

Explanation of Variance

For 2.2.1: Data is not yet available as the date to achieve this target is March 2017.

For 2.2.2 a): Data is not yet available as the date to achieve this target is March 2017.

Program 2.3: Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Description: The Environmental Stewardship Program does not have any lower-level Sub-Programs.

Strategic Outcome 3: A Safe and Secure Transportation System

A safe and secure transportation system moves people and goods across Canada, and to international destinations, without loss of life, injury or damage to property. Transport Canada supports a safe and secure transportation system by influencing the behaviour of the public and industry through policies, standards, regulations and laws. Harmonized and streamlined regulatory regimes, informed by the expertise of multiple countries and stakeholders, aid effective, safe and secure transportation practices and a sound safety and security culture. Transport Canada ensures that Canadians and the transportation industry are in compliance with the regulatory framework through its oversight program.

The following Programs’ Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 3.1: Aviation Safety

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework

Description: The Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework Program provides a balance of tools (policies, guidelines, regulations, standards, and education and awareness activities) based on risk, to promote a harmonized aviation safety regulatory framework for Canadians and Canada’s aviation industry.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Aviation Safety Oversight

Description: The Aviation Safety Oversight Program is risk-based and supports compliance of the aviation industry with the regulatory framework through services, assessments and validations, inspections, audits and, when necessary, enforcement.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.1: Service to the Aviation Industry

Description: Guided by the standards and regulatory requirements in the Canadian Aviation Regulations, the Service to the Aviation Industry Program licences personnel, provides operating certificates to organizations and certifies aeronautical products.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.2: Surveillance of the Aviation System

Description: The Surveillance of the Aviation System Program, based on risk, monitors aviation industry compliance of the regulatory framework through assessments and validations, inspections, audits and, when necessary, enforcement.

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Aircraft Services

Description: The Aircraft Services Program provides aircraft, aircraft operations, and aircraft maintenance and engineering, as well as related training services to Transport Canada and other federal government departments and agencies.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs
Sub-Program / Sub-Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.1.1 Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework 27,707,434 27,401,796 305,638
3.1.2 Aviation Safety Oversight 121,492,161 127,336,240 (5,844,079)
3.1.2.1 Service to the Aviation Industry 33,402,788 40,293,002 (6,890,214)
3.1.2.2 Surveillance of the Aviation System 88,089,373 87,043,238 1,046,135
3.1.3 Aircraft Services 24,248,361 26,749,053 (2,500,692)
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs
Sub-Program / Sub-Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.1.1 Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework 254 183 71
3.1.2 Aviation Safety Oversight 1,127 1,097 30
3.1.2.1 Service to the Aviation Industry 348 402 (54)
3.1.2.2 Surveillance of the Aviation System 779 695 84
3.1.3 Aircraft Services 353 288 65
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
3.1.1 Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework
A timely rulemaking program that supports a risk-based regulatory framework

Average time (years) to develop new or modified regulations governing Aviation Safety (with a goal of measuring a 5-yr rolling average, once sufficient data is available)

(Improvement = decrease)

5.64 (5% decrease from previous year) 2.26
3.1.2 Aviation Safety Oversight
Compliance of aviation community with regulatory requirements

Number of non-compliance findings in aviation enterprises based on certificates held, comparing year-over-year

(Improvement = decrease)

*Note: Overall trends cannot be measured fully until fiscal year end 2017-18 as a full surveillance cycle is 5 years. Implementation was in fiscal year 2013-14

1% decrease in number 17%
3.1.2.1 Service to the Aviation Industry
Services delivered support the conduct of business activities in the Canadian Aviation Industry

Percentage (%) of services delivered meeting service standards

(Improvement = increase)

*Note: Not all national activity is represented

66% (5% increase from previous year) 89%
3.1.2.2 Surveillance of the Aviation System
Aviation hazards and risks are being systematically managed by the aviation community

Average severity of non-compliance findings in aviation enterprises based on certificates held on a scale of 1 to 3 (1=minor, 2=moderate, 3=major)

(Improvement = decrease in severity)

2.0 2.0
3.1.3 Aircraft Services
a) Safe aviation services resulting in confidence from clients

Percentage of clients satisfied or very satisfied with services (scoring 2 or 3 on a 3-point scale)

(Improvement = increase)

80% 80%
b) Safe aviation services resulting in confidence from clients

Number of category 3Footnote 8 or greater category occurrences (per 1,000 flight hours)

(Improvement = decrease)

2.0 1.59Footnote 9

Explanation of Variance

For 3.1.1: The 2.26 years average time to develop new or modified regulations governing aviation safety is an improvement compared to the previous three year cycle (3.56 years). The variance was largely due to the average size and complexity of the two files that were published in 2015 versus those in 2014.

