Supplementary Table - Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative: Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative 1

Name of lead department: Transport Canada

Lead department Program Alignment Architecture program: Program 1.2 Gateways and Corridors

Start date: October 19, 2006

End date: March 31, 2018

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1.056 billion

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative was launched to strengthen Canada’s competitive position in global commerce.  It is an integrated package of investment and policy measures to strengthen the efficiency, capacity, security and reliability of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor transportation system.  It reflects the Government of Canada’s undertaking to work in partnership with provincial governments, private sector leaders and other stakeholders to further develop and build on Western Canada’s geographic advantage and strong transportation systems.  The Initiative seeks to establish Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor as the best transportation network facilitating global supply chains between North America and Asia.

Shared Outcomes: The following are planned shared outcomes and activities for the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative:

Key themes include:

  • Gateway capacity - Strategic infrastructure investments and network improvements;
  • Competitiveness - Increase Canada's share of Asia-Pacific commerce;
  • Efficiency and reliability - Improve movement of goods throughout supply chains;
  • Security and border efficiency - Establish a secure and efficient transportation network linking Canadian and North American markets; and
  • Effective partnerships and policy renewal - Integrative policy frameworks and regulations that address new approaches to governance.

Ultimate Outcome:

  • Boost Canada's commerce with the Asia-Pacific region;
  • Increase the Gateway's share of North American-bound container imports from Asia; and
  • Improve the efficiency and reliability of the Gateway for Canadian and North American exports and imports.

Governance structures: During the reporting period, two Ministers were jointly responsible for the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative. The Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway was the champion of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative, with support in this effort provided by Transport Canada.  The Minister of Transport was (and continues to be) accountable for the management of resources in the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund. 

The Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative is a horizontal initiative and its development and implementation involve a number of other key federal departments/agencies. While each is ultimately accountable for its own programs/activities and, when applicable, associated Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative resources, federal departments/agencies involved in delivery of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative are also responsible for contributing to the overarching objectives of the Initiative. All federal partners are accountable for the day-to-day management of their respective Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative-related activities.  Furthermore, each department/agency provides regular updates to the two lead ministers, via a Directors General-level Interdepartmental Steering Committee on the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.

A Horizontal Performance Framework was prepared in collaboration with all the departments/agencies involved in the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative. This framework provides a sound and coordinated performance measurement strategy to assess implementation and delivery of the Initiative. Partner departments/agencies in the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative and their roles are outlined below.

Transport Canada

Transport Canada, as the lead department for the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative, reported jointly to the Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway and to the Minister of Transport. Transport Canada is responsible for the ongoing coordination, management, integration and strategic development and implementation of the Initiative. Other federal departments/agencies, the four Western provinces and stakeholders from the private sector are consulted regularly in carrying out these tasks, and are involved in building consensus on Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative-related decisions. Transport Canada is also responsible for the management of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund, whose primary objective is to address capacity challenges facing the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor. Strategic project investments funded under Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund will enhance the efficiency and capacity of Canada's multi-modal transportation network and are focused specifically on the movement of international commerce between the Asia-Pacific region and North America. 

While transportation infrastructure forms the core of the Initiative, the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative also addresses the interconnected issues that impact the competitiveness, further development and exploitation of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor transportation system.  Transport Canada completed a number of non infrastructure/competitiveness measures and is focused on moving forward in the following areas:

  • Renewing and analyzing policy and regulations to improve the efficiency and use of the Gateway and Corridor system;
  • Ensuring the secure and efficient movement of goods and people, including participation in related areas outlined in the Canada-U.S. Beyond the Border Action Plan;
  • Developing new supply chain performance metrics that reflect how transportation systems are used in an era of globalization and global supply chains and that provide an evidence-base for promotion and continuous improvement;
  • Supporting innovative partnerships among federal and provincial counterparts to understand how and where future trade patterns will affect system-wide transportation capacity, and among Asia-Pacific Gateway stakeholders to develop a shared vision about the optimal performance and efficiency of the Asia-Pacific Gateway;
  • Engaging stakeholders across Western Canada to advance understanding of the long-term challenges and opportunities of the Gateway by tapping into Canadian and international expertise;
  • Conducting targeted outreach internationally to attract more trade to Canada and to maximize the return on federal and partners’ investments in the Asia-Pacific Gateway;
  • Strengthening cooperative relationships in the emerging economies of Asia to inform policy development and help identify commercial opportunities; and
  • Undertaking studies on the operations, use and efficiency of the Gateway and Corridor system to better understand and improve the multi-modal infrastructure network, to increase the productivity of the full supply chain and to provide an evidence-base for future action.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade

The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade supports the ongoing implementation of international marketing activities, in coordination with Transport Canada and with Asia-Pacific Gateway stakeholders, promoting greater use of the Gateway for Asia-Pacific business travel and as the supply chain route of choice for North American and Asia-Pacific importers, exporters, investors and transportation companies. The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Commissioners abroad remain engaged in advancing Canada as the Gateway and Corridor of choice and also serve to encourage investment and technology transfer, provide intelligence to Canada to support policy development and help determine which messages resonated best in target markets.

Canada Border Services Agency

Canada Border Services Agency is responsible for the implementation of a marine container inspection operation located at the Port of Prince Rupert, which is now fully operational. The marine container inspection ensures that containers arriving from other countries are properly inspected by means of effective processes and through the use of state-of-the art technology. Canada Border Services Agency has continued to refine its operations to ensure effective and efficient delivery of Canada Border Services Agency programs and developed partnerships with stakeholders to reinforce supply chain security. Canada Border Services Agency also served as a valuable partner in Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative engagement with China on trade logistics cooperation, and through the Canada-U.S. Beyond the Border Action Plan, will continue to play an active role in supporting the achievement of Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative objectives. In the context of the Beyond the Border Action Plan, this includes the Integrated Cargo Security Strategy and pilot testing of an approach where Canada Border Services Agency would conduct inspections on behalf of the United States Customs and Protection at the first point of entry into North America, thereby eliminating the need for these goods to be re-examined at the Canada-U.S. border. The first pilot testing of this “cleared once accepted twice” approach began on October 1, 2012, and centres on the movement by rail of offshore marine cargo from the Port of Prince Rupert to the United States.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for the Asia-Pacific Gateway Skills Table (Skills Table).  Modeled on the Sector Council Program, the Skills Table was launched in September 2008 to help address the skills and human resource pressure issues related to the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative. The development of the Skills Table follows a one-year fast-track consultative and planning process designed to inform Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative's future policy direction and investment decisions.  Human Resources and Skills Development Canada was provided $3 million over four years through the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative to fund projects prioritized by the Skills Table. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada provided an additional $2 million to support the establishment and operation of the Skills Table (total federal investment is $5 million). The Skills Table acts as a clearinghouse, ensuring sharing of data, projects, timetables, strategies, recruitment and retention practices and related ideas.  It provides a focused forum to identify, coordinate and leverage investments to address skills issues related to the Asia-Pacific Gateway.

Parks Canada

Parks Canada is responsible for the maintenance and recapitalization of highways that pass through national parks, including the Trans-Canada Highway.  The Trans-Canada Highway is a major pan-Canadian highway that connects the West Coast and its Asia-Pacific linkages to the rest of Canada, especially markets in the western provinces. Within the context of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative, Parks Canada was responsible for the twinning of a 10 km section of the Trans-Canada Highway through Banff National Park to improve transportation capacity and efficiency. The funding provided by the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative has helped to ensure the timely completion of this section of highway upgrading, in support of the Initiative's broader objectives. 

Western Economic Diversification Canada

Western Economic Diversification Canada was responsible for Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative elements in the first phase of the Initiative. This included development of “Seizing the Gateway Opportunity”, a study on how best to capitalize on the long-term value added economic opportunities presented by rise of the Asia-Pacific market, along with case studies of successful Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises in the Asia-Pacific market, establishing a Canadian presence at the China International Fair for Investment and Trade, a study tour of Western Canadian innovation capabilities by Trade Commissioners from Canadian Posts in the Asia-Pacific region and an assessment of community-level needs in Saskatrahewan and Manitoba for doing business in and with Asia.
 

Performance Highlights:

Proponents continue to make progress on Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative strategic infrastructure projects that support Asia-Pacific trade and boost the competitive advantages of the Gateway by reducing bottlenecks, addressing capacity issues and enhancing the efficiency of the transportation system. In 2012-13, one Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative project was completed, construction began on eleven projects, and contribution agreements were signed for an additional eight projects. In addition, an open call for proposals for Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative projects in British Columbia was announced by the Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway on October 30, 2012. The open call was made available by the reallocation of approximately $50 million under the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative Transportation Infrastructure Fund.

The federal government continued to engage and reach out within Canada and internationally to build and strengthen partnerships that underpin the success of the Asia-Pacific Gateway. In July 2012, the Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway undertook consultations across Western Canada to see first-hand how efforts to deepen Canada's trade and investment ties in the fast-growing Asia-Pacific region are being facilitated by strategic investments and effective partnerships. The Minister met with provincial and municipal counterparts, leading stakeholders, and key transportation and industry leaders to discuss ways to build on Canada's competitive advantages and further deepen trade and investment ties throughout the Asia-Pacific region. In June 2012, the Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway also welcomed the inaugural flight of a new air service by Sichuan Airlines between Vancouver, British Columbia and the inland Chinese city of Chengdu, one of the most important commercial centres in Western China.

In 2012-13, Transport Canada hosted and conducted seminars with delegations from China’s Ministry of Transport (Highways) on Gateway Infrastructure and Innovation, China’s Academy of Transportation Science, Ministry of Transport (Water bound Transportation), the World Bank (Logistics Performance Index working group) and the Henan Ministry of Transport. 

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
$ millions

2012-13
$ millions

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators) 2

Transport Canada

1.2 Gateway and Corridors

1.2.1 Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund

908.5

201.7

154.9

  • Maximization of the efficiency of the supply chain through the identification of bottlenecks, capacity constraints and other impediments to the flow of goods.

  • Completion of projects to improve highway, rail and marine capacity, and of inter-modal links and connectors to improve the efficiency and reliability of Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor.
  • Transport Canada advanced evidence-based measures of supply chain performance (fluidity, port utilization) that have helped identify bottlenecks for marine containers in the Asia-Pacific Gateway and potential remedies, by building on productive partnerships forged with industry stakeholders as part of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative. A fluidity data dissemination portal was launched in March 2013. This portal allows users to access evidence-based measures of supply chain performance, between origin ports in Asia and destinations in Canada and the United States, for the 2010 to 2013 period. It is now updated regularly, as data becomes available.
  • Significant progress has been made over the past year including:
    • The Roberts Bank Rail Corridor – 80th  St. Overpass Corporation of Delta, project was completed;
    • Eight contribution agreements were signed for eight projects:
      • Prince Rupert Port Authority: Ridley Island Road Rail Utility Corridor
      • Port Metro Vancouver:
        • Deltaport Causeway Project
        • Roberts Bank Rail Corridor 232nd Street Overpass Project
        • North Shore Trade Area Low Level Road Project
      • Ashcroft Terminal: Ashcroft Terminal Expansion Project
      • City of Vancouver: South Shore Trade Area Powell Street Grade Separation
      • Province of Alberta: Highway 2 and 41 Avenue Intermodal Access
      • Province of British Columbia: Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Mufford/64th Avenue Grade Separation
    • An amending agreement was signed to add to the scope of an existing project: Port Metro Vancouver, South Shore Corridor Project (formerly Stewart Street Elevated Structure)
    • Eleven projects began construction:
      • Ashcroft Terminal: Ashcroft Terminal Expansion Project
      • Prince Rupert Port Authority: Ridley Island Road Rail and Utility Corridor Project
      • City of Surrey: Roberts Bank Rail Corridor City of Surrey Combo Projects
        • 192nd Street Overpass Project
        • 196th Street Overpass Project
        • 54th Avenue Overpass Project
      • Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Panorama Ridge Project
      • Roberts Bank Rail Corridor 152nd Overpass Project
      • Port Metro Vancouver
        • South Shore Corridor Project
        • Deltaport Causeway Project
      • City of Richmond
        • Westminster Highway and Nelson Road Widening
        • Highway 91 & Knight Street: No. 6 Road Widening
    • A communications technology project began the implementation phase: Translink: Smart Corridors Regional Traffic Data Systems
    • Two new projects were announced:
      • Overpass on the Deltaport Causeway
      • Hwy 91 and 72nd Avenue Interchange in Delta
  • An open call for proposals was announced in October 2012 for job-creating and export-enhancing infrastructure and short-sea shipping projects in British Columbia. The open-call was made possible by the reallocation of approximately $50 million made available under the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund. 

Competitiveness Investment

12.3

1.4

0.9

Analysis of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor transportation system to support its optimization for imports and exports to and from Canada and North America.

  • Analysis was conducted in order to identify Asia-Pacific cargo traffic moving within and through British Columbia’s Lower Mainland region. A final report consolidated information on all truck freight traffic movements traversing the Lower Mainland into one comprehensive document and database. This information will be used to identify the impacts of Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative infrastructure investments within the region. Research was also conducted on the export opportunities for Canadian containerized products to China.

Identification of opportunities to  help fully utilize marine container capacity to aid exporters, including small and medium sized enterprises, in accessing Asia Pacific.

  • Transport Canada facilitated meetings of the Asia-Pacific Gateway Performance Table, an initiative aimed at improving the long-term efficiency and competitiveness of the Asia-Pacific Gateway. Participants comprise a cross section of major transportation, shipping and labour interests operating in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia.  Transport Canada facilitated meetings of the main steering committee, as well as the bulk and intermodal sub-committees. 
  • Members of the Gateway Performance Table identified areas of focus for the 2013-14 fiscal-year and endorsed the continuance of both the bulk and intermodal sub-committees.
    • The intermodal sub-committee refined performance metrics and used them to identify chokepoints for performance monitoring; and
    • The bulk 3 sub-committee held preliminary discussions on best practices and trade-related transportation issues.

Improved competitiveness of the Asia-Pacific Gateway through the continued development and publication of supply chain performance measures, the monitoring of industry trends and best practices, and examination of system capacity issues.

A revised Fluidity Data dissemination portal was launched in March 2013. This portal allows users to access new performance metrics for supply chains that link origin ports in Asia with destinations in Canada and the United States, for the 2010 to 2013 period. Going forward, the portal will be updated regularly as new data becomes available.

Implement the government response to the recommendations of the comprehensive review of freight rail service aimed at improving the efficiency, effectiveness and reliability of the rail system. This will help the rail system support domestic and international trade.

Transport Canada continued to implement the government response to the recommendations of the comprehensive review of freight rail service aimed at improving the efficiency, effectiveness and reliability of the rail system by:

  • Completing a facilitation process for the development of a template service agreement and commercial dispute resolution process;
  • Tabling legislation to amend the Canada Transportation Act provisions related to service agreements between shippers and railways; and
  • Conducting an in-depth analysis of the grain supply chain.

Continued collaboration at the government and private-sector level in China under the terms of existing agreements and expanded gateway outreach with other key Asia-Pacific economies.

  • Domestic and International outreach strategies were implemented in 2012-13.
  • The department hosted a delegation from China’s Ministry of Transport (Highways) on Gateway Infrastructure and Innovation and presented to delegations from China Academy of Transportation Science, Ministry of Transport (Water bound Transportation), World Bank (Logistics Performance Index working group) and the Henan Ministry of Transport on the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.
  • A familiarization tour was organized for British Columbia’s Lower Mainland mayors, Members of the Legislative Assembly and Members of Parliament to garner support for Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor infrastructure projects, during which the Minister of International Trade and Minister responsible for the Asia-Pacific Gateway held stakeholder consultations on the issue of “social license” with local organizations and Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative partners.
  • Public engagement products were produced and updated to raise awareness and promote the benefits of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative:
    • The Gateway Corridor News Spring 2012 edition;
    • An advertising piece in the Journal of Commerce with Asia-Pacific Gateway partners;
    • The Asia-Pacific Gateway: Your export connection to new markets; and
    • The Asia-Pacific Gateway website.
  • The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Port Services Network supported its bilateral relationship with China and provided opportunities to promote the Initiative. Since the inception of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Port Services Network in 2008, the Presidency of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Port Services Network Council has been held by Canada, which strengthened Canada’s maritime relations with China.
  • Transport Canada supported the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Port Services Network Secretariat, by finalizing arrangements for the Annual Council Meeting and Workshop in Hong Kong, November 2012, as well as advancing the planning arrangements of the 2013 Annual Council meeting and workshop.

An Electronic Freight Management information exchange platform was implemented with Chinese partners, as well as a regional traffic data system as part of the Smart Corridors component. A website interface is being developed to integrate data to a public website. 

Transport Canada continued to identify and helped address complex issues that impact Canada’s attractiveness as a destination for foreign investment and trade activities by:

  • Providing advice to Finance Canada in the context of the Foreign-Trade Zone-like policies and programs review and public consultations, and on resulting actions announced in Budget 2013 to reduce red tape, cut costs, improve access to existing programs and promote Canada's Foreign-Trade Zone advantage; and
  • Continuing value-added initiatives within Transport Canada such as: research and focus group on the maritime cluster concept, support for Intelligent Transportation System projects.

Coordination and Management

6.5

0.0

0.8

Funding for this function sunset in fiscal year 2010-11. Transport Canada will continue to explore ways of continuing to provide this support for the remainder of the mandate.

  • Funding to support the continuation of these activities for the remainder of the mandate was identified.
  • Ongoing support for the portfolio was provided.
  • An action plan was implemented to address recommendations made in the 2013 evaluation of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.

Fast-Track Process

2.3

0.0

0.0

(Completed in 2007-08)

Not applicable

Foreign Affairs and Inter-national Trade Canada

International Commerce - Managing and delivering commerce services and advice to Canadian business

Marketing the Asia-Pacific Gateway And Corridor Initiative

7.0

0.0*

0.0

Not applicable

DFAIT Trade Commissioners provided support to Transport Canada and the Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway for APGCI outreach and engagement conducted in North and Southeast Asia.

Canada Border Services Agency

Canadian Importing and Exporting Community

Marine Container Inspection Operation at Port of Prince Rupert

28.0

0.0

0.0

(Completed in 2009-10)

Not applicable

Parks Canada

Throughway management

Banff Trans Canada Highway Twinning

37.0

0.0

0.0

(Completed in 2009-10)

Not applicable

Western Economic Diversification

Business development and entrepreneurship

Seizing the Gateway opportunity

0.4

0.0

0.0

(Completed in 2008-09)

Not applicable

Dredging the Fraser River

4.0

0.0

0.0

(Completed in 2007-08)

Not applicable

Human Resources and Skills Develop-ment Canada

Skills and Labour Pressure

Asia-Pacific Gateway Skills Table

4.8

0.0

0.0

(Completed in 2008-09)

Not applicable

Total

1,056.0*

203.1

156.6

 

 

*Includes $1,001 million of core Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative funding as well as a transfer of $44 million from the Mountain Pine Beetle Fund to the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative Transportation Infrastructure Fund.

