Horizontal initiative:  Marine Security

Name of horizontal initiative: Marine Security Footnote 1

Name of lead department: Transport Canada

Lead department Program Alignment Architecture Program: Marine Security

Start date: 2001

End date: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (from start date to end date): Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement): Marine Security is a horizontal initiative that is linked to the government’s key priority of a safe and secure Canada. Its aim is to improve the security of Canada’s maritime domain, including territorial waters, inland waterways and ports. Elements of this initiative include:

  • Increased domain awareness, surveillance and tracking of marine traffic;
  • Improved coordination of and cooperation on marine security, including the development of Marine Security Operations Centres;
  • A security clearance program for marine-sector employees;
  • New detection equipment at Canadian ports to monitor containers;
  • Additional resources for emergency and law enforcement response capacity in the marine domain;
  • International initiatives that will ensure Canada meets current international standards and obligations, including those being developed by the International Maritime Organization; and
  • Resilience – efforts to ensure that Canada’s maritime transportation system prepares for and can recover in a timely manner from major disruptions due to a significant supply chain disruption. Resilience includes the steady and expedient recovery from the effects of threats to maritime activities.

Shared Outcomes: The following are planned shared outcomes and activities. Key areas include:

  • Domain awareness: Canada's surveillance and awareness efforts within marine areas;
  • Responsiveness: enforcement efforts in cooperation with all relevant police forces and security agencies;
  • Safeguarding: efforts to enhance the physical security of marine infrastructure of other critical infrastructure in or around marine areas; and
  • Collaboration: efforts in support of all other activities to ensure the various federal and provincial departments, agencies and police forces, and other groups with a responsibility for marine security work together.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Increased surveillance and awareness of the marine security environment;
  • Increased on-water presence;
  • Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;
  • Increased capability to respond to marine threats;
  • Increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;
  • Increased stakeholder ability to meet marine security requirements; and
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Effective domain awareness;
  • Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents;
  • A security-conscious culture among stakeholders;
  • Stakeholder compliance with security regulations; and
  • Increased collaboration: internationally, with industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Ultimate Outcomes:

  • An effective and efficient marine security system;
  • High public confidence in Canada's marine security system; and
  • A marine security system that facilitates the efficient and legitimate flow of people and goods.

Strategic Outcome:

  • The expected strategic outcome will be a marine system that contributes to the security, safety and prosperity of Canadians, and of our allies.

Governance structure: The Government of Canada created the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group, chaired by Transport Canada, to identify and coordinate federal actions in support of Canada's objectives with regard to public security and anti-terrorism in the maritime domain, as well as its international marine security obligations. Under the guidance of the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group, key departments are responsible for the following:

Transport Canada

The department leads the government's initiatives in marine security enhancements, including:

  • Policy coordination;
  • Chairing of the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group;
  • Regulatory developing regulations in support of marine security initiatives;
  • Managing the Marine Security Oversight and Enforcement program;
  • Managing the Marine Transportation Security Clearance program; and
  • Participation in the Marine Security Operations Centres.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), and the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG)

The department contributed to the enhancement of maritime domain awareness within Canada through increased vessel identification and tracking activities, the installation of shore-based Automatic Identification System infrastructure and the development of a long-range vessel tracking capability, namely the Long Range Identification and Tracking System. The department is also a key participant in the Marine Security Operations Centre where its maritime information and analysis is critical to identifying threats. Through the acquisition of new Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels, the department is increasing its on-water capability for providing platform support to security and law enforcement organizations.

Public Safety Canada

Public Safety Canada is the country's lead department for public safety. The department coordinates efforts with portfolio agencies, federal partners, other levels of government (including international allies) and stakeholders in building national policies and programs dealing with national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border integrity. This includes, for example, the development and implementation of marine-based counter-terrorism exercises.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

The Canada Border Services Agency's mandate is to manage the nation's borders at ports of entry by administering and enforcing the domestic laws that govern trade and travel, as well as international agreements and conventions. The work of the Canada Border Services Agency includes identifying and interdicting high-risk individuals and goods, working with law enforcement agencies to maintain border integrity and engaging in enforcement activities, including seizure of goods, arrests, detentions, investigations, hearings and removals.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police is responsible for enforcing federal statutes, leading national security and organized crime investigations across Canada on both land and water, and for maintaining border integrity between ports of entry.

National Defence

The department contributes to enhanced domain awareness of the strategic high-traffic coastal area. It leads the Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs) on the coasts and participates in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC. It works with partner departments and agencies to improve interdepartmental tactical operations. Lastly, it leads the Interdepartmental Maritime Integrated Command Control and Communication (IMIC3) project (approved January 10, 2011) that will improve tactical communications between the various departmental/agency vessels at sea.

Performance highlights:

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Transport Canada Marine Security a) Oversight and Enforcement 54.1 6.8 6.3 Expected Results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 54.1 6.8 6.3    

Comments on variance: There was a surplus in spending due to some delays in staffing to replace departing employees.

