Transport Canada 2018-2019 Departmental Plan

The original version was signed by
The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

Table of Contents

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Transport, 2018,
Ottawa, Canada

Catalogue No. T1-27E-PDF

ISSN 2371-8420

This document is available on the Transport Canada websiteEndnote i.

This document is available in alternative formats upon request.

Minister’s Message

I am pleased to present Transport Canada’s Departmental Plan for 2018-19. This Plan contains information for Canadians and Parliamentarians about what Transport Canada does, and the results we aim to achieve during the upcoming fiscal year and beyond.

First, let me say a quick word about the presentation of the information contained within this Plan. In line with our Government’s commitment to transparent information sharing, our plans and priorities are now presented in an easier-to-understand format. As such, program-specific information is now found exclusively on the government’s user-friendly GC InfoBaseEndnote ii interactive portal.

Many of our efforts in the coming year will focus on implementing the Transportation 2030Endnote iii vision I announced in November 2016 and shared in last year’s Departmental Plan. Working with our partners, we are already acting on this long-term vision for a safe, secure, green and innovative transportation system that supports economic growth, job creation and Canada’s middle class. We are advancing measures that will shape the future of transportation in Canada, such as:

  • In the context of the Canada Transportation Act ReviewEndnote iv, putting forward Bill C-49Endnote v, the Transportation Modernization Act, which is legislation that includes provisions for:
    • Creating a transparent, balanced, efficient and safer freight rail system that facilitates trade and economic growth; and
    • Enabling new rights, greater choice, better service and lower costs for air travelers;
  • Improving marine safety and protecting our waters, as mandated by the Prime Minister, through our unprecedented $1.5 billion national Oceans Protection PlanEndnote vi. This Plan is putting into place concrete measures to prevent and to better respond to marine pollution incidents, to address abandoned, wrecked and hazardous vessels, and to take action to restore coastal habitats and mitigate the impact of day-to-day vessel operations on marine mammals;
  • As part of our mandate, working with Indigenous groups, coastal communities, industry, and provincial governments, to formalize a moratorium on crude oil tanker traffic on British Columbia’s North Coast through Bill C-48Endnote vii, the proposed Oil Tanker Moratorium Act; and
  • Facilitating the efficient movement of goods to global markets and reducing shipping bottlenecks by creating the National Trade Corridors FundEndnote viii, which will improve Canada’s transportation infrastructure through new investments in roads, bridges, transportation corridors, ports and border gateways.

We are also proposing the Canadian Navigable Waters Act, which will: enable us to enforce safeguards and restore and better protect the right to travel on all navigable waters in Canada; provide extra oversight of key waterways, many of which are of great importance to Canadians and Indigenous communities; and allow us to increase transparency when assessing projects such as dams, mines and bridges along navigable waters. This is part of our mandate to review the previous government’s changes to the Fisheries Act and the Navigable Waters Protection Act.

In addition, we are developing the best approach to delivering a safe, secure, efficient and reliable passenger rail service in Canada. That is why we will be funding the replacement of VIA Rail'sEndnote ix cars and locomotives for use in the Windsor to Quebec City corridor, ensuring that VIA Rail's rolling stock will remain safe and comfortable, improve accessibility and generate fewer greenhouse gas emissions. By replacing existing locomotives with modern equipment, we will reduce smog and cancer-causing emissions by up to 85%.

I invite you to read within this report our plans, as well as the key commitments set out in my mandate letterEndnote x from the Prime Minister, which in collaboration with Transport Canada’s employees, we are delivering for Canadians. I also encourage you to follow our progress toward building—in partnership with the provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples, stakeholders and industry—a modern, efficient and greener transportation system, which will support Canada’s growth for years to come.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

Plans at a Glance

For our 2018-19 Departmental Plan, we have identified seven priorities we aim to fulfil. These are in support of the Minister’s mandate letter (priorities 1 through 5 below), Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, such as Transportation 2030, and our Department’s three Core Responsibilities. Each priority is outlined below, along with the actions we plan on undertaking to fulfil each priority.

Priority 1:

Priority: Improve the performance and reliability of Canada’s transportation system to get products to market and grow our economy.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Trade Corridors to Global Markets

For this priority, we plan to:

  • As part of the federal government’s transportation infrastructure initiatives:
  • Begin a review of Canada’s port system and Canadian Port AuthoritiesEndnote xi;
  • Launch the following new initiatives to better inform decision making and improve the coordination and planning of capacity and public/private transportation infrastructure investments:
    • The Canadian Centre on Transportation Data;
    • The Open Transportation Data Platform project; and
    • The Port-city Supply Chain Visibility project; and
  • Prepare for the planned implementation of Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act, which includes provisions to improve access and increase transparency, efficiency and long-term investment in the Canadian freight rail system.

    This Priority’s links to the Minister’s mandate letter:

    • Invest in transportation infrastructure that helps get goods to market;
    • Develop a 10-year infrastructure plan, improve governance and promote better data collection and asset management; and
    • Undertake a full review of the Canadian grain transportation system to help farmers get their products to market.
Priority 2:

Priority: Provide greater choice, better service, lower costs and enhanced rights for consumers.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: The Traveller

For this priority, we plan to:

  • Prepare research, analysis and advice to inform development of options on the future of intercity passenger rail, including VIA Rail Canada’s High Frequency Rail proposalEndnote xii;
  • Collaborate with the World Economic ForumEndnote xiii in the development of the passenger “Known Traveller Digital IdentityEndnote xiv” prototype, and pilot the concept in cooperation with other public-private sector partners. This prototype aims to provide a new approach to aviation security and facilitate the efficient movement of trusted travellers through security at Canada’s airports; and
  • Support:
    • The proposed purchase of a new VIA Rail Canada locomotive and railcar fleet for Windsor to Quebec City “Corridor” services; and
    • The Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities in proposed accessibility legislation and regulatory amendments.

    This Priority’s links to the Minister’s mandate letter:

    • Improving the experience of the Canadian traveller.
Priority 3:

Priority: Build world-leading marine corridors that are competitive, safe and environmentally sustainable, and enhance Northern transportation infrastructure.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Waterways, Coasts and the North

For this priority, we plan to:

  • Implement strategies for protecting whales on Canada’s coasts;
  • Develop and implement strategies to:
    • Increase marine safety;
    • Strengthen marine emergency spill response and compensation; and
    • Develop closer partnerships with coastal communities and Indigenous peoples;
  • Prepare for the planned implementation of Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act, which includes provisions to:
    • Support greater efficiency in marine transportation; and
    • Enable Canada Port Authorities to access new financing solutions.
  • Produce key findings and make recommendations stemming from the reviews of the Pilotage ActEndnote xv and the St. Lawrence SeawayEndnote xvi;
  • Advance:
  • Collaborate with Indigenous and Northern Affairs CanadaEndnote xxi to develop a section on arctic transportation for the new Arctic Policy FrameworkEndnote xxii; and
  • Develop multimodal strategies to improve transportation infrastructure in the North, including those which advance the project to construct National Aerial Surveillance ProgramEndnote xxiii facilities (i.e., a hangar and accommodation unit) in Iqaluit.

