Search and Rescue Signals

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You should be prepared to respond to the distress signals of other vessels. A Search and Rescue aircraft may also ask you to provide assistance after it has located a vessel in distress.

a search and rescue aircraft circling a fishing vessel to get its attention.

The aircraft will first try to get your attention by circling your vessel at least once.

a search and rescue aircraft flying across a fishing vessel's course at low altitude, rocking its wings.

The aircraft will then fly across your course directly ahead of the vessel at low altitude, rocking its wings or opening and closing its throttle. This is the signal that it wants you to follow.

a search and rescue aircraft flying off in the direction which it wants the fishing vessel to follow.

The aircraft will then fly off in the direction it wants you to follow. Proceed in that direction as quickly as possible.

a search and rescue aircraft returning across a fishing vessel's wake to indicate that assistance is no longer needed.

If the aircraft finds that your assistance is no longer needed, it will return and cross your wake close astern at low altitude, rocking its wings or opening and closing its throttle. You may return to your original course.

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