Specialized Chemical Tanker Safety Training

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6.1 General

  1. This chapter describes a course providing specialized Chemical Tanker safety training, designed to fulfil the requirements of Section A-V/1 of the STCW Code.
  2. The completion of the course is necessary to obtain the Specialized Chemical Tanker Training endorsement on a deck or engineer officer certificate. Refer to Section 228 of the Marine Personnel Regulations for details regarding the requirements of this endorsement and training according to personnel responsibilities and position on board.
  3. Even though Inert Gas Systems are often found on Chemical tankers, this course does not contain a specific section on such systems. The topics are embedded in the courseware and cover the necessary components required by STCW; they are broadly written so that the instructors have the freedom to adapt as the Chemical industry changes.

6.2 Objectives

  1. Provide the training required under Section 166 of the Marine Personnel Regulations in order to obtain a Specialized Oil Tanker Training endorsement.
  2. Enable the participants to take immediate responsibility for the loading, discharging or transfer of cargo and the operation of cargo equipment.

6.3 Duration

39 hours

6.4 Prerequisites

  1. MED with respect to STCW basic safety
  2. MED in advanced fire fighting
  3. Successful completion of an approved training course in Oil and Chemical tanker familiarization or holder of an Oil and Chemical Tanker Familiarization certificate or Endorsement

6.5 Specific instructor qualifications

The main course instructor must hold a Master Mariner or a First-class engineer certificate with a valid Specialized Chemical Tanker Training endorsement, but AMSP may consider lower certificates in special circumstances for instructors with additional experience on oil tankers. If the course is under the supervision of more than one instructor, the assistant instructors must hold qualifications related to the marine industry or have related skills and be approved in accordance with the Quality Management Manual – Marine Personnel Standards and Pilotage, referred to in Chapter 2.

6.6 Equipment requirements

  1. Personnel safety equipment, including breathing apparatus;
  2. Tank evacuation equipment;
  3. Portable oxygen meter and oxygen analyser;
  4. Portable combustible-gas indicator;
  5. Portable interferometer;
  6. Portable gas detector and sample detector tubes for vapours and gasses;
  7. Resuscitator;
  8. IMO medical first aid guide for accidents involving dangerous goods;
  9. ISM Code;
  10. IMO publication “Guidelines for the Development of Shipboard Emergency Response Plans”;
  11. Chemical Tanker Safety Guide and ISGOTT;
  12. Sample health data and cargo data sheets, emergency plans and casualty reports;
  13. Audio-visual presentation equipment.

6.7 Outline

Subject Area Hours
  Lecture Practical
1.0 The Chemical Tanker
1.1 Summarize the development of the chemical tanker trade
1.2 Describe types of cargoes shipped in chemical tankers
1.3 Describe types of chemical tankers
2  
2.0 Rules and regulations
2.1 Discuss international and national codes and regulations
2.2 Identify the general content of MARPOL 73/78 Annex II
2.3 Describe the Bulk Chemical Codes
4  
3.0 Ship Design and Cargo Containment
3.1 Establish elements of design
3.2 Describe means of cargo segregation and containment
3.3 Provide details of tank materials and coatings
4  
4.0 Chemistry of Cargo and Applied Science
4.1 Outline physical and chemical properties of cargoes
4.2 Extract cargo information from chemical data resources
4.3 Explain the principle of the controlled tank atmosphere
4  
5.0 Cargo handling Systems
5.1 Describe pipeline, pumping and discharge arrangements
5.2 Explain arrangements for efficient stripping
5.3 Describe cargo heating systems
5.4 Describe venting arrangements
5.5 Outline instrumentation requirements
4  
6.0 Chemical Tanker Operations
6.1 Plan for safe carriage and correct handling of cargo
6.2 Describe procedures for loading
6.3 Measure and calculate cargo quantities
6.4 Care for cargo during transit
6.5 Preplan for discharge
6.6 Discharge cargo, strip and prewash
6.7 Conduct ballast and de-ballast operations
6.8 Conduct tank cleaning procedures and disposal of residues
6.9 Gas-free and ventilate cargo tanks
6.10 Test for cleanliness and product purity
7  
7.0 Pollution Prevention
7.1 Discuss pollution of the marine environment from chemical ships
7.2 Summarize regulatory requirements for pollution prevention
7.3 Describe measures of pollution control
3  
8.0 Health and safety
8.1 Describe health hazards associated with chemical cargoes
8.2 Identify personal protection and safety equipment
8.3 Describe the function and use of gas indicators
8.4 Implement control measures for enclosed space safety
8.5 Review fire-fighting principles
4 4
9.0 Cargo and Emergency management
9.1 Discuss the requirements of an emergency organization
9.2 Describe ship and shore emergency alarms
9.3 Summarize the International Safety Management System
9.4 Develop criteria for different types of emergency
3  
  35 hours 4 hours
Total 39 hours

