Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Marine shipping is critical to Canada's economy and the movement of goods by sea is becoming increasingly important as trade with Asia and other international trading partners continues to grow. A dominant feature of marine transportation is its international dimension, which shapes the policy, regulatory and competitive environment. These conditions underpin the need for largely international governance of marine issues, in marine safety and environmental issues in particular, which is done mainly through the International Maritime Organization.

The movement of goods by sea carries with it a range of possible environmental consequences for the marine environment and water quality. For example, accidental oil spills in the marine environment are prominent in the public eye when they occur, and have immediate and obvious negative consequences for the environment and the health of local communities. Water-borne spills of hazardous and noxious substances can also cause serious damage to human health and the environment.

Transport Canada develops and administers policies, regulations and programs to: protect the marine environment; reduce the impact on the environment of marine pollution incidents in Canadian waters; and, promote the safety of the general public.


Transport Canada's Commitments

Transport Canada's commitments under Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability are listed below. Clicking on a commitment will bring you to more detailed information.

It is important to note that the numbering of these implementation strategies comes directly from the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.


Goal 3: Water Quality



IS 3.8.2 

FSDS Theme II – Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 – Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 – Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Implement programs to prevent pollution and respond to environmental incidences, including spills. (TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2 Clean Water Regulatory Framework and 2.2.2 Clean Water Regulatory Oversight

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

Pollution Prevention 
Transport Canada regulates under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 the carriage of oil and dangerous chemical cargoes onboard vessels as well as the fuel and wastes vessels generate onboard. Requirements vessels must comply with include having proper crew training, certified equipment and vessel construction, adherence to proper loading and unloading procedures, adherence to routeing restrictions, and the use of certified pollution control equipment. This regime aims to prevent pollution and incidents.

Currently, regulations under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, are in place that set requirements to prevent spills. These requirements set out how such substances may be carried, how they are to be loaded and unloaded, and for ships to have emergency plans.

Canada's Marine Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime
Transport Canada regulates and monitors certified response organizations, prescribed oil handling facilities and vessels as part of Canada's Marine Oil Pollution Preparedness and Response regime under Part 8 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001. The regime is built upon successful collaboration between government and industry. Transport Canada works with industry to ensure regulatory compliance and response preparedness in the event of an oil spill of up to 10,000 tonnes. The regime is operated and funded by the private sector through a bulk oil cargo fee.

The Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and its regulations and standards demand that potential polluters maintain a minimum level of preparedness at all times. The regime applies the polluter-pay principle, which makes the polluter liable for all response costs associated with an oil pollution incident. There are various national and international funds to pay for clean-up costs as well.

National Aerial Surveillance Program
Transport Canada carries out inspections of Canadian and foreign vessels in ports to verify they comply with Canadian and international requirements. As well, to deter illegal discharges at sea, Transport Canada operates the National Aerial Surveillance Program, which owns and operates three aircraft that cover all coasts of Canada and are equipped with state of the art sensors to detect oil on the ocean surface. If detected oil is linked to a ship, an evidence package is prepared for investigation and enforcement action. If the ship is not destined for a Canadian port, under international agreements, Canada can advise other countries of an incident in Canadian jurisdiction and request investigations which can lead to enforcement action.

Hazardous and Noxious Substances
Transport Canada is developing a national regime to deal with liability and compensation and to prepare for and respond to maritime hazardous and noxious substance incidents. With respect to a response regime for hazardous and noxious substances incidents, Transport Canada has conducted initial consultations with key stakeholders to develop a regime that will define how responses to maritime incidents involving hazardous and noxious substances should be managed. Further consultations to take place in fiscal year 2013/2014.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

This  work sets a regulatory regime to prevent pollution and incidents and ensures there are preparations and capacity in place to respond to an incident. Technology plays a key role in both preventing pollution and responding to incidents. By administering regulations and carrying out research and development Transport Canada aims to attain highest possible levels of protection for the environment. As such, this work supports Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 – Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non–financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011–2012

Regulations in place to prevent pollution

Regulations under development or in place

ACHIEVED

Draft Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations were pre-published in the Canada Gazette, Part I for public comment on
November 5, 2011. The final Regulations were published in May 2012. 

Regulations in place for response to incidents and spills

Regulations under development or in place

ACHIEVED

Environmental Response Regulations under development.

Compliance with regulations

100%

TO BE DETERMINED

Data not available at this time as the program is being realigned. Preliminary figures show that 100% of Oil Handling Facilities and Response Organizations that were inspected in 2011 were in compliance with regulations.

