Other Initiatives that Support the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

Renewed Clean Air Agenda

The 2011 Budget announced the renewal of the Clean Air Agenda (CAA), building on the momentum gained from the CAA over the period of 2007-2011 which formed part of the Government's broader efforts to address the challenges of climate change and air pollution, with a view to ensuring a clean and healthy environment for all Canadians.

The CAA spans 11 departments and agencies managing 60 environmental initiatives. The centrepiece of this approach is a regulatory agenda with complementary programming to support innovation and clean technologies, Canada's international participation and in adapting to the challenges of climate change.

Transport Canada (TC) is responsible for nine initiatives under the CAA, each of which contributes to one or more Federal Sustainable Development Strategy goals.

In this update of our Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, a new section called 'Other Initiatives that Support the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy' has been included, which will include planning and reporting information on TC CAA initiatives. Because some of Transport Canada's Federal Sustainable Development Strategy implementation strategies are now captured under the new CAA initiatives, to avoid duplication these will be reported on once under this new section, using the expected results and performance indicators of the CAA.

Transport Canada is responsible for the following CAA initiatives: 

  1. Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative
  2. Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative
  3. Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative
  4. Support for Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations
  5. Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative
  6. ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Initiative
  7. Truck Reservation System Program
  8. Shore Power Technology for Ports Program
  9. Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative

ecoTRANSPORT Strategy (2007-2008 to 2010-2011)

The ecoTRANSPORT Strategy involved a series of initiatives designed to reduce the amount of fuel consumed, improve transportation efficiency and introduce cleaner transportation technologies. Launched as part of the Government’s Clean Air Agenda Clean Transportation Theme, this strategy featured the ecoMOBILITY program; the ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles Program; the ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles Program (Natural Resources Canada); and the ecoFREIGHT programs.

Two of the programs, the Marine Shore Power Program and the ecoMOBILITY Program, were extended to 2011-2012. Please find below the 2011-2012 achievements for these two programs, which will conclude the reporting under the ecoTRANSPORT Strategy.


Clean Air Agenda - Clean Transportation Initiatives

Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Linkage

2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight

Program Description

 

Background

In Canada, domestic aviation accounted for 4.8 percent of transport-related greenhouse gas emissions (1 percent of the national total) in 2005; these emissions are projected to rise by 42 percent between 2005 and 2020. While further emission reductions are possible through operational improvements (e.g., fleet renewal, more efficient operations and improved air traffic management), technological breakthroughs (e.g., new aircraft designs, alternative fuels) will be needed to bring about large decreases.

Aviation is a highly integrated and competitive international industry that operates within a framework of rules and standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization. The International Civil Aviation Organization and the aviation sector have long worked to minimize or reduce aviation's environmental impacts. For example, the International Civil Aviation Organization has recently established new emission standards for oxides of nitrogen, which will soon be implemented in Canada, and is developing a certification requirement for a non-volatile particulate matter standard.

In recent years, the scope of the International Civil Aviation Organization's environmental work has expanded to include the global impact of aircraft emissions, including greenhouse gas emissions. In October 2009, the International Civil Aviation Organization's High-Level Meeting on Climate Change resulted in the adoption of a Programme of Action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from international aviation.

In October 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organization also adopted a new Assembly Resolution on climate change, Resolution A37-19. The resolution set several voluntary goals for international aviation emissions. The resolution encourages Member States to submit action plans detailing specific measures to address greenhouse gas emissions related to international aviation to the International Civil Aviation Organization by June 2012.

For more information on the International Civil Aviation Organization's emissions reduction work, please visit the International Civil Aviation Organization's website at: http://www.icao.int/environmental-protection/Pages/default.aspx.

In 2005, the Air Transport Association of Canada and Transport Canada signed a voluntary agreement to reduce collective Air Transport Association of Canada member fleet greenhouse gas emissions. This was the first voluntary agreement of this kind in the world. The agreement established a goal of an average 1.1 percent per annum improvement in fuel efficiency, reaching a cumulative improvement of 24 percent by 2012 compared to the 1990 base case scenario. At the end of 2010 , the industry had achieved a 1.9 percent annual average fuel efficiency improvement and a 31.0 percent cumulative improvement, surpassing the agreed upon goal.

Program Description:

This program supports Transport Canada's participation at the International Civil Aviation Organization to develop new aircraft emission standards for carbon dioxide and aircraft engine emission standards for non-volatile particulate matter. Once these standards are finalized at the International Civil Aviation Organization, Transport Canada will adopt them domestically through regulations under the Aeronautics Act.

Transport Canada will also be involved in assessing the impact of global fuel consumption goals, analysing possible market-based measures for aviation emissions, and providing input into the International Civil Aviation Organization guidance on the development of Action Plans.

Transport Canada will also support the Canadian aviation industry to develop a voluntary Canadian Action Plan to address domestic and international greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation sector, for submission to the International Civil Aviation Organization by June 2012.

