Syllabus PPS level 1, watchkeeping practices (Slow speed diesel engines)

Previous Page | Next Page

4.1. COURSE OUTLINE

Subject Area

Hours

Course Introduction

1

Familiarization

  • Plant arrangements
  • Instrumentation
  • Controls
  • Operational procedure

6

General procedures

  • Auxiliary units and systems
  • Diesel generator
  • Steam boiler
  • Steam turbo generator
  • Steam cargo turbine
  • Main-propulsion diesel engine

18

Main engine operation

8

Trouble-shooting

16

Watchkeeping

  • Duties associated with taking over and accepting a watch
  • Routine duties undertaken during a watch
  • Duties associated with handling over of a watch

28

Examination period

  • Briefing and debriefing (30 minutes)
  • Mid Term Evaluation (60 minutes)
  • Final Exam (90 minutes)

3

TOTAL

80

Note: ref TP 2293 Section 28.4; IMO Model Course, Engine Room Simulator, 2.07

4.2. Detailed Syllabus

Knowledge, understanding and proficiency (Learning Objectives)

IMO/STCW Reference

1. Course Introduction

 

The instructor shall:

 

1.1 explain the scope and objectives of the course

 

1.2 explain the relationship of this course to other courses within the subject area

 

1.3 explain that use is made during the course of individual and group activities to develop skills and attitudes in preparing for future service

 

1.4 explain the need to supplement what is learned with practical experience

 

1.5 explain what is required in order to reach each learning objective and pass each evaluation exercise

 

2. Familiarization  
2.1 Plant arrangements  
2.1.1 List the machinery and associated systems and equipment which form the simulated plant, such as:
  • Tanks
  • Valves
  • Pipe systems
  • Pumps
  • Heat exchangers
  • Oil treatment plant
  • Line filters
  • Electric generators (Diesel & Steam)
  • Main propulsion unit
  • Local controls
  • Distant controls

Table A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control systems

 

 

 

 

Table A-III/1 Operate alternators, generators and control systems

2.1.2 Describe how the machinery and associated systems and equipment are arranged and linked together to form the plant, and compiles a block diagram illustrating this  
2.1.3 Describe the relationship between the block diagram and the plant mimic  
2.2 Instrumentation  
2.2.1 Describe and lists the instrumentation used in the simulated plant to measure and indicate:
  • Pressure
  • Temperature
  • Fluid level
  • volume/mass (quantity)
  • Flow rate
  • Speed of rotation
  • Torque/power
  • Voltage
  • Current
  • CO2 content (of exhaust gases)
  • Pressure/volume in the engine cylinder (”Indicator diagram”)
 
2.2.2 Describe the alarms that are used to indicate malfunctions and faults A-III/1 Maintain a safe Engineering watch
2.2.3 Use the recorder to be able to demonstrate a cylinder P/V diagram (indicator card”) with the engine control at a specified power setting  
2.2.4 Be able to demonstrate:
  • Power output to shaft;
  • Cylinder mean effective pressure;
  • Power produced in cylinders;
  • Engine’s mechanical efficiency;
  • Specific fuel consumption in [kg/kWhour].
Table A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control systems
2.2.5 Be able to demonstrate the thermal data obtained to establish a heat balance  
2.3 Controls  
2.3.1 State that the machinery units forming the plant can be controlled from:
  • A position adjacent to the units in the engine room (local control);
  • A console in the control room (central control);
  • The bridge (bridge control).
Table A-III/1 Operate alternators, generators and control systems
2.3.2 State that operation of the main propulsion unit can be monitored from the instructor room, and faults introduced as required by the training programme  
2.3.3 State that the instructor room can also be used to issue commands for main engine power output to the control centre or to control the power output (bridge control)  
2.3.4 Demonstrate the use of controls from each location  
2.4 Operational procedures

