Low Speed Vehicle Crash Tests - Video

Video Length: 2 min. 10 seconds

Transcript

Title: Low Speed Vehicle Crash Tests

Introduction:

Transport Canada has conducted crash tests of low speed vehicles to find out what happens to drivers and passengers when these vehicles enter into collisions with rigid barriers and other motor vehicles that comply with crash test regulations.

[Frontal fixed rigid barrier (front view)]
As seen from the front, the dynamic response of both the vehicle and its occupants to the forces generated from the frontal impact of the vehicle into a rigid barrier at a speed of 40 km/hr.

[Frontal fixed rigid barrier crash (front view)].
As seen from the front, the dynamic response of both the vehicle and its occupants to the forces generated from the frontal impact of the vehicle into a rigid barrier at a speed of 40 km/hr.

[Frontal fixed rigid barrier (side view)]
The hood of the Low Speed Vehicle is dislodged and becomes airborne.

[Frontal fixed rigid barrier crash (driver's side)].
Driver's side view of a Low Speed Vehicle impacting a rigid barrier at a speed of 40 km/hr. The forces of the impact are transmitted to both the vehicle and the occupants.

[Lateral collision with micro-car].
LSV struck by a micro-car at 50 km/hr.

[Struck by a vehicle on driver door]
The front end of the incoming vehicle penetrates deeply into the occupant space, coming into direct contact with the driver. The forces of the impact are transmitted directly to the driver and the passenger.

Conclusion:
The physical structures of the Low Speed Vehicles were compromised, despite the low severity of the crashes. The risk of injury to drivers and passengers of Low Speed Vehicles is disproportionately high when they enter into collisions in an urban-traffic environment.

This testing reaffirms Transport Canada's position that the Low Speed Vehicle class was created for controlled low-speed environments, where the risk of colliding with larger, faster motor vehicles is much lower.

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