6.8 Syllabus

Topics and Learning Objectives

1. The Chemical Tanker

1.1 Summarize the development of the chemical tanker trade
1.1.1 Outline the growth of the chemical trade from the mid-1940’s
1.1.2 Describe the evolution of the transportation of chemicals in ships
1.1.3 Explain the requirement for standardized international regulations

1.2 Describe types of cargoes shipped in chemical tankers
1.2.1 Differentiate hazardous goods in package form and liquid bulk chemicals
1.2.2 Identify types of chemical tanker for the carriage of liquid bulk chemical cargoes
1.2.3 Identify a Certificate of Fitness stating what chemicals can be carried for that particular vessel
1.2.4 Identify the four main groups of chemical cargoes:
1.2.4.1 Petrochemicals
1.2.4.2 Alcohols and carbohydrates
1.2.4.3 Vegetable and animal oils and fats
1.2.4.4 Acids and inorganic chemicals
1.2.5 Differentiate organic and inorganic chemicals and bases
1.2.6 List examples of industrial products derived from the four main groups of chemical cargoes
1.2.7 Identify additional cargoes carried on chemical tankers unrelated to chemicals

1.3 Describe types of chemical tankers
1.3.1 Identify:
1.3.1.1 Parcel/chemical tanker
1.3.1.2 Product/chemical tanker
1.3.1.3 Specialized chemical tanker
1.3.2 Explain the term parcel tanker
1.3.3 Explain the difference between product tankers carrying refined product and chemical tankers carrying chemicals
1.3.4 Name the division of chemical tankers in categories, Ship Types 1, 2 and 3
1.3.5 Describe a modern chemical tanker general arrangement
1.3.6 Identify general tank arrangements

2. Rules and regulations

2.1 Discuss international and national codes and regulations
2.1.1 List the most important rules affecting chemical tankers as:
2.1.1.1 International conventions
2.1.1.2 National regulations
2.1.1.3 Classification society rules
2.1.2 Identify the IMO as the international forum for shipping matters
2.1.3 Identify the main IMO conventions affecting tankers
2.1.3.1 Define SOLAS 1974 as the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974
2.1.3.2 Define MARPOL 73/78 as the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973/1978
2.1.3.3 Define STCW 1995 as the International Convention for Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping, 1995
2.1.4 Explain how amendments affect the IMO conventions
2.1.5 Explain how the conventions are incorporated in national legislation
2.1.6 Differentiate MARPOL 73/78 Annex I and Annex II
2.1.7 Link the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate to SOLAS 1974
2.1.8 Link the Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate to SOLAS 1974
2.1.9 Link the International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate to MARPOL 73/78
2.1.10 Link the International Pollution Prevention Certificate for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk to MARPOL 73/78
2.1.11 Link the requirements of the Bulk Chemical Codes to the International Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk
2.1.12 Explain the use of supplements to the certificates
2.1.13 Explain the difference between International Pollution Prevention Certificate for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk and the International Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk
2.1.14 State the ISM Code is the International Safety Management Code
2.1.15 State a Safety Management System must be in place as required by the ISM Code
2.1.16 Identify the agencies responsible for the issue of certificates
2.1.16.1 Flag State
2.1.16.2 Delegated agencies
2.1.17 Identify regulations under the CSA affecting chemical tankers

2.2 Identify the general content of MARPOL 73/78 Annex II
2.2.1 Define ‘chemical tanker’ from MARPOL Annex II
2.2.2 Determine the application of MARPOL 73/78 Annex II to chemical and oil tankers
2.2.3 Define ‘noxious liquid substance’ (NLS)
2.2.4 Categorize noxious liquid substances (NLS) according to MARPOL 73/78 Annex II
2.2.5 Identify level of risk for each category
2.2.6 Outline how the discharge of NLS is controlled according to pollution category and location
2.2.7 Outline the procedure for the provisional assessment of an uncategorized liquid substance
2.2.8 Identify carriage requirements of oil-like substances from 1 January 2007
2.2.9 Identify carriage requirements of vegetable oils from 1 January 2007
2.2.10 Describe a Procedures and Arrangements Manual (P&A Manual)
2.2.10.1 State which ships must carry a P&A Manual
2.2.10.2 Describe the arrangements of the P&A manual
2.2.10.3 State the P&A Manual is approved by the Administration only for that ship
2.2.10.4 Explain how the procedures in the P&A Manual ensure compliance with Annex II
2.2.10.5 Link the information provided in the P&A Manual to the Certificate of Fitness
2.2.10.6 Explain the use of the Flow Diagrams of addendum A of Appendix 4
2.2.11 Identify and describe the Cargo Record Book (CRB)
2.2.11.1 Identify, from MARPOL 73/78 Annex II, the requirements for a CRB
2.2.11.2 Explain what entries must be made in the CRB
2.2.11.3 Illustrate correct and complete entries in the CRB
2.2.11.4 Explain the legal implications of the CRB