A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control systems

A-III/1 Maintain a safe Engineering watch

2.4.1 State that safe practices must always be used when preparing machinery units and associated systems for start up and operation A-III/1 Maintain a safe Engineering watch
2.4.2. Discuss the safe practices to be used for:
  • Opening and closing valves;
  • Starting and running pumps;
  • Operating water-circulation systems;
  • Admitting steam into a steam system;
  • Firing up an oil-fired boiler;
  • Filling oil tanks;
  • Operating centrifuges;
  • Keeping bilges empty;
  • Disposing of oil wastes.
A-III/1 Maintain a safe Engineering watch
2.4.3 State that as far as practicable a check-list should be used for all machinery units and systems when:
  • Preparing for use;
  • Starting up;
  • Entering normal operating mode.
A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control systems
2.4.4 Compile a Genericcheck-list for the preparation, start up and operation of an auxiliary machinery unit or system  A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control system
2.4.5 State the operational requirements for connecting an electric generator into the electrical system in the terms of:
  • Speed;
  • Voltage;
  • Frequency;
  • Synchronization.
A-III/1 Operate alternators, Generators and control systems
2.4.6 Demonstrate by the use of the simulated plant, a checklist and the procedures for:
  • The opening and closing of valves in a system;
  • The circulation of seawater;
  • Firing up the steam boiler;
  • Operating a fuel oil centrifuge;
  • Pumping out bilges.
 
3 General Procedure Operation  
3.1. General procedures A-III/1 Maintain a safe engineering watch
3.1.1 Observe and apply safe practices in all exercises

 

3.1.2 Use checklists in all exercises

 

3.1.3 Maintain a log of procedures and normal operating conditions for each exercise

 

3.2 Auxiliary units and systems A-III/1 Operating pumping systems and associated control systems
3.2.4 Prepare, start up, and put into the normal operating mode:
  • The seawater circulating system;
  • The freshwater circulating system;
  • The compressed air system;
  • The fuel centrifuge.
 
3.3 Diesel generator A-III/1 Operate alternators, generators and control systems
3.3.1 Prepare, start up, and run the diesel electric generator

 

3.3.2 Synchronize, Parallel and load share

 

3.4 Steam boiler

 

3.4.1 Prepare and raise steam to normal working pressure

 

3.4.2 Put the steam boiler on line

 

3.5 Steam turbo generator A-III/1 Operate alternators, generators and control systems
3.5.1 Prepare, start up and run the steam turbo generator

 

3.5.2 Connect the turbo generator to the main electrical system, applying control on:
  • Voltage;
  • Frequency;
  • Synchronization.

 

3.5.3 Demonstrate load sharing between diesel and turbo generators

 

3.6 Steam cargo turbine A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control systems
3.6.1 Prepare, start and run the steam cargo turbine

 

3.6.2 Operate the pump to discharge cargo

 

3.7 Main-propulsion diesel engine A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control systems
3.7.1 Apply preparation procedures, including:
  • Checking the seawater circulation through heat exchangers;
  • Checking the freshwater circulation through engine and heat exchangers;
  • Checking the lubricating-oil circulation through engine and heat exchangers;
  • Confirming that the engine turning gear is disconnected;
  • Checking the fuel oil circulation through heaters to injection pump inlets;
  • Confirming that compressed air is available for starting;
  • Confirming that the engine cylinder lubrication is functioning;
  • Turning the engine with starting air for one revolution with indicator cocks open.

 

3.7.2 Apply preparation procedures, including:
  • Confirming that all indicator cocks are closed;
  • Confirming fuel oil circulation;
  • Confirming of bridge order for engine movement;
  • Application of starting air for 3-4 revolutions;
  • Moving fuel control to required speed position.

 

3.7.3 Establish normal running mode and observe operating conditions, including:
  • Temperatures of lubricating oil and cooling water;
  • Temperatures of exhaust gas from each cylinder;
  • Temperatures of engine exhaust gas at inlet and exit from turbo charger;
  • Engine speed and power output;
  • Maintaining a check on fuel oil supply (service tank);
  • Maintaining a check on fuel viscosity and temperature;
  • Applying changes of engine speed and power as directed by the bridge and note changes in operating conditions.