Expected results:

  • Effective security measures at ports and marine facilities;
  • Continued stakeholder awareness and understanding;
  • Stakeholder compliance with security regulations;
  • Security-conscious culture among stakeholders; and
  • Further development of policies, standards and procedures, including the coming into force of an Administrative Monetary Penalty system in 2013–14.

Results achieved:

  • Publication of the Regulations Amending the Marine Transportation Security Regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part I, for a 60-day comment period;
  • Finalized the Regulatory Cooperation Council Marine Transportation Security Regulations Work Plan focused on further harmonizing Canada and US marine transportation security regulations and further improving consultation and coordination between Transport Canada and United States Coast Guard on regulatory development;
  • Finalized the Regulatory Cooperation Council Regulatory Oversight Regime on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Work Plan coordinated between Transport Canada and United States Coast Guard;
  • Finalized the development and implemented the Tall Ships Challenge – Great Lakes 2013 Security Measure;
  • Work is underway to finalize the development of the permanent Security Measure Respecting Designated Tall Ships Events; and
  • Work is also underway to finalize the development of the permanent Security Measure for Tall Ships and Marine Facilities interfacing with Tall Ships.

Nationally, the program conducted 656 inspections and Security Assessments of all marine facilities. Under the MTSR and the Domestic Ferry Security Regulations, 98 inspections of Canadian vessels, 237 inspections of marine facilities and Ports, and 329 inspections of foreign flagged vessels were conducted. TC also conducted inspections specifically for 2 Tall Ships events, as well as issued eight exemptions covering the Tall Ship events, one in Miramichi NB; the others were for the 1812 Tour in Ontario that covered 16 ports.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Transport Canada Marine Security b) Marine Security Policy and Interdepartmental Coordination 5.0 1.4 1.1 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 5.0 1.4 1.1    

Expected results:

  • Advancement of Marine Security Strategic Framework and its various subcomponents;
  • Increased security-conscious culture among stakeholders;
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and
  • Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations and other levels of government.

Results achieved:

Planning for the interdepartmental bi-annual gaps analysis exercise was completed, and the exercise is fully underway.

Work is underway to update Canada's Maritime Security Strategic Framework.

Transport Canada and the RCMP established the National Port Security Committee. Under its auspices, a National Waterside Security Framework was developed. The Framework is intended to support consistent national approach to mitigating security risk, outline roles and responsibilities as well as encourage the coordination of waterside security and policing around harbours under the jurisdiction of Canada Port Authorities.

Preparations were made to test the Marine Event Response Protocol, which promotes coordination of efforts at the national, regional and international levels in order to counter marine threats and events effectively. The response protocol was tested in April 2013 by way of a table top exercise to confirm its validity and to identify opportunities to further improve the Protocol.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Transport Canada Marine Security c) Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program 11.8 .989 .695 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 11.8 .989 .695    

Comments on variance: There was a surplus in spending due to some delays in staffing to replace departing employees.

Expected results:

  • Continued stakeholder awareness and understanding;
  • Continued security measures at ports and marine facilities; and
  • Stakeholder compliance with security regulations.

Results achieved:

All ports captured under this program are fully compliant. This fiscal year 3,391 submissions for Transportation Security Clearances were received and processed across Canada.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Transport Canada Marine Security d) Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (design team) 9.1 .7 .7 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 9.1 .7 .7    

Expected results:

  • Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;
  • Effective domain awareness; and
  • Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Results achieved:

Implementation of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (MSOC) program continues to progress.

Transport Canada continued to contribute to effective domain awareness through the development and sharing of departmental and interdepartmental threat assessments, statistical reports and other information and intelligence products. In 2013–14, we produced 11 threat assessments / intelligence reports through its participation in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC program.

Transport Canada provided its information and intelligence products to program partner departments and agencies, including United States Coast Guard, on a regular basis within legal guidelines. We also conducted awareness sessions with enforcement, intelligence, and industry partners in collaboration with all program partners.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Transport Canada Marine Security e) Coastal Marine Security Operations Centre 11.5 2.4 2.1 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 3.8 2.4 2.1    

Comments on variance: The variance in spending is due to some expenses in headquarters being funded from the Marine Security Operations Centre project funds that were extended and not accounted for in the original forecast.

Expected results:

  • Continued surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • Continued cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;
  • Effective domain awareness; and
  • Continued collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Results achieved:

  • Continued surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • Continued Cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and
  • Effective domain awareness, and continued collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Safe and Secure Waters a) Increased On-Water Patrols 10.0 (annually and ongoing) 10.0 10.0 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 10.0 10.0 10.0    

Expected results:

  • Increased on-water presence;
  • Improved domain awareness; and
  • Visible demonstration of Canada's sovereignty over its waters.

Results achieved:

The funding received from the Public Security and Anti-Terrorism (PSAT) Initiative contributed to the operations and on-water presence of 118 vessels in 2013–14.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total Allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Safe and Secure Waters b) Automatic Identification System (AIS) and Long Range Identification and Tracking 32.5 (includes 5M for AIS in the Great Lakes Region) 2.0 1.63 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 32.5 2.0 1.63    

Comments on variances: Automatic Identification and Long-Range Identification and Tracking: The variance in the planned versus actual spending for 2013–14 can be attributed to the fact that the costs associated with closing the project were less than anticipated.