2.3 Describe the Bulk Chemical Codes
2.3.1 Define IBC Code and BCH Code
2.3.2 State the dates of compliance for the Codes
2.3.3 Link the Codes to SOLAS 74 and MARPOL 73/78
2.3.4 Summarize the content of the Codes
2.3.5 Differentiate Chapter IV and Chapter VII of the BCH Code
2.3.6 Differentiate Chapter 17 and Chapter 18 of the IBC Code
2.3.7 Explain the Pollution Category of NLS in the Codes
2.3.8 Identify the Index of Products Carried in Bulk
2.3.9 Identify specific and operational requirements listed in the tables of Chapter 17 of the IBC Code

3. Ship Design and Cargo Containment

3.1 Establish elements of design
3.1.1 Identify general tank and ship arrangements
3.1.2 State the Codes that primarily deal with ship design and equipment
3.1.3 Identify ship types from the Bulk Chemical Codes
3.1.4 Explain the reason for ship types as defined in the Codes
3.1.5 Identify the hierarchy of ship types from 3 through 1 in relation to dangerous and noxious properties of cargoes to be carried
3.1.6 Explain how the ship type prescribes the survival capability
3.1.7 Explain assumed damage in relation to the ship types
3.1.8 Identify the inboard location of cargo tanks for each ship type
3.1.9 Describe other safety aspects of design in relation to:
3.1.9.1 Accommodation, service and machinery spaces and control rooms
3.1.9.2 Cargo and/or ballast pump-rooms
3.1.9.3 Ventilation of pump-rooms and/or similar spaces
3.1.9.4 Location of cargo tank vents
3.1.9.5 Electrical installations
3.1.10 Describe how tank design assists with:
3.1.10.1 Decreased residues
3.1.10.2 Increased cargo outturn
3.1.10.3 Prevention of cargo contamination

3.2 Describe means of cargo segregation and containment
3.2.1 Identify references from the Codes dealing with segregation and containment
3.2.2 Define:
3.2.2.1 Independent tank
3.2.2.2 Integral tank
3.2.2.3 Gravity tank
3.2.2.4 Pressure tank
3.2.3 Describe the importance of segregation and containment of cargoes and spaces from:
3.2.3.1 Accommodation, service and machinery spaces
3.2.3.2 Drinking water and stores for human consumption
3.2.4 Explain how segregation is achieved using:
3.2.4.1 Cofferdams
3.2.4.2 Void spaces
3.2.4.3 Cargo pump-rooms
3.2.4.4 Pump-rooms
3.2.4.5 Empty tanks
3.2.4.6 Oil fuel tanks
3.2.4.7 Other similar spaces

3.3 Provide details of tank materials and coatings
3.3.1 Explain why coatings, fixtures and fittings must be compatible with cargoes to be carried
3.3.2 Explain the reasons for the use of stainless steel and coatings in cargo tanks
3.3.3 Explain the use of stainless steel for cargo piping, valves and pumps
3.3.4 Differentiate ‘clad’ and ‘solid’ stainless steel
3.3.5 Show tank layouts using stainless steel and coatings
3.3.6 Describe the limitations and possibilities of specialized tank coatings
3.3.6.1 Zinc silicate
3.3.6.2 Epoxy
3.3.6.3 Phenolics
3.3.6.4 Polyurethane
3.3.7 Differentiate organic and inorganic coatings
3.3.8 Explain the use of rubber linings for highly corrosive cargoes
3.3.9 Explain the resistance of coatings to groups of chemicals
3.3.9.1 Identify the manufacturers ‘coating resistance list’
3.3.10 Describe in general terms maintenance of coatings
3.3.11 Explain physical and chemical absorption of coatings and subsequent cargo contamination

4. Chemistry of Cargo and Applied Science

4.1 Outline physical and chemical properties of cargoes
4.1.1 Explain the following terms:
4.1.1.1 States of aggregation
4.1.1.2 Melting point
4.1.1.3 Boiling point
4.1.1.4 Partial pressure
4.1.1.5 Vapour pressure
4.1.1.6 Volatility
4.1.1.7 Liquid density, specific gravity, litre weight
4.1.1.8 Vapour density
4.1.1.9 Viscosity, surface tension, adhesion, cohesion
4.1.1.10 Solubility, miscibility
4.1.1.11 Diffusion
4.1.2 Introduce Cargo Data Sheets
4.1.3 Explain the physical data of liquid chemicals given in Cargo Data Sheets
4.1.4 Differentiate organic and inorganic chemistry
4.1.5 Explain:
4.1.5.1 The structure of atoms
4.1.5.2 Atomic weight
4.1.5.3 Atomic number
4.1.5.4 The structure of the Periodic Table
4.1.6 Explain the structure of:
4.1.6.1 A saturated hydrocarbon molecule
4.1.6.2 An unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule
4.1.6.3 An aromatic hydrocarbon molecule
4.1.6.4 A halogenated hydrocarbon molecule
4.1.6.5 An alcohol molecule
4.1.7 Explain:
4.1.7.1 Acid
4.1.7.2 Base
4.1.7.3 PH value
4.1.7.4 Neutralization reaction
4.1.8 Explain the following reactions:
4.1.8.1 Chemical reaction
4.1.8.2 Exothermic
4.1.8.3 Endothermic
4.1.8.4 Polymerization
4.1.8.5 Decomposition
4.1.9 Explain:
4.1.9.1 Catalyst
4.1.9.2 Inhibitor
4.1.10 Name cargoes which:
4.1.10.1 Self-react
4.1.10.2 Polymerize
4.1.10.3 Require an inhibitor
4.1.10.4 React with air
4.1.10.5 React with water
4.1.10.6 React between cargoes
4.1.11 Identify reactions of cargoes with tank coatings and tank materials