 

4 Main Engine Operation A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control systems
4.1 Prepare, start and run the main propulsion unit and associated systems

 

4.2 Set the main propulsion unit controls to maximum full ahead sea power as directed from bridge control, or  
4.3 Apply manoeuvring procedures and use the controls to obtain required power outputs  
5 Trouble Shooting A-III/1 Operate main and auxiliary machinery and associated control systems
5.2 Locate and apply remedial action for the following malfunctions or faults but not limited to:
  • Fuel injection timing (early/late);
  • Worn piston rings in one cylinder;
  • Fire in the scavenge air space;
  • Fouled turbo charger (exhaust side);
  • Fouled turbo charger (air side);
  • Fouled turbo charger air filters;
  • Fouled scavenge air cooler/ports;
  • Blackout;
  • Clogged auxiliary machinery oil filters;
  • Overheated main bearing;
  • Fouled heat exchanger surfaces;
  • Lubricating-oil circulation pump failure;
  • Flooded bilge sump;
  • Bridge control failure.
 
6 Maintain a safe engineering watch A-III/1 Maintain a safe engineering watch
6.1 Duties associated with taking over and accepting a watch

A-VIII/2, part 4-2 Principles to be observed in keeping engineering watch

6.1.1 Enter the machinery space 15 minutes before the change of watch

 

6.1.2 Inspect all operating units, noting operational conditions and any deviations from the normal mode

 

6.1.3 Check steam boiler water level

 

6.1.4 Inspect bilge

 

6.1.5 Note engine telegraph instruction and check engine control position and related speed

 

6.1.6 Check quantities and levels in engine room service tanks

 

6.1.7 Examine the engine room log

 

6.1.8 Receive an oral report from the engineer officer in charge of the watch for the period of watch keeping now completed

 

6.1.9 Enter in the engine room log any abnormal operational conditions noted during inspection

 

6.1.10 Accept, if satisfied, responsibility for the machinery space operation

 

6.2 Routine duties undertaken during a watch

A-VIII/2, part 4-2 Principles to be observed in keeping engineering watch

6.2.1 At regular intervals: inspect all operational machinery, noting operating conditions and correcting any deviations from the normal mode

 

6.2.2 Operate the oil centrifuges as necessary

 

6.2.3 Check the steam production plant periodically and adjust as necessary
  • CO2 content of exhaust gas
  • exhaust gas inlet and outlet temperatures if operating on waste heat

 

6.2.4 The seawater temperature periodically and adjust the heat exchanger control valves in order to maintain the engine cooling water and lubricating oil within the correct operational range

 

6.2.5 Check that the main engine cylinder lubrication is within the correct range

 

6.2.6 Check the electrical system voltage and load and, if two or more generators are operating, that the load is properly balanced

 

6.2.7 Check the pressure in compressed air storage tanks and top up

 

6.2.8 Inspect bilge and under floor spaces and clear them using the bilge pump and complying with any anti-pollution regulations

 

6.2.9 State that when serving on an actual ship the watch keeping routines and duties would also include responsibilities related to:
  • steering gear
  • propeller shaft casing and bearings
  • domestic freshwater
  • water for sanitary use

 

6.210 maintain the machinery space log book and know the significance of the readings taken

 

6.3 Duties associated with handing over of a watch  A-VIII/2 part 4-2 “Principles to be observed in keeping an engineering watch”,
6.3.1 Prepare an oral report to the relieving engineer officer in charge of the watch  
6.3.2 Not hand over the watch to the relieving officer if there is a reason to believe that the latter is not capable of carrying out the watch keeping duties  
6.3.3 Maintain the machinery space log book  

4.3. Course Expectation

  1. Upon completion the PPS Level 1 Course, the course participants will be able to perform Watchkeeping duties.
  2. At the end of this course the participants will understand how to take over and handle an engine room watch and operate a power plant as if it is operated onboard a vessel.
  3. The watch will be a minimum of one hour during that time; the Instructor will bring in malfunctions and change the machinery condition in order to keep the watchkeeper alert.
  4. The Scenario might include various vessel operations such as: the vessel alongside under cargo operation, the vessel is berthing, leaving the dock or at sea
  5. On completion of this course, the participants will know what is expected of a watchkeeper at sea, enabling him/her to be a valuable member of the engine room team.
  6. Good Marine Engineering practises will be emphasised throughout the course, careful monitoring and operation of the ships’ machinery will be stressed.   Scenarios used in training runs will be as realistic as possible.