Comments on Variance: 

  • The variance between planned and actual spending for 2012-13 in the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund program area resulted from delays in several projects, resulting primarily from complex project approval processes and challenges associated with multi-stakeholder collaboration.
  • The variance between planned and actual spending for 2012-13 in the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative Competitiveness Investment program area resulted from the approval of new authorities during the reporting period to support the continuation of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.
  • The variance between planned and actual spending for 2012-13 in the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative Coordination and Management program area resulted from the approval of new authorities to support the continuation of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative, including those necessary for policy, coordination and management functions.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:  Not Applicable

Contact information: Paul Sandhar-Cruz, Director, Pacific Gateway Coordination, Transport Canada; 613-949-0654 Paul.Sandhar-Cruz@tra.gc.ca

 

 

Name of horizontal initiative: Marine Security1

Name of lead department: Transport Canada

Lead Department Program Alignment Architecture Program: Marine Security

Start date: 2001

End date: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): N/A

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Marine Security is a horizontal initiative that is linked to the government’s key priority of A Safe and Secure Canada. Its aim is to improve the security of Canada’s maritime domain, including territorial waters, inland waterways and ports.  Elements of this initiative include:

  • increased domain awareness, surveillance and tracking of marine traffic;
  • improved coordination of and cooperation on marine security, including the development of Marine Security Operations Centres;
  • a security clearance program for marine-sector employees;
  • new detection equipment at Canadian ports to monitor containers;
  • additional resources for emergency and law enforcement response capacity in the marine domain; and
  • International initiatives that will ensure Canada meets current international standards and obligations, including those being developed by the International Maritime Organization.

Shared Outcomes: The following are planned shared outcomes and activities. Key areas include:

  • domain awareness: Canada’s surveillance and awareness efforts within marine areas;
  • responsiveness: enforcement efforts in cooperation with all relevant police forces and security agencies;
  • safeguarding: efforts to enhance the physical security of marine infrastructure of other critical infrastructure in or around marine areas; and
  • Collaboration: efforts in support of all other activities to ensure the various federal and provincial departments, agencies and police forces, and other groups with a responsibility for marine security work together.

Immediate Outcomes:

Immediate outcomes of the Marine Security initiative are:

  • increased surveillance and awareness of the marine security environment;
  • increased on-water presence;
  • enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;
  • increased capability to respond to marine threats;
  • increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;
  • increased stakeholder ability to meet marine security requirements; and
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security.

Intermediate Outcomes:

Intermediate outcomes will be:

  • effective domain awareness;
  • rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents;
  • a security-conscious culture among stakeholders;
  • stakeholder compliance with security regulations; and
  • Increased collaboration:  internationally, with industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Ultimate Outcomes:

The final outcomes of this initiative are expected to be:

  • an effective and efficient marine security system;
  • high public confidence in Canada’s marine security system; and
  • A marine security system that facilitates the efficient and legitimate flow of people and goods.

Strategic Outcome:

  • The expected strategic outcome will be a marine system that contributes to the security, safety and prosperity of Canadians, and of our allies.

Governance Structure: The Government of Canada created the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group, chaired by Transport Canada, to identify and coordinate federal actions in support of Canada’s objectives with regard to public security and anti-terrorism in the maritime domain, as well as its international marine security obligations. Under the guidance of the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group, key departments are responsible for the following:

Transport Canada

The department leads the government’s initiatives in marine security enhancements, including:

  • policy coordination;
  • chairing of the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group; regulatory development in support of marine security initiatives;
  • the Marine Security Oversight and Enforcement program;
  • the Marine Transportation Security Clearance program; and
  • Participation in the Marine Security Operations Centres.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), and the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG)

The department contributed to the enhancement of maritime domain awareness within Canada through increased vessel identification and tracking activities, the installation of shore-based Automatic Identification System infrastructure and the development of a long-range vessel tracking capability, namely the Long Range Identification and Tracking System. The department is also a key participant in the Marine Security Operations Centre where its maritime information and analysis is critical to identifying threats. Through the acquisition of new Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels, the department is increasing its on-water capability for providing platform support to security and law enforcement organizations.

Public Safety Canada

Public Safety Canada is the country’s lead department for public safety. The department coordinates efforts with portfolio agencies, federal partners, other levels of government (including international allies) and stakeholders in building national policies and programs dealing with national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border integrity. This includes, for example, the development and implementation of marine-based counter-terrorism exercises.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

The Canada Border Services Agency’s mandate is to manage the nation’s borders at ports of entry by administering and enforcing the domestic laws that govern trade and travel, as well as international agreements and conventions. The work of the Canada Border Services Agency includes identifying and interdicting high-risk individuals and goods, working with law enforcement agencies to maintain border integrity and engaging in enforcement activities, including seizure of goods, arrests, detentions, investigations, hearings and removals.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police is responsible for enforcing federal statutes, leading national security and organized crime investigations across Canada on both land and water, and for maintaining border integrity between ports of entry.

National Defence

The department contributes to enhanced domain awareness of the strategic high-traffic coastal area. It leads the Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs) on the coasts and participates in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC. It works with partner departments and agencies to improve interdepartmental tactical operations. Lastly, it leads the Interdepartmental Maritime Integrated Command Control and Communication (IMIC3) project (approved January 10, 2011) that will improve tactical communications between the various departmental/agency vessels at sea.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)2

Transport Canada

Marine Security

a) Marine Security Coordination Fund

16.2

0.3

0.3

Expected Results for the Marine Security Coordination Fund

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

16.2

0.3

0.3

 

 

Results Achieved: The Marine Security Coordination Fund was cancelled as part of the wider government expenditure reduction initiatives nevertheless; projects with multi-year funding were honored. 
Consequently, funding was provided for the following Marine Security Coordination Fund projects:

  • Commercial Marine Export Examination Mapping Exercise (Canada Border Services Agency); and
  • Lake Ontario Radar Project (Royal Canadian Mounted Police).

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Transport Canada

Marine Security

Oversight and Enforcement

54.1

6.8

9.4

Expected Results for Oversight and Enforcement

Results achieved are listed below. 

Total

54.1

6.8

9.4

 

 

Results Achieved:

  • Phase I of the proposed amendments to the Marine Transportation Security Regulations (MTSR) received Ministerial approval and were advanced to pre-publication in Canada Gazette, Part I;
  • Finalized the response plan under the auspices of the Government of Canada’s Red Tape Reduction initiative for reducing the MTSR-related regulatory burden for Canadian-flagged vessels;
  • Advanced the delivery of a work plan under the auspices of the Canada-US Regulatory Cooperation Council focused on further harmonizing Canada and US marine transportation security regulations and further improving consultation and coordination between Transport Canada and the US Coast Guard on regulatory development;  
  • Advanced the delivery of another work plan under the auspices of the Canada-US Regulatory Cooperation Council focused on the regulatory oversight regime on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway coordinated between Transport Canada and the US Coast Guard;
  • Finalized the development of the New Brunswick Festival of Tall Ships on the Miramichi – 2013 Security Measure.

Nationally, the program conducted 830 inspections.  Under the MTSR and the Domestic Ferry Security Regulations, 138 inspections of Canadian vessels, 306 inspections of marine facilities and Ports, and 387 inspections of foreign flagged vessels were conducted.  We also conducted 30 inspections specifically for Tall Ships events, as well as issued eight exemptions covering the Tall Ship events.  Four other exemptions were issued for vessels captured under the MTSRs.  Also, Transport Canada’s Marine Security program issued two Tall Ships security measure pursuant to section 7 of the Marine Transportation Security Act, namely the Nova Scotia Tall Ships 2012 Security Measure for the event that took place in Halifax and other Nova Scotia communities in July 2012, and “Les Grands Voiliers au Vieux-Port 2012” held in September 2012 at the Old Port of Montreal, Quebec.

Three Marine Security Operations Bulletins were issued, namely “Use of Cruise Ship and Passenger Vessel Tenders to Transfer Passengers to and from Shore”, “Ship Security Alert System (SSAS) Requirements for Canadian Registered Vessels” and “Updates to the Marine Security Oversight Regime under the Marine Transportation Security Act” to provide awareness to stakeholders, regional inspectors and other government departments.

Last, Marine Security implemented the updated Marine Security Compliance program in February 2013 to promote compliance with the requirements of the Marine Transportation Security Act and its regulations. Compliance policy and procedures were developed to state the oversight philosophy and ensure consistency in the application of the program activities. Training in the enforcement component of the program was provided to marine security inspectors across Canada.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Transport Canada

Marine Security

b) Marine Security Policy and Interdepartmental Coordination

5.0

1.0

0.7

Expected Results for Marine Security Policy and Interdepartmental Coordination

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

5.0

1.0

0.7

 

 

Results Achieved: The Maritime Security Strategic Framework (MSSF), the Maritime Domain Awareness Strategy and the Government of Canada Maritime Commerce Resilience and Recovery Strategy were approved. The Resilience and Recovery Strategy is intended to provide guiding principles and best practices for use by Government of Canada departments and agencies undertaking resilience and recovery planning for Canada’s maritime supply chain. Collaboration with the United States Coast Guard on resilience and recovery initiatives led to the establishment of operational and communications protocols for the resumption of maritime trade in the event of major disruptions.

A Transport Canada/RCMP-led study on waterside security roles and responsibilities was completed. Transport Canada and the RCMP are examining the recommendations and planning to action them through a new National Port Security Committee.

Following the conclusion of the offshore security memorandum of understanding between Transport Canada and the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board first and Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board in 2011, Transport Canada entered into a similar agreement with the National Energy Board which came into effect on February 9, 2012. Planning is underway to enhance the memorandum of understanding in light of future operational activities in the North.

The Marine Event Response Protocol, developed as a whole-of-government response to a significant marine event, underwent a major rewrite in 2012 and was re-endorsed by both the Associate Deputy Minister Emergency Management Committee and the Associate Deputy Minister National Security Operations Committee in April 2012. The Protocol promotes coordination of efforts at the national, regional and international levels in order to counter marine threats and events effectively.

The Beyond the Border declaration identified several key areas of cooperation for Canada and the United States, including bi-national cooperation to address significant maritime threats or events before they reach our shores. The recent development of a strategic protocol linking Canada’s Marine Event Response Protocol  and the United States’ Maritime Operational Threat Response protocol supports the beyond the border declaration by enhancing bi-national-level communication, coordination and timely counter terrorism response efforts. The newly developed strategic protocol was endorsed in June 2012 by Canada’s Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group and the United States’ National Security Staff. The Protocol was then tested in February 2013 by way of a table top exercise held simultaneously in Ottawa, Ontario and Washington, D.C. This exercise confirmed the utility, value, and importance of the strategic protocol, identified issues associated with implementation and highlighted best practices for future use.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Transport Canada

Marine Security

c) Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program

11.8

1.9

1.1

Expected Results for the Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

11.8

1.9

1.1

 

 

Results Achieved: All ports captured under this program are fully compliant. This fiscal, 6,434 submissions for Transportation Security Clearances were received and processed across Canada.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Transport Canada

Marine Security

d) Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (design team)

9.1

1.9

0.8

Expected Results for the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (design team)

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

9.1

1.9

0.8

 

 

Results Achieved: Implementation of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (MSOC) program continues. Transport Canada along with the other core partners continually reviewed their Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). In 2012-13, three new SOPs were adopted to reflect improved ways of doing business.

Transport Canada continued to contribute to effective domain awareness through the development and sharing of departmental and interdepartmental threat assessments, statistical reports and other information and intelligence products. In 2012-13, we produced 29 threat assessments / intelligence reports through its participation in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC program.

Transport Canada provided its information and intelligence products to program partner departments and agencies, including United States Coast Guard, on a regular basis within legal guidelines. We also conducted awareness sessions with enforcement, intelligence, and industry partners in collaboration with all program partners.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions )

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Transport Canada

Marine Security

e) Coastal Marine Security Operations Centre

11.5

3.8

2.7

Expected Results for Coastal Marine Security Operations Centre

Results Achieved in 2012-13 for the Coastal Marine Security Operations Centre (design team) are listed below.

Total

3.8

3.8

2.7

 

 

Results Achieved:

  • Continued surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • Continued Cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and
  • Effective domain awareness, and continued collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Safe and Secure Waters

a) Increased On-Water Patrols

10.0 (annually and ongoing)

10.0

10.0

Expected results for Increased On-Water Patrols

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

10.0

10.0

10.0

 

 

Results Achieved: Canadian Coast Guard delivered a total of 44,779 operational days in 2012-13, which includes operational days funded from the Public Security and Anti-Terrorism (PSAT) Initiative.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Safe and Secure Waters

b) Automatic Identification System (AIS) and Long Range Identification and Tracking

32.5 (includes 5M for AIS in the Great Lakes Region)

 

 

1.8

1.3

Expected results for Automatic Identification System (AIS) and Long Range Identification and Tracking

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

32.5

1.8

1.3

 

 

Results Achieved: Terrestrial-Automatic Identification System shore-based infrastructure has been integrated within Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS) centres. As of today, the Canadian Coast Guard has all 21 MCTS centres installed and operational with the final Automatic Identification system (AIS) solution.

To look to increase domain awareness in the Arctic, additional terrestrial-AIS sites have been established in Resolute Bay and Iqaluit, Nunavut. The two sites were ready for testing during the 2012 Arctic sailing season.  Resolute Bay is installed and ready for operational use.  Iqaluit is installed and ready for operational use. A third terrestrial-AIS site is being scoped for Cambridge Bay, Nunavut.

The department completed full national implementation of the Long-Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) System.

Percentage availability of the LRIT system and the terrestrial-Automatic Identification System (AIS):

  • Target:  99.7%
  • Results: AIS - 99.75%. with the System now fully implemented and the warranty period complete. An in-service support contract has been signed with the provider to ensure ongoing support of the system for the next five years.
  • Target: 99.7%
  • Results: LRIT - 99.7%

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Safe and Secure Waters

c) Great Lakes/ St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre

3.2 (annual and ongoing)

 

 

3.2

3.2

Expected results for Great Lakes/ St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

3.2

3.2

3.2

 

 

Results Achieved: Percentage availability of the consolidated maritime picture versus advertised level of availability for clients:

  • Target:  99.7 percent
  • Results: The project to was delayed, however, the percentage of availability of Fisheries and Oceans/Canadian Coast Guard information to enhance the awareness of the federal law enforcement and intelligence communities of vessel movements and response to maritime activities corresponds to the percentage availability of the LRIT and AIS systems.

Note: Consolidated maritime picture not yet available – National Information System on Marine Navigation (INNAV) data has been used as a proxy. INNAV is a comprehensive, operational information management tool designed to support commerce, provide reliable waterway management and maximize opportunities to integrate emerging technologies.

The system has been available and reliable. No major equipment/system breakdown occurred that affected the availability of service to MSOCs.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Safe and Secure Waters

d) Marine Security Enforcement Teams

12.9 (annually and ongoing)

 

 

 

6.3

5.4

Expected results for Marine Security Enforcement Teams

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

12.9

6.3

5.4

 

 

Results Achieved: The teams supported ad hoc law enforcement requests in all areas of Canadian waters. In 2012-13, 872 days were planned in support of the Marine Security Enforcement Team program, while 825.42 days were delivered.  This represents a delivery rate of 94.65 percent.

Note: These numbers are captured in elapsed days (or non-weighted days).  Elapsed operational days calculate the number of days as if each client were the only client aboard. The sum of elapsed days recorded on a vessel may exceed the total number of calendar days available. E.g., a vessel with two similar programs onboard during one operational day will each be attributed up to a maximum of one (1) elapsed day.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Safe and Secure Waters

e) Construction of Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels

63.3

 

 

 

69.1

69.2

Expected results for Construction of Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

227.0

69.1

69.2

 

 

Results Achieved: The contract for the design and construction of 9 Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels (MSPVs) was awarded in August 2009 to Irving Shipbuilding Inc. (ISI). Construction of the vessels commenced in September 2010 and is presently ongoing.  Three Marine Security Enforcement Team vessels were delivered in July 2012, November 2012 and February 2013 respectively. The remaining vessels will be delivered by Fall 2014.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

 

Safe and Secure Waters

f) Increased Surveillance Flights

7.0 (annually and ongoing)

 

 

 

7.0

7.0

Expected Results for Increased Surveillance Flights

Results achieved are listed below.

  Total

7.0

7.0

7.0

 

 

Results Achieved: Additional marine security funds were provided to enhance the DFO aerial surveillance program. The DFO program provides situational awareness through fisheries patrols that identify the location and activities of foreign and domestic fishing vessels, both inside and outside the 200 mile Exclusive Economic Zone. The additional funding increased the existing program and provided a collateral benefit to maritime security and the recognized maritime picture. The program also provides aerial surveillance services including digital photography and real-time video to the MSOC partner agencies on an as and when required basis.

For example, the department provided aerial surveillance coverage in the search of vessels of interest. All operations were successful and DFO flew approximately 4,239.8 hours in 2012-13.

Comments on Variances:

Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Canadian Coast Guard

  • Automatic Identification and Long-Range Identification and Tracking: In 2012-13, $200,000 was not spent and has been carried forward.  It is anticipated that the project will be delivered approximately $400,000 under budget and, as per the build to cost model, Canadian Coast Guard will examine the feasibility of additional sites with remaining funds; and
  • Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Enforcement Teams: Due to Canadian Coast Guard organization, it was not possible to fully realize planned expenditures. Acquisition of Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels: Variance is attributed to planned milestones that were accelerated under the latest production schedule, as provided by the Contractor.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Canada Border Services Agency

 

Risk Assessment

a) Radiation Detection Equipment Initiative

 

0.3

0.0

Expected Results for Increased Surveillance Flights

Results achieved are listed below.

Admissibility Determination 2.6 2.3
Internal Services 2.7 3.2
  Total

47.1

5.6

5.5

 

 

Results Achieved:

  • For the fiscal year 2012-13, the CBSA radiation screening program reported 3 marine containers contaminated with Cesium 134-137 as a direct result from the natural disaster that occurred in Japan. Eight containers of goods arrived contaminated with Cobalt 60, each of these containers was returned to origin;
  • Provision of 24/7 operational, technical and engineering support for Radiation portals, including continuous availability of radiation experts;
  • Scanning of 100% of marine containers for the presence of radiation.
  • Upgrade of radiation portal technology (panels);
  • Corrective and preventative maintenance of regionally deployed detection equipment (X-ray, VACIS, Portals, Ionscans, etra.);
  • Technical support for regional technicians;
  • Relocation of regionally deployed detection equipment;
  • Procurement and distribution of trace detection consumables (air purification cartridges, sample swabe, etra.) Drug ID Kits (NIK Tests and sprays)
  • Software upgrades for ionscans;
  • Technical support to the Postal Modernization project team, including the technical evaluation of equipment; and
  • Procurement of replacement hand held radioisotope identifiers for use at MCEFs.
  • Preparation of detailed procurement documentation (SOW’s) for the purchase of next generation portal technology.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Canada Border Services Agency

 

Risk Assessment

b) Passenger and Crew Screening Initiative

 

2.1

0.0

Expected Results for Passenger and Crew Screening Initiative

Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.

Screened 100% of all vessels entering Canadian waters. Boarded selected vessels identified as high-risk.
Admissibility Determination 2.7 5.9
Immigration Enforcement 1.3 0.0
Internal Services

Total

59.6

0.7

0.0

 

 

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Canada Border Services Agency

 

Risk Assessment

c) Cruise Ship Inspections

 

0.1

0.0

Expected Results for Cruise Ship Inspections

Results achieved are listed below.

Secure and Trusted Partnerships 0.4 0.0
Admissibility Determination 3.5 4.4
Immigration Enforcement Total

39.8

0.5

0.0

 

 

Results Achieved:  In fiscal year 2012-13, a total of 536 cruise ships arrived at designated cruise shop operations (SCOs) sites. The CBSA processed 1,134,307 of passengers and 446,120 of crew, which accounts for total of 1,600,427 cruise ship travellers in 2012.  The program area developed and submitted the Simplified Reporting Requirements for Cruise Ships and other Conveyances MC which introduces exceptions from the presentation and reporting obligations for certain vessels.  The proposed amendments, once implemented, will decrease the reporting burden on the cruise ships.  As a result, it will allow the CBSA to streamline the clearance of cruise ships and to better focus our resources on targeting and interdicting non-compliance in the marine mode.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Public Safety

National Exercise Division

Marine-Based Counterterrorism Exercises

102.6 (less Corporate hold back)

 

 

 

 

 

Expected Results for Marine-Based Counter Terrorism Exercises

Results achieved are listed below.

25.0 21.9

a) Expected Results for Trends Analysis

 
25.0 9.5 b) Expected Results for Marine Security Exercise Planning, Conduct and Evaluation  
6.6 6.5 c) Expected Results for Training: Marine Facility Security  

Total

102.6

56.6

37.9

 

 

Results Achieved:

  1. Trends Analysis: Public Safety National Exercise Division contracted the review of marine security exercise After-Action Reports and related Capability Improvement Process (CAIP) matrices for the compilation of a marine security Trends Analysis Report and CAIP. The study consolidated the findings included in Government of Canada’s exercises with marine security scenarios or threads that were conducted between the 2003 to 2012 time-period. A total of sixteen exercises, with more than 150 separate observations and recommended corrective actions were examined to arrive at the trends identified in the Report. The intended use of the marine security exercise Trends Analysis Report is to provide partner agencies with a broader picture of the current state of marine security preparedness and to assist in the development of a coordinated multi-jurisdictional program.

  2. Exercise Planning, Conduct and Evaluation – Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre (MSOC): Public Safety National Exercise Division awarded a 2 year/2 phase contract to provide advice and recommendations regarding exercise requirements for the Great Lakes MSOC, development of a proposed marine security exercise program (types, timeframe, design requirements, etra.) for the Great Lakes MSOC and potential implementation of the Exercise Program. Going forward, all produced documentation will be vetted with key marine security partners through a broad consultation to ensure appropriate support to the Great Lakes MSOC program.

  3. Port Security Training: The objective of the training was to provide enhanced knowledge of Marine Transportation Security Regulations for Port personnel assigned responsibilities for the maintenance of a marine security plan on the east coast.  Five employees participated and completed the related training.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Public Safety

Border Strategies

National Security

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (Design Team)

1.6

 

 

 

0.3

0.2

Expected Results for Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (Design Team)

Results achieved are listed below.

Results Achieved: The department participated in the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre (MSOC) National Representatives Working Group, as well as senior level fora including the Directors’ Working Group and the Interdepartmental MSOC Program Review Board, in order to provide overall policy coordination and support in developing the Great Lakes MSOC project, and addressing legal challenges within both the Great Lakes MSOC and Coastal MSOC projects.

Specifically, the department worked with Public Security and RCMP evaluations groups to develop and administer the formal impact evaluation for the Great Lakes MSOC program, as required by the Treasury Board Secretariat. The department also assisted with the drafting of core documents such as the Great Lakes MSOC and amalgamated Great Lakes /Coastal MSOC Concept of Operations, as well as a Memorandum of Understanding for the sharing of routine data and information by partners within the Marine Security Operations Centres.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

National Defence

 

Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces — Generate and Sustain Forces Capable of Maritime Effects — Operational Units

a) Coastal Marine Security Operations Centres

130.7

119.7

 

 

30.2

5.2

12.8

2.1

Expected Results for Coastal Marine Security Operations Centres

Results achieved are listed below.

  Total

250.2

35.4

14.9

 

 

Results Achieved The Marine Security Operations Centres project received effective project approval on March 24, 2011, and is forecasting Full Operational Capability in April 2014.  Project management and engineering support contracts established to be used during the project’s implementation phase.  The project increased cooperation between departments and agencies.

Core partners initiated the development of the Marine Security Operations Centres Capability Management Organization to fully support the Marine Security Operations Centres capability upon project close-out. MSOCs continued to provide effective domain awareness and support to core partner departments and agencies.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

National Defence

Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces — Generate and Sustain Forces Capable of Maritime Effects — Operational Units

b) Interdepartmental Maritime Integrated Command Control and Communication

17.0

 

 

0.9

0.5

Expected Results for Interdepartmental Maritime Integrated Command Control and Communication

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

17.0

0.9

0.5

 

 

Results Achieved:

  • Initiated Certification and Accreditation activities;
  • Conducted three project review meetings;
  • Resolved Satellite Communication Integration problems;
  • Conducted First Article Factory Acceptance Test, which verifies that DND has received what was contracted for with the supplying company; and
  • Initiated detailed planning and coordination for Harbour and Sea acceptance tests.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

National Defence

Conduct Operations — Domestic and Continental Operations — Conduct Ongoing Operations and Services to Canadians

c) Increased On-Water Presence/ Coordination (Marlant and Joint Task Force)

5.0

 

 

5.0

5.0

Expected Results for Increased On-Water Presence/ Coordination

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

5.0

5.0

5.0

 

 

Results Achieved: The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) continued to execute dedicated sovereignty patrols with Canada’s coastal approaches. The department provided additional sea day funding to the RCN to enable the Canadian Forces to further contribute to maritime surveillance / Maritime Domain Awareness within Canada’s coastal approaches. Of note, Maritime security functions are conducted whenever a Royal Canadian Navy ship proceeds to sea, whether this is a dedicated patrol or as a secondary function of normal operations.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Marine Security

a) National Ports Project

11.5

 

 

1.0

Included in the actual for b). See below  

Expected Results for Increased On-Water Presence/ Coordination

Results achieved are listed below.

b) National Port Enforcement Teams 35.7 4.5 5.9 Expected Results for National Port Enforcement Teams Results achieved are listed below.
  Total

47.2

5.5

5.9

 

 

Results Achieved:

  • The National Port Enforcement Teams (NPET) maintains a strong relationship with core partners such as the Canada Border Services Agency and local law enforcement agencies;
  • NPET recovered 251 stolen vehicles that were being exported from the Port of Montreal (185) and the Port of Halifax (66). NPET operations demonstrate another decrease in the number of vehicles seized compared to the previous year. The approximate value of the recovered stolen vehicles is $4 million. Investigations resulted in one individual in the Montréal region being charged with conspiracy, forgery as well as trafficking and possession of property obtained by crime; and
  • In collaboration with CBSA, NPET also seized a total of 151 kg of cocaine, 1511 kg of hashish and 1095 kilograms of precursor chemicals (mainly for the illicit manufacturing of ecstasy) that were imported to Canada. While several investigations are being pursued, long term investigations have resulted in 16 individuals being charged for conspiracy and importation of drugs under sections 465 of the Criminal Code and section 6 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Marine Security

c) Marine Security Emergency Response Team Training

5.6

 

 

0.6

0.8

Expected Results for Marine Security Emergency Response Team training

Results Achieved in 2012-13 for Marine Security Emergency Response Team are listed below.

Total

5.6

0.6

0.8

 

 

Results Achieved

  • The Emergency Response Team Marine Intervention training course is delivered once a year. Emphasis is placed on tactical proficiency while operating safely in a marine environment. The course was held in June 2012;
  • Both "O" Division and "C" Division Marine Security Emergency Response Teams (MSERT) have completed over 100 training sessions during the past fiscal year. A recruiting and in-house training program to identify and train suitable candidates to ensure human resources sustainability in both divisions is ongoing. Both teams were involved in a week-long joint training exercise in May 2012 to ensure interoperability and maintain operational standards; and
  • Support is being provided by the Critical Incident Program and the National Tactical Training Section to MSERT through continuous research and tactical innovation. Required improvement and evolution of equipment remains ongoing and is necessary to ensure safe and efficient policing operations.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Marine Security

Marine Security Emergency Response Teams

49.6

 

 

5.6

4.6

Expected Results for Marine Security Emergency Response Teams

Results achieved are listed below

Total

49.6

5.6

4.6

 

 

Results Achieved: Marine Security Emergency Response Teams (MSERT) were involved in 105 operations over the past year, three of which occurred in the maritime environment. Both “O” and “C” Division teams provided on water response capacity in their respective region, ready to respond to any water borne threat, during VIP visits. The "C" Division team also provided on water security to the Prime Minister during his visit in Ïle–aux–Noix, Québec.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Forensic Identification

e) Marine Transportation Clearance Program

2.7

 

 

0.2

0.1

Expected Results for Marine Transportation Clearance Program

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

2.7

0.2

0.1

 

 

Results Achieved:

  • The Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program (MTSCP) was initiated in January 2003 with a commitment to introduce background checks of workers at marine facilities and ports;
  • The MTSCP is an expansion of the existing Transportation Security Clearance Program which was implemented at Canada’s airports in 1985;
  • The MTSCP applies to persons who work in certain restricted zones, persons performing designated duties, and others, such as marine pilots and seafarer's who wish to obtain a Seafarer's Identification Document (SID);
  • The purpose of the MTSCP is to reduce the risk of security threats by preventing unlawful interference with the marine transportation system by conducting background checks on marine workers who perform certain duties or who have access to certain restricted zones. Those that fail to obtain their restricted zone passes will be permitted to work in non restricted areas;
  • In 2012-13, the RCMP performed 6323 Law Enforcement Record Checks (LERC) on new marine ports employees and security updates for the renewal of current employees’ Restricted Area Identification Cards (RAIC). Of those checks, the RCMP submitted LERC reports to Transport Canada on 30 employees; and
  • Transport Canada refused to grant 14 employees clearance for access to marine port restricted zones out of the 30 positive LERC reports.

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Marine Security

f) Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre

31.5

 

 

8.7

5.2

Expected Results for the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

31.5

8.7

5.2

 

 

Results Achieved:

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Marine Security

g) National Waterside Security Coordination Team

7.3

 

 

0.8

0.4

Expected Results for the National Waterside Security Coordination Team

Results achieved are listed below.

Total

7.3

0.8

0.4

 

 

Results Achieved: The National Waterside Security Coordination Team (NWSCT) is responsible for the development of operational policies, directives and best practices, through the provision of research and studies, advice, and analysis in support of marine security programs. The team identifies vulnerabilities and provides 8 recommendations such as one related to the “clarification of roles and responsibilities [by which] an appropriate agency should be identified to take the lead and establish a standard approach to waterside security across Canada”. This will contribute to bridge and close the gaps and provide a coordinated and integrated solution to waterside security.

The NWSCT contributed to the development of the Port Waterside Security Action Plan and the creation of the National Port Security Committee (NPSC).

Federal Partners

Program Alignment Architecture Programs

Contributing Activities / Programs

Total Allocation (from start to end date)
 

2012-13
($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Expected Results

Contributing Activity / Program Results (using specific indicators)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Marine Security

g) National Waterside Security Coordination Team

47.5

 

 

6.3

4.6

Expected Results for the National Waterside Security Coordination Team

Results achieved are listed below.

Public Works and Government Services Canada - Accommodations   7.5 0.5 0.5    

Total

55.0

6.8

5.1

 

 

Results Achieved:

  • The Marine Security Enforcement Teams (MSET) held 287 outreach activities and police community relation events including operating a booth at the Toronto International Boat Show to increase public awareness and the reporting of suspicious activities;
  • MSET participated in three Marine Security Emergency Response Teams training exercises;
  • The teams continue to increase our maritime domain awareness through their partnership with the Canadian Coast Guard and with other law enforcement agencies, and by providing the Marine Security Operations Centers with timely information and intelligence;
  • During the 2012-13 spring season, “C” Division MSET provided support to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and monitored the seal hunt in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and in the Atlantic Provinces’ region; and
  • Throughout the summer MSET engaged other RCMP units, federal departments and agencies as well as international partners, as a result of their operations and interdictions, 12 charges were laid for failing to report under the Customs Act by CBSA.
  • “C” Division MSET leads a project in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the East coast which is aimed at identifying international recreational vessels sailing into Canada’s internal water via the East coast. This project included the participation of the Coastal and Airport Watrah Program, “C”, “B”, “H”,” J” and “L” Divisions coastal Detachments, the MSOC East, the Sûreté du Québec (SQ), CBSA, DFO, and Transport Canada. During the on water operations, 35 vessels were boarded and verified of which, 16 vessels were determined to have come from outside Canadian internal water.

Comments on Variances:

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Contact information:  Donald Roussel, Director General, Marine Safety & Security, Transport Canada, 613-998-0610, Donald.Roussel@tra.gc.ca

Footnotes

[1] Further information on performance results can be found in Section II of the Departmental Performance Report. (Return to footnote 1 source paragraph)

[2] Performance indicators are defined in the Performance Measurement Strategies and/or Performance Measurement Frameworks (PMF) of each federal partners. (Return to footnote 2 source paragraph)

[3] Bulk, or bulk cargo, is loose, unpackaged, commodity cargo that is transported in large quantities, such as grains or ores. (Return to footnote 3 source paragraph)

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