For 3.1.2:

  • For fiscal year 2015-16, we performed 560 activities, 36 less than the 596 performed in 2014-15. The difference in the number of surveillance activities conducted is attributable to an increase in other unscheduled oversight activities, such as follow-ups to findings and certifications. Minor variations are expected from year-to-year.
  • The 2015-16 average rating of compliance means that 41% of areas measured were found to be compliant, 54% were found to be partially compliant and 5% were not documented/implemented.
  • We were also able to measure the areas of compliance versus non-compliance. For 2015-16, the average compliance score was 2.31 which was a 2% improvement from fiscal 2014-15 which had an average compliance score of 2.27.

For 3.1.2.1: This variance is a positive result. However, it must be considered in the context that all services are not yet represented as full national implementation of the CCM Activity Tracking System has not yet occurred.

Program 3.2: Marine Safety

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Marine Safety Regulatory Framework

Description: The Marine Safety Regulatory Framework Program provides a balance of tools (policies, guidelines, regulations and standards) to support a harmonized marine safety regulatory framework for Canada’s marine industry (seafarers, commercial vessels [non-pleasure craft] and pleasure crafts). This Program also works to harmonize Canada’s marine safety regulatory framework with other jurisdictions.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Marine Safety Oversight

Description: The Marine Safety Oversight Program is risk-based and supports compliance of the marine industry with the regulatory framework through services, assessments, validations, inspections, audits and, when necessary, enforcement.

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Navigation Protection Program

Description: The Navigation Protection Program is responsible for the administration of the Navigation Protection Act. The main activities are the review and authorization of works in scheduled waters, the management of obstructions in scheduled waters and the enforcement of the prohibitions against depositing or throwing material into navigable waters and dewatering of navigable waters. The Program also has an opt-in provision that allows the owners of works in non-scheduled navigable waters to apply for a review under the Act. The Program also has responsibilities under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 to conduct reviews and render decisions under navigation-related authorities, including the Receiver of Wreck Program and the Private Buoy Regulations.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.2.1 Marine Safety Regulatory Framework 10,270,273 9,892,708 377,565
3.2.2 Marine Safety Oversight 43,491,322 51,275,306 (7,783,984)
3.2.3 Navigation Protection Program 3,713,941 5,147,340 (1,433,399)
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.2.1 Marine Safety Regulatory Framework 97 75 22
3.2.2 Marine Safety Oversight 425 486 (61)
3.2.3 Navigation Protection Program 45 47 (2)
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
3.2.1 Marine Safety Regulatory Framework
A risk-based regulatory framework consistent with international conventions and Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation

Percentage of regulations aligned with domestic legislation and/or adopted international standards

(Improvement = increase)

85% 75%
3.2.2 Marine Safety Oversight
a) Compliance with regulations for inspected domestic vessels (non-pleasure craft)

Percentage of inspected domestic vessels (non-pleasure craft) that are compliant with regulationsFootnote 10

(Improvement = increase)

68% 60%
b) Compliance with regulations for pleasure craft

Percentage of pleasure craft compliant with regulations (includes those that received a courtesy check)

(Improvement = increase)

60% 74%
c) The Port State Control regulatory oversight inspects the highest risk foreign vessels

Percentage of high-risk foreign vessels inspected

(Improvement = increase)

95% 95%
3.2.3 Navigation Protection Program
Safe navigation in Canada’s busiest waterways Number of safely placed works in a yearFootnote 11 Baseline to be established in 2017Footnote 12 N/A: See variance explanation below

Explanation of Variance

For 3.2.1: Some progress has been made since the last update of 65%. This number is based on recent legislative and regulatory updates such as the amendment to the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, which will allow us to incorporate international documents.