4.4. Simulator Evaluation Criteria

Plant Operation

The student must understand the operational procedures necessary for a ship’s power plant safe operation and in accordance with the STCW Convention & Code requirements.

The Engineer of the Watch (EOW) shall be knowledgeable of the following process and criteria:

  1. General Procedures 
    1. Safe practices:  Ensure that the members of the engineering watch are fully capable of performing their duties effectively and apply safe work practices.
    2. Checklists: Understand and operate the propulsion- and auxiliary plant status, while using checklists.
    3. Maintaining the log: The state of completion of the engine room log shall reflect the work and changes that have been carried out.
  2. Auxiliary units and systems start up and engage normal operation mode of:
    1. the seawater system
    2. the freshwater system
    3. the air compressed systems
    4. the lubrication oil system
    5. the fuel oil system
    6. the centrifuges
  3. Diesel Generators: start up and engage normal operation mode of the diesel generators including proper synchronization and load sheering.
  4. Steam boiler: start up and engage normal operation mode of the steam boiler and its sub systems.
  5. Steam turbo generators start up and engage normal operation mode of the steam-driven generators including proper synchronization and load sharing
  6. Steam cargo turbines: start up and engage normal operation mode of the steam cargo turbines.
  7. Main propulsion: start up and engage normal operation mode of the main propulsion unit.  Demonstrate operational modes, such as:
    1. Bridge,
    2. Local and Emergency Control, and react properly to Emergency Run,
    3. Shut and Slow down of the main engine.
  8. Attitude -The student shall be able to demonstrate:
    1. Confidence, including the ability to learn from past mistakes and accept constructive criticism
    2. Initiative, including the ability to identify problems and situations in advance and subsequently develops and implements solutions in a timely manner
    3. Flexibility, including the ability to react to unexpected changes; and
    4. Intensity (sense of urgency) including the ability to maintain control under stress and demonstrate an understanding of the degree of risk posed by various breakdowns or abnormal situations during navigation, ship handling and collision avoidance scenarios.
  9. Safety
    1. Demonstrate correct assessment of risk of equipment malfunctions or breakdown based on available information, while taking into consideration ship safety and emergency procedures and changeover from remote/automatic to local control of affected systems
    2. Assess, plan and take necessary action to contain the effects of damage resulting from equipment breakdown, rupture, fire, or other causes. Inform the bridge in the event of fire and of any impending action in machinery spaces that may cause reduction in the ship’s speed, imminent steering failure, stoppage of the ship’s propulsion system or any alteration in the generation of electric power or similar threats to safety.
    3. Inform the Chief Engineer Officer
      1. When engine damage or a malfunction occurs this may endanger the safe operation of the vessel.
      2. In any emergency or in doubt as to what decision or measures to take.
      3. Explain and always take into account the possibilities of hazards and prioritize the safety of human lives, over the marine environment and over damage to cargo and vessel 

4.5. Officer Taking Over the Watch

The EOW shall be knowledgeable of the following process and criteria:

  1. Watch Turnover Procedures
    1. Personnel: Ensure that the members of the engineering watch are capable of performing their duties effectively
    2. Machinery: Understand the propulsion- and auxiliary plant status including:
      1. The nature of all work being performed on machinery and systems, the personnel involved and potential hazards;
      2. The level, and where applicable, the condition of water or residues in bilges, ballast tanks, slop tanks, reserve tanks, fresh water tanks, sewage tanks and any special requirements for use or disposal of the contents thereof;
      3. The condition and level of fuel in the reserve tanks, settling tanks, day tanks and other fuel storage facilities;
      4. The conditions of operation of the main propulsion plant and auxiliary equipments in polar waters and various ice conditions
      5. The condition and mode of operation of centrifuges;
      6. Any special requirements relating to sanitary system disposals;
      7. Condition and mode of operation of the various main and auxiliary systems, including the electrical power distribution system;
      8. The condition of monitoring and control console equipment and which equipment that is manually operated.
      9. The condition and mode of operation of automatic boiler controls and other equipment related to the operation of steam boilers
      10. The reports of engine room ratings relating to their assigned duties
      11. The availability of fire-fighting appliances; and
      12. The state of completion of the engine room log
    3. Communications: Relevant communication passed and received from the bridge or other stations: e.g. bunkering, emergency stations including equipment status
    4. Operations: The standing orders and special orders of the Chief Engineer Officer relating to the operation of the ship’s systems and machinery
    5. Weather: Including any potentially adverse conditions resulting from bad weather, ice, or contaminated or shallow water
    6. The student shall demonstrate:
      1. basic knowledge of and ability to use all engine room equipment relevant to the type of ship being simulated
      2. effective working relationship with the engine room crew
      3. effective supervision of engine room personnel
      4. basic understanding of engineering principles
      5. Ability to select and utilize available information to keep the ship safe from danger by identifying possible hazardous situations or upcoming events and take the necessary precautions by:
        1. Assessing the effects (ship movements) of wind, tide, ice conditions and current on the ship’s propulsion machinery and auxiliary machinery, including presentation of valid solutions to maintain/regain safe operation
        2. Using available information from external sources and observations of equipment in the engine room and other areas together with information obtained from alarm and monitoring systems to plan and schedule maintenance and other unforeseen, but necessary, actions required to maintain a safe and efficient operation of the ship
        3. Meeting a scheduled arrival time and in this process demonstrating an appreciation of the importance of correct disposal of bilge, preparing for maneuvering, securing adequate reserve of power and steering gear equipment, taking into account fuel consumption considerations, and the requirement to achieve a pre-planned arrival
        4. Being able to make correct and timely reports to the Bridge Officer and Chief Engineer Officer and follow their instructions
        5. Recording and properly documenting all events, which have occurred during the watch, such as events related to main and auxiliary machinery, bunkering, oil transfer, waste or bilge disposal
        6. Being able to promptly execute all bridge orders and record any changes in direction or speed of the main propulsion units; and
        7. Supervising and using internal and external communications efficiently
    7. Handling (Managing)
      1. Take the actions necessary to contain the effects of damage resulting from equipment breakdown, fire, flooding, or other cause
      2. Communicate any emergency or abnormal situation to the bridge, Chief Engineer Officer and other persons according to ship procedures
      3. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the main engine maneuvering characteristics
      4. Demonstrate the ability to positively supervise ratings on the engineering watch and direct them to inform of potentially hazardous conditions; and
      5. Demonstrate the ability to pay due attention to the ongoing maintenance and support of all machinery, their control apparatus, accommodation service systems and safety equipment
    8. Attitude The student shall demonstrate:
      1. Confidence, including the ability to learn from past mistakes and accept constructive criticism
      2. Initiative, including the ability to identify problems and situations in advance and subsequently develops and implements solutions in a timely manner
      3. Flexibility, including the ability to react to unexpected changes; and
      4. Intensity (sense of urgency) including the ability to maintain control under stress and demonstrate an understanding of the degree of risk posed by various breakdowns or abnormal situations during navigation, ship handling and collision avoidance scenarios.
    9. Safety:
      1. Demonstrate correct assessment of risk of equipment malfunctions or breakdown based on available information, while taking into consideration ship safety and emergency procedures and changeover from remote/automatic to local control of affected systems
      2. Assess, plan and take necessary action to contain the effects of damage resulting from equipment breakdown, rupture, fire, or other cause.
      3. Inform the bridge, in the event of fire and of any impending action in machinery spaces that may cause reduction in the ship’s speed, imminent steering failure, stoppage of the ship’s propulsion system or any alteration in the generation of electric power or similar threat to safety.
      4. Inform the Chief Engineer Officer and make recommendations to the Bridge Officer in the event of an engine damage or a malfunction occurs which may be such as to endanger the safe operation of the ship
      5. Inform the Chief Engineer Officer in the event of:
        1. any malfunction occurs, which is believed to cause damage or breakdown of propulsion machinery, auxiliary machinery or monitoring and governing systems; and
        2. in any doubt about what decision to make or measures to take to rectify a situation
      6. Demonstrate, the ability to assess an emergency situation and perform necessary emergency operation of propulsion machinery and auxiliary machinery
      7. Take into account the possibilities of hazards and prioritize the safety of human lives, over the marine environment and over damage to cargo and vessel. 

4.6. Process Flowchart PPS1

Process Flowchart for PPS1

Date modified: