Syllabus PPS level 2, ship management practices (slow speed engines)

 

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5.1. Course Outline

Subject Area

Hours

Simulator Familiarisation and course introduction

  • Plant arrangements
  • Instrumentation
  • Controls
  • Operational procedure

7

Systems Setup

  • Auxiliary units and systems
  • Diesel generator
  • Steam boiler
  • Steam turbo generator
  • Steam cargo turbine
  • Main-propulsion diesel engine

14

Main engine operation

4

Trouble-shooting

16

Power plant and resources management practices

  • Written Report, reflecting the student’s knowledge at the management level

16

Examination period

  • Briefing and debriefing (30 minutes)
  • Midterm Evaluation (60 minutes)
  • Final Exam (90 minutes)

3

TOTAL

60

Ref. TP 2293 Section 26.3.

5.2. Detailed Syllabus

Knowledge, understanding and proficiency
(Learning Objectives)

IMO/STCW
Reference

1. Course Introduction

 

The instructor shall:

 

1.1. explain the scope and objectives of the course

 

1.2. explain the relationship of this course to other courses within the subject area

 

1.3. explain that use is made during the course of individual and group activities to develop skills and attitudes in preparing for future service

 

1.4. explain the need to supplement what is learned with practical experience.

 

1.5. explain what is required in order to reach each learning objective and pass each evaluation exercise

 

2. Familiarization

 

2.1. Plant arrangements

 

2.1.1. List the machinery and associated systems and equipment which form the simulated plant, such as:
  • Tanks
  • Valves
  • Pipe systems
  • Pumps
  • Heat exchangers
  • Oil treatment plant
  • Line filters
  • Electric generators
  • Steam generators
  • Main propulsion unit
  • Local controls
  • Distant controls

 

2.1.2. Describe how the machinery and associated systems and equipment are arranged and linked together to form the plant, and compiles a block diagram illustrating this

 

2.1.3. Describe the relationship between the block diagram and the plant mimic

 

2.2. Instrumentation

 

2.2.1. Describe and lists the instrumentation used in the simulated plant to measure and indicate:
  • Pressure
  • Temperature
  • Fluid level
  • volume/mass (quantity)
  • Flow rate
  • Speed of rotation
  • Torque/power
  • Voltage
  • Current
  • CO2 content (of exhaust gases)
  • Pressure/volume in the engine cylinder (”Indicator diagram”)

 

2.2.2. Describe the alarms that are used to indicate malfunctions and faults

 

2.2.3. Use the recorder to obtain a cylinder P/V diagram (indicator card”) with the engine control at a specified power setting

 

2.2.4. Be able to calculate:
  • Power output to shaft;
  • Cylinder mean effective pressure;
  • Power produced in cylinders;
  • Engine’s mechanical efficiency;
  • Specific fuel consumption in [kg/kW hour].

 

2.2.5 Use the thermal data obtained to establish a heat balance

 

2.3. Controls A-III/2
Manage the operation of propulsion plant machinery
2.3.1. State that the machinery units forming the plant can be controlled from:
  • A position adjacent to the units in the engine room (local control);
  • A console in the control room (central control);
  • The bridge (bridge control). 
 
2.3.2. State that operation of the main propulsion unit can be monitored from the instructor room, and faults introduced as required by the training programme  
2.3.3 State that the instructor room can also be used to issue commands for main engine power output to the control centre or to control the power output (bridge control)  
2.3.4. Demonstrate the use of controls from each location  
2.4. Operational procedures A-III/2
Operation, surveillance, performance assessment and maintaining safety of propulsion plant and auxiliary machinery
2.4.1. State that safe practices must always be used when preparing machinery units and associated systems for start up and operation  
2.4.2. Discuss the safe practices to be used for:
  • Opening and closing valves;
  • Starting and running pumps;
  • Operating water-circulation systems;
  • Admitting steam into a steam system;
  • Firing up an oil-fired boiler;
  • Filling oil tanks;
  • Operating centrifuges;
  • Keeping bilges empty;
  • Disposing of oil wastes.
 
2.4.3. State that as far as practicable a check-list should be used for all machinery units and systems when:
  • Preparing for use;
  • Starting up;
  • Entering normal operating mode.
 