Expected results:

  • Increased awareness of, and ability to identify vessels transiting Canadian waters; and
  • Improved domain awareness.

Results achieved:

Terrestrial-Automatic Identification System (AIS) shore-based infrastructure has been integrated within all Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS) centres.

In an effort to increase domain awareness in the Arctic, two additional terrestrial-AIS sites were established in Resolute Bay and Iqaluit, Nunavut and are now operational. Equipment for a third terrestrial-AIS site in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, has been procured and installation is planned for fiscal year 2014–15. It should be noted that operational requirements may take precedence and if so, installation may be pushed to fiscal year 2015–16. This project is now considered complete. The original scope for the project was to procure equipment and install 80 remote AIS sites and develop a satellite communication solution. Ultimately, the project was able to deliver 113 remote AIS sites (the 80 planned plus an additional 33 sites) with the funding allocated.

In addition, this funding facilitated the development of Canada's satellite communication solution to track Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) class vessels, the Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) system, which has been operational since 2009–10. Further, Canada led international efforts to establish the international LRIT regime and currently the majority of SOLAS Contracting Governments to the International Maritime Organization (IMO) are LRIT compliant and operational.

Percentage availability of the AIS and LRIT systems:

  • Target: 99.7 percent
  • Results: AIS - 99.75 percent. An in-service support contract has been signed with the provider to ensure ongoing support of the system for the next five years.
  • Target: 99.7 percent
  • Results: LRIT - 99.7 percent
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Safe and Secure Waters c) Great Lakes/ St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre 3.2 (annual and ongoing) 3.2 3.2 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 3.2 3.2 3.2    

Expected results:

  • Increased surveillance and awareness of maritime environment;
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with maritime security;
  • Improved domain awareness; and
  • Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Results achieved:

Percentage availability of the consolidated maritime picture versus advertised level of availability for clients:

  • Target: 99.7 percent
  • Results: The percentage of availability of Fisheries and Oceans/Canadian Coast Guard information to enhance the awareness of the federal law enforcement and intelligence communities of vessel movements and response to maritime activities corresponds to the percentage availability of the LRIT and AIS systems, as well as the National Information System on Marine Navigation (INNAV).
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Safe and Secure Waters d) Marine Security Enforcement Teams 12.9 (annually and ongoing) 8.1 8.4 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 12.9 8.1 8.4    

Comments on variance: The variance between the planned and actual expenditures for 2013–14 is attributable to a lack of operational experience and historical budget data for the new vessels; a higher degree of precision in planning expenditures for next year is anticipated after one full year of operations has been successfully completed. In terms of planned versus delivered operational days for 2013–14, the variance can be attributed to the significant warranty and breakdown issues experience with the new Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels. These issues were resolved and are not anticipated to impact operations moving forward. Finally, the variance between the 2012–13 and 2013–14 expenditures can be attributed to the higher costs of crewing and operating the new, larger vessels.

Expected results:

  • Increased on-water presence;
  • Increased awareness of maritime environment;
  • Increased capability to respond to maritime threats;
  • Improved domain awareness;
  • Rapid and effective response to maritime threats and incidents; and
  • Provides dedicated vessels and crew to support activities of Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers onboard.

Note: Royal Canadian Mounted Police will report on the enforcement results of the Marine Security Enforcement Teams program.

Results achieved:

The teams supported ad hoc law enforcement requests in all areas of Canadian waters. In 2013–14, 868 days were planned in support of the Marine Security Enforcement Team (MSET) program, while 381 days were delivered.

Fiscal year 2013–14 was an anomaly for the MSET program. The discrepancy between operational days planned and delivered can be attributed to unforeseen warranty and breakdown issues experienced with the new Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels. It should however be noted that the RCMP continued its operations in support of the MSET program using Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats.

Note: These numbers are captured in elapsed days (or non-weighted days). Elapsed operational days calculate the number of days as if each client were the only client aboard. The sum of elapsed days recorded on a vessel may exceed the total number of calendar days available. (e.g., a vessel with two similar programs onboard during one operational day will each be attributed up to a maximum of one (1) elapsed day).

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Safe and Secure Waters e) Construction of Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels 63.3 39.3 31.6 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 227.0 39.3 31.6    

Comments on variance : Construction of Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels: A variance of approximately $7M resulted from: (a) various contract milestones slipping into the next fiscal year (including dock and sea trials for the eighth vessel); (b) inability to finalize warranty claims; and (c) inability to trial warranty repairs due to ice coverage on the Great Lakes. This amount will be carried forward and used to undertake scheduled work that was not completed in 2013–14.

Expected results:

  • Canadian Coast Guard will acquire and put into service nine new Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels.

Results achieved:

The contract for the design and construction of nine Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels (MSPVs) was awarded in August 2009 to Irving Shipbuilding Inc. (ISI). Construction of the vessels commenced in September 2010 and is presently ongoing. Four Marine Security Enforcement Team vessels were delivered in July 2012, November 2012, February 2013 and May 2013 respectively. Two Conservation and Protection vessels were delivered in October 2013 and a third in March 2014. The two remaining Conservation and Protection vessels will be delivered by Fall 2014.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Safe and Secure Waters f) Increased Surveillance Flights 7.0 (annually and ongoing) 7.0 7.0 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 7.0 7.0 7.0    

Expected results:

  • Increased surveillance and awareness of maritime environment; and
  • Improved domain awareness

Results achieved:

Additional marine security funds were provided to enhance the aerial surveillance program. The program provides situational awareness through fisheries patrols that identify the location and activities of foreign and domestic fishing vessels, both inside and outside the 200 mile Exclusive Economic Zone. The additional funding increased the existing program and provided a collateral benefit to maritime security and the recognized maritime picture. The program also provides aerial surveillance services including digital photography and real-time video to the MSOC partner agencies on an as and when required basis.

For example, the department provided aerial surveillance coverage in the search of vessels of interest. All operations were successful and Fishers and Oceans Canada flew approximately 4,281.7 hours in 2013–14. There is no variance or surplus/deficit as flying hours are adjusted monthly directly related to expenditures incurred (i.e. fuel costs).

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Canada Border Services Agency Risk Assessment a) Radiation Detection Equipment Initiative   0.3 0.0 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Admissibility Determination 2.6 5.5
Internal Services 2.7  
Total 47.1 5.6 5.5    

Comments on variances:

Amounts that were previously coded under Internal Services for Information Science and Technology Branch are now coded under the direct program activity Admissibility Determination

Expected results:

  • Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.
  • Screening 100 percent of all containerized marine cargo.
  • Screening 100 percent of all vessels entering Canadian waters.
  • Board selected vessels identified as high-risk.

Results achieved:

  • Provision of 24/7 operational, technical and engineering support for Radiation portals, including continuous availability of radiation experts.
  • Corrective and preventative maintenance of regionally deployed detection equipment
  • Procurement, acceptance testing and delivery of 12 replacement Carborne radiation detection systems for marine facilities.
  • Procurement, acceptance testing and delivery of 34 small-scale imaging systems for container examination facilities.
  • Acceptance testing and deployment of four mobile large-scale imaging systems, including radiation detection.
  • Evaluation of radiation detection as part of the Postal Modernization Initiative.
  • Provision of personal radiation dosimeters to employees at container examination facilities.
  • Procurement and evaluation of next-generation radiation portal technology.
  • Provision of radiation safety services to the Agency.
  • Progress applied science and engineering studies to advance radiation detection: degradation of radiation portal sensitivity with time, alternatives to He-3 for neutron detection, use of gravity gradiometer to detect special nuclear materials.
  • Represent the CBSA at national and international fora related to radiation detection.
  • CBSA continues to work with its Canadian Port Authority partners to screen 100% of all containerized marine cargo.
  • CBSA responded to 32, 911 radiation alarms and was able to mitigate all but four containers that had legitimate commercial goods, but were contaminated with radioactive material.
  • Personal Radiation Detectors (PRDs) were distributed to officer's at all major marine ports (Halifax; Montréal; Vancouver; Prince Rupert).
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Canada Border Services Agency Risk Assessment b) Crew Ship Operations   2,197 0.0 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Admissibility Determination 6,268 5,645

Immigration Enforcement

Internal Services

Secure and Trusted Partnership

1,722

.696

.472

 
 
  Internal Services Total 39,820 11,355 5,645    

Comments on variances:

Note: Passenger and Crew Screening and Cruise Ship Inspections are now one initiative - Cruise Ship Operations – the planned spending number for 2013–14 after DRAP reductions is $5,837,000 with the entire amount under Admissibility Determination.

Expected results:

  • Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.
  • Screening 100 percent of all containerized marine cargo.
  • Screening 100 percent of all vessels entering Canadian waters.
  • Board selected vessels identified as high-risk.

Results Achieved:

Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities. Screened 100 percent of all vessels entering Canadian waters. Boarded selected vessels identified as high-risk. CBSA processed 417 cruise ships. This represents 826,004 passengers and 343,409 crew, which total 1,169,413 cruise ship travelers.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Public Safety National Exercise Division Marine-Based Counterterrorist Exercises .127 (less Corporate hold back) .127 .115 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total .127 .127 .115    

Expected results:

  • Improve domain awareness in the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway region;
  • Lead to increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;
  • Increase stakeholder awareness and understanding;
  • Increase stakeholder ability to meet marine security requirements;
  • Enhance security measures at ports and marine facilities: and
  • Increased capability to respond to marine threats.