Number of releases by vessels of substances that could have a negative impact on the marine environment

5% reduction by 2017

ACHIEVED

For 2011-2012, there were 19 releases by vessels identified that could have a negative impact on the marine environment.  This is a reduction of 32% from the 2009-2010 baseline of 28 releases.  Performance indicator will be reviewed in 2012 following introduction of new pollution regulations.

TC and partners' research advancing new technologies to facilitate regulatory development

New technologies being researched and adopted by industry

ACHIEVED

In 2011-2012, research was undertaken on the use of brine water to treat ballast water.  In addition, a study compiling waste management technologies was completed.

Created an Environmental Technology Session at the Canadian Marine Advisory Council.

2012–2013

Regulations in place to prevent pollution

Regulations under development or in place

 

Regulations in place for response to incidents and spills

Regulations under development or in place

 

Compliance with regulations

100%

 

Percentage change in number of releases by vessels of substances that could have a negative impact on the marine environment

5% reduction by 2017

 

TC and partners' research advancing new technologies to facilitate regulatory development

New technologies being researched and adopted by industry

 

2013–2014

Regulations in place to prevent pollution

Regulations under development or in place

 

Regulations in place for response to incidents and spills

Regulations under development or in place

 

Compliance with regulations

100%

 

Percentage change in number of releases by vessels of substances that could have a negative impact on the marine environment

5% reduction by 2017

 

TC and partners' research advancing new technologies to facilitate regulatory development

New technologies being researched and adopted by industry

 

IS 3.8.3 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Provide advice on garbage, ballast water, sewage and other marine pollution to support Canadian positions in international commitments. (TC, EC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

As Canada depends on foreign ships to carry its trade, Canada also relies on strong international standards to protect its environment. Canada is a key member of the International Maritime Organization, the United Nations specialized agency governing marine shipping, and plays a leading role in its committees and working groups.

In 1973, the International Maritime Organization adopted the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, now known universally as MARPOL, which has been amended by the Protocols of 1978 and 1997 and kept updated with relevant amendments. The MARPOL Convention addresses pollution from ships by oil; by noxious liquid substances carried in bulk; harmful substances carried by sea in packaged form; sewage, garbage; and the prevention of air pollution from ships. MARPOL has greatly contributed to a significant decrease in pollution from international shipping and applies to 99% of the world's merchant tonnage. Other treaties address anti-fouling systems used on ships, the transfer of alien species by ships' ballast water and the environmentally sound recycling of ships.

Canada makes specific proposals to the International Maritime Organization to ensure international standards are protective of the environment. Transport Canada leads Canada's participation at the International Maritime Organization and often relies on timely science and technical advice from other departments to develop Canadian positions. Transport Canada in turn provides advice on shipping to other departments who lead other fora, such as Environment Canada and the United Nations Environment Programme.

For more information see http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety/rsqa-imo-menu-1877.htm.

This implementation strategy is linked to 3.8.5, 3.8.7 and 6.4.8.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

This strategy aims to ensure that international standards on marine shipping protect the environment, and supports Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Formal papers or positions supported, developed or tabled

As required

ACHIEVED

Paper submitted to International Maritime Organization’s Bulk Liquids and Gases Sub-Committee on requiring combined ballast water exchange and treatment systems for vessels destined to freshwater ports.

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required

ACHIEVED

Participated at International Maritime Organization’s Marine Environment Protection Committee and worked to:

  • revise standards for managing ships’ garbage;
  • develop standards for the recycling of ships;
  • examine the risks of invasive species by hull fouling; and,
  • examine the risks to marine life from vessel noise in the ocean.

Chaired Standing Committee on Environment at Canadian Marine Advisory Council and created a new forum to promote environmental technology.

2012-2013

Formal papers or positions supported, developed or tabled

As required  

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required  
2013-2014

Formal papers or positions supported, developed or tabled

As required  

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required  

IS 3.8.4 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Collect required data to support International Maritime Organization, the United Nations Environmental Programme and other domestic and international organizations. (TC, EC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

Canada is a key member of the International Maritime Organization, the United Nations specialized agency governing marine shipping, and plays a leading role in its committees and working groups. Transport Canada submits annual reports to the International Maritime Organization on Canada's compliance with international standards and on observed compliance by other countries vessels operating in Canada's jurisdiction.

For more information see http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety/rsqa-imo-menu-1877.htm.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

The work supports the protection of the marine environment by providing international policy makers current information on environmental issues to guide negotiations, supporting Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Canada submits reports to the International Maritime Organization

Reports submitted on time

ACHIEVED

Paper submitted to International Maritime Organization’s Bulk Liquids and Gases Sub-Committee on time.