All of these activities will be informed by targeted scientific research that will improve understanding of the technical aspects of reducing emissions.

Research will also be undertaken to improve knowledge of the Canadian aviation sector as well as to enhance Transport Canada's capacity to evaluate potential options for future policies, regulations, and programs and to inform future input for the International Civil Aviation Organization.

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)

 

Once developed, the regulatory framework will lead to reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants, thus supporting:

  • FSDS Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions 17 percent by 2020; and
  • FSDS Target 2.1 Air Pollutants: Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country to achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultations with provinces and stakeholders.

 

Furthermore, the initiative groups together the following six
Transport Canada Federal Sustainable Development Strategy implementation strategies. This template will therefore replace these six Federal Sustainable Development Strategy templates, in order to provide a more fulsome description and to streamline progress reporting.
 

1.1.16 Work within the International Civil Aviation Organization to develop aircraft design performance standards for CO2 as early as 2013. (TC)
 

1.1.17 Develop and/or implement new rules within Canada's domestic regulatory regime which reflect appropriate international standards and recommended practices concerning greenhouse emissions adopted by the International Maritime Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization. (TC)
 

1.1.44 Support the development of international principles, standards and recommended practices with the International Civil Aviation Organization aimed at a globally coherent approach to manage international aviation GHG emissions. (TC)
 

1.1.51.1 Work within the International Civil Aviation Organization to continue to advance emissions limitations and reductions from international aviation, including the implementation of the ICAO Programme of Action on International Aviation and Climate Change, while maintaining a high level of safety. (TC, EC)
 

2.1.30.1 Support the development of standards and recommended practices within the Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP) of the International Civil Aviation Organization concerning air pollutant emissions from aviation sources. (TC)

2.1.34 Participate in the International Civil Aviation Organization Council's Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection. (TC)

Program's Expected Results
 
 

This initiative is expected to result in new or amended emission regulatory frameworks for the Canadian aviation sector, along with compliance and oversight regimes. The new nitrogen oxide standards are expected to reduce the emissions from new aircraft engines by 15 percent (targeted for 2013).
 

The initiative is also expected to result in a domestic emission reduction voluntary agreement in the form of a Canadian Action Plan for addressing greenhouse gas emissions.
 

Transport Canada will support the development of standards, global targets, market-based mechanisms, and other related instruments at the International Civil Aviation Organization.

Transport Canada will support research that examines the short- and long-term impacts of aviation emissions with regards to climate change and regional and local air quality, technological and operational challenges to addressing these emissions, as well as safety, security and economic considerations.
Program's Expected Achievements for 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, The program expects to:

  • Engage with the Canadian aviation industry to develop a voluntary Action Plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation sector, building upon the existing voluntary agreement with Canadian air carriers;
  • Undertake analysis to formulate Canada’s positions at the International Civil Aviation Organization contributing to international aviation emission standards and practices, as well as to support efforts to address emissions from domestic aviation;
  • Support the International Civil Aviation Organization in the development of new international standards for aircraft CO2 emissions and aircraft engine particulate matter emissions;
  • Participate in International Civil Aviation Organization meetings, working groups and committees;
  • Support research on operational efficiencies, technologies and emissions measurement to support regulatory development and reduced emissions.
Program Achieved results/performance summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Worked with the Canadian aviation industry to develop Canada’s voluntary Action Plan to address aviation emissions.
  • Participated in discussions at key international meetings to present Canada’s position on the application of the European Union Emissions Trading system to international aviation.
  • Supported the development of global framework for market-based measures to address aviation emissions at International Civil Aviation Organization through participating in a Working Group on Market-Based Measures.
  • Participated in the meetings of the International Civil Aviation Organization/ Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection emissions and operations working groups’ to develop:
    • a metric for the new CO2 standard for airplanes;
    • a sampling and measurement protocol for non-volatile particulate matter emissions from aircraft engines; and,
    • additional guidance on operational efficiencies and environmental assessment criteria for airspace changes.
  • Commissioned a study on aviation biofuels activity in Canada.
  • Funded research by the National Research Council to support the development of a new international standard for particulate matter emission standard.
  • Participated as an Advisory Board member to the Partnership for AiR Transportation Noise and Emissions Reductions (PARTNER), funded five projects and gained knowledge related to the other PARTNER-sponsored projects. 
  • Worked jointly with Canadian airports on projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from airport operations.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $2,075,249 $1,482,087

Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Linkage

2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight

Program Description

 

Background

In 2009, Canadian railways produced close to 8 percent of Canada's total transportation-related nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and approximately 3.7 percent of the transportation sector's total greenhouse gas emissions. If left unaddressed, rail emissions will continue to increase as traffic levels rise.

In October 2006, the Government of Canada issued a notice of intent to regulate air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from the rail sector under the Railway Safety Act. Budget 2011 renewed funding for the Clean Air Agenda, including for the development of regulations in the rail sector.