4.2 Extract cargo information from chemical data resources
4.2.1 Identify CFR46-150 Cargo Compatibility Charts or other Cargo Compatibility Charts
4.2.2 Describe the use of the Index of Products Carried in Bulk
4.2.3 Explain the importance of correct technical names and synonyms
4.2.4 Explain the term cargo compatibility
4.2.5 Explain the grouping of cargoes using Cargo Compatibility Charts
4.2.6 Use the Charts to identify cargoes which may be incompatible

4.3 Explain the principle of the controlled tank atmosphere
4.3.1 Define:
4.3.1.1 Flashpoint
4.3.1.2 Auto-ignition temperature
4.3.2 Identify flash point of a liquid chemical from data sheets
4.3.3 Describe flammable range, lower flammable limit (LFL) and upper flammable limit (UFL)
4.3.4 Identify a flammability composition diagram
4.3.5 Name the critical components of the flammability diagram
4.3.6 Describe, with the aid of a flammability diagram, the effects of:
4.3.6.1 gas freeing
4.3.6.2 purging
4.3.6.3 dilution with air
4.3.6.4 critical dilution with air
4.3.6.5 dilution with inert gas
4.3.7 Explain flammable range in relation to different chemicals
4.3.8 Differentiate inert and non-inert tank atmosphere
4.3.9 Identify regulations for inert gas systems on chemical tankers
4.3.9.1 Identify IMO Regulations for Inert Gas Systems on Chemical Tankers
4.3.9.1.1 Identify components of IG generator systems contained in the Annex
4.3.9.1.2 Identify requirements for detailed instruction manuals
4.3.9.2 Identify other IMO Resolutions affecting Chemical Tankers
4.3.10 Define ‘inert gas’
4.3.11 Explain how inert gas is used in cargo tanks
4.3.11.1 Protection against polymerization, oxidation and humidity
4.3.11.2 Replace air to prevent fire and explosion
4.3.12 Describe methods of production and supply of inert gas
4.3.13 Explain why nitrogen is used instead of inert gas

5. Cargo handling Systems

5.1 Describe pipeline, pumping and discharge arrangements
5.1.1 Describe general cargo piping arrangements on chemical tankers
5.1.2 Identify materials of construction
5.1.3 Identify and describe commonly used types of valve
5.1.3.1 Ball valves
5.1.3.2 Membrane valves
5.1.3.3 Gate valves
5.1.3.4 Butterfly valves
5.1.4 Describe cargo segregation in terms of:
5.1.4.1 Segregation by two valves
5.1.4.2 Spool-pieces
5.1.5 Discuss the care, handling and use of cargo hoses:
5.1.5.1 Compatibility and suitability with chemical cargoes
5.1.5.2 Cargo temperature limitations
5.1.5.3 Inspection and testing procedures
5.1.5.4 Certification of hoses
5.1.5.5 Maintenance and correct handling
5.1.6 Describe the construction and operation of pumps found on chemical tankers:
5.1.6.1 Centrifugal
5.1.6.2 Piston
5.1.6.3 Screw
5.1.6.4 Eductors
5.1.7 Explain basic pumping concepts
5.1.8 Describe deepwell pumps and submerged pumps
5.1.9 Discuss the benefits of the deepwell and submerged pump
5.1.10 Discuss the limitations of deepwell and submerged pumps
5.1.11 Explain the pump graph with regard to:
5.1.11.1 Performance curve
5.1.11.2 Efficiency
5.1.11.3 Power consumption
5.1.11.4 NPSH
5.1.12 Explain the terms:
5.1.12.1 Total head
5.1.12.2 Design point
5.1.12.3 NPSH
5.1.12.4 Cavitation
5.1.13 Explain the characteristics and dangers of running two or more pumps in parallel
5.1.14 Explain how discharge rate is affected by:
5.1.14.1 Pressure in shore-tank
5.1.14.2 Static back-pressure
5.1.14.3 Dynamic back-pressure
5.1.15 Describe stripping using an eductor
5.1.16 Describe stripping arrangements using a deepwell pump