2012-2013

Canada submits reports to the International Maritime Organization

Reports submitted on time

 
2013-2014

Canada submits reports to the International Maritime Organization

Reports submitted on time

 

IS 3.8.5 
 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Ensure compliance with the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, and its regulations that set controls for ships to manage ballast water and marine pollution as well as the controls on ships' discharges set out under the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act. (TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2.2 Clean Water Regulatory Oversight

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

Transport Canada carries out inspections of Canadian and foreign vessels in ports to verify they comply with Canadian and international requirements for ballast water management and to prevent pollution. Details are found at http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety/oep-inspection-menu-770.htm. These inspections are complemented for ballast water by a Canada-US joint inspection program in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway, and for pollution prevention by the National Aerial Surveillance Program and international cooperation with other countries on enforcement.

Transport Canada also implements the provisions of the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act for the zero discharge regime for the Arctic.

This implementation strategy is linked to 3.8.3 and 6.4.8.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

This work protects the marine environment by ensuring laws and regulations are followed. It supports Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Percentage of industry compliance with regulatory framework

95% by 2017

IN PROGRESS - 42%

As of April 1, 2012, 42% of Environmental Response regulations are aligned with Canada Shipping Act, 2001.  Work is ongoing to ensure full alignment by 2017.   

Percentage of vessels in compliance with the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules

95% by 2017

ACHIEVED - 96%

For 2011-2012, preliminary data indicates that 96% of vessels entering Canadian waters submitted a ballast water report as required by the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations. 

2012-2013

Percentage of industry compliance with regulatory framework for environmental response regime

95% by 2017

 

Percentage of vessels in compliance with the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules

95% by 2017

 
2013-2014

Percentage of industry compliance with regulatory framework for environmental response regime

95% by 2017

 

Percentage of vessels in compliance with the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations reporting rules

95% by 2017

 

IS 3.8.6 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Implement a national regime for preparedness and response to maritime hazardous and noxious substances incidences. (TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

While an oil response regime is in place, Transport Canada is developing a national regime to deal with liability and compensation and to prepare for and respond to ship-source hazardous and noxious substance incidents.

With respect to a response regime for hazardous and noxious substances incidents, Transport Canada has conducted an initial round of consultations with key stakeholders to develop a regime that will define how response to maritime incidents involving hazardous and noxious substances should be managed. More consultations will be necessary in order to capture a broader audience which may have an interest in hazardous and noxious substances.

With regards to a liability and compensation regime that would provide a framework for effective compensation in the event of an incident of hazardous and noxious substances, the International Maritime Organization has also developed an international convention on shipowner's liability and which creates an international compensation fund. Transport Canada has released a discussion paper to consult stakeholders on a proposal for Canada to ratify this convention.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

These measures will protect the marine environment by ensuring a capacity is in place to respond to a maritime incident involving hazardous and noxious substances. It will also ensure that appropriate liability and compensation is available to pay for a response to such an incident and for the damages it would cause. This work supports Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Theme II Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Initial consultations with stakeholders

Completed

ACHIEVED

Held national consultations on the development and implementation of a national ship-source hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) incident preparedness and response regime between November 2011 to February 2012. A discussion paper was prepared to support this process. The paper was initially presented at the 2011 Canadian Marine Advisory Council meeting in Ottawa and distributed to more than 120 stakeholders from a wide range of sectors.

In addition to presenting the paper at various venues across Canada (conferences, Regional Advisory Council meetings, etc), a round table with key industry representatives was also held to hear stakeholder’s views, questions and recommendations on Transport Canada's current proposals for creating a national HNS regime.

A post-consultation report/summary will be made available in 2012.

2012-2013

Development of capacity needs and legislation/regulations

Capacity needs identified legislation/regulations under development

 
2013-2014

Development of capacity needs and legislation/regulations

Capacity needs addressed, legislation/regulations implemented

 

IS 3.8.7 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Monitor and regulate discharges from marine vessels into the marine environment through inspections and the detection of oil discharges using the National Aerial Surveillance Program, which may result in investigations and enforcement actions. (TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2.2 Clean Water Regulatory Oversight

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

Transport Canada carries out inspections of Canadian and foreign vessels in ports to verify they comply with Canadian and international requirements. As well, to deter illegal discharges at sea, Transport Canada operates the National Aerial Surveillance Program, which owns and operates three aircraft that cover all coasts of Canada and are equipped with state of the art sensors to detect oil on the ocean surface. If detected oil is linked to a ship, an evidence package is prepared for investigation and enforcement action. If the ship is not destined for a Canadian port, under international agreements, Canada can advise other countries of an incident in waters under Canadian jurisdiction and request investigations which can lead to enforcement action.