2.4.4. Compile a check-list for the preparation, start up and operation of an auxiliary machinery unit or system   
2.4.5. State the special requirements for connecting an electric generator into the electrical system in the terms of:
  • Speed;
  • Voltage;
  • Frequency;
  • Synchronization.
 
2.4.6. Demonstrate the use of the simulated plant, a checklist and the procedures for:
  • The opening and closing of valves in a system;
  • The circulation of seawater;
  • Firing up the steam boiler;
  • Operating a fuel oil centrifuge;
  • Pumping out bilges.
A-III/2
Plan and schedule operation
3. Systems setup  
3.1. General procedures A-III/2
Plan and schedule operation
3.1.1. Observe and apply safe practices in all exercises

 

3.1.2. Use checklists in all exercises

 

3.1.3 Maintain a log of procedures and normal operating conditions for each exercise

 

3.2 Auxiliary units and systems A-III/2
Operation, surveillance, performance assessment and maintaining safety of propulsion plant and auxiliary machinery
3.2.1. Prepare, start up, and put into the normal operating mode:
  • The seawater circulating system;
  • The freshwater circulating system;
  • The compressed air system;
  • The fuel centrifuge.

 

3.3. Diesel generator A-III/2
Manage operation of electrical and electronic control equipment
3.3.1. Prepare, start up, and run the diesel electric generator  
3.3.2. Couple, synchronize and load sheer  
3.4 Steam boiler A-III/2
Operation, surveillance, performance assessment and maintaining safety of propulsion plant and auxiliary machinery
3.4.1. Prepare and raise steam to normal working pressure  
3.4.2. Put the steam boiler on line  
3.5 Steam turbo generator A-III/2
Manage operation of electrical and electronic control equipment
3.5.1. Prepare, start up and run the steam turbo generator  
2.5.2 Connect the turbo generator to the main electrical system, applying control on:
  • Voltage;
  • Frequency;
  • Synchronization.
 
3.5.3 Demonstrate load sharing between diesel and turbo generators  
3.6. Steam cargo turbine A-III/2
Operation, surveillance, performance assessment and maintaining safety of propulsion plant and auxiliary machinery
3.6.1. Prepare, start and run the steam cargo turbine  
3.6.2. Operate the pump to discharge cargo  
3.7 Main-propulsion diesel engine

A-III/2
Operation, surveillance, performance assessment and maintaining safety of propulsion plant and auxiliary machinery

A-III/2
Manage fuel, lubrication and ballast operations

 

3.7.1. Apply preparation procedures, including:
  • Checking the seawater circulation through heat exchangers;
  • Checking the freshwater circulation through engine and heat exchangers;
  • Checking the lubricating-oil circulation through engine and heat exchangers;
  • Confirming that the engine turning gear is disconnected;
  • Checking the fuel oil circulation through heaters to injection pump inlets;
  • Confirming that compressed air is available for starting;
  • Confirming that the engine cylinder lubrication is functioning;
  • Turning the engine with starting air for one revolution with indicator cocks open.
 
3.7.2. Apply preparation procedures, including:
  • Confirming that all indicator cocks are closed;
  • Confirming fuel oil circulation;
  • Confirming of bridge order for engine movement;
  • Application of starting air for 3-4 revolutions;
  • Moving fuel control to required speed position.
 
3.7.3. Establish normal running mode and observe operating conditions, including:
  • Temperatures of lubricating oil and cooling water;
  • Temperatures of exhaust gas from each cylinder;
  • Temperatures of engine exhaust gas at inlet and exit from turbo charger;
  • Engine speed and power output;
  • Maintaining a check on fuel oil supply (service tank);
  • Maintaining a check on fuel viscosity and temperature;
  • Applying changes of engine speed and power as directed by the bridge and note changes in operating conditions.
 
4 .Main engine operation A-III/2
Operation, surveillance, performance assessment and maintaining safety of propulsion plant and auxiliary machinery
4.1. Prepare, start and run the main propulsion unit and associated systems.  
4.2. Set the main propulsion unit controls to maximum full ahead sea power as directed from bridge control.  
4.3. Apply maneuvering procedures and use the controls to obtain required power outputs.  
4.4. Apply and demonstrate the conditions of operation of the main propulsion plant and auxiliary equipments in polar waters and various ice conditions.  
5. Trouble-shooting

A-III/2
Detect and identify the cause of machinery malfunctions and correct faults

A-III/2
Manage trouble shooting, restoration of electrical and electronic control equipment to operating condition