5.2 Explain arrangements for efficient stripping
5.2.1 Use the Code and identify examples of:
5.2.1.1 Pollution Category X substances
5.2.1.2 Pollution Category Y substances
5.2.1.3 Pollution Category Z substances
5.2.1.4 Pollution Category OS substances
5.2.2 Describe the importance of efficient stripping with regard to the Categories
5.2.3 Describe the stripping test and efficiency parameters
5.2.4 Explain effects of viscosity and melting point during stripping
5.2.5 Explain efficient stripping with regard to:
5.2.5.1 Using compressed gas
5.2.5.2 Not using compressed gas
5.2.6 Use MARPOL 73/78 Regulation 12 to discuss the maximum quantities of residues permitted

5.3 Describe cargo heating systems
5.3.1 Explain the importance of heating for some cargoes
5.3.2 Describe different heating medium
5.3.3 Describe heating systems using:
5.3.3.1 Heating coils
5.3.3.2 Deck mounted heat exchanger
5.3.4 Explain the risks associated with overheating cargo
5.3.5 Explain the risks and dangers associated with poor maintenance of heating systems
5.3.6 Identify problems associated with heated cargoes adjacent to polymerizable or inhibited cargoes
5.3.7 Identify dangers associated with heated cargoes adjacent to highly volatile cargoes

5.4 Describe venting arrangements
5.4.1 Use the IBC Code to define open and controlled ventilation systems
5.4.2 Discuss load rates and ventilation capacity
5.4.3 Explain the design of safe ventilation to minimize cargo vapours in areas open to access by personnel
5.4.4 Explain the limitations and risks of open-venting
5.4.5 Explain when controlled venting is required
5.4.6 Describe the reason for and use of the vapour return
5.4.7 Describe safety aspects of vent design, including:
5.4.7.1 Flame arrestors
5.4.7.2 Flame screens
5.4.7.3 High-velocity vents
5.4.8 Explain the mode of operation and precautions of:
5.4.8.1 High-velocity valve
5.4.8.2 Flame arrestor
5.4.9 Explain the purpose and operation of a pressure/vacuum valve (P/V’s)
5.4.10 Discuss general precautions and maintenance of P/V’s

5.5 Outline instrumentation requirements
5.5.1 Explain the terms intrinsically safe, flameproof and increased safety equipment
5.5.2 Describe the principles of operation and types of gauging devices for cargo tanks
5.5.3 Explain the terms:
5.5.3.1 Open gauging
5.5.3.2 Restricted gauging
5.5.3.3 Closed gauging
5.5.4 Describe the limitations of open and restricted gauging with regard to open venting
5.5.5 Explain the use and purpose of high-alarm systems for cargoes
5.5.6 Explain the tank overflow control system
5.5.7 Describe the test instruments necessary for toxic and flammable cargoes
5.5.8 Discuss fixed and portable vapour-detection instruments

6. Chemical Tanker Operations

6.1 Plan for safe carriage and correct handling of cargo
6.1.1 Identify the role and responsibilities of the cargo planner
6.1.2 Describe the key elements of cargo planning, including:
6.1.2.1 Cargo requirements
6.1.2.2 Stowage and segregation
6.1.2.3 Cargo compatibility and reactivity
6.1.2.4 Tank coatings
6.1.2.5 Tank preparation, cleanliness and product purity
6.1.2.6 Trading pattern and load and discharge rotation
6.1.2.7 Nitrogen supply
6.1.2.8 Slop disposal
6.1.3 Identify minimum requirements from Chapter 17 of the Code
6.1.4 Use Chemical data Sheets and CFR46-150 to identify physical and chemical properties of some sample cargoes
6.1.5 Identify correct technical name and methods to verify the above
6.1.6 Use a cargo compatibility chart to determine suitability of cargoes adjacent to each other
6.1.7 Use a Tank Lining Guide to ascertain suitability of cargo coatings for different cargoes
6.1.8 Discuss the importance of tank cleanliness for the loading of cargoes
6.1.9 Explain the requirements of heating, padding and blanketing
6.1.10 Explain the reasons for not stowing toxic cargoes next to edible cargoes
6.1.11 Identify additional stowage requirements for toxic products
6.1.12 Identify requirements for inhibited cargoes

6.2 Describe procedures for loading
6.2.1 Identify the cargo information and shipping documents required for safe loading of cargoes
6.2.2 Explain the important operational requirements from the Codes
6.2.3 Describe the stowage plan and its role in preplanning
6.2.4 Describe general tanker precautions to be taken prior to loading
6.2.5 Explain lining up for loading
6.2.6 Describe different methods of loading and precautions to be taken:
6.2.6.1 Over the top
6.2.6.2 Through the drop line
6.2.6.3 Through the deepwell pump and/or drop line
6.2.6.4 Through the pump-room
6.2.7 Explain:
6.2.7.1 Inerting
6.2.7.2 Padding
6.2.7.3 Drying
6.2.8 Explain the requirements for line and cargo sampling
6.2.9 Describe the load sequence
6.2.10 Describe procedures to take on completion of loading
6.2.11 List general precautions during lightering operations