This implementation strategy is linked with 3.8.3.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

This work protects the marine environment from the adverse effects of shipping by ensuring laws and regulations are followed and enforced. It supports Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Commercial vessel over-flights per flight patrol hour by National Aerial Surveillance Program aircraft

4.4

ACHIEVED

For 2011-2012, there were 12,032 vessel over-flights, which equated to 7.04 vessel over-flights per hour.

Ship source pollution spills identified per total pollution spills detected by National Aerial Surveillance Program aircraft

11%

ACHIEVED

In 2011-2012, there were 135 pollution sightings, of which 16 were identified as a known source (11.9%).

2012-2013

Number of commercial vessel over-flights per flight patrol hour by National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) aircraft

4.5

 

Ship source pollution spills identified per total pollution spills detected by National Aerial Surveillance Program aircraft

13%

 
2013-2014

Number of commercial vessel over-flights per flight patrol hour by National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) aircraft

4.6

 

Ship source pollution spills identified per total pollution spills detected by National Aerial Surveillance Program aircraft

14%

 

IS 3.8.8 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Monitor and regulate Canada's Marine Oil Pollution Preparedness and Response regime to ensure private industry maintains the required capacity to respond to oil spills caused by marine transportation. (TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2.2 Clean Water Regulatory Oversight

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

Transport Canada regulates and monitors certified response organizations, prescribed oil handling facilities and vessels as part of Canada's Marine Oil Pollution Preparedness and Response regime under Part 8 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001. The regime is built upon successful collaboration between government and industry. Transport Canada works with industry to ensure regulatory compliance and response preparedness in the event of an oil spill of up to 10,000 tonnes. The regime is operated and funded by the private sector through a bulk oil cargo fee.

The Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and its regulations and standards demand that potential polluters maintain a minimum level of preparedness at all times.

The regime applies the polluter-pay principle, which makes the polluter liable for all response costs associated with an oil pollution incident. There are various national and international funds to pay for clean-up costs as well.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

The regulations and monitoring of the Marine Oil Pollution Preparedness and Response regime ensures a state of readiness to respond during an incident, thus protecting the marine environment. It supports Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Response organizations meet requirements for their area of operations

100%

ACHIEVED

In 2010, Transport Canada’s National Review Board evaluated the response plans from four response organizations (RO). The plans were thoroughly reviewed and met the certification criteria as stipulated under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and the Response Organizations and Oil Handling Facilities Regulations, which outline the procedures, equipment and resources of response organizations and oil handling facilities for use in respect of an oil pollution incident.

Over the next certification period (three years), Transport Canada will continue to inspect the ROs and evaluate their capabilities and activities, reporting any deficiencies or anomalies and following-up (monitor for compliance).

2012-2013

Response organizations meet requirements for their area of operations

100%

 
2013-2014

Response organizations meet requirements for their area of operations

100%

 

IS 3.8.9 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Advance positions that can influence global rules and practices on dumping waste at sea and other marine pollution matters. (EC, TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

Controls on dumping at sea fall under the mandate of Environment Canada, under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

For other marine pollution matters, as Canada depends on foreign ships to carry its trade, Canada also relies on strong international standards to protect its environment. Canada is a key member of the International Maritime Organization, the United Nations specialized agency governing marine shipping, and plays a leading role in its committees and working groups. Canada makes specific proposals to the International Maritime Organization to ensure international standards are protective of the environment.

For more information see http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety/rsqa-imo-menu-1877.htm.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

Ensuring international standards on marine shipping protect the environment contributes to Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required

ACHIEVED

Participated at International Maritime Organization’s Marine Environment Protection Committee and worked to:

  • Revise standards for managing ships’ garbage;
  • Develop standards for the recycling of ships.
  • Examine the risks of invasive species by hull fouling; and,

Examine the risks to marine life from vessel noise in the ocean.

2012-2013

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required  
2013-2014

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required  

IS 3.8.10 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Manage research and development, develop partnerships, support and/or conduct technology development (emerging and forward-looking) to improve pollution prevention technologies and manage risks for marine transportation. (TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

1.4 Transportation Innovation

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

Transport Canada supports sustainable transportation through the efforts of the Transportation Development Centre's research and development projects focusing on pollution prevention. This includes consulting with industry and developing strategic partnerships to ensure the feasibility of these innovative technologies.