During this time period exercise activity will be focused on planning for marine security exercise(s) related to the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre. This presumes a sufficiently mature operations centre and related operations documentation. Both East and West Coasts have seen exercise activity since the commencement of the initiative. The Marine Security Exercise Program uses a building block approach to prepare the region for a functional (or full-scale exercise) in future years which could also involve key marine partners. Such an exercise approach would include orientation(s), workshop(s) and tabletop exercise(s) at appropriate times in order to assist in the ongoing development of operations concepts specific to the operational realities of the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway marine environment.

Results achieved:

  • a) In 2012, PS NED (Public Safety National Exercise Division) contracted the review of marine security (MARSEC) exercises After Action Reports and related Capability Improvement Process (CAIP) matrices for the compilation of a Marine Security Trends Analysis Report and CAIP. The intended use of the MARSEC Trends Analysis was to provide partner agencies with a broader picture of the current state of marine security preparedness, to assist in the development of a coordinated multi-jurisdictional program and to identify potential exercise requirements for marine security with a focus on the GL MSOC. As part of Public Safety's mandate to conduct exercises in the maritime domain, PS NED proposed an Orientation and Tabletop exercise for the GL MSOC.
  • b) Exercise Planning, Conduct and Evaluation – Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre (MSOC): Public Safety National Exercise Division coordinated the conduct of an Orientation session in December 2013 and a Table Top Exercise (TTX) in February 2014. Goals and objectives were established respectively for the orientation and the TTX and approved by key marine security partners through a broad consultation to ensure appropriate support to the Great Lakes MSOC program. An After Action Report (AAR) was developed including recommendations from the exercise and a Capability Improvement Process (CAIP) Matrix based on these recommendations was prepared for implementation discussion. It is anticipated that PS will provide a presentation to MSOC Directors on the AAR and CAIP to support discussion regarding the MSOC way forward.
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Public Safety National Exercise Division
National Security
Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Fiscal year 2008–09 to fiscal year 2012–13: $1.25M and $250K ongoing .227 .220 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Internal Services Fiscal year 2008–09 to fiscal year 2012–13: $350K and $50K ongoing .045 .045
Total $1.6M and $300K ongoing .273 .266    

Note: Total allocation amounts include EBP premiums of 20 percent and PWGSC accommodation premiums of 13 percent. Planned spending amounts exclude PWGSC accommodation premiums.

Expected results:

  • Improved domain awareness in the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway region.

While not an operational member of the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre, Public Safety provides overall policy coordination of the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre, which includes providing advice to senior management and the Minister of Public Safety. Public Safety resources support, coordinate and oversee the overall implementation and direction of the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre; oversee the development and administration of evaluations of the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre; and ensures that linkages and synergies between the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre and other Portfolio-led maritime security and border initiatives are maximized.

Results achieved:

The Department participated in the GL-MSOC National Representatives Working Group, as well as senior level fora, including the MSOC Directors’, Directors General and Assistant Deputy Ministers’ Working Groups in order to provide overall policy coordination and support in implementing the GL-MSOC and addressing legal, policy and operational challenges within both the GL and Coastal MSOC.

Specifically, the Department worked with the RCMP and interdepartmental partners to develop and finalize the formal impact evaluation for the GL-MSOC program, as required by the Treasury Board Secretariat. In an effort to respond to recommendations stemming from the evaluation report, the Department also worked with partners to develop the Management Response Action Plan. Further, the Department Co-Chaired an MSOC Policy Working Group, tasked by ADMs with developing options that would allow the MSOCs to “operate with maximum effectiveness, within a clear legal framework with broad routine information sharing authority and with appropriate governance and accountability structures to provide accurate, timely, relevant situational awareness to MSOC partners and other clients.” The Department also contributed to the development and implementation of MSOC information sharing MOU.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
National Defence Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces — Generate and Sustain Forces Capable of Maritime Effects — Operational Units a) Coastal Marine Security Operations Centres

118.48

119.52

20.7

17.98

14.9

2.1

Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 238 39 17.0    

Comments on variance: The variance is due to a change in MSOC solution design approach. The original plan was for the Project to design, develop, and install a unique MSOC Protected B and Classified IT infrastructure along with associated hardware, software and telecommunication services. However, the Project was able to leverage existing SSC Protected B IT and DND Classified IT infrastructures which significantly reduced IT hardware, software, telecommunication services and construction costs

Expected results:

  • Surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • Cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and
  • Effective domain awareness.

Results achieved:

The Marine Security Operations Centres project received effective project approval on March 24, 2011, and is forecasting Full Operational Capability in April 2014. Project management and engineering support contracts established to be used during the project’s implementation phase. The project increased cooperation between departments and agencies.

Core partners initiated the development of the Marine Security Operations Centres Capability Management Organization to fully support the Marine Security Operations Centres capability upon project close-out. MSOCs continued to provide effective domain awareness and support to core partner departments and agencies.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
National Defence Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces — Generate and Sustain Forces Capable of Maritime Effects — Operational Units b) Interdepartmental Maritime Integrated Command Control and Communication 31.6 3.5 1.8 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 31.6 3.5 1.8    

Comments on variance: The project ended up spending $1.8M in 2013–14 due to contract slippages.

Expected results:

  • Improved surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and
  • More effective domain awareness.

Results achieved:

  • Installed two shipboard, two portable and three shore-based first articles sub-systems
  • Conducted Set to Work and initial Integration Testing of Phase 1 First Articles
  • Worked with contractor to resolve issues uncovered during initial Integration Testing
  • Conducted four project review meetings and two contract review meetings
  • Conduct the Functional and Physical Configuration Audits
  • Conducted the Initial Operator Cadre Training and two Maintainer Initial Cadre Training Courses
  • Obtained the Security Assessment and Authorization initial Authorization To Test and an extension to it
  • Initiated detailed planning and coordination for Harbour and Sea acceptance tests.
  • Produced interdepartmental MOU for Installation, Operation And Maintenance for the IMIC3 Project (as of 08/05/2015, four pending DND signature for full ratification)
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
National Defence Conduct Operations — Domestic and Continental Operations — Conduct Ongoing Operations and Services to Canadians c) Increased On-Water Presence/ Coordination (Marlant and Joint Task Force) 5.0 5.0 5.0 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 5.0 5.0 5.0    

Expected results:

  • Surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • On-water presence; and
  • Effective domain awareness.

Results achieved:

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) continued to execute dedicated sovereignty patrols with Canada's coastal approaches. The department provided additional sea day funding to the RCN to enable the Canadian Forces to further contribute to maritime surveillance / Maritime Domain Awareness within Canada's coastal approaches. Of note, Maritime security functions are conducted whenever a Royal Canadian Navy ship proceeds to sea, whether this is a dedicated patrol or as a secondary function of normal operations.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security a) National Ports Project 12.5 1.0 Included in the actual for b). See below Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
b) National Port Enforcement Teams 40.1 4.5 5.9 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 52.6 5.5 5.9    

Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Expected results:

  • National Port Enforcement Teams are integrated and intelligence-led teams which conduct federal investigations in four (4) major Canadian ports (Halifax, Montreal, Hamilton and Vancouver).
  • National Port Enforcement Teams will continue to detect, prevent, interdict and investigate organized criminal activity, contraband smuggling, and people who may pose a threat to the safety and security of Canada and other countries.
  • Further, National Port Enforcement Teams will continue to detect, prevent, interdict and investigate corruption and internal conspiracies at the four (4) major Canadian ports.
  • This program includes the National Ports Project

Results achieved:

  • The National Port Enforcement Teams (NPET) maintains a strong relationship with core partners such as the Canada Border Services Agency and local law enforcement agencies;
  • NPET recovered 508 stolen vehicles that were being exported from the Port of Montreal (420) and the Port of Halifax (88). NPET operations demonstrate a significant increase in the number of vehicles seized compared to the previous year (251). The approximate value of the recovered stolen vehicles is $12.2 million (compared to $4 million in 2012–13).
  • In collaboration with CBSA, NPET also seized a total of 591.1 kg of cocaine, 1511 kg of hashish and 5100 kilograms of precursor chemicals (mainly for the illicit manufacturing of ecstasy) that were imported to Canada. While several investigations are being pursued, long term investigations have resulted in 12 individuals being charged for conspiracy and importation of drugs under sections 465 of the Criminal Code and section 6 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA).
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security c) Marine Security Emergency Response Team Training 6.2 0.6 0.8 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 6.2 0.6 0.8    

Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Expected results:

  • Marine Security Emergency Response Team Training is responsible for the development of the training for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and its law enforcement partners to provide a tactical on water response to board ships in Canadian waters and apprehend persons that pose a security risk to Canada.
  • Training initiatives will take place both at the national and regional level ensuring members are trained in a tactical police response to critical events within the domestic marine environment.

Results achieved:

  • The Emergency Response Team Marine Intervention training course is delivered once a year. Emphasis is placed on tactical proficiency while operating safely in a marine environment. The course was held in January 2014.
  • Both "O" Division (Ontario) and "C" Division (Québec) Marine Security Emergency Response Teams (MSERT) have completed 112 training sessions during the past fiscal year. A recruiting and in-house training program to identify and train suitable candidates to ensure human resources sustainability in both divisions is ongoing. Both teams were involved in a week-long joint training exercise in October 2013 to ensure interoperability and maintain operational standards.

Support is being provided by the Critical Incident Program and the National Tactical Training Section to MSERT through continuous research and tactical innovation. Required improvement and evolution of equipment remains ongoing and is necessary to ensure safe and efficient policing operations.

Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security Marine Security Emergency Response Teams 55.2 5.6 4.6 Expected Results are listed below Results achieved are listed below
Total 55.2 5.6 4.6    

Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Expected results:

Marine Security Emergency Response Teams are integrated teams with provincial and municipal partners which will continue to provide a tactical police response to critical threats and events within the domestic marine environment of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River region, and elsewhere in Canada when required.

Results achieved:

  • Marine Security Emergency Response Teams (MSERT) were involved in 97 operations over the past year, one of which occurred in the maritime environment, with the remaining 96 operations occurring on land.
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Forensic Identification e) Marine Transportation Clearance Program 2.9 0.2 0.1 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 2.9 0.2 0.1    

Expected results:

Contributing to security measures at ports and marine facilities.

Results achieved:

  • The Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program (MTSCP) was initiated in January 2003 with a commitment to introduce background checks of workers at marine facilities and ports;
  • The MTSCP applies to persons who work in certain restricted zones, persons performing designated duties, and others, such as marine pilots and seafarer's who wish to obtain a Seafarer's Identification Document (SID);
  • The purpose of the MTSCP is to reduce the risk of security threats by preventing unlawful interference with the marine transportation system by conducting background checks on marine workers who perform certain duties or who have access to certain restricted zones. Those that fail to obtain their restricted zone passes will be permitted to work in non restricted areas;
  • In 2013–14, the RCMP performed 3038 Law Enforcement Record Checks (LERC) on new marine ports employees and security updates for the renewal of current employees' Restricted Area Identification Cards (RAIC). Of those checks, the RCMP submitted LERC reports to Transport Canada on 50 employees; and
  • Transport Canada refused to grant 32 employees clearance for access to marine port restricted zones out of the 50 positive LERC reports.
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security f) Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre 38.8 8.7 5.2 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 38.8 8.7 5.2    

Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Expected results:

  • The Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre consists of five core federal government departments responsible for marine safety and security in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region.
  • Through cooperation and collaboration, the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre will produce actionable intelligence, concentrating on national security, organized crime and other criminality, and provides this intelligence to the appropriate agency or service in a timely fashion.
  • The Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre will continue to work with partners to increase the sharing of information and intelligence as legally permitted, in order to combat illegal activities in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region. Partners also include provincial and municipal authorities contributing to the safety and security of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region.
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will enhance domain awareness and the security of our border in collaboration with our domestic and United States partners by deploying technology to address identified bi-national gaps and increasing border integrity intelligence investigators capacity through the Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre. These objectives will enhance domain awareness contributing significantly to the security of both, Canada and the United States. Specific actions planned include the development and implementation of a technology strategy for the Great Lakes and contributing to Beyond the Border Action Plan for the prioritization of initiatives and procurement.
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will lead the completion of the new Great Lakes Marine Security Operations Centre permanent facility to be delivered in April 2014.

Results achieved:

  • The implementation of intelligence collection plans and the increased participation of core partners, including United States Coast Guard, as well as provincial and municipal law enforcement agencies within the Great Lakes Marine Security Operation Centre (GL-MSOC) contributed to obtaining an improved domain awareness picture within the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway.
  • Through 2013–14 GL-MSOC collaboratively produced a comprehensive Annual Report on Trends and Patterns within the Great Lakes, two Maritime Analytical Team (MAT) Threat Assessments, 15 Marine Investigative Reports related to law enforcement trends, patterns or information, eight Target Profile Sheets on criminal targets and vessels known to operate in our Area of Responsibility (AOR), 34 Daily Radar Analysis Reports for Shiprider, three Intelligence Briefs, one Intelligence Bulletin and one Intelligence Report. Additionally, RCMP at GL-SLS MSOC provided over 80 outreach presentations to internal and external clients.
  • The enhanced use of sensor technology at the GL-MSOC assisted the deployment of Shiprider resources and the analysis of sensor data has provided an improved situational awareness resulting in increased law enforcement interdictions.
  • The GL-MSOC provided information and actionable intelligence to several government departments and/or agencies, as well as law enforcement on the East and West coasts and within the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River region.
  • The GL-MSOC building project is meeting its timelines following its approval by the federal government in 2010. The Functional Program Verification Analysis and building design were completed and the building tender was awarded in July 2012. The construction of the permanent facility is on schedule to be completed in October 2014.
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security g) National Waterside Security Coordination Team 8.2 0.8 0.4 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Total 8.2 0.8 0.4    

Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Expected results:

Transport Canada partnering with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police will reach out to the Association of Canadian Port Authorities and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to establish a policy forum/framework which will coordinate the development and implementation of national policies on waterside security and waterside policing at ports through the establishment of a National Port Security Committee.

Results achieved:

MSOC East-Halifax:

  • RCMP MSOC East received 63 Requests for Information from RCMP units/departments.
  • MSOC East created 11 collaborative Threat Assessments. Highlighted collaborative efforts are: Evaluation and Threat assessment for the Yarmouth Ferry, Threat assessment for the Strait of Canso, and Threat assessment for Iqaluit.
  • MSOC East disseminated nine BOLOs (Beyond the Look Out)/Intelligence bulletins for small vessels possible transiting designated area of responsibility. These BOLOs were widely distributed throughout B, L, H, J and C divisions.
  • MSOC East provided 26 outreach presentations to internal/external clients.
  • MSOC East has created 116 collaborative reports/products including: Atlantic Canada Seal Harvest Report, Arctic Cruise Activity and Weekly Civil Maritime Reports.
  • MSOC East contributed as an assisting agency to PROS occurrences that related to suspicious vessel activities.
  • MSOC East is currently evaluating over 300 active Maritime Interest files, many of which have multiple vessels.
  • MSOC East provided information and actionable intelligence to several government departments and/or agencies. The Marine Security Summaries are produced and disseminated on a monthly basis.
Federal partners Program Alignment Architecture programs Contributing activities/ programs Total allocation (from start to end date) 2013–14 ($ millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results Contributing activity/ program results
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security Marine Security Enforcement Teams 53.8 6.3 4.6 Expected results are listed below Results achieved are listed below.
Public Works and Government Services Canada - Accommodations   7.5 0.5 0.5    
Total 61.3 6.8 5.1    