For 3.2.2:

  1. a) The inspection regime is influenced by the periodicity of inspections and certification.
  2. b) Even though the number of courtesy checks has decreased, the level of compliance of the inspected vessels has remained high. It may be that the compliance rate is high due to the voluntary nature of courtesy checks.

For 3.2.3: The Minister has been instructed by the Prime Minister to conduct a full review of the Navigation Protection Act, restore lost protections and incorporate modern safeguards, which will impact the priorities of the Program. This will likely result in changes that will require a review of the existing performance indicators.

Program 3.3: Rail Safety

Sub-Program 3.3.1: Rail Safety Regulatory Framework

Description: The Rail Safety Regulatory Framework Program provides a balance of tools (policies, guidelines, regulations, rules and engineering standards) to promote a harmonized rail safety regulatory framework for the rail industry and the public at large, while ensuring viability of the rail sector.

Sub-Program 3.3.2: Rail Safety Oversight

Description: The Rail Safety Oversight Program is risk-based and promotes compliance of the rail industry with the regulatory framework through inspections, audits and, when necessary, enforcement.

Sub-Program 3.3.3: Rail Safety Awareness and Grade Crossing Improvement

Description: The Rail Safety Awareness and Grade Crossing Improvement Program provides funding for safety improvements at grade crossings and promotes public and stakeholder awareness and education in order to prevent fatalities and injuries.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.3.1 Rail Safety Regulatory Framework 3,261,159 2,445,652 815,507
3.3.2 Rail Safety Oversight 16,938,982 96,284,267 (79,345,285)
3.3.3 Rail Safety Awareness and Grade Crossing Improvement 15,507,530 11,821,685 3,685,845
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.3.1 Rail Safety Regulatory Framework 22 20 2
3.3.2 Rail Safety Oversight 149 178 (29)
3.3.3 Rail Safety Awareness and Grade Crossing Improvement 38 14 24
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
3.3.1 Rail Safety Regulatory Framework
The regulatory framework addresses the highest risks

Percentage of rail risk-mitigation strategies developed per total number of identified risks in rail safety business plan

(Improvement = increase)

90% 100%
3.3.2 Rail Safety Oversight
Rail industry is compliant

Rate of industry non-compliance found in Rail Safety oversight activities

(Improvement = decrease)

2% decrease year-over-year Not measurableFootnote 13
3.3.3 Rail Safety Awareness and Grade Crossing Improvement
a) Safe railway grade crossings

Percentage of crossing collisions reduced

(Improvement = increase)

5% 11.4%Footnote 14
b) Trespassing on railways eliminated

Percentage of trespassing accidents reduced

(Improvement = increase)

5% 5.2%Footnote 15

Program 3.4: Motor Vehicle Safety

Sub-Program 3.4.1: Motor Vehicle Safety Regulatory Framework

Description: The Motor Vehicle Safety Legislative and Regulatory Framework Program provides a balance of tools (policies, guidelines, regulations and standards) to create and maintain a harmonized motor vehicle safety framework for Canadians and Canada’s motor vehicle manufacturing industry. The framework is developed using evidence obtained from field investigations, physical testing of vehicles, collision statistics and joint regulatory development with our trading partners.

Sub-Program 3.4.2: Motor Vehicle Safety Oversight

Description: The Motor Vehicle Safety Oversight Program is risk-based and assesses compliance of the motor vehicle manufacturing industry with the regulatory framework through inspections, audits, physical testing and, where necessary, enforcement.

Sub-Program 3.4.3: Motor Carrier Safety

Description: Guided by the Motor Vehicle Transport Act, the Motor Carrier Safety Program achieves safer motor carrier (trucking and busing) operations by: advancing implementation of the National Safety Code (performance standards for commercial vehicle operations); managing a contribution program for provinces and territories towards consistent implementation of the National Safety Code; and by maintaining the Commercial Vehicle Drivers Hours of Service Regulations for commercial vehicle drivers.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.4.1 Motor Vehicle Safety Regulatory Framework 7,779,850 8,393,027 (613,177)
3.4.2 Motor Vehicle Safety Oversight 9,781,553 11,621,531 (1,839,978)
3.4.3 Motor Carrier Safety 5,161,845 3,656,636 1,505,209
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.4.1 Motor Vehicle Safety Regulatory Framework 51 38 13
3.4.2 Motor Vehicle Safety Oversight 51 38 13
3.4.3 Motor Carrier Safety 7 5 2
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
3.4.1 Motor Vehicle Safety Regulatory Framework
A performance-based regulatory framework that is harmonized with international vehicle safety regimes where appropriate

