Conclusion

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The issue of animal-vehicle collisions continues to be a well-documented problem and several researchers are working hard to address the problem. The literature review confirmed that although much progress has been made in the identification of more universal mitigation measures, local conditions often demand custom-designed solutions.

The update of the 2003 report confirms that at the national level there is still underreporting of the number of animal-collisions. In some provinces, notably Newfoundland & Labrador, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, there are mechanisms or organizations in place to capture data on the majority of these collisions. For those provinces, the data show a discrepancy between provincial databases and the national statistics. Although the underreporting issue seems to be most noticeable for collisions with property damage only (PDO), it also exists for the other categories as well.

The following tables provide a comparison and the discrepancies between provincial data and Transport Canada data. The two sets of data illustrate the underreporting issue:

Exhibit 7.1 Comparison of Transport Canada Data and Provincial Data Collisions with Fatality

Provinces/Territories 2001 2002 2003
TC Provincial TC Provincial TC Provincial
Alberta 2 5 2 5 0 6
British Columbia 1 1 2 2 3 3
Manitoba 1 2 2 0 0 0
New Brunswick 1 1 4 4 2 2
Newfoundland 1 1 2 2 2 2
Nova Scotia 0 11 3 11 0 01
N.W.T. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ontario 4 4 8 8 4 4
P.E.I. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Quebec 2 2 6 6 6 6
Saskatchewan 0 0 3 2 0 1
Yukon 0 N/A2 0 N/A2 0 N/A2
Total Canada 12 17 32 30 17 24

¹Provincial data received from Nova Scotia only includes collisions involving deer
² N/A: not available – no response was received from the jurisdiction

Exhibit 7.2 Comparison of Transport Canada Data and Provincial Data Collisions with Injury

Provinces/Territories 2001 2002 2003
TC Provincial TC Provincial TC Provincial
Alberta 166 346 185 324 12 299
British Columbia 276 276 316 330 345 280
Manitoba 199 238 159 251 214 277
New Brunswick 104 104 85 85 106 106
Newfoundland 56 64 70 80 62 87
Nova Scotia 82 741 69 551 47 331
N.W.T. 3 3 1 1 2 2
Ontario 482 569 610 610 596 596
P.E.I. 7 7 5 5 9 9
Quebec 383 383 363 363 435 435
Saskatchewan 123 189 140 209 164 229
Yukon 7 N/A2 6 N/A2 6 N/A2
Total Canada 1,975 2,253 2,009 3,313 2,003 2,353


¹Provincial data received from Nova Scotia only includes collisions involving deer
² N/A: not available – no response was received from the jurisdiction

Exhibit 7.3 Comparison of Transport Canada Data and Provincial Data Collisions with Property Damage Only

Provinces/Territories 2001 2002 2003
TC Provincial TC Provincial TC Provincial
Alberta 4,098 11,061 5,487 11,120 353 11,318
British Columbia 1,465 1,465 1,741 9,300 1,998 9,100
Manitoba 3,213 9,141 3,218 9,011 3,971 10,527
New Brunswick 893 893 806 806 786 786
Newfoundland 315 718 364 805 312 706
Nova Scotia 688 6381 573 5141 432 3641
N.W.T. 12 12 20 20 16 16
Ontario 11,248 10,565 12,894 12,894 14,018 14,018
P.E.I. 16 16 13 13 14 14
Quebec 5,456 5,456 5,780 5,780 6,256 6,256
Saskatchewan 3,604 11,775 5,780 11,514 9,564 13,966
Yukon 41 N/A2 37 N/A2 34 N/A2
Total Canada 31,049 51,740 37,008 61,777 37,754 67,077

¹ Provincial data received from Nova Scotia only includes collisions involving deer
² N/A: not available – no response was received from the jurisdiction

There does not seem to be any easy solution to correct the underreporting problem. It is possible that there may be an issue here with the data dictionary being used by Transport Canada so that some events may not be entered in the national data fields by the provinces/territories. Alberta would be a perfect case study to explore that angle.

It needs to be pointed out that even though some provinces capture all events involving large animals and motor vehicles, not all provinces and territories can do it. They simply do not have the mechanism for doing so. Although one of the compromises would be for Transport Canada to show the full data where it is available, this could raise other uniformity issues in the national database.

The review of the mitigation measures by province/territory shows that almost all provinces and territories are involved in mitigation measures of some sort. Special highway signs remain the most-favored mitigation measure.

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