6.3 Measure and calculate cargo quantities
6.3.1 Explain why cargo quantities are limited for Type 1 and Type 2 tankers
6.3.2 Predict expansion of cargo due to high-temperatures
6.3.3 Identify from the Code special requirements for maximum tank filling limits
6.3.4 Define:
6.3.4.1 Ullage
6.3.4.2 Innage
6.3.4.3 Sounding
6.3.5 Identify units of measurement used in cargo calculations
6.3.6 Use ullage tables to calculate tank quantities, allow for corrections and correct for temperature
6.3.7 Show a cargo report

6.4 Care for cargo during transit
6.4.1 Explain precautions to take to avoid cargo loss during transit
6.4.2 Explain how to maintain cargo temperature according to shipper’s instructions
6.4.3 Explain cargo care and safety during transit
6.4.4 Outline the requirements for care and transportation of vegetable and animal oils and fats
6.4.5 Identify requirements for inhibitors and where this information is obtained
6.4.6 Identify the Certificate of Inhibition

6.5 Preplan for discharge
6.5.1 Identify the cargo information and shipping documents required for safe discharge of cargoes
6.5.2 Identify the operational tests required prior to arrival at the disport
6.5.3 Identify inerting and drying requirements, if applicable
6.5.4 Explain the requirements for line and cargo sampling
6.5.5 Describe general tanker precautions to be taken prior to discharging
6.5.6 Identify trim requirements for efficient stripping
6.5.7 Explain techniques and precautions for discharge of high vapour pressure cargoes

6.6 Discharge cargo, strip and prewash
6.6.1 Identify maximum allowed stripping quantity left after discharge for Categories X, Y and Z substances
6.6.2 Discuss measures of control for Category X substances
6.6.2.1 Required washing on completion of discharge
6.6.2.2 Exemptions from washing requirements
6.6.2.3 Reception facilities and concentration of substance in the effluent discharge to shore
6.6.2.4 Action to take when unable to measure concentration of residues after discharge
6.6.2.5 Limitations on subsequent discharge of wash water or ballast into the sea
6.6.3 Discuss measures of control for Categories Y and Z substances
6.6.3.1 Conditions for pre-wash on completion of discharge
6.6.3.2 Exemptions from washing requirements
6.6.3.3 Procedures for solidifying and non-solidifying substances
6.6.3.4 Procedures for high-viscosity and low-viscosity substances
6.6.3.5 Operational requirements for ballasting and de-ballasting
6.6.3.6 Prohibition of discharges in the Antarctic Area
6.6.4 Discuss slop tank discharge restrictions and requirements
6.6.5 Describe procedures to take on completion of discharge
6.6.6 Make entries in the Cargo Record Book

6.7 Conduct ballast and de-ballast operations
6.7.1 Identify an independent ballast pipeline and pumping arrangement
6.7.2 Comply with the requirements of the P&A Manual
6.7.3 Describe a ballast/de-ballast sequence identifying:
6.7.3.1 General stability and trim requirements
6.7.3.2 Stability problems with different ballast tank configurations
6.7.3.3 Ballasting during cargo operations using segregated ballast tanks (SBT)
6.7.3.4 Precautions to take before and during ballasting of cargo tanks
6.7.3.5 Free surface effect

6.8 Conduct tank cleaning procedures and disposal of residues
6.8.1 List the reasons for tank cleaning
6.8.2 Comply with the requirements of the P&A Manual
6.8.3 Describe the use of tank cleaning guides such as Verwey’s Tank Cleaning Guide
6.8.4 Describe the water washing process and components of the cleaning system
6.8.5 Explain the use of cleaning agents or additives during tank cleaning
6.8.6 Explain the use of other liquids for water reactive residues
6.8.7 Consult resistance lists for tank coatings
6.8.8 Use a Tank Cleaning Guide and provide an example for cleaning a cargo tank
6.8.9 Identify and describe phases of tank cleaning
6.8.9.1 Prewash
6.8.9.2 Main wash
6.8.9.3 Fresh water rinse
6.8.9.4 Gas-freeing and/or ventilation
6.8.9.5 Drying
6.8.9.6 Inspection/testing
6.8.10 Explain the use of a Cleaning and Disposal Procedure (CDP) flow diagram

6.9 Gas-free and ventilate cargo tanks
6.9.1 Explain the purpose of gas-freeing
6.9.2 Describe the equipment used for gas-freeing
6.9.3 Explain different ventilation methods with regard to:
6.9.3.1 Type of equipment
6.9.3.2 Weight of cargo vapours
6.9.3.3 Shape of the tank
6.9.4 Describe safety precautions to take during gas freeing
6.9.5 Describe the equipment used for checking for a gas-free tank
6.9.6 Describe, with the aid of a flammability diagram, a gas-freeing operation by ventilation with air of a tank containing a mixture of:
6.9.6.1 Cargo vapour and air
6.9.6.2 Cargo vapour and inert gas
6.9.7 Explain when a tank is considered to be gas-free