Percentage of standards that are harmonized with international motor vehicle safety standards

(Improvement = increase)
80% 88%
3.4.2 Motor Vehicle Safety Oversight
Motor vehicle industry is compliant with the regulatory framework

Percentage of the motor vehicle industry that is compliant with the regulatory framework

(Improvement = increase)

80%Footnote 16 97%
3.4.3 Motor Carrier Safety
Harmonized safety regime for motor carriers among provinces and territories

Percentage of jurisdictions that have adopted all of the 15 standards under the National Safety Code

(Improvement = increase)

80% 80%

Explanation of Variance

For 3.4.2: While compliance remained above target levels, year-over-year recalls and defect complaints increased by 5% and 7% respectively, and 37 compliance testing files are still under review.

Program 3.5: Transportation of Dangerous Goods

Sub-Program 3.5.1: Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulatory Framework

Description: The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulatory Framework Program provides a balance of tools (policies, guidelines, regulations and standards) to promote a harmonized regulatory framework for the safe transportation of dangerous goods within Canada and imported to Canada.

Sub-Program 3.5.2: Transportation of Dangerous Goods Oversight

Description: The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Oversight Program is risk-based and, supports compliance of industry with the regulatory framework through services, assessments and validations, inspections, audits and, when necessary, enforcement.

Sub-Program 3.5.3: Emergency Response for Transportation of Dangerous Goods

Description: Required by the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992, the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Emergency Response Program: protects the safety of human life and health, of property and the environment, by providing immediate 24-hour scientific advice, safety precautions and action measures to first responders through the Canadian Transport Emergency Centre (CANUTEC) following an incident involving dangerous goods; attends to dangerous goods incidents and provides onsite response direction by the Transportation of Dangerous Goods’ Remedial Measure Specialist; produces the Emergency Response Guidebook as a tool for initial response during the first 15 minutes at the scene of an accident involving dangerous goods; responds to security threats in partnership with industry; and conducts research on emergency response to releases of chemicals.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.5.1 Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulatory Framework 3,770,296 4,452,529 (682,233)
3.5.2 Transportation of Dangerous Goods Oversight 9,039,462 16,954,591 (7,915,129)
3.5.3 Emergency Response for Transportation of Dangerous Goods 2,512,865 5,213,450 (2,700,585)
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.5.1 Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulatory Framework 30 59 (29)
3.5.2 Transportation of Dangerous Goods Oversight 92 136 (44)
3.5.3 Emergency Response for Transportation of Dangerous Goods 25 33 (8)
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
3.5.1 Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulatory Framework
The harmonization of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations with international regulations and national standards

Percentage of proposed regulatory requirements that harmonize with international standards, codes, practices or requirements

(Improvement = increase)

85%Footnote 17 90%
3.5.2 Transportation of Dangerous Goods Oversight
The dangerous goods industry is compliant

Percentage of inspections that do not require a follow-up inspection as per the Compliance Estimation programFootnote 18

(Improvement = increase)

90% 96%
3.5.3 Emergency Response for Transportation of Dangerous Goods
Clients are satisfied with the response provided by CANUTEC

Percentage of calls to CANUTEC that do not require follow up

(Improvement = increase)

90% No data (see explanation below)

Explanation of Variance

For 3.5.3: In the 2015-16 fiscal year, CANUTEC developed tools that will enable us to measure results against a new performance indicator which was approved for implementation in the fiscal 2016-17 year. The new performance indicator, “Percentage of calls to CANUTEC Emergency Centre that meet service standards”, is more reflective of CANUTEC’s operations.

Program 3.6: Aviation Security

Sub-Program 3.6.1: Aviation Security Regulatory Framework

Description: The Aviation Security Regulatory Framework Program develops and uses a balance of tools (policies, guidelines, regulations and standards) to promote a harmonized aviation security regulatory framework for Canadians and the Canadian aviation industry.