Comments on variance: As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Expected results:

  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Coast Guard have combined their expertise and strengths to further enhance national security and strengthen Canada's response to potential marine threats and events in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River region.
  • Marine Security Enforcement Teams are integrated and intelligence-led teams which are deployed to safeguard and address federal on water enforcement requirements and provide an armed fast-response capacity to address potential threats and events.
  • Marine Security Enforcement Teams will continue to detect, prevent and interdict organized criminal activity, contraband smuggling, and people who may pose a threat to the safety and security of Canada and Canadian interests. The Canadian Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Mounted Police will increase the capability of Marine Security Enforcement Teams to provide maritime security and border integrity with the deployment of the new "hero class" Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River, including the enhancement of maritime security training, in alignment with the Government's commitment to the 2011 Canada-US Beyond the Border Declaration. Specific actions planned include the continuous support to the Canadian Coast Guard law enforcement familiarization training, the development and implementation of Marine Security Enforcement Teams law enforcement specialized training and the deployment of four new "hero class" Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels with combined training for vessel operations.

Results achieved:

MSOC West- Esquimalt:

  • RCMP MSOC west has provided strategic and operational direction divisionally and nationally as well as assisted in numerous files to provide intelligence to government departments and or/agencies. There are a actionable number of documents that have been collaboratively produced: 110 Vessel of Interest (VOI) nominations, 12 Maritime Intelligence Summary Reports (MARINTSUM), identified 27 Priority Interest Tracks (PIT), and completed two Intelligence Reports (INTREP).
  • MSOC West has monitored 3762 vessel arrivals of which 1775 (47 percent) were screened for more in depth review.
  • RCMP MSOC specific investigations have resulted in seven observe/record/report briefs (ORR) and RCMP MSOC have investigated 82 PRIME files.
  • RCMP MSOC West has several technical systems upgrades and provisions such as the Canadian Top Secret Network, a classified environment terminal, top secret phone and fax system, and Signalis MTS raw radar feed. Development on the expansion of the Signalis MTS raw radar feed is currently underway. It is anticipated that a significant portion of the BC North Coast will be monitored by RCMP MSOC West by next fiscal year.
  • RCMP MSOC West has justified and acquired new software, Semantica, for analytical use and testing. This is supported fully by National Headquarter Technical Operations. It is anticipated that once this software concept is proven, the capability will be rolled out nationally as an approved software program.
  • RCMP MSOC West has taken on the responsibilities of the Coastal/Air Watch Program. There have been four presentations to private/public partners over this fiscal year and material on the Coastal/Air Watch Program provided to coastal RCMP detachments and Port facilities in British Columbia.

Results achieved:

National:

  • The National Waterside Security Coordination Team (NWSCT) is responsible for the development of operational policies, directives and best practices, through the provision of research and studies, advice, and analysis in support of marine security programs.
  • The NWSCT contributed to the development of the Port Waterside Security Action Plan (PWSAD) and the National Port Security Committee (NPSC).
  • The Marine Security Enforcement Teams (MSET) held 408 outreach activities and police community relation events including operating a booth at the Toronto International Boat Show to increase public awareness and the reporting of suspicious activities.
  • MSET participated in 17 Marine Security Emergency Response Teams training exercises.
  • The teams continue to increase our maritime domain awareness through their partnership with the Canadian Coast Guard and with other law enforcement agencies, and by providing the Marine Security Operations Centers with timely information and intelligence.
  • Throughout the summer MSET engaged other RCMP units, federal departments and agencies as well as international partners, as a result of their operations and interdictions, 27 charges were laid for failing to report under the Customs Act by CBSA.
  • "C" Division MSET leads a project in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the East coast which is aimed at identifying international recreational vessels sailing into Canada's internal water via the East coast. This project included the participation of the Coastal and Airport Watch Program, "C" (Québec), "B" (Newfoundland), "H" (Nova Scotia), "J" (New Brunswick) and "L" (Prince Edward Island) Divisions coastal Detachments, the MSOC East, the Sûreté du Québec (SQ), CBSA, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Transport Canada. During the on water operations, 137 vessels were boarded and verified; of which 19 vessels (14%) were determined to have come from outside Canadian internal water.

Comments on variances:

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Contact information: Sylvain Lachance, A/Director General, Marine Safety & Security, Transport Canada, 613-998-0610, sylvain.lachance@tc.gc.ca

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