6.10 Test for cleanliness and product purity
6.10.1 Explain the importance of tank cleanliness
6.10.2 Describe the standards expected for tank cleanliness
6.10.3 Discuss the role of the independent surveyor and the issue of the ‘Clean Certificate’
6.10.4 Demonstrate a test for contamination by hydrocarbons
6.10.5 Demonstrate a test for contamination by chloride
6.10.6 Describe the permanganate time test
6.10.7 Demonstrate an ‘acid wash’ test
6.10.8 Demonstrate the use of a colour scale

7. Pollution Prevention

7.1 Discuss pollution of the marine environment from chemical ships
7.1.1 Identify major worldwide pollution incidents
7.1.2 Describe how pollution can occur from chemical tankers:
7.1.2.1 In port
7.1.2.2 At sea
7.1.3 Describe damage to the marine environment from chemical tankers
7.1.4 State the penalties for pollution of Canadian waters

7.2 Summarize regulatory requirements for pollution prevention
7.2.1 Identify ships to which MARPOL 73/78 Annex II (as amended) applies
7.2.2 Identify the categorization of chemicals and the guidelines for categorization
7.2.3 Explain, briefly, how chemicals are categorized
7.2.4 Define GESAMP
7.2.5 Explain the GESAMP hazard profiles with regard to ship types
7.2.6 Explain the practical execution of Annex II of MARPOL 73/78 based on:
7.2.6.1 Efficient stripping
7.2.6.2 Mandatory pre-wash
7.2.6.3 Control in port
7.2.7 Explain the discharge into the sea of NLS based on:
7.2.7.1 Category of NLS
7.2.7.2 Control of discharges
7.2.8 Identify the stripping test to assess residue quantities left in tanks
7.2.9 Explain the main purpose of the P&A manual with regard to pollution
7.2.10 Identify CSA ‘Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and for Dangerous Chemicals’
7.2.10.1 Identify what sections apply to chemical tankers
7.2.10.2 Explain the provisions, prohibition and exceptions for discharge in waters under Canadian jurisdiction
7.2.10.3 Identify the main requirements dealing with Transfer Operations
7.2.11 Explain when the following certificates are issued:
7.2.11.1 Canadian Noxious Liquid Substances Certificate
7.2.11.2 International Pollution Prevention Certificate for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances in bulk
7.2.11.3 Canadian Certificate of Fitness for the carriage of Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk
7.2.11.4 International Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk
7.2.11.5 Certificate of Compliance
7.2.12 Identify the requirements for a shipboard marine pollution emergency plan for noxious liquid substances in MARPOL 73/78 Annex II (SMPEP)

7.3 Describe measures of pollution control
7.3.1 Summarize the content of a SMPEP
7.3.2 Discuss the importance of timely response to marine spills
7.3.3 Evaluate the effects of timely and delayed response to a marine spill
7.3.4 List pollution prevention equipment required on board
7.3.5 Describe methods of containment using ship pollution equipment
7.3.6 Describe pollution prevention equipment limitations
7.3.7 Discuss the use of chemical dispersants and detergents
7.3.8 Identify parties responsible for:
7.3.8.1 Clean up
7.3.8.2 Resources available
7.3.8.3 Assistance available
7.3.8.4 Supply of pollution prevention equipment
7.3.8.5 Disposal
7.3.8.6 Costs for a marine spill
7.3.9 List equipment available from a shore based pollution response centre
7.3.10 Identify resources for response to chemical pollutions

8. Health and Safety

8.1 Describe health hazards associated with chemical cargoes
8.1.1 Define ‘health hazard’ as provided in the Code
8.1.2 Identify the IMO Medical First Aid Guide for Accidents Involving Dangerous Goods (MFAG)
8.1.3 Identify health hazards posed by cargoes:
8.1.3.1 Toxicity
8.1.3.2 Asphyxia
8.1.3.3 Corrosivity
8.1.4 Explain how chemicals may enter and affect the human body
8.1.5 Explain the synergistic effect of some chemicals
8.1.6 Describe toxic effects from:
8.1.6.1 Vapours from fires of certain chemicals
8.1.6.2 Inhibitors
8.1.6.3 Inert gas
8.1.7 Describe the general symptoms of poisoning
8.1.8 Explain the general symptoms of asphyxia
8.1.9 Identify ‘health data’ from Cargo Data Sheets or CFR 46-150
8.1.10 Identify health hazard criteria from the Code
8.1.11 Show and explain a Material Safety Data Sheet for sample products
8.1.12 Differentiate MSDS and Cargo Hazard Sheets
8.1.13 Identify ‘health data’ from MSDS
8.1.14 Extract first-aid procedures from Cargo Data Sheets
8.1.15 Identify medical first-aid equipment provided onboard including oxygen resuscitation equipment and antidotes for products carried
8.1.16 Explain when professional medical treatment and advice should be sought
8.1.17 Extract information from the MFAG for sample products