Railway companies have been voluntarily implementing measures to reduce emissions from the rail sector. The rail industry worked with the Government of Canada since 1995 through a series of Memoranda of Understanding to reduce emissions. These agreements have served as a bridge to regulation and have been cost effective in encouraging the rail sector to take early and voluntary action on reducing emissions in advance of federal regulations coming into force.

Program Description

Air Pollutant Emission Regulations

Transport Canada will complete the development of air pollutant emission regulations for locomotives. Regulations will be aligned with those currently in place in the U.S.

Transport Canada will also set up the compliance and enforcement regime.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations

Transport Canada will undertake analytical work to prepare for the development of potential future greenhouse gas emission regulations for the rail sector. Transport Canada intends to collaborate with the U.S. to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the North American rail industry.

Voluntary Action Plan

Transport Canada will work with the rail sector to continue to address emissions by negotiating a renewed voluntary agreement to reduce these emissions.

Research

The rail industry's ability to comply with future air pollutant and greenhouse gas emission regulations will depend to a large extent on the development and adoption of new technologies. Transport Canada will advance research into innovations that address air emissions from the rail sector.

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)

Once developed, the regulatory framework will lead to reduction of air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions, thus supporting:

  • FSDS Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020 and
  • FSDS Target 2.1 Air Pollutants: Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country to achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultations with provinces and stakeholders.

Furthermore, the initiative groups together the following two Transport Canada Federal Sustainable Development Strategy implementation strategies. This template will therefore replace these two Federal Sustainable Development Strategy templates, in order to provide a more fulsome description and to streamline progress reporting.

1.1.15 Develop regulations under the Railway Safety Act to address greenhouse gas emissions from the rail sector in collaboration with the United States. (TC)

2.1.12 Develop emission regulations for criteria air contaminants (CAC) for rail sector under the Railway Safety Act to take effect in 2011, aligned with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emission standards. (TC)

Program's Expected Results
 
 

This initiative is expected to result in new or amended regulatory frameworks, along with effective compliance and oversight regimes. The new air pollutant emission regulations are expected to reduce air pollutant emissions and lead to both environmental and health benefits.

The initiative is also expected to result in domestic emission reductions from a voluntary agreement.

Finally, scientific and technical research and studies will result from this initiative. Specifically, Transport Canada will engage in research on new and emerging technologies in the rail sector, including assessments of how they perform from a safety, economic and environmental perspective.
Program's Expected Achievements for 2011-2012

In 2011-12, the program’s expected achievements include the:

  • Development of new emission regulations for criteria air contaminant emissions from locomotives, under the Railway Safety Act to take effect in 2011
  • Initiation of the negotiation of a voluntary agreement with the railway sector to continue to reduce greenhouse gas emissions;
  • Undertaking of policy analysis and research related to greenhouse gas emissions from locomotives, in collaboration with the U.S.; and,
  • Support of research into new and emerging technologies for the rail sector.
Program Achieved results/performance summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Continued the drafting of proposed Locomotive Emissions Regulations, including the development of the compliance and enforcement regime to support the proposed regulations. Pre-publication of the proposed regulations in Canada Gazette, Part I is expected to take place in 2012-2013. 
  • Held discussions with the rail industry on the development of a voluntary agreement to address greenhouse gas emissions.  The agreement is expected to be signed in 2012-13.
  • Worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop a work plan for the Canada-U.S. Regulatory Cooperation Council locomotive emissions initiative, in consultation with stakeholders.
  • Identified current emission reduction research priority areas in consultation with relevant rail stakeholders and initiated a rail technology and infrastructure scan to provide recommendations on promising technologies and research opportunities related to emission reductions in the rail industry.
  • Provided funding for three multi-year projects on emission reducing technologies that will have industry uptake in the short-term.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $1,649,865 $1,231,543

Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative

Federal Partners

Environment Canada

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Linkage

2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight

Program Description
 

Background

Domestic marine transportation accounted for 3% of Canada's transport-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (<1% of the national total) in 2005; these emissions are expected to increase by 8% between 2005 and 2020. The marine sector is also a significant source of air pollutants.

Marine transportation is a highly integrated and competitive global industry that operates within a framework of rules and standards set by the International Maritime Organization to ensure a level playing field. The International Maritime Organization and the maritime sector have long worked to manage the environmental impacts of international shipping. With respect to air emissions, most of this work has focused on reducing air pollutants. Recently, addressing greenhouse gas emissions and climate change has become an additional area of focus for the International Maritime Organization.

Transport Canada has been actively engaged at the International Maritime Organization in developing standards and recommended best practices for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants caused by ships.

In the Canadian context, aligning marine emission regulations with U.S. domestic standards is also crucial for trade and the economy because ships that travel the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway are subject to both Canadian and U.S. regulations.