5.1. Locate and apply remedial action for the following malfunctions or faults not limited to:
  • Fuel injection timing (early/late);
  • Worn piston rings in one cylinder;
  • Fire in the scavenge air space;
  • Fouled turbo charger (exhaust side);
  • Fouled turbo charger (air side);
  • Fouled turbo charger air filters;
  • Fouled scavenge air cooler/ports;
  • Blackout;
  • Clogged auxiliary machinery oil filters;
  • Overheated main bearing;
  • Fouled heat exchanger surfaces;
  • Lubricating-oil circulation pump failure;
  • Flooded bilge sump;
  • Bridge control failure.
 
6. Power plant and resource management practices A-III/2
Develop emergency and damage control plans and handle emergency situations

6.1. The candidate must prepare individually a written report in which he outlines a problem or situation that a plant manager might have to deal with under normal circumstances.

6.2. This report helps the assessor to evaluate the candidate’s management skills and ability to manage, organize both a technical situations and manpower.  This must include appropriate recommendations and solutions to the ship owners or other authorities.

 

6.3. Among the items to be outlined in the report are costs, fuel consumption, cause of the problem or situation and actions to resolve the problem or situation.

6.4. This written report must include the power plant technical management and may be consisted of one of the following criteria, but not limited to:

  • Piston Ring Wear on engine efficiency;
  • Exhaust Gas Boiler-Turbo Alternator on Propulsion Plant efficiency;
  • Hull Fouling on engine performance and fuel consumption;
  • Scavenge Air Port Fouling;
  • Cross head lubrication on engine performance;
  • Blow by on main engine;
  • Late and early injection timing;
  • Effect of engine room ventilation on propulsion engines;
  • Best fuel consumption;
  • Effect of hull fouling on fuel economy;
  • Effect of wear on the fuel injection equipment;
  • Cylinder peak pressures;
  • Fuel economy with different fuels (calorific value);
  • Air cooler fouling;
  • Turbocharger fouling;
  • Use of P, I and D settings on a specific PID controller;
  • Indicator cards;
  • Effect of different fuel viscosities on engine performance;
  • Effect of propeller size on plant efficiency;
  • Effect of water depth on plant efficiency;
  • Effect of static converter supply on fuel economy;
  • Resources management;
  • Any subject concerns power operation and maintenance management;
  • Any other related subject approved by the examiner
 

5.3. Course Expectation

  1. Upon completion this course, the participants will be able to demonstrate sound management practices.
  2. At the end of this course, the participants will understand how to manage and organize operation of a power plant as implemented onboard a vessel.
  3. The Scenario may include various vessel operations such as: the vessel alongside under cargo operation, the vessel is berthing, leaving the dock or at sea
  4. Good marine engineering practises will be emphasised throughout the course, careful monitoring and operation of the vessels’ machinery will be stressed. Scenarios used in training runs will be as realistic as possible.

5.4. Simulator Evaluation Criteria

  1. Simulator Familiarization and course introduction
    1. Introduction to the configuration and basic functions of the simulator. Each separate system should have the capacity to stand-alone for segregated studies.
  2. Systems Setup
    1. Setup procedure under normal and abnormal conditions, align, start and run all auxiliary and ancillary systems, start and run the main engine.
  3. Main engine operation
    1. Prepare, start and run the main propulsion unit and associated systems
    2. Set the main propulsion unit controls to maximum full ahead sea power as directed from bridge control, or
    3. Apply maneuvering procedures and use the controls to obtain required power outputs
  4. Troubleshooting
    1. The student will analyze symptoms and diagnose malfunctions, which could lead to major breakdown and damage to vessel’s machinery.
  5. Power plant and resources management practices
    1. Each candidate must prepare a written report in which he will outline a problem or a situation that a plant manager might have to deal with under normal circumstances.
    2. This report helps the assessor to evaluate the candidate’s management skills and ability to manage and organize any technical situations.
    3. The report should include appropriate recommendations and solutions to the vessel’s owners or other authorities.
    4. This report must be submitted to the assessor prior the completion of  the training
    5. This report account for 50% of the final mark and is to be combined with the assessment resulted from the developed scenarios.
    6. It should be understand that a failure in any of these 2 assessments criteria will result in a course’s failure.

5.5. Process Flowchart

PPS2 Flowchart

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