Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–16, tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the FSDA, to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Transport Canada supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in its departmental strategy.

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) presents the results for commitments for Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, Theme II – Maintaining Water Quality and Availability, Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians, within the context of the 2013–16 FSDS. This DSDS also provides the results for Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government based on the 2010–13 FSDS.

Transport Canada-led target
FSDS Goal FSDS Performance Indicator FSDS Target FSDS Performance Status

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Availability

Number of marine spills from identified vessels

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants

Protect the marine environment by an annual 5 percent reduction in the number of releases of harmful pollutants in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013–16.

The National Aerial Surveillance Program detected or responded to 308 pollution incidents of which 43 were of a known source, 171 were mystery spills for which no source could be identified, and 94 were persistent spills that were detected on different occasions over the same location.

The total quantity observed was estimated at 4,453 litres. Of these incidents, 11 were seen offshore.

NOTE: This result represents the baseline against which future years will be measured.

Themes I–III: Implementation Strategies

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Transportation is one of the largest sources of air pollutants and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Canada. In 2012, transportation accounted for 24 percent of Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions. Transportation is also linked with the emission of air pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, sulphur oxides, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter. These pollutants contribute to the formation of smog and poor air quality. Pollutant emissions have fallen significantly, largely due to regulatory changes introduced by the federal government, however, more action is required to ensure this trend continues in the transportation sector.

Transport Canada's Commitments

In 2013–14, under Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, Transport Canada contributed to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy through the fifteen implementation strategies listed below under Goal 1 – Climate Change and Goal 2 – Air Pollution. These are drawn from Transport Canada’s initiatives under the federal Clean Air Agenda.

The Clean Air Agenda spans 11 departments and agencies managing 60 environmental initiatives over five fiscal years, from 2011–12 until 2015–16. The centrepiece of this approach is a regulatory agenda with complementary programming to support innovation and clean technologies, Canada's international participation, and adaptation to a changing climate.

Transport Canada is responsible for the following nine initiatives under the Clean Air Agenda:

  • Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative;
  • Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative;
  • Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative;
  • Support for Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations;
  • Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative;
  • ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Program;
  • Truck Reservation System Program;
  • Shore Power Technology for Ports Program; and
  • Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative.

In 2013–14, Transport Canada was in the third year of implementing its Clean Air Agenda initiatives under both the Clean Transportation and Adaptation Themes. The initiative descriptions are those which were developed at the beginning of their implementation in 2011–12. If you are interested in seeing Transport Canada’s progress to date on these initiatives, please visit previous reporting updates at http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/policy/acs-sd-dsds-2615.htm

Transport Canada’s implementation strategies have been organized according to the appropriate Program or Sub-program in the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. This means that Transport Canada’s Theme I implementation strategies are linked to two Sub-programs 2.1.1 - Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight and 2.1.2 – Clean Air Initiatives, and one Program 2.3 – Environmental Stewardship of Transportation.

Sub-Program 2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

1.1.36 - Address GHG emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s development of new international standards and recommended practices through the development and implementation of new domestic standards, monitoring of Canada’s voluntary Action Plan in collaboration with the Canadian domestic aviation sector, and through targeted research.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020.*

* Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.22 - Address air pollutant emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s development of new international standards and recommended practices through the development and implementation of new domestic standards, and through targeted research.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1.: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020 and thus reduce emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

Transport Canada addressed greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutant emissions from aviation through the following actions:

  • Contributed to the ongoing development of the new international aviation carbon dioxide (CO2) and particulate matter emissions standards in consultation with other governmental departments, Canada’s aviation industry, and other National Airworthiness Authorities.
  • Actively participated on the International Civil Aviation Organization Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection’s Steering Group, working groups and committees, providing leadership for four groups.
  • Funded projects to advance the understanding and characterization of emissions from bio-derived jet fuels, to improve the understanding and impact of aviation emissions in the North, and to identify unleaded replacement fuels for piston aircraft in Canada.
  • Actively participated in international scientific work to support the development of a certification requirement for the new non-volatile particulate matter standard by collaborating on international sampling and measurement campaigns. This collaboration was achieved through funding and provision of equipment and technical expertise and by participating on the international committee writing the Aerospace Recommended Practice.
  • Released the 2012 Annual Report under Canada’s Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in December 2013.
  • Closely monitored the progress through the European Union parliamentary process of the European Union’s Emission Trading System, as it would have applied to international aviation. Transport Canada also led the process to conduct a demarche to the European Union expressing Canada’s views on the application of the system to aviation.
  • Participated as a PARTNER Advisory Board member and funded five projects under the PARTNER program:
    • Project 12 | Emissions Atmospheric Impacts.
    • Project 21 | Airport Surface Movement Optimization.
    • Project 30 | Metrics for an Aviation CO2 Standard.
    • Project 37 | Non-volatile Particulate Matter – SAE E31 Aerospace Recommended Practice Research Issues.
    • Project 45 | Aviation System Air Quality Performance Analysis.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards 100 percent by March 31, 2015 100 percent - All current Canadian Aviation environmental standards are aligned with approved International Civil Aviation Organization standards.
Number of voluntary emission reduction agreements signed One by March 31, 2015 One - The aviation action plan was signed in June 2012.
2013–14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$2,767,614 $2,512,182
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

1.1.34 - Address GHG emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations, and targeted research and development. (Environment Canada, Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.21 - Address air pollutant emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations, and targeted research and development. (Environment Canada, Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020 and thus reduce emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

Transport Canada addressed greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutant emissions from maritime shipping through the following actions:

  • Continued its efforts at the International Maritime Organization’s Marine Environment Protection Committee to address air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from international maritime transportation through work at regular meetings of the Committee, and by participating in intercessional working groups and informal correspondence groups.
  • Supported the work of the International Maritime Organization to enhance the energy-efficiency of international maritime shipping through the development of technical, operational and other measures, in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from international maritime shipping.
  • Put in place amendments to the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, implementing the North American Emission Control Area under Canadian jurisdiction, and air emissions standards for domestic vessels operating on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway System.
  • Implemented requirements of the International Maritime Organization’s Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI), through amendments to the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations, which apply energy-efficiency standards to newly built ships, and the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) which requires all ships to monitor their energy-efficiency.
  • Published the Transportation Information Regulations in Canada Gazette, Part II, in November 2013. Plans are being developed to complete data collection surveys (28) starting in 2014–2015 until 2015–2019.
  • Managed the 15 scientific and/or technical research projects (total contribution of approximately $3 million) that have been initiated since the launch of this initiative.
  • The research included the following examples:
    • Thrust Cushion – This project has the potential to revolutionize high speed vessel design while meeting a goal to drastically reduce fuel consumption and emissions.
    • Ionomers for ship exhaust scrubbers – The results of this work will provide a fuel-efficient means of cleaning ship exhaust without producing harmful by-products that require further processing.
    • Liquefied Natural Gas as marine fuel – The Transportation Development Centre approached industry partners and initiated the West Coast Liquid Natural Gas Supply Chain project to examine the barriers that must be overcome to establish liquefied natural gas as a safe and environmentally responsible marine fuel in Canada.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards 100 percent by March 31, 2015 80 percent - Technical work is ongoing for applying an energy-efficiency standard to domestic vessels. Fleet averaging will bring the domestic fleet into full alignment in 2020.
Compliance with vessel emissions regulations 100 percent by March 31, 2017 Early compliance to date is projected at over 95 percent based on reporting data and Port State Control inspections.
2013–14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$4,322,280 $4,156,832
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.35 - Address GHG emissions from the rail sector through the joint Canada–U.S. locomotive emissions initiative under the Regulatory Cooperation Council, a voluntary agreement with the Canadian rail industry, and research activities to enhance understanding of new technologies to reduce GHG emissions. (Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020.

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.26 - Address air pollutant emissions from the rail sector through locomotive regulations aligned with U.S. standards, and research activities to enhance understanding of new technologies to reduce air pollutant emissions. (Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020 and thus reduce emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

Transport Canada addressed greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutant emissions from the rail sector through the following actions:

  • Continued to develop Locomotive Emissions Regulations that will help to reduce criteria air contaminant emissions from locomotives in Canada. Pre-publication in Canada Gazette, Part I, is expected to occur in 2014.
  • Announced the renewal of the Canadian Memorandum of Understanding with the Railway Association of Canada. The renewed agreement encourages Railway Association of Canada member railway companies to continue to voluntarily reduce and report on criteria air contaminants and greenhouse gas emissions over the 2011 to 2015 period.
  • Developed and released the 2011 Locomotive Emissions Monitoring Report.
  • In partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, continued to work with key stakeholders on a path forward for addressing greenhouse gas emissions under the framework of the Regulatory Cooperation Council Locomotive Emissions Initiative.
  • Additionally, formed a Steering Committee to make recommendations on the development of a Canada–U.S. Voluntary Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Locomotives.
  • Completed the development of the Locomotive Emissions Information System (LEIS), Phase I. Phase II for the Locomotive Emissions Information System will be reviewed once the proposed regulation is approved.
  • Continued to manage 17 research projects (e.g. producing lighter, stronger materials for freight cars, development of next generation electricity storage devices) with a total contribution of approximately $2.3 million and the Clean Rail Academic Grant program. Many of these research projects were completed with additional funding or in-kind support from Natural Resources Canada, National Research Council, Environment Canada and Bombardier Canada.
  • Developed training programs in consultation with the Rail Safety Inspection Group to the extent possible in the absence of finalization of the regulations.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Number of voluntary emission reduction agreement signed One by March 31, 2015 One – The renewed rail Memorandum of Understanding was signed in April 2013.
Number of regulations and standards developed One by March 31, 2015 One – Currently in progress
2013–14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$3,550,660 $2,999,161
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

1.1.33 - Develop and implement GHG emission regulations for light-duty vehicles (for model years 2017–2025) and heavy-duty vehicles (for model years 2014–2018) under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, which will align with those of the United States. (Environment Canada, Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020. *

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

  • Implemented the heavy-duty vehicle use study (HDVUS) in the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Preliminary results circulated to the provinces, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and other internal stakeholders.
  • Supported Environment Canada in the development of greenhouse gas emissions regulations to align the light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle emissions regulations with the United States, by assessing the safety, environmental and competitiveness impacts associated with proposed greenhouse gas emission regulations. Regulations were published by Environment Canada in March 2014.
  • Contributed to the publication of the second edition of CSA B109, Natural Gas for Vehicles Installation Code - Part 1 Compressed Natural Gas.
  • Completed a study in partnership with the National Research Council on the stability of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles.
  • Continued to work with provinces and territories for updating or creating new standards and/or codes to ensure the safe use of natural gas and propane for motor vehicles.
  • Worked with the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the United Nations World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (UN WP.29) towards the development of international regulations related to tire and hydrogen safety, the safety of visually impaired pedestrians in relation to the use of electric and electric hybrid quiet vehicles, and the safety of electrical energy storage systems for such vehicles.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards 100 percent by March 31, 2015 Support provided to Environment Canada that ensured that 100 percent of Government of Canada’s GHG regulations for light-and heavy-duty vehicles were aligned with the United States.
2013–14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$2,058,100 $1,897,345
Sub-Program 2.1.2 Clean Air Initiatives
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

1.1.31 - Quantify the carbon (GHG) footprint of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

Through the Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative, Transport Canada quantifies the carbon footprint of Canada Strategic gateways and trade corridors by creating an inventory of existing information sources on production and energy consumption for the supply chains of Canada’s three gateway and corridor initiatives; developing and implementing data gathering and processing; and, generating and organizing data to quantify the carbon performance of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors. Specific accomplishments in 2013–14 include:

  • Finalized development of a port data collection tool and user guide and incorporated data from two westerns ports (Port of Prince Rupert and Port of Metro Vancouver) into the carbon footprint model. This allowed for improved greenhouse gas emissions estimates for containerized traffic from Asia to key North American destinations via the western ports.
  • Initiated ongoing consultations with railways to discuss options for getting access to origin-destination pairs emissions data.
  • Completed the Asia-Pacific Gateway model with the integration of all available data. Additionally, the development of the model structure for the Continental Gateway was initiated and is nearing completion.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Number of gateway, corridor segments and traffic for which emission intensity (e.g. kg of CO2 / unit of transportation activity) is assessed or monitored and for which carbon footprint is available Carbon footprint of all gateway and corridor segments quantified by the end 2016 One – One of three gateways has been fully quantified (Asia-Pacific). Work begun to quantify a second gateway (Continental).
2013–14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$387,346 $139,343
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.26 - Address GHG emissions through testing and evaluation of advanced vehicle technologies to support the development of regulations and industry codes and standards in order to ensure that new technologies that reduce GHG emissions can be introduced in Canada in a safe and timely manner.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.6 - Address air pollutant emissions through testing and evaluation of advanced vehicle technologies to support the development of regulations and industry codes and standards in order to ensure that new technologies that reduce air pollutant emissions can be introduced in Canada in a safe and timely manner.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020 and thus reduce emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II (eTV II) program is an integrated technical assessment initiative that provides the knowledge base required to develop proactive safety and environmental regulatory approaches for new technologies.

The initiative also supports Transport Canada's participation in efforts to align codes, standards and regulations nationally, continentally and internationally, as well as with non-regulatory authorities. Increased alignment will expand the market for Canadian vehicle technology innovations and allow technology developers to design to a more predictable set of standards. Specific accomplishments in 2013–14 include:

  • Held an Interdepartmental Director General-level Steering Committee meeting to review and update the program’s multi-year testing and evaluation work plan to reflect current technology priorities, testing regimes and protocols. As a result, three additional testing and evaluation activities were added to support the development of joint Canada–U.S. greenhouse gas emission regulations for light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles, including vehicle light-weighting, component testing and tire testing. Additionally, “Connected Vehicles” were added as a new priority technology area for further examination.
  • Managed 17 test campaigns, and will continue with ten ongoing projects in 2014–15.
  • Compiled and disseminated test results from the program’s 17 test activities in 2013–14 to stakeholders through, for example, the program’s formal technical and governance committees, presentations/reports at various conferences, participation in interdepartmental committees and standards development activities, and technical submissions to support regulatory/standards development.
  • Hosted the 3rd Advanced On-Road Vehicle Technology Forum where 80 stakeholders from the federal government participated in a series of presentations and discussions on advanced vehicle technologies.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Number of technologies/vehicles tested/evaluated Greater than or equal to five by March 31, 2016 17 – The ecoTECHNOLOGY for vehicles program conducted 17 advanced vehicle technology testing and evaluation programs.
2013-14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$8,563,580 $7,605,562
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)
1.1.22 - Address GHG emissions by supporting the deployment of truck reservation systems at port and terminal facilities to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.7 - Address air pollutant emissions by supporting the deployment of truck reservation systems at port and terminal facilities to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020 and thus reduce emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

The Truck Reservation Systems Program looked at ways innovative technology applications and improved operational practices can help increase efficiency and environmental sustainability for port terminal and trucking fleet operators through the following actions:

  • Engaged with the Port of Montreal, Port Metro Vancouver, and the Port of Halifax to seek further interest in the Port-Related Trucking Program.
  • Received two project proposals (one from Port Metro Vancouver and one from the Port of Montreal).
  • Signed two contribution agreements, one with Port Metro Vancouver (Container Drayage Truck Efficiency GPS Program) and one with Port of Montreal (Initiative to Reduce Polluting Emissions at the Port of Montreal).
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved

Clean transportation technologies implemented by users

10 technologies by March 31, 2016

(Target shared with the Shore Power Technology for Ports Program (implementation strategies 1.124 and 2.1.8)

Installation and deployment of one technology in 2012–13 at Port Metro Vancouver (50 percent of fleet outfitted with Global Positioning System [GPS] units). Remainder of fleet to be outfitted in 2014–15, for a total of approximately 2000 trucks). Installation of one technology is scheduled in 2014–15 at the Port of Montreal (Radio Frequency Identification [RFID] infrastructure).

2013–14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$2,731,718 $366,940
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

1.1.24 - Address GHG emissions from the marine sector by funding the installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian ports.

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17 percent by 2020.*

*Transport Canada contributes to this Government of Canada target.

2.1.8 - Address air pollutant emissions from the marine sector by funding the installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian ports. (Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants - Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020 and thus reduce emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

The cost-shared funding for the deployment of marine shore power technology at Canadian ports allows ships to plug into the local electrical grid to power the vessel instead of using their auxiliary diesel engines when docked. In 2013–14, TC:

    • Managed three contribution agreements for projects selected under the first round of funding, two of which have been completed.
    • Selected four projects for funding under the second round of funding and a further two have been recommended for funding.
  • Contributed to the upgrading of three Transfer Payment departmental tools (Program Operation Risk Tool [PORT], Surface Information System [SIS] and Contribution Agreement template).
  • Engaged the Association of Canadian Port Authorities and the ports of Los Angeles/Long Beach in discussions to explore options for improving the environmental footprint of port operations and to gather information that would benefit the development of future programs relating to clean transportation at ports. This included shore power technologies, as well as “green” technologies for trucks, intermodal rail and trucking connections, and port equipment.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved

Clean transportation technologies implemented by users (Target: 10 by March 31, 2016).

10 technologies by March 31, 2016

(Target shared with the Truck Reservation System Program for Ports Program (implementation strategies 1.122 and 2.1.7)

Nine installations are underway (two are operational and seven are under construction)

2013–14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$10,975,610 $4,962,649
Program 2.3 Environmental Stewardship of Transportation
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

1.2.10 - Support the development and testing of innovative science-based tools and technologies to help improve the resiliency and adaptability of existing and future northern transportation infrastructure and Arctic marine operations. (Transport Canada)

FSDS Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1 - Climate Change: In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

Target 1.2.: Climate Change Adaptation - Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

  • Held workshops for two department-led stakeholder network groups, one on permafrost and the other on Arctic marine shipping. Workshop discussions facilitated and fostered collaborative partnerships between government, academia and industry, and helped identify existing knowledge gaps in the North.
  • Provided five grants to not-for-profit academic and research institutions for projects that help foster a more in-depth understanding of climate change impacts in the North, facilitate adaptation considerations in transportation planning, and develop northern adaptation capacity. Those receiving grants included the University of Manitoba, University of Ottawa, University of Victoria, Université de Montréal and the Interdisciplinary Centre for the Development of Ocean Mapping.
  • Established seven Contribution Agreements with territorial governments (Government of Yukon and Government of the Northwest Territories) and Canadian academic institutions (University of Alberta, Université de Laval) to support multi-year research and development projects focused on building adaptive capacity in the North.
  • In the Quebec Region, completed a study on pavement characteristics and started a study on the effect of pavement reflective surface and underground water at Kuujjuaq airport.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of Grant/Contribution Agreements Involving Multiple Collaborators (aside from Federal government) 100 percent by March 31, 2014 100 percent
Number of individuals, organizations or sectors supported to participate in technical exchanges, including workshops, conferences, training seminars, and other related exchange activities 20 by March 31, 2014 23
Number of analyses, assessments and research reports performed on specific transportation infrastructure, technologies and operations Two by March 31, 2014 Nine
Number of tools and technologies evaluated and/or developed for the adaptation of transportation infrastructure and operations to climate change One by March 31, 2014 Two
Number of meetings, workshops and conferences hosted or facilitated to support Partnerships and Networking Activities Three by March 31, 2014 Five
2013–14 Financial Information
(Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs.)
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Expenditure
$3,143,000 $2,275,194

Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Marine shipping is critical to Canada's economy, and the movement of goods by sea is becoming increasingly important as trade with Asia and other international trading partners continues to grow. A dominant feature of marine transportation is its international dimension, which shapes the policy, regulatory and competitive environment. These conditions underpin the need for largely international governance of marine issues, in marine safety and environmental issues in particular, which is done mainly through the International Maritime Organization.

The movement of goods by sea carries with it a range of possible environmental consequences for the marine environment and water quality. For example, accidental oil spills in the marine environment are prominent in the public eye when they occur, and have immediate and obvious negative consequences for the environment and the health of local communities. Water-borne spills of hazardous and noxious substances can also cause serious damage to human health and the environment.

Transport Canada develops and administers policies, regulations and programs to protect the marine environment, reduce the impact on the environment of marine pollution incidents in Canadian waters, and promote the safety of the general public.

Transport Canada's Commitments

Under Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability, Transport Canada contributed to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy through Goal 3: Water Quality and Quantity - Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems, details of which can be found in the tables below.

Transport Canada’s implementation strategies have been organized according to the appropriate Sub-program in the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. This means that Transport Canada’s Theme II implementation strategies are linked to two different Sub-programs, 2.2.1 - Clean Water Regulatory Framework and 2.2.2 - Clean Water Regulatory Oversight.

Sub-Program 2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

3.8.1 - Set the legal and regulatory frameworks through domestic legislation and international conventions that govern the protection of the marine environment from pollution, the introduction of invasive species and the environmental impact of pollution incidents, and advance Canadian positions on reducing and managing global marine pollution from ships. (Transport Canada)

Theme II. Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants - Protect the marine environment by an annual 5 percent reduction in the number of releases of harmful pollutants in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013–16.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

Technology plays a key role in both preventing pollution and responding to incidents. By setting legal and regulatory frameworks domestically via international conventions, by administering regulations and carrying out research and development, Transport Canada aims to attain highest possible levels of protection for the environment. Specific accomplishments in 2013–14 include:

  • Published the final regulations amending the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations. While the focus of these regulations was air emissions, they also provided new standards for controlling ship-to-ship transfer operations of oil and for vessels to manage greywater.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation and/or adopted international standards 95 percent by March 31, 2017 99 percent aligned with legislation / 90 percent aligned with international standards
Sub-Program 2.2.2 - Clean Water Regulatory Oversight
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

3.8.2 - Contribute to reducing pollution from vessels by monitoring compliance of marine transportation firms with Canadian legislation such as the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 through the National Aerial Surveillance Program, inspections, audits, monitoring, and enforcement. (Transport Canada)

Theme II. Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants - Protect the marine environment by an annual 5 percent reduction in the number of releases of harmful pollutants in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013–16.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

  • With the National Aerial Surveillance Program, overflew 19,989 vessels and detected 219,627 vessels by the Automatic Identification System. Of these overflights, the National Aerial Surveillance Program detected or responded to 308 pollution incidents, of which 43 were from a known source, 171 were mystery spills for which no source could be identified, and 94 were persistent spills that were detected on different occasions over the same location. The total quantity observed was estimated at 4,453 litres. Of these incidents, 11 were seen offshore.

NOTE: This result represents the baseline against which future years will be measured.

Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

3.8.3. Implementation of the World Class Tanker Safety initiatives announced in Budget 2012 and on March 18, 2013, to support Responsible Resource Development. This includes, among others, increased tanker inspection, aerial surveillance, navigational products, and a new Incident Command System. (Transport Canada)

Theme II. Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.8: Marine Pollution – Releases of Harmful Pollutants - Protect the marine environment by an annual 5 percent reduction in the number of releases of harmful pollutants in the marine environment by vessels identified during pollution patrol from 2013–16.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

In 2013–2014, Transport Canada supported the work of the Government in tabling the Safeguarding Canada’s Seas and Skies Act, which is amending the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

In addition, of the eight measures announced to strengthen Canada’s tanker safety system, Transport Canada worked on:

  • Tanker inspections to ensure that all foreign tankers are inspected on their first visit to Canada, and annually thereafter, to ensure they comply with rules and regulations, especially with respect to double hulls;
  • Expanding the National Aerial Surveillance Program for the systematic surveillance and monitoring of ships; and
  • Designating more ports as public ports, for traffic control measures, starting with Kitimat.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation and/or adopted international standards 95 percent by March 31, 2017 99 percent aligned with legislation / 90 percent aligned with international standards
Increased aerial surveillance over Canadian waters 3,400 hours by March 31, 2018 National Aerial Surveillance Program aircraft flew a total of 3,876.8 patrol hours.

Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians

Canada has one of the longest navigable coastlines in the world, from the St. Lawrence Seaway and Great Lakes to the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific oceans. A significant increase in worldwide shipping traffic and the corresponding amount of ballast water discharged by them has resulted in an increase in alien species introductions.

Modern commercial shipping cannot operate without ballast water, which provides balance and stability to ships. Water is pumped into the ballast tanks when the vessel is departing a port of origin and released when it takes on cargo at another port. Over the past 30 years, there has been growing international recognition of potential problems associated with the discharge of ships’ ballast water.

The introduction and spread of alien invasive species is a serious problem that has ecological, economic, health and environmental impacts, including loss of native biological diversity. Species are considered alien if they are not native to a given ecosystem. Alien species are considered to be invasive when their introduction causes, or is likely to cause, harm to the environment, the economy, or human health.

For more information on the Canadian Ballast Water Program, please visit Transport Canada's website.

Transport Canada's Commitment

Under Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians, Transport Canada committed to contribute to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy through Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians - Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come. Details on performance against specific goals can be found in the summary tables below.

Transport Canada’s implementation strategies have been organized according to the appropriate Program and Sub-program in the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. This means that Transport Canada’s Theme III implementation strategies are linked to two different Sub-programs 2.2.1 - Clean Water Regulatory Framework and 2.2.2 - Clean Water Regulatory Oversight and two Programs, 2.3 - Environmental Stewardship of Transportation and 3.5 Transportation of Dangerous Goods.

Sub-Program 2.2.1 - Clean Water Regulatory Framework
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

4.6.6 - Implement the vessel-related invasive species provisions of the 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement through policy, regulations, research and enforcement actions. (Transport Canada)

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.6 - Invasive Alien Species - By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

  • Continued the joint Canada-United Stated inspection program with inspectors from Transport Canada, the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation and the Canadian St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation. This program ensures 100 percent of all vessels from overseas are inspected and compliant with regulations prior to them entering the Seaways.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of vessels in compliance with Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules 95 percent by March 31, 2017 90 percent - Overall compliance found at 90 percent for vessels to report on the status of their ballast water 96 hours before arrival at a Canadian Port.
Canadian compliance with obligations for invasive species under 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement 95 percent by March 31, 2017 100 percent of vessels entering Great Lakes comply with the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations
Sub-Program 2.2.2 - Clean Water Regulatory Oversight
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

4.6.5 - Implement conventions and guidelines of the International Maritime Organization relating to reducing the risk of aquatic species invasions into domestic regulations.

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.6 - Invasive Alien Species - By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

  • Continued formal consultations on how to amend the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations to implement the provision of vessels to fit ballast water treatment systems under the International Convention for Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments.
  • Continued to enforce regulations with an overall high compliance rate of 95 percent observed from inspections, the coastal ports representing 25 percent of traffic, and 100 percent of all traffic entering the St. Lawrence Seaway through a joint Canada-United States inspection program.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of vessels in compliance with Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules 95 percent by March 31, 2017 90 percent - Overall compliance found at 90 percent for vessels to report on the status of their ballast water 96 hours before arrival at a Canadian Port.
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

4.6.9 - Cooperate with U.S. and international regulators to inspect vessels to ensure compliance with Canadian regulations. (Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Transport Canada)

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.6 - Invasive Alien Species - By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

  • Under the Port State Control program as well as through a joint Canada-United States inspection program, found an overall high compliance rate with over 95 percent observed from inspections, with the coastal ports representing 25 percent of traffic and 100 percent of all traffic entering the St. Lawrence Seaway.
  • Continued to work with Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species Network to support science into monitoring aquatic invasive species and developing strategies to prevent and mitigate them.
Performance Indicators Targets Results Achieved
Percentage of vessels in compliance with Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules 95 percent by March 31, 2017 90 percent - Overall compliance found at 90 percent for vessels to report on the status of their ballast water 96 hours before arrival at a Canadian Port.
Program 2.3 - Environmental Stewardship of Transportation
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

4.8.1 - Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites. (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Correctional Services Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Department of National Defence, Environment Canada, National Research Council of Canada, Parks Canada, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Transport Canada)

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.8 - Chemicals Management - Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

Transport Canada reported on its contaminated sites effort through the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan annual reports that can be found at: http://www.federalcontaminatedsites.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=B15E990A-1.

Program 3.5 – Transportation of Dangerous Goods
Implementation Strategy Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

4.7.4 - In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable. (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Environment Canada, Health Canada, Infrastructure Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Public Safety, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Transport Canada)

Theme III. Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Target 4.7 - Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies - Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated.

Performance Summary in 2013–14:

In accordance with its transport-related mandated responsibilities, Transport Canada oversees regulatory programs and provides advice related to preventing incidents, ensuring preparedness and response to incidents, and determining liabilities arising from incidents. Examples of actions include the operation of the 24/7 Canadian Transport Emergency Centre (CANUTEC) and provision of aerial surveillance of marine incidents through the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP). Transport Canada’s actions related to the National Aerial Surveillance Program are captured under Theme II, implementation strategy 3.8.2.

Theme IV: Implementation Strategies

Green Building Targets

As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new construction and build-to-lease projects, and major renovation projects, will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance.Footnote 1 (Target 8.1 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease, and major renovation projects in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease, and major renovation projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Existence of a strategic framework. Yes – updated January 2013

Strategies and/or Comments :

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: Transport Canada completed its Green Buildings Strategic Framework and developed a comprehensive implementation plan.
  2. Minimum level of environmental performance: LEED NC Silver, Green Globes Design 3 Globes, or equivalent.
  3. Appropriate threshold (dollar value or floor area): $1 million and 1,000m2.
  4. Applicable building types: All Transport Canada-owned buildings over 1,000m2 occupied by Transport Canada employees.
  5. Industry recognized assessment and verification tool(s) used: Not applicable.
  6. Assessment level achieved for each completed new construction, build-to-lease, and major renovation project: Not applicable.
  7. Certification sought for each completed new construction, build-to-lease, and major renovation: Not applicable.
  8. Transport Canada’s strategies have been developed and incorporated into the strategic framework.
  9. Justification for change to strategic framework: Building inventory was updated with more accurate information.
  10. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Developing a Strategic Framework for Green Buildings. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, our Green Building implementation plan can be found online.

As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, existing Crown buildings over 1000 m2 will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool.Footnote 2 (Target 8.2 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of buildings over 1000 m2, according to the departmental strategic framework. 9
Percentage of buildings over 1000 m2 in the given fiscal year that have been assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool, according to the departmental strategic framework. 100 percent
Existence of a strategic framework. Yes – updated January 2013

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: Transport Canada completed its Green Buildings Strategic Framework and developed a comprehensive implementation plan. Six of nine building assessments were completed; the remaining three buildings are undergoing renovations. Those building assessments will therefore occur after the renovations are complete.
  2. Minimum level of assessment: BOMA BESt, Green Globes or equivalent.
  3. Appropriate threshold (dollar value or floor area): 1,000m2.
  4. Applicable building types: All Transport Canada-owned buildings over 1,000m2 occupied by Transport Canada employees.
  5. Industry recognized assessment and verification tool(s) used: Not applicable.
  6. Assessment level achieved for each targeted building: Not applicable.
  7. Certification sought for each targeted building: Not applicable.
  8. Transport Canada’s strategies have been developed and incorporated into the strategic framework.
  9. Justification for change to strategic framework: Building inventory was updated with more accurate information.
  10. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Developing a Strategic Framework for Green Buildings. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, our Green Building implementation plan can be found online.

As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new lease or lease renewal projects over 1000 m2, where the Crown is the major lessee, will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool.Footnote 3 (Target 8.3 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1000 m2 in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1000 m2 that were assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Existence of a strategic framework. Yes – updated January 2013

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: Transport Canada completed its Green Buildings Strategic Framework and developed a comprehensive implementation plan.
  2. Minimum level of assessment: BOMA BESt, an appropriately tailored BOMA.
  3. Appropriate threshold (dollar value or floor area): $1 million and 1,000m2.
  4. Applicable building types: Any building occupied by Transport Canada employees, where Transport Canada is the major lessee.
  5. Industry recognized assessment and verification tool(s) used: Not applicable.
  6. Assessment level achieved for each completed lease and lease renewal project: Not applicable.
  7. Certification sought for each completed lease and lease renewal project: Not applicable.
  8. Transport Canada’s strategies have been developed and incorporated into the strategic framework.
  9. Justification for change to strategic framework: Building inventory was updated with more accurate information.
  10. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Developing a Strategic Framework for Green Buildings. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, our Green Building implementation plan can be found online.

As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, fit-up and refit projects will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance.Footnote 4 (Target 8.4 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Existence of a strategic framework. Yes – updated January 2013

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: Transport Canada completed its Green Buildings Strategic Framework and developed a comprehensive implementation plan.
  2. Minimum level of environmental performance: LEED CI Silver, Green Globes Fit-Up 3 Globes or equivalent.
  3. Appropriate threshold (dollar value or floor area): $1 million and 1,000m2.
  4. Applicable building types: All Transport Canada-owned buildings with office space greater than 1,000m2 that are occupied by Transport Canada employees.
  5. Industry recognized assessment and verification tool(s) used: Not applicable.
  6. Assessment level achieved for each completed fit-up and refit project: Not applicable.
  7. Certification sought for each completed fit-up and refit project: Not applicable.
  8. Transport Canada’s strategies have been developed and incorporated into the strategic framework.
  9. Justification for change to strategic framework: Building inventory was updated with more accurate information.
  10. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Developing a Strategic Framework for Green Buildings. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, our Green Building implementation plan can be found online.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Target

The federal government will take action now to reduce levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from its operations to match the national target of 17 percent below 2005 by 2020.
(Target 8.5 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status On track to exceed
Departmental GHG reduction target: Percentage of absolute reduction in GHG emissions by fiscal year 2020–21, relative to fiscal year 2005–06. 21 percent
Departmental GHG emissions in fiscal year 2005–06, in kilotons of CO2 equivalent. 62.99
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotons of CO2 equivalent. 53.00
Change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005–06 to the end of the given fiscal year, expressed as a percentage. -15.9 percent
Existence of an implementation plan to reduce GHG emissions. Yes – completed November 2011

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: Transport Canada is on track to exceed the 17 percent federal government reduction in GHG emissions by 2020.
  2. Targeted GHG emission sources include facilities and fleet. Transport Canada was unable to obtain all the required information for the 2013–14 reporting year to meet the Departmental Performance Report deadlines, so 2012–13 data was used.
  3. Exclusions: Guardhouses where energy consumption is minimal and that are used for security reasons, where billing includes other electrical costs that cannot be separated (three in total).
  4. Changes to the departmental GHG reduction target: No changes since 2011–12.
  5. Key components of the departmental implementation plan:
    • annual reporting;
    • maintenance and renovation planning;
    • working with building landlords;
    • innovative technology strategies;
    • awareness and promotional programs aimed at employees;
    • continuous fleet management; and
    • leadership vehicles.
  6. Green power purchases: Ontario Region (Sudbury Transport Canada Centre) is currently the only facility to purchase renewable green power in the Department.
  7. Base year adjustments: As a result of two exclusions (security and custodian exclusions) imposed on the Department’s airport hangar facilities, the original 2005–06 baseline figures were changed to represent only those facilities and buildings that fell within the reporting requirements. As such, the 2005–06 baseline changed from 64.26 kilotonnes of CO2 to 62.99 kilotonnes.
  8. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, our Greenhouse Gas Reduction implementation plan can be found online.

Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target

By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner. (Target 8.6 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Existence of an implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally generated EEE. Yes – updated February 2013
Total number of departmental locations with an EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year. 100 percent

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator: Department has achieved 100 percent of locations with an EEE implementation plan fully implemented.
  2. Definition of location: Number of locations is six, based on consolidated responsibility for waste disposal at the regional office level, including the National Capital Region.
  3. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Putting into Action an Implementation Plan for the Disposal of Federal Electronic and Electrical Equipment. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s EEE waste implementation plan can be found online.

Printing Unit Reduction Target

By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply the target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow. (Target 8.7 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units in fiscal year 2010–11, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. Not applicable
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. 10:1

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Rational for selected traffic light indicator: In the given fiscal year, the Department has completed the following:
    • Developed and put into action a comprehensive implementation plan for achieving and maintaining an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units;
    • Exceeded the target; and
    • Made efforts to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts associated with the achievement of the target, which are highlighted in the implementation plan.
  2. Definition: Multifunctional devices, desktop printers, network printers, photocopiers and faxes.
  3. Scope: The Department determined the possibility of meeting the 8:1 ratio at Transport Canada buildings across the nation, based on building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configurations. While some buildings may have a smaller ratio due to the above-mentioned considerations, on average, the Department will meet this target for all employees (100 percent).
  4. Method used for determining number of printing units: Information Management / Information Technology (Corporate Services) is leading a departmental initiative to inventory (via electronic and manual means) all printing units.
  5. Method used for determining number of office employees: Number of Transport Canada unique user identifications as validated against Human Resources (HR) statistics (5,632 employees).
  6. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Achieving the Printing Unit Reduction Target. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Printing Unit Reduction implementation plan can be found online.

Paper Consumption Target

By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20 percent. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005–06 and 2011–12, and an applicable scope. (Target 8.8 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the selected baseline year, according to the departmental scope. 9,030 sheets per departmental employee in 2010–11
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption per office employee in the given fiscal year, expressed as a percentage, relative to the selected baseline year. 51 percent

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Rational for selected traffic light indicator: In the given year, the Department:
    • Developed and put into action a comprehensive implementation plan for reducing internal paper consumption; and
    • Exceeded the target; and
    • Made efforts to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts associated with the achievement of the target, which are highlighted in the Paper Consumption implementation plan.
  2. Scope: The Department has elected to include all departmental employees, instead of just office employees.
  3. Method used for determining paper consumption: Information available within the Department.
  4. Method used for determining the number of office employees: Number of Transport Canada unique user identifications as validated against HR statistics.
  5. Number of office employees subject to the target: 5,632.
  6. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Reducing Internal Paper Consumption. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Paper Consumption implementation plan can be found online.

Green Meetings Target

By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings. (Target 8.9 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Presence of a green meetings guide. Yes – adopted and approved in 2010

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: Department has adopted a green meeting guide.
  2. Adoption: Transport Canada has incorporated Environment Canada’s green meeting guide into its National Environmental Management System and has developed an internal web page to link Transport Canada employees to the document.
  3. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Establishing a Green Meeting Guide. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Green Meeting implementation plan can be found online.

Green Procurement Targets

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts. (Target 8.10 from 2010–13 FSDS)

By March 31, 2014, 80 percent of all vehicles purchased annually are right sized for operational needs, fuel-efficient vehicles in their class in the Government Motor Vehicle Ordering Guide, and/or alternative fuel vehicles.

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of vehicle purchases that meet the target relative to the total number of all vehicle purchases in the given year. 36 vehicle purchases: 36 met the target
Progress against this measure in the given fiscal year. 100 percent

Strategies and/or Comments

Why this self-selected target is SMART

  • Specific: Refers to a specific type of commodity and purchasing mechanism.
  • Measurable: Information available through the Department’s tracking and financial systems.
  • Achievable: Departmental policy mandating use of Public Works and Government Services Canada standing offers.
  • Relevant: High rating according to the environmental issue impact assessment.
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other Reporting Considerations

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selection: In the given fiscal year, the Department has completed the following:
    • Developed and put into action a SMART target approach and a comprehensive implementation plan for achieving and maintaining the self-selected target;
    • Exceeded the self-selected target; and
    • Made efforts to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts, which are available in the implementation plan.
  2. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Establishing SMART Green Procurement Targets. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Green Procurement implementation plan can be found online.

As of April 1, 2012, all office computers will have a minimum average of a four-year life in the Department.

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Average life of office computers in the Department 4
Progress against this measure in the given fiscal year. 6-year life span maintained

Strategies and/or Comments

Why this self-selected target is SMART

  • Specific: Refers to a specific type of commodity.
  • Measurable: Information available from the departmental tracking system.
  • Achievable: Department’s Desktop Life Cycle Plan.
  • Relevant: High rating according to the environmental issue impact assessment.
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other Reporting Considerations

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator: In the given fiscal year, the Department has completed the following:
    • Developed and put into action a SMART target approach and a comprehensive implementation plan for achieving and maintaining the self-selected target; and
    • Exceeded the self-selected target; and
    • Made efforts to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts, which are available in the implementation plan.
  2. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Establishing SMART Green Procurement Targets. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Green Procurement implementation plan can be found online.

By March 31, 2014, 100 percent of copy paper purchases contain a minimum of 30 percent recycled fibres and have forest management certification, or EcoLogoM or equivalent certification.

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Volume of paper purchases meeting the target relative to the total volume of all paper purchases in the given year. Baseline: 81 percent in fiscal year 2010–11
Progress against this measure in the given fiscal year. 98 percent

Strategies and/or Comments

Why this self-selected target is SMART

  • Specific: Refers to a specific type of commodity.
  • Measurable: Information available within the Department.
  • Achievable: Departmental bulletin mandating that copy paper purchases contain a minimum of 30 percent recycled fibres and have forest management certification, or EcoLogoM or equivalent certification.
  • Relevant: High rating according to the environmental issue impact assessment.
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other Reporting Considerations

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: In the given fiscal year, the Department has completed the following:
    • Developed and put into action a SMART target approach and a comprehensive implementation plan for achieving and maintaining the self-selected target;
    • Achieved the self-selected target as the variance was less than 5 percent.
    • Made efforts to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts, which are available in the implementation plan.
  2. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Establishing SMART Green Procurement Targets. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Green Procurement implementation plan can be found online.

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making. (Target 8.11 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Training for select employees

By March 31, 2014, 90 percent of designated contracting specialists and 60 percent of new acquisition cardholders will have taken a recognized training course on green procurement offered by the Canada School of Public Service or any other federal government department.

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of designated contracting specialists who have completed training relative to the total number of material managers and procurement personnel. 18 of 20
Number of new acquisition cardholders who have completed training relative to the total number of acquisition cardholders. 61 of 62
Progress against this measure in the given fiscal year. 90 percent of designated contracting specialists completed; 98 percent of new acquisition cardholders

Strategies and/or Comments

Why this self-selected target is SMART

  • Specific: Refers to a specific type of training and purchasing mechanism.
  • Measurable: Combination of manual, human resources and financial systems.
  • Achievable: Departmental policy mandating participation in a green procurement course.
  • Relevant: Main requirement of the Policy on Green Procurement.
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other Reporting Considerations

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: In the given fiscal year, the Department has completed the following:
    • Developed and put into action a SMART target approach and a comprehensive implementation plan for achieving and maintaining the self-selected target;
    • Exceeded the self-selected target; and
    • Made efforts to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts, which are available in the implementation plan.
  2. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Greening Services Procurement. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Green Procurement implementation plan can be found online.

Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management.

By March 31, 2012, identified designated contracting specialists, and their managers and functional heads, will have environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations.

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of performance evaluations of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses relative to the total of identified positions. One (changed from two positions due to staffing changes)
Progress against this measure in the given fiscal year. 100 percent

Strategies and/or Comments

Why this self-selected target is SMART

  • Specific: Refers to a specific type of target group, based on pre-established criteria.
  • Measurable: Information on the number of positions will be tracked, based on manual recording, and will be captured by human resources. Since information is protected upon completion, actual performance results cannot be captured or released.
  • Achievable: Departmental policy mandating inclusion of a performance clause in positions that have been identified as requiring such a clause based on pre-established criteria.
  • Relevant: Main requirement of the Policy on Green Procurement.
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other Reporting Considerations

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selected: In the given fiscal year, the Department has completed the following:
    • Developed and put into action a SMART target approach and a comprehensive implementation plan for achieving and maintaining the self-selected target;
    • The employee in one of the positions included in this target retired in 2013; therefore, only one position retained the environmental clause in its performance evaluation for 2013–14.
    • Achieved the self-selected target; and
    • Made efforts to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts, which are available in the implementation plan.
  2. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Establishing SMART Green Procurement Targets. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Green Procurement implementation plan can be found online.

Management processes and controls.

By March 31, 2013, departmental fleet management policies, guidelines and/or standards that include mandatory green fleet practices and purchasing will be reviewed and evaluated.

Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of reviews and evaluations conducted to verify that the fleet management standards are met. 2
Progress against this measure in the given fiscal year. 0

Strategies and/or Comments

Why this self-selected target is SMART

  • Specific: Refers to a specific type of commodity and purchasing mechanism.
  • Measurable: Information available from Transport Canada’s financial system.
  • Achievable: Departmental policy mandating use of Public Works and Government Services Canada standing offers.
  • Relevant: Main requirement of the Policy on Green Procurement.
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other Reporting Considerations

  1. Rational for traffic light indicator selection: Department has achieved the target.
  2. Transport Canada’s implementation plan includes all of the required elements and non-mandatory information specified in the Guideline for Setting Green Procurement Management Framework Targets. In the spirit of transparency and accountability, Transport Canada’s Green Procurement implementation plan can be found online.

Reporting on the Purchase of Offset Credits

Mandatory reporting on the purchase of greenhouse gas emissions offset credits, according to the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events.

Performance Measure Performance Status
Quantity of emissions offset in the given fiscal year. Not applicable

Strategies and/or Comments

Not applicable

Additional Departmental/Agency Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

Not applicable

Sustainable Development Management System

Transport Canada's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy provides information on:

  • Sustainable development and transportation
  • What this means for Transport Canada
  • Departmental decision-making and sustainable development

Sustainable development and transportation

Transportation takes place within a complex web of human and physical interactions and conditions. Trends in the environment, the economy and society affect the nature and scale of transportation activities, the impacts of those activities, and our responses to those impacts. The nature and volume of trade drives the demand for freight transportation. Similarly, the size of the population, its habits, income levels, the cost of energy and land use patterns affect passenger travel.

Transportation is fundamental to Canada's economic prosperity and Canadians' quality of life. To enhance our quality of life, we need to ensure that our system is safe, secure and environmentally responsible. To maintain and enhance competitiveness, we must ensure our transportation system is efficient and able to adapt to new challenges as they arise.

To preserve and strengthen Canada's transportation system, transportation policy must provide a framework that addresses the three elements of sustainable transportation: social, economic and environmental. It must also give carriers the opportunity to adapt, innovate, compete and serve shippers and travelers, in a way that takes into account each of these elements. The fundamental policy challenge is to find the right balance among these three elements.

Canada's size and dependence on international trade make transportation very important to Canadians. Transportation—by land, water and air—links Canadians to each other and Canada to the world. Transportation has a wide range of impacts on the economy, society and the environment. While many of these impacts are positive (e.g., supporting economic growth, moving people to their destinations and goods to markets, providing jobs, supporting mobility and enabling human contact), there are negative impacts as well that need to be considered (e.g., emissions, materials and energy resource use, possibility of spills and leaks, impacts on land use).

What this means for Transport Canada

Transport Canada is responsible for the Government of Canada's transportation policies and programs. While not directly responsible for all aspects or modes of transportation, the Department plays a leadership role to ensure that all parts of the transportation system work together effectively. Transport Canada leads Canada's efforts in addressing environmental issues from the rail, marine and aviation sectors. For example, under the legislative authority of the Railway Safety Act, the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and the Aeronautics Act, Transport Canada contributes to reducing the air emissions from transportation by creating and implementing regulatory regimes.

Our vision is a transportation system in Canada that is recognized worldwide as safe and secure, efficient and environmentally responsible.

The Department's vision of a sustainable transportation system is one that integrates and balances social, economic and environmental objectives. This vision is guided by the following principles:

  • highest possible safety and security of life and property, guided by performance-based standards and regulations when necessary;
  • efficient movement of people and goods to support economic prosperity and a sustainable quality of life, based on competitive markets and targeted use of regulation and government funding; and
  • respect for the environmental legacy of future generations of Canadians, guided by environmental assessment and planning processes in transportation decisions and selective use of regulation and government funding.

Transport Canada’s decision-making and sustainable development

In line with the federal approach, Transport Canada’s sustainable development planning and reporting is linked with the federal government's core expenditure planning and reporting system under the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. This integration occurs through two primary planning and reporting vehicles:

  • Report on Plans and Priorities: Objectives and plans that contribute to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy are highlighted in Transport Canada's annual Reports on Plans and Priorities.
  • Departmental Performance Report: Transport Canada reports progress against its Federal Sustainable Development Strategy implementation strategies in its annual Departmental Performance Reports.

The following are some other key examples of how Transport Canada is integrating sustainable development into its decision-making:

  • Strategic Environmental Assessment
  • Transport Canada's National Environmental Management System

Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2013–14 reporting cycle, Transport Canada considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision–making processes. Through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process, departmental/agency proposals were found to have positive effects on the 2013–16 FSDS goals and targets in Theme II – Maintaining Water Quality and Availability and Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians.

Strategic Environmental Assessment evaluates the environmental effects of a proposed policy, plan, or program and its alternatives, and informs decision-making through a careful analysis of environmental risks and opportunities.

As required by the Guidelines for Implementing the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, all departments are required to consider FSDS goals and targets when undertaking Strategic Environmental Assessments and report on the results of their Strategic Environmental Assessments in their Departmental Performance Reports.

The Strategic Environmental Assessment guidelines are designed to improve the transparency of environmental decision-making in the following ways:

  • Departments and agencies describe the impact of their initiatives on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy goals and targets in their Strategic Environmental Assessment public statements; and
  • Departments and agencies report on the extent and results of their Strategic Environmental Assessment in their year-end performance report, including how initiatives are expected to affect progress toward the FSDS goals and targets.

During the first Federal Sustainable Development Strategy period (2010–2013), in order to reflect the above-mentioned changes to the guidelines, Transport Canada updated its internal Strategic Environmental Assessment process and supporting materials, including the departmental Strategic Environmental Assessment Policy Statement, guidance and training documents, tools, website and correspondence products. All these updates were completed by March 2011.

On April 1, 2013, Transport Canada introduced a new internal tool, called the Sustainable Transportation Assessment Tool, which replaces the former Strategic Environmental Assessment preliminary scan. Transport Canada now requires all potential policies, plans or programs to consider possible effects on the economy, on society, and on the environment. The Sustainable Transportation Assessment Tool also includes specific questions to assess possible impacts on Federal Sustainable Development Strategy goals and targets.

By asking these kinds of questions early in the design and development of proposals, it is anticipated that risks and opportunities will be better identified and managed, potential impacts across the Department’s strategic outcomes will be considered, and economic, social and environmental considerations will be better integrated into departmental decision-making.

Transport Canada publishes the results of its Strategic Environmental Assessments when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors are integrated into the decision-making process.

Transport Canada will also continue to report on the following activities and performance measures in the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy:

  • Number of approved proposals submitted by Transport Canada to Cabinet or Treasury Board that are subject to departmental Strategic Environmental Assessment requirements (Memorandum to Cabinet, Treasury Board Submissions, Regulatory Amendments);
  • Number of proposals for which a detailed Strategic Environmental Assessment was completed and how it contributed towards Federal Sustainable Development goals and targets; and
  • Transport Canada's overall Strategic Environmental Assessment compliance (76 percent).
2013–14 Progress Number of approved proposals submitted by Transport Canada to Cabinet or Treasury Board subject to departmental Strategic Environmental Assessment requirements (62)
Memorandum to Cabinet 12
Treasury Board Submissions 8
Regulatory Amendments 48
Number of proposals for which a detailed Strategic Environmental Assessment was completed and how it contributed towards Federal Sustainable Development goals and targets 0
Transport Canada’s overall Strategic Environmental Assessment Compliance 76 percent
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