For more information on the International Maritime Organization's emission reduction work, please visit the International Maritime Organization website at:
http://www.imo.org/OurWork/Environment/Pages/Default.aspx

 

Program Description

Transport Canada will develop and implement new regulations under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, expected by August 1, 2012, to address emissions, including standards for:

  • Vessels operating in Canadian coastal waters (i.e. the North American Emission Control Area) and Canadian vessels overseas;
  • Vessels operating in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway; and,
  • Medium marine diesel engines aligned with US standards.

Transport Canada, with support from Environment Canada, leads Canada's participation at the International Maritime Organization.

Transport Canada will update regulations for marine vessels operating in the Arctic. Transport Canada will carry out research on new design standards that will increase the fuel efficiency of Polar class vessels. The new standards will then be incorporated into regulations under the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act.

Transport Canada will engage in research, in collaboration with Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada, to facilitate the adoption of innovations such as lower carbon fuels, hybrid propulsion systems, and emerging clean air and fuel-efficient technologies, while leveraging private-sector investment. Outcomes of this effort will support the International Maritime Organization 's work on new global standards and guidelines and foster the maritime industry's ability to comply with emission standards over the medium to long term.

Transport Canada will also work on the development and implementation of a marine vessel activity and fuel consumption survey aimed at improving estimates of domestic and international marine-related energy use, air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions.

Research will also be undertaken to improve knowledge of the Canadian marine sector as well as to enhance Transport Canada's capacity to evaluate potential options for future policies, regulations, and programs as well as inform future input for the International Maritime Organization.

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)
 

 

Once developed, the regulatory framework will lead to reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants, thus supporting:

  • FSDS Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020; and
  • FSDS Target 2.1 Air Pollutants: Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country to achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultations with provinces and stakeholders.

 

The initiative groups together the following eight Transport Canada Federal Sustainable Development Strategy implementation strategies. This template will therefore replace these eight Federal Sustainable Development Strategy templates, in order to provide a more fulsome description and to streamline progress reporting.

1.1.14 - Work within the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to support the development of international energy efficiency / GHG standards for marine vessels. (TC)

1.1.17 - Develop and/or implement new rules within Canada's domestic regulatory regime which reflect appropriate international standards and recommended practices concerning greenhouse emissions adopted by the International Maritime Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization. (TC)

1.1.45 - Support the development of international standards and recommended practices with the International Maritime Organization concerning greenhouse gas emissions from marine sources. (TC)

1.1.52 - International Maritime Organization: Work within the International Maritime Organization toward the development of international standards and recommended practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions from marine shipping, while maintaining a high level of safety. (TC)

2.1.13 - Continue to work with the United States and France to implement a designated Emission Control Area for North American coastal areas, under the auspices of the IMO, by 2012. (TC, EC)

2.1.14 - Develop enhanced emissions regulations under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, for vessels operating in Canadian waters. (TC)

2.1.30.2 - Support the development of international standards and recommended practices within the International Maritime Organization concerning air pollutant emissions from marine sources. (TC)

2.1.33 - Participate in the Marine Environmental Protection Committee of the International Maritime Organization. (TC)

Program's Expected Results
 

This initiative is expected to result in new or amended regulatory frameworks, along with effective compliance and oversight regimes. The new regulations made under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 are expected to reduce sulphur oxide emissions from marine vessels by up to 94 percent and nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 80 percent by 2020. The regulatory amendments planned for the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act should reduce fuel use, in turn decreasing air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions.

The regulatory amendments planned for the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act should reduce fuel use, in turn decreasing air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions.

Transport Canada will contribute to the development of new international emission standards as well as a framework, technical measures, and possibly market-based measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at the International Maritime Organization. Canada's input will not generate emission reductions directly; however, once the instruments are finalized at the International Maritime Organization and adopted domestically in Canada, they should lead to decreased emissions.

Transport Canada will engage in research that examines new technologies and practices that can be used for emission reduction or emission measurement.

Program's Expected Achievements for 2011-2012
 

In 2011-2012, the program’s expected achievements include:

  • Lead Canada’s representation at the International Maritime Organization leading to an International Maritime Organizationdecision to adopt technical and operational measures (Energy Efficiency Design Index and Shipboard Energy Efficiency Management Plans) to address greenhouse gas emissions from ships;
  • New Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and for Dangerous Chemicals in Canada forpublishing in Canada Gazette, Part I for public comment;
  • International Maritime Organization Environment Protection Committee to report on progress on the development of market-based measures to the International Maritime Organization Assembly; and,
  • Implementation of the marine vessel activity and fuel consumption survey.
Program Achieved results/performance summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Led Canada’s participation at the International Maritime Organization to advance the adoption of technical measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from ships and participated in working groups to advance discussions on market-based measures and Arctic vessel construction standards. 
  • The International Maritime Organization adopted the Energy Efficiency Design Index and Shipboard Energy Efficiency Management Plans under Annex VI to MARPOL Convention in July 2011. 
  • Developed for publication the Regulations Amending the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations which set out the new marine air emission regulations under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 to reduce air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Held national consultations on all elements supporting the marine air emissions initiative through the Canadian Marine Advisory Council and bilateral meetings with interested parties.
  • Initiated the development of inspector training package and supporting administrative policies.
  • Initiated the development of the Marine Data Survey (implementation pending amendments to the data regulations being approved via Canada Gazette, Part II), acquired Automated Identification System activity data through Canadian Space Agency, initiated collection of vessel characteristics (Lloyds) and the Canadian Marine Register as well as collection of the Information System on Marine Navigation (INNAV) data through the Canadian Coast Guard.
  • Provided policy, economic and environmental analysis to support the development of domestic marine environmental regulations under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.
  • Initiated research and development projects to enable new technologies and operational measures for current and future regulatory compliance as well as initiated technical studies that will evaluate the effectiveness of the regulations.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $3,471,840 $2,926,051

Support for Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Linkage

2.1.1 Clean Air Regulatory Framework and Oversight

Program Description
 

Background

In 2005, on-road vehicles accounted for 18% of Canada's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, more than any other mode in the transportation sector. Emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (buses and trucks) are expected to rise by 27% between 2005 and 2020.

To address these emissions, the Government of Canada has announced that it will put in place greenhouse gas emission regulations for heavy-duty vehicles for model years 2014 to 2018.

It has also committed to implementing progressively more stringent emission standards for light-duty vehicles (passenger automobiles and light trucks) that will cover model years 2017 and beyond, extending the current regulatory approach that sets emission standards for light-duty vehicles for model years 2011 to 2016. The proposed heavy-duty and light-duty greenhouse gas emission regulations, lead by Environment Canada, will align with standards developed by the United States.

Program Description

Transport Canada will support Environment Canada's efforts by assessing the safety, environmental and competitiveness impacts associated with proposed greenhouse gas emission regulations.

For light-duty vehicles, Transport Canada will engage in data, analytical and modeling work, building on existing knowledge and expertise gained through supporting the former ecoAUTO Rebate Program and Green Levy. These activities will provide a better understanding of the sector and increased capacity to assess the competitiveness and environmental impacts of future regulatory and other mitigation policy options.

With respect to heavy-duty vehicles, Transport Canada, in collaboration with Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada, will develop and launch a national heavy-duty vehicle survey.

The survey will improve data gathering that will assist Environment Canada in the development of the heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emission regulations.

The greenhouse gas emission regulations for new light- and heavy-duty vehicles are expected to accelerate the introduction of new fuel-saving and energy-efficient technologies for motor vehicles (e.g., low-rolling resistance tires). In assessing these technologies, Transport Canada will develop new or revised vehicle safety regulations, standards, codes, or guidelines (under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act) as required

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)

Once developed, the regulatory framework will lead to reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, thus supporting:

  • FSDS Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020.

In order to provide a more fulsome description and to streamline progress reporting this template will replace the 1.1.10 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy template.

1.1.10 - Develop regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to address greenhouse gas emissions from heavy-duty vehicles, aligned with the United States but taking into consideration the distinct nature of the Canadian fleet. The draft regulations are expected to be available for consultation in early 2012. (EC, TC)

Program's Expected Results
 

This initiative is expected to result in new or amended regulatory frameworks, along with effective compliance and oversight regimes. Preliminary estimates suggest that the proposed heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emission regulations will result in a reduction of approximately 2 megatonnes (Mt) per year by 2020. The emission reduction potential of the future light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas regulations can only be estimated once the regulations are developed

This initiative could also result in new or amended vehicle safety regulatory frameworks made under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act, if determined to be required. While greenhouse gas emission reductions would not result directly from the new safety regulations, standards, codes, or guidelines, they would help eliminate barriers to the introduction of fuel-saving vehicle technologies in Canada. Finally, research results and studies are expected to result from this initiative.

Program's Expected Achievements for 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, the program’s expected achievements include:

  • Engagement in data collection, modeling, and analysis to assess the competitiveness and safety impacts of the proposed heavy-duty and light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emission regulations;
  • Support of consultations with key stakeholders during the development of the heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emission regulations;
  • Determination of whether new vehicle safety regulations, codes, standards, or guidelines are required to respond to the expected increased introduction of new fuel-saving or energy-efficient vehicle technologies; and,
  • Initiation of work to update the Canadian road safety regulatory regime.   
Program Achieved results/performance summary for 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Initiated the heavy-duty vehicle use study to collect data on heavy duty vehicles using an on-board electronic logger.  Through this study, Transport Canada acquired:
    • 350 on-board electronic loggers to collect data from heavy duty vehicles; and,
    • Heavy-duty vehicle GPS activity data from providers of fleet management solutions.
  • Supported Environment Canada in the release of a pre-publication consultation document on main elements of the proposed heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emission regulations and co-chaired two stakeholder consultation meetings with Environment Canada.
  • Completed a study with the Canadian National Research Council reviewing the fire safety aspects of liquefied natural gas for large trucks.
  • Initiated a review of existing voluntary standards to identify any requirements for updating or creating new standards, regulations and/or codes to ensure the safe use of natural gas and propane in motor vehicles.
  • Initiated work with the United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the United Nations World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations towards the development of international regulations related to the safety of visually impaired pedestrians in relation to the use of electric and electric hybrid quiet vehicles as well as to the safety of their energy storage systems.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $1,596,112 $1,433,983

ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Initiative

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Linkage

2.1.2 Clean Transportation Programs

Program Description
 

Background

The Government of Canada has committed to progressively more stringent greenhouse gas regulations for light-duty vehicles and heavy-duty vehicles. While these regulations are expected to generate environmental benefits and reduce fuel use and fuel costs, they are also likely to increase the pace of technological change. As new technologies move towards commercialization more quickly and in greater numbers, Canada will need regulatory approaches that are more proactive, streamlined, and targeted.

To achieve this, Transport Canada's ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles initiative will proactively test and evaluate advanced heavy-duty vehicle  and light-duty vehicle technologies before they are well established in the market. Test results will help inform the development of safety and environmental regulations. Results will also help inform the development and harmonization of the regulatory and non-regulatory codes and standards required to address new and emerging technologies and facilitate their entry into the marketplace over the next 5-10 years.

Identifying environmental benefits and potential safety risks earlier in the development of new vehicle technologies will allow for the faster, safer, and more cost-effective introduction of advanced vehicle technologies in Canada.

Program Description

The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II (eTV II) program is an integrated technical assessment initiative that will provide the knowledge base required to develop proactive safety and environmental regulatory approaches for new technologies. It will also support national, continental and international standards alignment to foster timely access to new advanced vehicle technologies for Canadians.

In-depth testing and evaluations of advanced light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle technologies will be conducted in laboratories, on test tracks, and in real world conditions to establish an integrated and comprehensive knowledge base about their environmental and safety performance in Canadian conditions.

Technical findings will be proactively made available to regulators across the Government of Canada to inform the development of safety and greenhouse emissions regulations; to industry associations to support the development of non-regulatory codes and standards; and to other governments (provincial, territorial, US, and international) to support the harmonization of regulations, codes and standards.

The initiative will also support Transport Canada's participation in efforts to align codes, standards and regulations nationally, continentally and internationally, and well as with non-regulatory authorities. Increased alignment will expand the market for Canadian vehicle technology innovations and allow technology developers to design to a more predictable set of standards.

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)
 

 

The eTV II initiative will support Environment Canada's work to develop greenhouse gas emission regulations for light- and heavy-duty vehicles, proposed under its renewal of the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda. Once developed, these regulations will lead to reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants, thus supporting

  • FSDS Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada's total GHG emissions 17% by 2020; and,
  • FSDS Target 2.1 Air Pollutants: Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country to achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultations with provinces and stakeholders.

Program's Expected Results
 

The eTV II will produce scientific and technical research results and studies that assess the safety and environmental performance of advanced vehicle technologies in order to:

  • support the development of standards, codes, protocols, guidelines, and related instrument;
  • inform the development of Safety Standards and Environment Canada 's light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emissions regulations; and,
  • to help more low-emission vehicle technologies enter the Canadian market.

Program's Expected Achievements and Planning Highlights for 2011-2012
 

The program’s 2011-2012 expected achievements included:

  • Implementing program governance mechanisms and initiating stakeholder engagement;
  • Establishing multi-year technology priorities, testing regimes, and protocols; and
  • Acquisition of assets, e.g. vehicles and equipment;
  • Undertaking necessary staffing activities; and
  • Undertaking safety and environmental testing activities/reporting for high priority light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle technologies – initial focus on supporting heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas regulatory developments as an early priority, e.g., program support for other departments, such as Natural Resources Canada. 

Program’s Achieved Results/Performance Summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Implemented a comprehensive program governance structure, including an Interdepartmental Director-General Level Steering Committee and a Departmental Director-General Committee. Extensive stakeholder consultations were conducted among federal government departments and U.S. agencies, (e.g. United States Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration).
  • Based on the outcomes of these consultations, the program produced a detailed work-plan that established multi-year technology priorities, testing regimes, and protocols.
  • Acquired assets required for program testing and evaluation activities, including a hybrid vehicle, two fully electric vehicles, and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, as well as two electric vehicle charging stations.
  • Conducted several safety and environmental testing activities on high priority technologies that support light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle regulatory developments.  They include:
    • Tested audible alert systems, in collaboration with Transport Canada’s Road Safety group and the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, under the Regulatory Cooperation Council, to develop safety regulations for quiet vehicles, (e.g., electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids).
    • Worked with industry to develop North American standards for electric vehicles to ensure the compatibility and support the adoption of electric vehicles and electric vehicle infrastructure across Canada and the U.S.
    • Performed extensive testing on electric vehicles and produced results required by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and Environment Canada to implement testing procedures in support of harmonized greenhouse gas emissions regulations.
    • Completed an extensive investigation into the cold weather performance of advanced tire technologies, in support of the proposed Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations.  Test results will help to identify potential safety issues and harmonize regulations to enable uptake of these technologies by Canadian industry.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $4,595,722 $3,879,409

Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Linkage

2.1.2 Clean Transportation Programs

Program Description
 

Background

Transport Canada has a mandate to ensure the national transportation system is efficient and to lead Canada's efforts in advancing a National Policy Framework for Strategic Gateways and Trade Corridors. This framework includes long-term policy, planning and strategic investments in transportation systems to strengthen Canada's position in international commerce.

The gateways and corridors (i.e., Atlantic Gateway, Ontario-Quebec Continental Gateway, Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative) are of strategic importance to Canada's trade movements. International pressure is mounting to reduce transportation's environmental impacts, and increasingly, shippers and carriers are looking for ways to green their supply chains. The competitiveness of Canada's system could be enhanced via measures that improve efficiency and reduce emissions in the gateways and corridors.

Program Description

Under this initiative Transport Canada's will:

  • Create an inventory of existing information sources on production and energy consumption for the supply chains of Canada's three gateway and corridor initiatives;
  • Develop and implement data gathering and processing; and,
  • Generate and organize data to quantify the carbon performance of Canada's strategic gateways and trade corridors.

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)

No linkages identified.

Program's Expected Results

This initiative is expected to result in research analysis and collection of data that will help the freight transportation sector and governments to demonstrate the carbon performance of Canada's strategic gateways and trade corridors and make transportation decisions that limit greenhouse gas emissions.

Program's Expected Achievements and Planning Highlights for 2011-2012
 

In 2011-2012, the program’s expected achievements include:

  • An initial detailed work plan with specific tasks.
  • An inventory of relevant data sources available to Transport Canada, on both activities and greenhouse gas emissions by gateway and type of service, including consultations with governmental agencies.
  • Research on models that could be used to produce estimated values for unavailable elements.

Program’s Achieved Results/Performance Summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Developed an initial work plan, including tasks such as:
    • Assessing the level of detail of available data that could match the level required to effectively estimate the carbon footprint of the Canadian Gateways;
    • Reviewing related data development projects, internally and with other government departments and completing a data gap analysis by transportation mode;
    •  Initiating consultations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Smartway Initiative and Smartway Canada to share preliminary information on methodologies and study scope to avoid overlaps and generate possible synergies; and,
    • Exploring potential linkages with the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation and the North American Transportation Statistics Interchange.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $149,079 $63,548

Truck Reservation Systems Program

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Linkage

2.1.2 Clean Transportation Programs

Program Description
 

Background

As container traffic at ports across Canada continues to grow, trucking fleets find it increasingly challenging to access port terminals. Multiple trucks often arrive at port entrances at the same time, causing congestion and contributing to long queues and wait times for entry into the port. Unnecessary greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions result as the trucks idle their engines.

Truck reservation systems use technologies, software, and communications equipment (such as radio-frequency identification tags for vehicles and readers at port and terminal facilities) to allow port operators to schedule the arrival of trucks for pick-up and delivery of containers. They also track trucks, align them with their scheduled time slot, and direct them to the appropriate location within the port facility.

In addition to reducing emissions, truck reservation systems provide advanced freight scheduling, appointment and container tracking information to trucking companies and container terminals, which in turn can provide substantial benefits to the port community at large. These port terminals solutions can alleviate congestion and delays on roads and at the terminal gate, result in fuel savings, and increase overall port/terminal efficiency and competitiveness.

Program Description

Under this initiative, Transport Canada will be looking at ways innovative technology applications and improved operational practices can help increase efficiency and environmental sustainability for port terminal and trucking fleet operators. The department will work with various supply chain participants to better understand the needs, challenges and benefits from a systems perspective.

Work to improve port-related trucking efficiency and environmental sustainability will align with and support Transport Canada's Smart Corridor approaches, which are part of the gateway initiatives. These approaches underline the importance of improved, more interoperable technology systems, and they take a holistic and integrated approach to goods movement.

Transport Canada will provide transfer payment funding to support the deployment of truck reservation systems. Eligible recipients will include port and container terminal operators and trucking operations.

Federal funds will support the installation of technologies, software, and equipment.

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)
 

 

This initiative will lead to reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants, thus supporting:

  • FSDS Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020; and,
  • FSDS Target 2.1 Air Pollutants: Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country to achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultations with provinces and stakeholders.