This implementation strategy is linked to 1.1.5, 1.1.38 and 2.1.2.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

The research undertaken during the period will contribute to prevent marine pollution, supporting Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Enhanced focus of the R&D efforts allocated to sustainable transportation activities

To be determined

NOT ACHIEVED

Transport Canada’s Transportation Development Centre’s Marine Research and Development priorities for this fiscal year are focused on air quality rather than water quality.

2012-2013

Enhanced focus of the R&D efforts allocated to sustainable transportation activities

To be determined

 
2013-2014

Enhanced focus of the R&D efforts allocated to sustainable transportation activities

To be determined

 

IS 3.8.11 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Advance Canadian positions on reducing and managing global marine pollution from ships. (TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

As Canada depends on foreign ships to carry its trade, Canada also relies on strong international standards to protect its environment. Canada is a key member of the International Maritime Organization, the United Nations specialized agency governing marine shipping, and plays a leading role in its committees and working groups. Canada also makes specific proposals to the International Maritime Organization to ensure international standards are protective of the environment.

For more information see http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety/rsqa-imo-menu-1877.htm.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

This strategy seeks to protect the marine environment by ensuring the international standards on marine shipping are protective of the environment and contributes to Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Formal papers or positions supported, developed or tabled

As required

ACHIEVED

Paper submitted to International Maritime Organization’s Bulk Liquids and Gases Sub-Committee on requiring combined ballast water exchange and treatment systems for vessels destined to freshwater ports.

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required

ACHIEVED

Participated at International Maritime Organization’s Marine Environment Protection Committee and worked to:  

  • revise standards for managing ships’ garbage;
  • develop standards for the recycling of ships;
  • examine the risks of invasive species by hull fouling; and,
  • examine the risks to marine life from vessel noise in the ocean.

Chaired a Standing Committee on Environment at Canadian Marine Advisory Council, created new forum to promote environmental technology.

2012-2013

Formal papers or positions supported, developed or tabled

As required  

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required  
2013-2014

Formal papers or positions supported, developed or tabled

As required  

Engagement in committees, working groups or sub groups

As required  

IS 3.8.12 

FSDS Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3 - Water Quality: The quality of water is protected and enhanced so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems
Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality: Prevent marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea. Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure)

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY 3.8.12
Support the adoption by Canada of Marine Environmental Protection Committee (International Maritime Organization) requirements where applicable. (TC)

PART 1: Linkage to the departmental PAA

Implementation strategy 3.8.12 is linked to 2.2.1 Clean Water Regulatory Framework

PART 2: A brief description of the implementation strategy

Canada is a key member of the International Maritime Organization, the United Nations specialized agency governing marine shipping, and plays a leading role in its committees and working groups. As foreign ships carry most of Canada's trade, and comprise most of Canada's shipping activity, setting clear and predictable rules based on international standards ensures compliance by foreign vessels.

Marine Environmental Protection Committee
The Marine Environment Protection Committee administers key international conventions to prevent pollution from ships, including air and greenhouse gas emissions. Three sub-committees, Bulk Liquids and Gases, Design and Equipment, and Facilitation, play a key supporting role. Canada makes specific proposals to Marine Environment Protection Committee and related sub-committees to ensure international standards are protective of the environment. More information is available at www.imo.org.

Adoption of international standards into domestic regulatory framework
Transport Canada is adopting applicable international standards developed by the International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee into its regulatory framework under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

For more information on Transport Canada's involvement in the International Maritime Organization, please visit http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety/rsqa-imo-menu-1877.htm.

PART 3: An explanation of the relationship between that implementation strategy and one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy targets

Implementation strategy 3.8.12 seeks to protect the marine environment by ensuring the international standards on marine shipping are protective of the environment, supporting Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target 3.9 - Marine Water Quality.

PART 4: An outline of the non-financial performance expectations

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results Achieved

2011-2012

Adoption of international standards into Canadian regulations and guidelines

As appropriate

ACHIEVED

Final Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations published in the Canada Gazette, Part II on November 9, 2011.

Proposed Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations pre-published in the Canada Gazette, Part I on November 5, 2011.

2012-2013

Percentage of clean water domestic instruments harmonized or aligned within 5 years after adoption of an international standard

90%

 
2013-2014

Percentage of clean water domestic instruments harmonized or aligned within 5 years after adoption of an international standard

As appropriate

 
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