8.2 Identify personal protection and safety equipment
8.2.1 Identify personnel protection requirements from the Code
8.2.2 List typical protective equipment required onboard
8.2.3 Identify how used and contaminated equipment is segregated from accommodation spaces
8.2.4 List additional safety equipment required for ships carrying toxic products and certain cargoes
8.2.5 Differentiate total protection and partial protection
8.2.6 Demonstrate the use of personal safety and protective equipment

8.3 Describe the function and use of gas indicators
8.3.1 Describe the operating principle of:
8.3.1.1 A catalytic-filament combustible-gas indicator
8.3.1.2 A non-catalytic heated-filament gas indicator
8.3.1.3 A refractive index meter
8.3.1.4 Chemical indicator tubes
8.3.1.5 An oxygen meter with paramagnetic sensors
8.3.1.6 An oxygen analyzer with electrolytic sensor
8.3.1.7 An oxygen analyzer with selective chemical absorption liquid
8.3.2 Carry-out instrument-check procedures and gas measurements
8.3.3 Determine the suitability of each gas indicator
8.3.4 Explain the role of the marine chemist
8.3.5 Identify and describe the Gas Free Certificate
8.3.6 Describe the content, details and use of work permits
8.3.7 Explain the terms intrinsically safe, flameproof and increased safety equipment

8.4 Implement control measures for enclosed space safety
8.4.1 Define the enclosed space
8.4.2 Identify enclosed spaces
8.4.3 Identify potential hazards
8.4.4 Discuss role and duties of a ‘responsible person’
8.4.5 Review the requirements of the SMS
8.4.6 Discuss Permit to Work Systems
8.4.7 Discuss Work Planning Meetings
8.4.8 Analyze check lists by identifying important elements
8.4.9 Assess hazards prior to entry
8.4.10 Recommend procedures and practices for pump-room safety
8.4.11 Recommend procedures and safety practices for tank entry
8.4.11.1 List precautions to take for tank entry
8.4.11.2 Identify tank atmosphere test procedures
8.4.11.3 List equipment required
8.4.11.4 Identify key personnel
8.4.11.5 Analyze tank entry checklists
8.4.12 Simulate tank entry and evacuation procedures
8.4.12.1 Use tank evacuation equipment
8.4.12.2 Resuscitation equipment
8.4.12.3 Self-contained breathing apparatus

8.5 Review fire-fighting principles
8.5.1 Explain the principles of fire prevention
8.5.2 List sources of emission of flammable cargo vapours
8.5.3 Identify possible ignition sources on chemical tankers
8.5.4 Identify fire safety measures for tankers from SOLAS 74, exceptions and additional requirements from the Code
8.5.5 List methods of controlling fire
8.5.6 Describe advantages, disadvantages and methods of controlling fires on chemical tankers with:
8.5.6.1 Water
8.5.6.2 Foam
8.5.6.3 Inert gas
8.5.6.4 Carbon dioxide
8.5.6.5 Dry chemical
8.5.7 Identify in Chapter 17 of the Code fire protection requirements
8.5.8 Identify additional fire control problems with certain chemicals

9. Cargo and Emergency Management

9.1 Discuss the requirements of an emergency organization
9.1.1 List the main components of an emergency organization
9.1.2 Explain the function of an emergency organization
9.1.3 List information that should be available to the emergency organization
9.1.4 Give an overview of general emergency procedures
9.1.5 Simulate the action required for different emergencies

9.2 Describe ship and shore emergency alarms
9.2.1 Describe different ship alarms used in cases of emergency
9.2.2 Describe shore and terminal alarms used in cases of emergency

9.3 Summarize the International Safety Management System
9.3.1 State the mandatory ISM Code requirements for Safety Management
9.3.2 State the objectives of the ISM Code
9.3.3 Describe the Document of Compliance (DOC) and the Safety Management Certificate (SMC)
9.3.4 State the requirements of a Safety Management Manual (SMM)
9.3.5 List the type of emergencies that require written procedures
9.3.6 Discuss the use of Contingency Plans

9.4 Develop criteria for different types of emergency
9.4.1 Identify the IMO publication ‘Guidelines for the Development of Shipboard Emergency Response Plans’
9.4.2 Differentiate operational and non-operational emergencies
9.4.3 Discuss the use of emergency plans
9.4.4 Implement and evaluate the effectiveness of emergency plans
9.4.5 Develop criteria for monitoring alarms
9.4.6 Develop procedures for responding to alarms
9.4.7 Discuss training for emergencies
9.4.8 Discuss, with the use of casualty reports, emergency scenarios and responses

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