    This Priority’s links to the Minister’s mandate letter:

    • Improve marine safety;
    • Review the previous government’s changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act; and
    • Formalize a moratorium on crude oil tanker traffic on British Columbia’s North Coast.
Priority 4:

Priority: Build a safer and more secure transportation system that Canadians trust.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Safer Transportation

For this priority, we plan to:

  • Develop:
    • A “Whole-of-Government” approach (i.e., across multiple departments) and guiding principles for Connected Vehicles (CVs) and Autonomous Vehicles (AVs);
    • Regulations for locomotive voice and video recorders should Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act, receive Royal Assent;
    • Rules and regulations to reinforce railway safety in the areas of:
      • Fatigue management;
      • Passenger equipment;
      • Track safety; and
      • Railway employee qualifications/training;
  • Respond to recommendations of the review of the Railway Safety ActEndnote xxiv;
  • Commence work on legislative amendments to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992Endnote xxv;
  • Undertake a multi-department review of the Marine Security Operations CentresEndnote xxvi;
  • Increase the availability of marine inspectors in the North;
  • Implement amendments to the Motor Vehicle Safety ActEndnote xxvii; and
  • Undertake a review of aviation security.

    This Priority’s links to the Minister’s mandate letter:

    • Reinforce railway safety; and
    • Improve marine safety.
Priority 5:

Priority: Reduce environmental impacts and embrace new technologies to improve Canadians’ lives.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Green and Innovative Transportation

For this priority, we plan to:

  • Develop policies, regulations and programs to address new and emerging threats and hazards, such as reducing underwater vessel noise and whale-vessel collisions;
  • Continue to strengthen the aviation regulatory framework that enables the safe and innovative deployment of remotely piloted aerial systemsFootnote 1 (RPAS) and associated technologies in Canada;
  • Finalize a Canada-wide Zero-Emission Vehicle strategy in collaboration with other government departments and the provinces and territories;
  • Adopt strategies to accelerate the development and adaptation of technology in the transportation sector, including the creation and implementation of a new Innovation Centre within the Department; and
  • Implement an updated plan for our Motor Vehicle Test Centre.

    This Priority’s links to the Minister’s mandate letter:

    • Implement an Infrastructure Strategy that improves green infrastructure; and
    • Develop a 10-year infrastructure plan, improve governance and promote better data collection and asset management.
Priority 6:

Priority: Advance our Department’s five-year plan to: reform key outdated legislation; allow for more modern oversight and enforcement; better align with international best practices.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Transport Canada’s Operations and Service Delivery

For this priority, we plan to:

  • Present options for revising the safety and security legislative regime, as well as the legislative plans for Acts that fall under the purview of “Legislative Modernization”;
  • Commence work to update:
    • The Canadian Aviation Regulations;
    • Certification processes; and
    • Marine regulation oversight;
  • Strengthen Canada’s influence and aviation expertise on the international stage;
  • Pursue a “Whole-of-Government” aircraft services review by exploring options for the delivery of:
    • Government of Canada civilian aircraft services that Transport Canada provides; and
    • A Remotely Piloted Aerial Systems strategy;
  • Continue to modernize our Department’s cost recovery regime; and
  • Develop an approach to modernize the Canadian Transportation AgencyEndnote xxviii to ensure its capacity to deliver on its mandate and the efficiency of its operations.
Priority 7:

Priority: Modernize our Department’s services delivery framework for Canadians, including oversight modernization.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Transport Canada’s Operations and Service Delivery

For this priority, we plan to:

  • Establish a Transport Canada modernization office and develop a five-year work plan with preliminary policy development in its first year;
  • Implement a multi-year initiative to develop a risk-based safety and security oversight framework to manage risks arising in the transportation system of the 21st century; and
  • Continue to strengthen our technological capabilities by:
    • Providing external clients with the ability to access services online;
    • Increasing inspector productivity by investing in mobile technology solutions that will collect and provide access to data in real-time; and
    • Developing platforms to facilitate the collection and consolidation of departmental data, that will strengthen our Department’s reporting and decision making processes.

Additional Information

For more information about our Department’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Planned Results: What We Want to Achieve This Year and Beyond

Our Department’s Core Responsibilities

Transport Canada‘sEndnote xxix work is structured around three Core Responsibilities (CR). Each Core Responsibility is comprised of groups of Programs that are similar in nature, while having a distinct raison d’être and mandate (e.g., Aviation Safety Oversight, Rail Safety Oversight, etc.). Our Department’s three CRs are as follows:

  • CR1: A Safe and Secure Transportation System;
  • CR2: A Green and Innovative Transportation System; and
  • CR3: An Efficient Transportation System.

In addition, our Internal Services Programs (e.g., Human Resources, Finance, etc.) provide internal corporate support to all of the Programs within our three Core Responsibilities.

In this section of the Departmental Plan, for each Core Responsibility we will present our:

  • Major planning highlights for the coming fiscal year;
  • Targets and planned achievement dates for our results indicators (performance indicators) and the results for the past three fiscal years; and
  • Financial and human resources that we plan on dedicating to each Core Responsibility, both in the coming year and in the next two fiscal years.
Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Gender-Based Analysis Plus, also referred to as GBA+, is an analytical tool to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The “plus” in GBA+:

  • Acknowledges that GBA goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences as we all have many identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; and
  • Considers many other identity factors, like race, ethnicity, religion, age and mental or physical disability.

We employ GBA+ when shaping the services and programs we provide to Canadians. Each of our Core Responsibilities and Internal Services include an analysis as to how GBA+ influences their plans and planning highlights for the coming fiscal year and beyond.

For more information regarding GBA+, please consult the Status of Women Canada’sEndnote xxx website.

Core Responsibility 1: A Safe and Secure Transportation System

The programs within this Core Responsibility (CR) are responsible for ensuring a safe and secure transportation system in Canada. They achieve this by enacting, updating and enforcing all laws, regulations, policies and oversight activities (e.g., inspections) related to transportation safety and security.

Planning Highlights

To support this Core Responsibility, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we plan on:

  • Advancing our aviation safety regulatory framework by:
    • Starting to modernize the Canadian Aviation RegulationsEndnote xxxi to support a regulatory framework that responds to the emerging priorities of the aviation community;
    • Engaging with the international aviation community to strengthen Canada’s influence and aviation regulatory expertise on the international stage;
  • Publishing in Canada Gazette, Part II regulations for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS)Footnote 2 weighing between 250 grams and 25 kilograms operated within Visual Line of Sight (VLOS)Footnote 3 rules;
  • Enabling projects with Canada’s RPAS industry to validate RPAS technologies, and spur innovation and collaboration;
  • Strengthening our aviation safety certification team’s capacity to meet industry service demands through the “Aircraft Certification Enhanced Activity initiative”, whose improvements will help support the economic competitiveness of Canada's aerospace sector;
  • Implementing planned improvements to aviation safety surveillance, including:
    • Taking a more strategic approach to quality assurance;
    • Introducing additional inspector education and training;
    • Providing better tools to help inspectors do their work efficiently and effectively; and
    • Amending our risk-based surveillance methodologies;
  • Conducting an “Aviation Security Review” to identify challenges and opportunities within Canada’s aviation security system, such as exploring the use of new technologies and developing stronger partnerships, both within Canada and abroad;
  • Helping to protect whales via our Aircraft Services Program, by obtaining and operating by 2020-21, an additional surveillance aircraft for the National Aerial Surveillance Program;
  • Participating in a “Whole-of-Government” aircraft services review by exploring options for Transport Canada’s delivery of Government of Canada civilian aircraft services;
  • Expanding the Automatic Identification System (AIS) carriage requirements and working towards amending the Navigation Safety RegulationsEndnote xxxii to extend the AIS carriage requirements to include a greater number of vessels;
  • Continuing to modernize our marine safety regulatory and oversight frameworks by:
  • Continuing to promote safety on, and the environmental protection of, Canadian waters by:
  • Amending the Vessel Certificates RegulationsEndnote xxxvi;
  • Preparing for the consideration and passing of the Canadian Navigable Waters Act by:
    • Engaging with Indigenous peoples and key stakeholders about policy and regulatory development associated with the Act; and
    • Making plans for anticipated changes to the federal navigation protection system by:
      • Building our internal navigation protection capacities; and
      • Developing public communications and guidance documents to inform Canadians;
  • Working with foreign governments, such as Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States, to strengthen our awareness of the maritime domain and implement agreements for responding to marine incidents;
  • Reviewing and updating processes and guidance material for marine security oversight to improve its effectiveness and performance in the face of evolving industry business models and security risks (e.g., increased traffic at remote and unmanned marine facilities, updated methods of checking containers, and greater reliance on computers and technology in marine transportation);
  • Implementing the Railway Safety Act Review PanelEndnote xxxvii Report’s recommendationsFootnote 5;
  • Strengthening the legislative and regulatory regime, including:
    • Bringing forward legislative amendments and regulations related to locomotive voice and video recorders;
    • Developing new requirements within the “Railway Employee Qualifications and Training Regime”, to reflect changes in an evolving railway industry;
    • Addressing fatigue issues by reviewing and assessing the impact of fatigue-related issues and bringing forward amendments to the rail safety regulatory framework; and
    • Amending the track safety rules to better address risks/gaps and take into account new standards and technology;
  • Continuing to focus on improving rail safety oversight by:
    • Implementing our “National Oversight Plan”, which includes inspections and audits, by improving our risk based oversight methodology, which will increase the number of inspections based on risk;
    • Following up on audits and inspection results to ensure we are effectively addressing safety risks; and
    • Working with industry and other stakeholders, such as municipalities and provinces, to reduce crossing and trespassing deaths (fatalities);
  • Improving rail safety and reducing injuries and deaths related to rail transportation by providing federal funding, in the form of grants or contributions, to eligible recipients, for projects such as:
    • Safety improvements to existing rail lines;
    • Closures of grade crossings; and
    • Initiatives to raise awareness about rail safety issues across Canada;
  • Consulting with experts, government and industry stakeholders on the issues of:
  • Seeking Canada Gazette Part II publication for regulations:
    • Mandating the installation of seat belts on many types of commercial buses; and
    • Pertaining to motor vehicle lighting;
  • Implementing new motor vehicle legislative measures designed to:
    • Improve motor vehicle safety; and
    • Safely facilitate the adoption/introduction to market of innovative vehicles and vehicle technologies, to support economic growth, mobility and the environment;
  • Maintaining the capacity and ability to conduct oversight activities of vehicles, equipment and innovative technologies, based on their risk level;
  • Continuing to implement a regulatory plan that anticipates and responds to evolving issues faced when transporting dangerous goods to:
    • Support better methods to test, classify and map dangerous goods and their movements; and
    • Allow for public consultations about stricter training requirements for those who transport and handle dangerous goods;
  • Conducting research with our partners, including other government departments and other levels of government to:
    • Test the hazard, flammability and behavior properties of crude oil;
    • Assess lithium battery packaging; and
    • Monitor the emergence of liquefied natural gas as an alternative fuel;
  • Modernizing our transportation of dangerous goods oversight regime by designing:
    • Strategies for key oversight activities, such as compliance inspections; and
    • A thorough monitoring system that strengthens transportation of dangerous goods compliance rates;
  • Increasing the consistency, quality, efficiency and effectiveness of our transportation of dangerous goods enforcement activities by:
    • Developing database systems and methodologies to effectively measure compliance rates; and
    • Examining ways to improve the inspection process for low risk clients so we can dedicate more inspectors to higher risk areas;
  • Developing a transportation of dangerous goods response code of best practices based upon previous field simulation exercises;
  • Working with first responders, municipalities, Indigenous groups, industry and training schools to advance the development of a Canadian flammable liquid curriculum, which will help first responders protect the public’s safety following an incident involving flammable liquids transported by rail;
  • Completing the drafting of the proposed Transportation of Dangerous Good by Rail Security RegulationsEndnote xxxix for publication in Canada Gazette Part II;
  • Developing an oversight program for the planned Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Rail Security Regulations;
  • Strengthening multimodal oversight policies and processes to maintain the timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency and consistency of training, oversight, enforcement and regulatory development approaches across all transportation modes;
  • Improving the operational effectiveness of Transport Canada’s safety and security enforcement activities by:
    • Increasing major case management capacity and delivery;
    • Strengthening our Department’s enforcement, departmental inspection and investigation standards; and
    • Developing analytical processes for enforcement data, so we will be able to establish trends and areas of risk; and
  • Modernizing Transport Canada’s incident response systems to enable a more coordinated and standardized response to emergencies and incidents.
Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our programs within Core Responsibility 1, “A Safe and Secure Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake within the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • When working with the international community to develop international aviation security rules and laws, we will bring the GBA+ view to the table and promote gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness;
  • When acquiring new aircraft, our aircraft services team will work to:
    • Ensure the aircraft comply with applicable regulations and standards related to equality and accessibility;
    • Factor in crew comfort and satisfaction, based on any special needs they may have; and
    • Ensure modern design standards consider the increased representation of women in the aerospace industry.

    This information will be helpful in outlining the design needs of our future fleet (e.g., gender-neutral washrooms) so modern aircraft are designed with both women and men in mind;

  • We recognize that marine shipping continues to be a male-dominated industry. Through our leadership at the International Maritime OrganizationEndnote xl, we will continue to make a concerted effort to encourage industry to move from a male-dominated workforce to one that welcomes women; and
  • Under the Oceans Protection Plan we are responsible for the Marine Training Program,Endnote xli which aims to reduce barriers to marine training for underrepresented groups in the marine labour force, such as women and Indigenous peoples.
Experimentation

We have identified the following Core Responsibility 1 (CR1) initiatives totalling $0.5 million (equivalent to 0.1% of CR1’s 2018-19 planned expenditures), that involve using elements of experimentation. The initiatives include:

  • Undertaking our first-ever air cargo security artificial intelligenceFootnote 6 (AI) pilot project. This project will examine the feasibility of using “Machine Learning”Footnote 7 and advanced statistical analysis to determine whether:
    • AI can improve our ability to conduct risk-based air cargo surveillance and inspection activities; and
    • An automated system can identify which inspections should take place before cargo is loaded on an aircraft.

    Should this experimentation project prove to be successful, it will:

    • Enable us to improve the efficiency of our oversight activities; and
    • Give us the ability to:
      • Provide more effective security and oversight services of our clients’ operations; and
      • Explore avenues to possibly reduce the administrative burden on industry; and
  • Pioneering, in collaboration with the World Economic Forum, the Kingdom of the Netherlands and private industry, the testing of the “Known Traveller Digital Identity” prototype, which aims to improve security and the seamless flow of people across borders using:
    • Biometrics;
    • Cryptography; and
    • Distributed ledger technologyFootnote 8.

    The goal of this experimentation project is to provide travellers with the ability to voluntarily share their information with authorities in advance of travel for expedited or more seamless service, while strengthening trust between public authoritiesFootnote 9 around the globe to improve risk and threat detection.

Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollarsFootnote 10) - For CR1
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
2020-21
Planned Spending
440,882,904 440,882,904 362,862,769 364,852,337
Planned Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) - For CR1
2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
3,339 3,088 3,079
Planned Results - Result 1: A Safe Transportation System
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
1a) A safe transportation system Ten-year aircraft accident rateFootnote 11 (average per year, per 100,000 aircraft movements) Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year 2019-03-31 N/AFootnote 12 - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
1b) A safe transportation system Ten-year aircraft fatality rate (average per year, per 100,000 aircraft movements) Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year 2019-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
1c) A safe transportation system Ten-year marine accident rate (average per year, per 1,000 commercial vessels) Footnote 13 Target to be established using 2017-18 data as the baseline year N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
1d) A safe transportation system Ten-year marine fatality rate (average per year, per 1,000 commercial vessels) Target to be established using 2017-18 data as the baseline year N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
1e) A safe transportation system Ten-year rail accident rate (average per year, per million-train miles) 5% reduction in the rate as compared to the average of previous five yearsFootnote 14 2018-12-31 N/A N/A 3.7% reduction
1f) A safe transportation system Ten-year rail fatality rate (average per year, per million-train miles) 5% reduction in the rate as compared to the average of previous five years 2018-12-31 N/A N/A 12.5% reduction
1g) A safe transportation system Rate of reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years 2019-03-31 15.8% reduction in 2013 as compared to the five year average (2008-12) 16.8% reduction in 2014 as compared to the five year average (2009-13) 13.2% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14)Footnote 15
1h) A safe transportation system Rate of serious injuries in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five yearsFootnote 16 2019-03-31 13.8% decrease in 2013 as compared to the five year average (2008-12) 12.6% reduction in 2014 as compared to the five year average (2009-13) 7.9% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14)
1i) A safe transportation system Rate of fatalities in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years 2019-03-31 10.3% decrease in 2013 as compared to the five year average (2008-12) 4.5% reduction in 2014 as compared to the five year average (2009-13) 3.4% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14)
1j) A safe transportation system Rate of reportable releasesFootnote 17 of dangerous goods per year (the number of reportable releases divided by the nominal Canadian Gross Domestic Product for the year) Target is currently being established for presentation in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan 2020-12-31Footnote 18 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
Planned Results - Result 2: A Secure Transportation System
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
2a) A secure transportation system Aviation Security: National compliance rates of Canadian regulated entities with transportation security regulationsFootnote 19 90% 2019-03-31 89.4% 88.94% 90.78%
2b) A secure transportation system Marine Security: National compliance rates of Canadian regulated entities with transportation security regulationsFootnote 20 80% 2019-03-31 85% 77% 84%
2c) A secure transportation system Rate of refusals of new Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 new Transportation Security Clearance applications) N/AFootnote 21 N/A 160.93 156.35 113.17
2d) A secure transportation system Rate of suspensions of new Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 Transportation Security Clearance holders) N/A N/A 2.76Footnote 22 15.75 9.30
2e) A secure transportation system Rate of cancellations of new Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 Transportation Security Clearance holders) N/A N/A 10.04 14.36 5.63
Planned Results - Result 3: A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
3a) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada aviation security regulations that align with international transportation standards 90% 2019-03-31 100% 100% 100%
3b) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada marine safety and security regulations that align with international transportation standards Target to be established using 2018-19 data as the baseline year N/A - New Indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator
3c) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada transportation of dangerous goods by rail security regulations that align with international transportation standards Target currently being established for presentation in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator
3d) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of aviation client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standardsFootnote 23 79% 2019-03-31 88% 89% 79%
3e) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of marine client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards 80% 2019-03-31 N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator
3f) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of transportation of dangerous goods client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards Target currently being established for presentation in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan To be determined once the target is established N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GCFootnote 24 InfoBase.

Core Responsibility 2: A Green and Innovative Transportation System

The programs within this Core Responsibility (CR) are responsible for advancing the Government of Canada’s environmental and innovation agendas within the transportation sector by:

  • Aiming to reduce harmful air emissions;
  • Protecting Canada’s ocean and marine environments by reducing the environmental impacts of marine shipping; and
  • Promoting and encouraging innovation within the transportation sector.
Planning Highlights

To support this Core Responsibility, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we plan on:

  • Bringing into force regulations to domestically implement the monitoring, reporting and verification requirements of the International Civil Aviation Organization’sEndnote xliiCarbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Civil AviationEndnote xliii”(CORSIA);
  • Preserving and restoring marine ecosystems by:
    • Using new tools and research; and
    • Taking measures to address abandoned and wrecked vessels;

    These actions will help restore marine habitats and ecosystems in key strategic areas. By 2022, the Oceans Protection Plan aims to reduce the number of abandoned and wrecked vessels in Canadian waters by addressing at least 275 abandoned or wrecked vessels;

  • Continuing to work with Canadian industry and international partners towards:
  • Expanding the capacity of the National Aerial Surveillance Program to help prevent and deter ship-source spill pollution and support the response during oil spills;
  • Participating and engaging in environmental assessments coordinated by the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency’s Northern Projects Management OfficeEndnote xlv;
  • Providing policy development leadership by:
    • Working with other government departments and other jurisdictions;
    • Having effective partnerships with industry; and
    • Promoting Canadian expertise in transportation technology; and
  • Advancing regulatory development allowing for the:
    • Safe adoption and integration of emerging and evolving transportation technologies; and
    • Funding projects that promote innovative transportation.
Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our programs within Core Responsibility 2, “A Green and Innovative Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake within the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • For the Oceans Protection Plan we will be will addressing the underrepresentation of women in the marine sector by increasing our engagement, partnerships and training opportunities with Canada’s Indigenous, coastal and northern communities;
  • We recognize there are areas where advanced transportation technologies could potentially produce specific benefits to one or more segments of the population. As such:, we are working on developing partnerships with industry and academia (both within Canada and abroad), to examine approaches we can take to achieving gender parity in the transportation and technology workforces; and
  • We are supporting the adoption and/or introduction of advanced transportation technologies such as Connected Vehicles (CVs) and Autonomous Vehicles (AVs). In the long-term, CVs and AVs should improve mobility for the elderly and some Canadians with disabilities, which at present, may prevent them from safely operating a vehicle.
Experimentation

We have identified the following Core Responsibility 2 (CR2) initiatives totalling $10 million (equivalent to 5.3% of CR2’s 2018-19 planned expenditures), that involve using elements of experimentation. The initiatives include:

  • The establishment of a Transport Canada Innovation Centre to:
    • Serve as a focal point for innovation, experimentation, technology development and expertise;
    • Integrate expertise from across the Department and act as a hub to stimulate and support innovation and experimentation across all transportation modes;
    • Position us as a leader in transportation innovation; and
    • Provide us with a stronger capacity to:
      • Anticipate technological change;
      • Share technology and research, including collaborating across all levels of government, the private sector, and academia – both within Canada and abroad;
      • Identify innovative regulatory solutions; and
      • Influence transportation-related technology development globally.

    Some examples of work being undertaken by the Innovation Centre include:

    • Clean rail research related to new and emerging technologies to reduce emissions from the rail and transit sectors, and inform regulatory requirements;
    • Clean marine research and development for new and emerging technologies involving alternative fuels and operational practices for the marine sector to reduce emissions and inform policy and regulatory requirements;
    • “Advanced Vehicle Technology Crashworthiness Testing”, which involves testing and evaluating the safety of emerging advanced vehicle technologies through crashworthiness and occupant protection assessments of advanced technology vehicles; and
    • In collaboration with the National Research CouncilEndnote xlvi, developing of a “novel free-stream anemometerFootnote 25” system, whose intended purpose will be to strengthen the reliability of vehicle drag assessments during track tests.
Recent Evaluations and Their Impact on Our Green and Innovative Transportation Systems’ Plans

Name of the Evaluation: Horizontal Implementation Review of the World Class Prevention, Preparedness and Response for Oil Spills from Ships Initiative

The Evaluation’s Impact: We are adopting all recommendations stated within the above-noted Evaluation, and in order to do so, have undertaken the following initiatives thus far:

  • We have developed an Oceans Protection Plan tracking scheme to monitor:
    • The implementation of initiatives;
    • Track information about initiative timelines and milestones; and
    • Provide us with monthly interdepartmental (i.e., between departments) expenditure information; and
  • To ensure a “Whole-of-Government” approach (i.e., across multiple departments), we have created an interdepartmental senior management oversight committee to:
    • Maintain strong oversight of activities;
    • Facilitate coordination amongst departments;
    • Provide strategic direction on the Oceans Protection Plan.

    This Committee is and will continue to be responsible for:

    • Reviewing the interdepartmental tracking scheme; and
    • Overseeing the interdepartmental rollout of the Oceans Protection Plan.
Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) - For CR2
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
2020-21
Planned Spending
187,851,477 187,851,477 193,715,120 150,435,213
Planned Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) - For CR2
2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
516 498 451
Planned Results - Result 4: Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
4a) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for domestic aviation Improve the total fuel efficiency for Canadian airlines’ combined domestic and international operations by a 1.5% annual average until 2020, from the 2008 baseline yearFootnote 26 2020-12-31Footnote 27 N/A (Target established in 2015) 1.52% improvement (2015 calendar year) 1.73% improvement (2016 calendar year)
4b) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for domestic marine transportation Target to be developed To be developed N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator
4c) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for freight rail transportation To be determined To be determinedFootnote 28 2014 Class I freight railwaysFootnote 29 emissions intensity was 14.37 kg CO2eFootnote 30 per 1,000 revenue tonne kilometres 2015 Class I freight railways emissions intensity was 14.07 kg CO2e per 1,000 revenue tonne kilometres Data not available for 2016Footnote 31 The 2017 GHG emissions intensity improvement (i.e., decline) target was 7.2%Footnote 32 versus 2010 levels for Class I freight equivalent to an emissions intensity of 14.97 kg CO2e per 1,000 revenue tonne kilometres in 2017
Planned Results - Result 5: Canada’s oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
5a) Canada’s oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts Rate of spills into Canada’s oceans and marine environment (per 1,000 commercial vessels)Footnote 33 Target will be set once the 2018-19 results are available Date to achieve target will be set once the 2018-19 results are available N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
Planned Results - Result 6: A transportation system that supports innovation
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
6a) A transportation system that supports innovation Number of new aeronautical products certified Target to be established in 2018-19Footnote 34 2020-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
6b) A transportation system that supports innovation The number of motor vehicle features introduced in Canada through the use of Transport Canada’s regulatory tools that facilitate innovative technologies Target to be established in 2018-19 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Core Responsibility 3: An Efficient Transportation System

The programs within this Core Responsibility (CR) are responsible for:

  • Supporting efficient market access to products through investments in Canada’s trade corridors;
  • Adopting rules to ensure Canadian air travellers have sufficient choice and increasing levels of service; and
  • Managing transportation assets to ensure value for Canadians.
Planning Highlights

To support this Core Responsibility, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we plan on:

  • Supporting the passage of Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act, through Parliament, and being prepared to implement it upon Royal Assent. This Act will strengthen and modernize the policy framework for the air traveller, freight rail, rail safety and marine policy;
  • Implementing the Budget 2017Endnote xlvii commitment on the Trade and Transportation Corridors InitiativeEndnote xlviii;
  • Supporting the safe and continued operations of small airports and ports owned and operated by the Government of Canada, primarily serving remote and isolated communities, by addressing key health and safety requirements through ongoing capital investments;
  • Implementing Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act’s public reporting requirements by establishing and managing effective data governance and capacity;
  • Providing funding through the National Trade Corridors Fund ($2 billion over 11 years), for transportation infrastructure projects that strengthen Canada’s trade infrastructure, including ports, waterways, airports, roads, bridges, border crossings, rail networks and the interconnectivity between them;
  • Addressing critical transportation needs in Canada’s three northern territories;
  • Under the Ports Asset Transfer ProgramEndnote xlix, continuing to:
    • Advance negotiations with interested parties to divest port facilities; and
    • Pursue the closure and demolition of ports with no strategic value and no acquisition interest; and
  • Pursuing a long-term approach for providing ferry services in Eastern Canada.
Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our programs within Core Responsibility 3, “An Efficient Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake within the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • A GBA+ assessment was completed for the individual components of Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act, to consider related opportunities or challenges for men and women in all their diversity. The assessment found that:
    • Bill C-49’s measures will result in a more reliable, efficient and safer transportation system while modernizing current legislative provisions, improving Canada’s competitive advantage, and improving service levels to the benefit of Canadians and travellers as a whole; and
    • Some of the measures may result in positive, indirect effects that could impact one gender more than the other. More specifically:
      • The indirect effect of potential employment growth in the rail sector would impact men more than women, as the freight rail industry and many of the businesses railways support (e.g., grain, forestry and mining) predominantly employ males.
      • For the air sector components of Bill C-49, there would be no differential impacts on men and women, with the exception of creating regulations pertaining to the seating of children on aircraft. Such regulations would positively affect women more than men, as women are approximately four times more likely to travel as a lone parent with their child(ren) as compared to men; and
      • There are no intended direct gender impacts of pursuing the modernization of the Canadian Transportation Agency with respect to its role, mandate, and authorities.

    If upon implementing any of the individual Bill C-49 initiatives, we observe unanticipated equity impacts, we will conduct further analysis to make adjustments and develop mitigation measures as appropriate;

Experimentation

We have not identified any Core Responsibility 3 (CR3) experimentation initiatives for 2018-19.

Recent Evaluations and Their Impact on Our Efficient Transportation Systems’ Plans

Name of the Evaluation: Evaluation of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative and the Gateways and Borders Crossing Fund (view the summary of this Evaluation here)

The Evaluation’s Impact: This Evaluation was instrumental in building the architecture for the National Trade Corridors Fund, which is the centerpiece activity under the National Trade Corridors Program. For example, the following initiatives were directly based upon the Evaluation findings from the predecessor programs (i.e., the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative and the Gateways and Borders Crossing Fund):

  • Best practices from those Programs;
  • Feedback on the intake process;
  • Contribution mechanisms;
  • Stakeholder engagement; and
  • Fund management.
Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) - For CR3
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
2020-21
Planned Spending
712,185,680 712,185,680 581,343,623 531,822,429
Planned Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) - For CR3
2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
425 421 403
Planned Results - Result 7: Transportation corridors get products reliably to market
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
7a) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end transit time of containerized freight arriving from ports in AsiaFootnote 35 Average 25 days of end-to-end transit time 2019-03-31 26.0 Days (2014) 25.2 Days (2015) 23.8 Days (2016)
7b) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end transit time of grains departing from the Canadian Prairies to ports in AsiaFootnote 36 Average 38.5 days of end-to-end transit time 2019-03-31 38.8 Days (2014) 38.0 Days (2015) 38.4 Days (2016)
Planned Results - Result 8: Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
8a) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger air service routes within Canada (domestic routes) 0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2018-12-31 788 785 740
8b) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger air service routes between Canada and the United States (transborder routes) 0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparison: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2018-12-31 Data Not Available 460 395
8c) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger air service routes between Canada and other countries (international routesFootnote 37) 1% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2018-12-31 403 427 423
8d) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger flights within Canada (annual grand total, domestic flight segments) 1% increase in the 10-year average comparison: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2018-12-31 847,016 845,916 851,927
8e) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger flights between Canada and the United States (annual grand total, transborder flight segments) 0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparison: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2018-12-31 392,363 386,119 387,549
8f) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger flights between Canada and other countries (annual grand total, international flight segments) 1% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2018-12-31 139,997 151,240 162,389
Planned Results - Result 9: Transport Canada manages its assets effectively
Departmental Results Departmental Results Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2014-15 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2016-17 Actual Results
9a) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed airports Target currently being established for presentation in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan 2019-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
9b) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed ports Target currently being established for presentation in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan 2019-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
9c) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed ferries Target currently being established for presentation in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan 2019-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal ServicesFootnote 38

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the ten distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The ten service categories are:

  • Management and Oversight Services;
  • Communications Services;
  • Legal Services;
  • Human Resources Management Services;
  • Financial Management Services;
  • Information Management Services;
  • Information Technology Services;
  • Real Property Services;
  • Materiel Services; and
  • Acquisition Services.
Planning Highlights

To support our Internal Services programs, the Minister’s mandate letter and Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we plan on:

  • Continuing our modernization plans, (which began with the development of the Department’s 2016-17 Comprehensive Review) through several initiatives including:
    • Increasing the number of services Transport Canada provides that citizens can buy and pay for online;
    • Introducing a department-wide training program aimed at strengthening the financial management competencies of both financial officers and delegated managers;
    • Using data analytics to improve financial and operational performance and support decision-making; and
    • Modernizing office space in our Dorval, Quebec office, to enable increased occupancy and improved financial performance (multi-year project to be completed in 2020-21; plans and specifications to be completed in 2018-19);
  • Exploring the use of enabling technology, such as robotic and cognitive process automation tools, to achieve process efficiencies and internal control improvements;
  • Implementing a “Digital Strategy” to support the Department-wide priority for our Programs to optimize, transform and provide services that meet the needs of Canadians. Doing so will:
    • Provide Canadians with services that are easy to use and accessible anywhere;
    • Make data more usable and help ensure that information is open and accessible; and
    • Allow for new technologies to contribute to achieving departmental priorities through innovation;
  • Advancing critical information technology (IT) initiatives that will help transform how we provide program services to Canadians, including:
    • Strengthening our Business IntelligenceFootnote 39 and advanced data analytics capabilities;
    • Implementing a new “Project Management Framework” that optimizes the delivery of IT projects; and
    • Building internal IT capacities so we no longer require as many contracted resources to provide reliable IT services;
  • Continuing to expand the number of:
    • Services available to external clients via Transport Canada’s online portal, MyTC Online Account (launched in 2017-18); and
    • Inspection processes for which inspectors can collect results via mobile technology solutions (e.g., tablets);
  • Remaining focussed on mental health and workplace well-being by continuing the development of our “Transport Canada Wellness Program and Mental Health Strategy”;
  • Supporting the Clerk of the Privy Council’s priorities of mental health and public service renewalEndnote l, for our employees by:
    • Sharing any changes to policies and services that affect them; and
    • Providing information to staff, via various channels (e.g., email, face-to-face engagement, etc.), of the available programs that support career development and wellness; and
  • Using many communications platforms to inform Canadians and various target audiences, about:
    • Transport Canada programs and initiatives; and
    • The Minister’s priorities.

    The platforms will be in line with the government’s Directive on the Management of CommunicationsEndnote li, whereby we will take a “digital first” approach (i.e., through social media, video, posting speeches online, etc.), while continuing to use other more traditional means as required.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our Internal Services Programs have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake within the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • To be more inclusive, whenever possible, we will design our future and expand our existing information technology systems to support non-binary identifications of gender (i.e., not restricted solely to “male” or “female” options);
  • As required under the Government of Canada’s Policy on Communications and Federal Identity, our communications team will provide communicate information in different formats to:
    • Accommodate the diverse needs of Canadians; and
    • Ensure information is equally accessible to all audiences, including Indigenous, ethno cultural and official language minority communities.

      To do so, we will continue to:

Experimentation

We have not identified any Internal Services (IS) experimentation initiatives for 2018-19.

Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) - For Internal Services
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
2020-21
Planned Spending
174,031,977 174,031,977 165,457,501 161,214,020
Planned Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) - For Internal Services
2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
1,193 1,173 1,180

Spending and Human Resources

Planned Spending

The following financial resources table provides a summary of the total planned spending for Transport Canada for the next three fiscal years. For more details on Planned Spending, including adjustments, please visit our websiteEndnote lv.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018-19
Planned Spending
2019-20
Planned Spending
2020-21
Planned Spending
1,514,953,038 1,514,953,038 1,303,379,013 1,208,323,999
Departmental Spending Trend Graph for Transport Canada
Departmental Spending Trend Graph for Transport Canada - Text version
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
Statutory 274,426,794 254,383,748 236,049,383 223,825,936 227,786,599 238,141,208
Voted 1,294,700,268 936,775,036 1,059,938,465 1,291,127,102 1,075,592,414 970,182,791
Total 1,569,127,062 1,191,158,784 1,295,987,848 1,514,953,038 1,303,379,013 1,208,323,999
Historical Spending and Planned Spending Until 2018-19

As illustrated in the departmental spending trend graph, Transport Canada’s expenditures decreased from fiscal year 2015-16 to 2016-17. This decrease is mainly due to:

  • A significant, one-time, out-of-court settlement that occurred in 2015-16; and
  • Decreased spending in initiatives that are reaching their maturity dates such as the Gateways and Border Crossings Fund (GBCF) and the Asia Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund (APGCTIF). Generally, funding levels for the GBCF and the APGCTIF are declining up to 2020-21.

Planned spending increases in 2017-18 and 2018-19 are the result of increased funding for various initiatives such as the:

Spending Plans For 2019-20 and 2020-21

Spending plans decline after 2018-19 mostly due to sunsetting funding for initiatives such as:

  • Enhancing the safety of railways and the transportation of dangerous goods;
  • The PATP, Ferry Services Contribution ProgramEndnote lvi and Federal Infrastructure Initiatives (FII); and
  • The previously mentioned GBCF and the APGCTIF.

These decreases are partially offset by increased funding of the:

  • Oceans Protection Plan;
  • Trade and Transportation Corridor Initiative; and
  • Transport Canada’s Transformation Initiatives.

Note: The planned spending does not include expected funding for items included in Budget 2018Endnote lvii.

Budgetary Planning Summary for our Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (in dollars)

The following table presents (in dollars) the:

  • Total forecast spending for our Department’s three Strategic Outcomes, as well as Internal Services under our former Program Alignment Architecture structure, as well as historical spending for the prior two fiscal years; and
  • Planned spending for 2017-18 for our Department’s current three Core Responsibilities, as well as Internal Services, under our current (new) Departmental Results Framework structure, as well as forecast spending for the next two fiscal years.
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2015–16
Actual Expenditures
2016–17
Actual Expenditures
2017–18
Forecast spending
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
A Safe and Secure Transportation System (former Strategic Outcome 3) 474,768,789 365,642,579 459,634,328



A Safe and Secure Transportation System (new Core Responsibility 1)


440,882,904 440,882,904 362,862,769 364,852,337
A Clean Transportation System (former Strategic Outcome 2) 85,520,131 81,070,570 125,228,987



A Green and Innovative Transportation System (new Core Responsibility 2)


187,851,477 187,851,477 193,715,120 150,435,213
An Efficient Transportation System (former Strategic Outcome 1) 845,205,279 588,975,050 526,608,712



An Efficient Transportation System (new Core Responsibility 3)


712,185,680 712,185,680 581,343,623 531,822,429
Subtotal 1,405,494,199 1,035,688,199 1,111,472,027 1,340,920,061 1,340,920,061 1,137,921,512 1,047,109,979
Internal Services 163,632,863 155,470,585 184,515,821 174,032,977 174,032,977 165,457,501 161,214,020
Total 1,569,127,062 1,191,158,784 1,295,987,848 1,514,953,038 1,514,953,038 1,303,379,013 1,208,323,999

Planned Human Resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (Full-time Equivalents (FTEs))

The following human resources table provides a summary of the total planned human resources for Transport Canada for the next three fiscal years.

Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2015-16
Actual FTEs
2016-17
Actual FTEs
2017-18
Forecast FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
2020-21
Planned FTEs
Note: At Transport Canada, we have changed the methodology used to calculate planned FTEs (full-time equivalents) from a historical based average to an average salary based calculation. This change will give us a more accurate measurement of expected FTE totals.
A Safe and Secure Transportation System (former Strategic Outcome 3) 3,297 3,088 3,382


A Safe and Secure Transportation System (new Core Responsibility 1)


3,339 3,088 3,079
A Clean Transportation System (former Strategic Outcome 2) 283 248 343


A Green and Innovative Transportation System (new Core Responsibility 2)


516 498 451
An Efficient Transportation System (former Strategic Outcome 1) 457 394 441


An Efficient Transportation System (new Core Responsibility 3)


425 421 403
Subtotal 4,037 3,730 4,166 4,280 4,007 3,933
Internal Services 1,226 1,085 1,275 1,193 1,173 1,180
Total 5,263 4,815 5,441 5,473 5,180 5,113

Estimates by Vote

For information on Transport Canada’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2018-19 Main EstimatesEndnote lviii.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations provides a general overview of Transport Canada’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented condensed statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

You can find a more detailed future-oriented condensed statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, on our website.

Future Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31, 2019
(in Thousands of dollars)
Financial Information 2017-18
Forecast Results
2018-19
Planned Results
Difference (2018-19 Planned Results Minus 2017-18 Forecast Results)
Note: Due to rounding, the figures may not agree with the totals or details provided elsewhere. These figures are prepared on an accrual basis and therefore differ from the planned spending in other sections of this Departmental Plan.
Total expenses 1,424,009 1,668,355 244,346
Total revenues 72,520 70,573 (1,947)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,351,489 1,597,782 246,293

Supplementary Information

Corporate Information

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport

Institutional Head: Michael Keenan, Deputy Minister

Ministerial Portfolio: Transport Canada

The Transport Portfolio includes:

Grouping these organizations into one portfolio allows for integrated decision making on transportation issues.

Enabling Instrument: Department of Transport ActEndnote lx (R.S., 1985, c. T-18)

Transport Canada administers over 50 laws related to transportationEndnote lxi and shares the administration of many others. Justice Canada is the federal department responsible for maintaining the Consolidated Statutes of CanadaEndnote lxii and provides access to the full text of federal acts and regulations.

Year of incorporation / Commencement: 1936

Raison d’être, Mandate and Role

Transport Canada’s “Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on our website.

Operating Context and Key Risks

Information about our Department’s operating context and key risks are available on our website.

Reporting framework

Transport Canada’s Departmental Results Framework (DRF) and Program Inventory of record for 2018-19 are shown below. This table:

  • Provides a comparison of our Department’s former Programs, Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs under the old Program Alignment Architecture, to our new inventory of Programs under the DRF; and
  • Presents the estimated percentages (in dollarsFootnote 40) of the old Program(s)/Sub-Program(s)/Sub-Sub-Program(s) represented within the 34 new Programs of our DRF.
Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the Program Inventory, 2018-19, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017-18
2018-19 Core Responsibilities and Program Inventory 2017-18 Lowest-level program of the Program Alignment Architecture Percentage of Lowest-level Program Alignment Architecture Program(s) (in dollars) Corresponding to the Program in the Program Inventory

Note: The “crosswalk” (i.e., the linking of our new/current Programs to our old/former Programs, Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs) between the new/current Departmental Results Framework and the old/former Program Alignment Architecture was based on 2016-17 actual expenditures. The actual allocation of planned spending may differ from the crosswalk based on the:

  • Composition of new funding; and
  • The reallocation of resources received after fiscal year 2016-17 (e.g., the consolidation of resources for the Oceans Protection Plan under one Program, namely the Protecting Oceans and Waterways Program).
Core Responsibility 1: A Safe and Secure Transportation System
Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework 100%
Aviation Security Oversight Surveillance of the Aviation System 100%
Aviation Safety Certification Services to the Aviation Industry 100%
Aircraft Services Aircraft Services 100%
Marine Safety Regulatory Framework Marine Safety Regulatory Framework 100%
Marine Safety Oversight Marine Safety Oversight 23%
Marine Safety Certification Marine Safety Oversight 77%
Navigation Protection Program Navigation Protection Program 100%
Rail Safety Regulatory Framework Rail Safety Regulatory Framework 100%
Rail Safety Oversight Rail Safety Oversight 100%
Rail Safety Improvement Program Rail Safety Awareness and Grade Crossing Improvement 100%
Motor Vehicle Safety Regulatory Framework Motor Vehicle Safety Regulatory Framework 100%
Motor Carrier Safety 50%
Motor Vehicle Safety Oversight Motor Vehicle Safety Oversight 100%
Motor Carrier Safety 50%
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulatory Framework Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulatory Framework 100%
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Oversight Transportation of Dangerous Goods Oversight 100%
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Technical Support Emergency Response for Transportation of Dangerous Goods 100%
Aviation Security Regulatory Framework Aviation Security Regulatory Framework 100%
Aviation Security Technological Infrastructure 25%
Aviation Security Oversight Aviation Security Oversight 100%
Aviation Security Technological Infrastructure 75%
Marine Security Regulatory Framework Marine Security Regulatory Framework 100%
Marine Security Oversight Marine Security Oversight 100%
Marine Security Operations Centres 100%
Intermodal Surface Security Regulatory Framework Surface and Intermodal Security 50%
Multimodal Strategies and Integrated Services 11%
Intermodal Surface Security Oversight Surface and Intermodal Security 50%
Multimodal Safety and Security Services Integrated Technical Training 100%
Multimodal Strategies and Integrated Services 56%
Security Screening Certification Multimodal Strategies and Integrated Services 33%
Emergency Management Emergency Preparedness and Situation Centres 100%
Core Responsibility 2: A Green and Innovative Transportation System
Climate Change and Clean Air Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight 100%
Clean Air Initiatives 100%
Protecting Oceans and Waterways Clean Water Regulatory Framework 100%
Clean Water Regulatory Oversight 100%
Environmental Stewardship of Transportation Environmental Stewardship of Transportation 84%
Transportation Innovation Transportation Analysis and Innovation 22%
Indigenous Partnerships and Engagement Environmental Stewardship of Transportation 16%
Core Responsibility 3: An Efficient Transportation System
Transportation Marketplace Frameworks Air Marketplace Framework 100%
Marine Marketplace Framework 100%
Surface Marketplace Framework 100%
International Frameworks and Trade 100%
Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis and Innovation 78%
National Trade Corridors Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative 100%
Gateways and Border Crossings Fund 100%
Transportation Marketplace Frameworks Airport Authority Stewardship 100%
Airport Operations 100%
Small Aerodrome Support 100%
Canada Port Authority Stewardship 100%
Seaway Stewardship and Support 100%
Ferry Services Stewardship and Support 100%
Port Operations 100%
Rail Passenger Stewardship and Support 100%
Bridge Stewardship 100%
Highway and Border Infrastructure Support 100%

Supporting Information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to our Department’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary Information Tables

The following 2018-19 Departmental Plan supplementary information tables can be found on our website, including our Department’s:

  • 2017-2020 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (updated for 2018-19);
  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More;
  • Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million;
  • Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+);
  • Planned Evaluation Coverage Over the Next Five Fiscal Years; and
  • Upcoming Internal Audits for the Coming Fiscal Year.

Federal Tax Expenditures

The federal government can use the tax system to achieve public policy objectives by applying special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report of Federal Tax ExpendituresEndnote lxiii. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

Transport Canada welcomes your comments on this report.

Email: Questions@tc.gc.ca
Phone: 613-990-2309
Toll Free: 1-866-995-9737
Teletypewriter (TTY): 1-888-675-6863
Fax: 613-954-4731

Mailing Address:
Transport Canada (ADI)
330 Sparks Street
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0N5

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

departmental plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)
Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

departmental results report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (experimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.

full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus (ACS+))
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability).

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.

program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)Footnote 41
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Footnotes

Endnotes

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