Sub-Program 3.6.2: Aviation Security Oversight

Description: The Aviation Security Oversight Program supports the aviation industry’s compliance with the regulatory framework through services, assessments and validations, inspections, audits and enforcement. The Program also contributes to aviation security through incidence management procedures, plans and tools.

Sub-Program 3.6.3: Aviation Security Technological Infrastructure

Description: The Aviation Security Technological Infrastructure Program develops, evaluates and provides stakeholders access to standards, research data and best practices for technologies that assist the effective, consistent management of aviation security risks.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.6.1 Aviation Security Regulatory Framework 3,808,631 5,745,782 (1,937,151)
3.6.2 Aviation Security Oversight 18,481,257 21,454,247 (2,972,990)
3.6.3 Aviation Security Technological Infrastructure 7,501,850 1,841,095 5,660,755
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.6.1 Aviation Security Regulatory Framework 39 58 (19)
3.6.2 Aviation Security Oversight 197 201 (4)
3.6.3 Aviation Security Technological Infrastructure 53 10 43
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
3.6.1 Aviation Security Regulatory Framework
Regulatory framework meets international standards

Percentage of the regulatory framework which meets international standards

(Improvement = increase)

100% 100%
3.6.2 Aviation Security Oversight
Stakeholders understand the compliance requirements within the security regulatory framework

Percentage of completed inspections that did not result in a deficiency

(Improvement = increase)

85% 92%
3.6.3 Aviation Security Technological Infrastructure
Stakeholders are compliant with standards

Percentage of completed technology verification reviews that are compliant with standards

(Improvement = increase)

90% 83%

Explanation of Variance

For 3.6.3: One Air Cargo Security equipment qualification was not completed as a result of a fiscal realignment of operational priorities and resources.

Program 3.7: Marine Security

Sub-Program 3.7.1: Marine Security Regulatory Framework

Description: The Marine Security Regulatory Framework Program provides a balance of tools (policies, guidelines, regulations and standards) to promote a harmonized maritime security regulatory framework for Canadians and the marine industry.

Sub-Program 3.7.2: Marine Security Oversight

Description: The Marine Security Oversight Program is risk-based and supports the marine security industry’s compliance with the regulatory framework through services, assessments and validations, inspections, audits and, when necessary, enforcement.

Sub-Program 3.7.3: Marine Security Operations Centres

Description: The Marine Security Operations Centres Program works to detect, assess, and support a response to threats in Canada’s maritime domain and approaches as a key partner in the Marine Security Operations Centres, by conducting threat and risk assessments of vessels entering Canadian waters, and threat assessments of facilities within Canada. The Centres also serve as a maritime-centric interface between national and international partners and stakeholders, and support the Marine Security Oversight Program. Transport Canada is a partner in the Marine Security Operations Centres along with Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Coast Guard, the Department of National Defence and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The threat assessment and the risk assessment performed by inspectors, provides the basis for the establishment of restricted areas within marine facilities and the subsequent access control. Only those who have acquired a marine transportation security clearance would have access to restricted areas. The access control systems would be audited and tested by inspectors in the regions. Failure to control access could lead to enforcement.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.7.1 Marine Security Regulatory Framework 4,865,322 1,577,824 3,287,498
3.7.2 Marine Security Oversight 6,942,364 7,056,364 (114,000)
3.7.3 Marine Security Operations Centres 1,064,443 3,626,474 (2,562,031)
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.7.1 Marine Security Regulatory Framework 44 16 28
3.7.2 Marine Security Oversight 66 62 4
3.7.3 Marine Security Operations Centres 7 33 (26)
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
3.7.1 Marine Security Regulatory Framework
A risk-based regulatory framework consistent with international conventions

Percentage of the regulatory framework aligned with domestic legislation and/or adopted international conventions

(Improvement = increase)

85% 85%
3.7.2 Marine Security Oversight
Stakeholders are compliant with the requirements within the Marine Security regulatory framework

Percentage of inspections completed that do not result in an administrative monetary penaltyFootnote 19

(Improvement = increase)

90% 100%
3.7.3 Marine Security Operations Centres
The Government of Canada has the necessary information to address marine security threats and/or incidents

Percentage of vessels entering Canadian waters for which a regulatory compliance matrix is completedFootnote 20

(Improvement = increase)

100% 100%

Program 3.8: Surface and Intermodal Security

Description: The Surface and Intermodal Security Program does not have any lower-level Sub-Programs.

Program 3.9: Multimodal Safety and Security

Sub-Program 3.9.1: Multimodal Strategies and Integrated Services

Description: The Multimodal Strategies and Integrated Services Program provides strategic direction and advice on, and leads the coordination of, cross-cutting issues, the delivery of departmental enforcement services and regulatory and policy initiatives affecting transportation in safety and security. This Program also directs integrated planning and reporting initiatives for safety and security. It serves as the main departmental point of contact for security and intelligence matters through its liaison with the Canadian intelligence community and its central role in the sharing and analysis of intelligence information. In addition, this Program is responsible for processing requisite transportation security clearances for workers within the national transportation infrastructure.

Sub-Program 3.9.2: Emergency Preparedness and Situation Centres

Description: The Emergency Preparedness and Situation Centres Program works to ensure that Transport Canada is prepared for and able to respond to emerging threats and situations that may impact the national transportation system by collaborating closely with partners throughout the Department, industry, stakeholders and other government departments and/or agencies. The Program seeks to ensure that the Department continues to successfully meet its responsibilities under the Emergency Management Act, including the Government of Canada’s emergency management agenda, focusing primarily on preparedness and response activities.

Sub-Program 3.9.3: Integrated Technical Training

Description: The Multimodal Integrated Technical Training Program is responsible for maintaining an integrated technical training branch that is accountable for assessing training needs and designing, developing, delivering and evaluating technical training products and services. The Program is also responsible for the management of an integrated Learning Management System to manage, track and report technical learning, including the hosting of e-learning courses.

2015-16 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
Spending
Actual
Spending
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.9.1 Multimodal Strategies and Integrated Services 8,303,091 11,194,293 (2,891,202)
3.9.2 Emergency Preparedness and Situation Centres 1,817,702 3,687,467 (1,869,765)
3.9.3 Integrated Technical Training 770,104 4,889,476 (4,119,372)
2015-16 Human Resources (Full –time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Name
 
Planned
 
Actual
 
Difference (planned
minus Actual)
3.9.1 Multimodal Strategies and Integrated Services 91 95 (4)
3.9.2 Emergency Preparedness and Situation Centres 19 37 (18)
3.9.3 Integrated Technical Training 8 45 (37)
Performance Results – For Sub-Programs
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
3.9.1 Multimodal Strategies and Integrated Services
Internal stakeholders have the information they need to manage safety and security transportation issues in an integrated and consistent manner across modes

Percentage of safety and security modes’ clients indicating a satisfactory rate (at least 80%) on services, expertise and guidance provided

(Improvement = increase)

85% N/A (see explanation below)
3.9.2 Emergency Preparedness and Situation Centres
a) Transport Canada meets its preparedness responsibilities under the Emergency Management Act

Rating on the preparedness sections of Public Safety Canada’s assessment of the Transport Canada Strategic Emergency Management Plan

(Improvement = increase)

80% 81.25%Footnote 21
b) Transport Canada is able to respond to emergency situations

Rating on Transport Canada Situation Centres readiness status

(Improvement = increase)

80% 82%
3.9.3 Integrated Technical Training
Core and multimodal-specialized technical training received by inspectors and technical experts is standardized Number of core and multimodal specialized technical training courses developed 5 courses by March 2016 20: includes
5 e-Learning and
15 classroom courses

Explanation of Variance

For 3.9.1: Since the publication of the 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities, a new performance indicator was developed: “Percentage of Transport Canada safety and security programs’ National Oversight Plans approved by Strategic Outcome 3 Management Board before the beginning of the fiscal year.” The 2015-16 target was set at 85% and the actual result of National Oversight Plans were approved was 100%.

For 3.9.2 b): The Transport Canada Situation Centre successfully responded to 50,000 phone calls and emails from various stakeholders, industry and other government departments, generating 5,000 notifications; however, due to staffing shortages, quality assurance / control was limited.

For 3.9.3: Greater opportunities for multimodality were identified through common learning requirements established in the Safety and Security Learning Continuum. In addition, some multimodal courses previously offered within a specific program were expanded to others to address similar competencies.

Program 4: Internal ServicesFootnote 22

Description: Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are reported on at the Program level and can be found within the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report.

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