Program's Expected Results
 

This initiative is expected to result in the implementation of integrated, more efficient truck reservation systems or other technologies and innovative practices to increase efficiencies at Canadian ports and terminals. Key benefits include:

Efficiency Benefits: Alleviating congestion and delays on roads and at terminal gates by enhancing the efficiency of truck freight movements at ports resulting in time and fuel savings, and improved supply chain competitiveness and productivity.

Environmental Benefits: Greening the supply chain by encouraging greater awareness and uptake of proven advanced technologies and best practices that enable operators to reduce truck idling and emissions at port facilities. This initiative is also expected to produce studies and reports that broaden understanding of system technologies.

Economic Benefits: Supporting the supply chain objectives of Canada's major container ports, and working in collaboration with supply chain participants in order to help position Canada's gateways for long-term growth.

Program's Expected Achievements and Planning Highlights for 2011-2012
 
 

In 2011-2012, the program’s expected achievements include

  • Collect information on existing technologies/systems and improvement initiatives aimed at port-related trucking efficiency and environment performance; and
  • Engage in preliminary outreach with port authorities and container terminal operators.

Program’s Achieved Results/Performance Summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Conducted an environmental scan of port efficiency and environmental practices for reducing emissions from port-related trucking at North American and international ports; these practices include reservation systems, as well as a range of anti-idling initiatives, technology applications, operational practices and management strategies.
  • Met with container ports and terminal operators, as well as marine industry associations, to initiate the dialogue among supply chain participants with respect to port-related trucking improvement initiatives.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $64,101 $14,390

Shore Power Technology for Ports Program

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) Linkage

2.1.2 Clean Transportation Programs

Program Description
 

Background

Marine shore power is a leading edge technology that allows ships to plug into the local electrical grid to power the vessel while at port, thereby avoiding the use of diesel auxiliary engines which consume fuel and produce greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions.

Canadian ports are facing barriers to the adoption of marine shore power including the initial capital cost of these installations for the port and terminal operators, the lack of experience in Canada with this technology, and the complexity of contractual arrangements with partners (e.g., utilities, provincial and/or municipal governments) governing access to city electrical grids and power lines. Additionally, the benefits of shore power are shared among many stakeholders, making the business case for investment by the port challenging. These challenges continue to limit the uptake of shore power in Canada. Experience with previous programs has shown that these complex and innovative projects are not likely to happen without federal leadership over the near term.

Vessels entering Canadian coastal ports will be required to burn cleaner fuel to comply with the North American Emission Control Area requirements that came into effect August 1, 2012.  Similarly, marine emission standards on the Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Seaway System will require the use of cleaner fuel.  Shore power will reduce the need to burn this fuel while in ports.

Program Description

Under this initiative Transport Canada will:

  • Provide transfer payment funding to support the deployment of shore power technology in up to six eastern, western coastal or Great Lakes ports for all types of commercial vessels (cruise, container, bulk); and,
  • Share information to inform industry and stakeholders on shore power initiatives.

Transport Canada will provide transfer payment funding ($27.2M over five years) to support the deployment of shore power technology in a range of port and geographical settings. The proposed Shore Power Technology for Ports Program will support coastal or Great Lakes ports for all types of commercial vessels (cruise, container, bulk).

Eligible recipients will include Canadian port authorities and terminal operators. Federal funds will equal no more than 50% of eligible project costs. Eligible expenses will include costs related to research and planning; construction; labour; the purchase, lease, or modification of equipment, or other technologies; and related administrative costs.

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)
 

 

Once fully implemented, the SPTP will lead to reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants, thus supporting:

  • FSDS Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation: Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020; and,
  • FSDS Target 2.1 Air Pollutants: Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country to achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultations with provinces and stakeholders.

Program's Expected Results
 

This initiative is expected to result in the implementation of shore power technologies at Canadian ports. Once these projects are completed, they are expected to result in reduced emission intensity in port facilities.

Transport Canada expects to fund projects yielding estimated total reductions of 217 tonnes of SOx, 422 tonnes of NOx, 34 tonnes of particulate matter and 34 tonnes of CO from port facilities (preliminary estimates). The initiative is also expected to achieve up to 30,000 tonnes in annual greenhouse gas reductions by 2016 (preliminary estimates). These emissions will result from decreased fuel use by ships at port. The initiative could decrease fuel consumption in the marine sector by up to 9.7M litres/year.

This initiative is also expected to produce reports that broaden understanding of shore power facilities. Project reports will describe results and lessons learned from the installation of these technologies. These reports will highlight the potential benefits of Shore Power technologies and help other ports identify partners and sources of capital investment to initiate additional projects.

Program's Expected Achievements and Planning Highlights for 2011-2012
 

In 2011-2012, the program’s expected achievements include:

  • Consultation with key stakeholders on program design
  • Complete program design, program management documents and management systems and controls. (e.g. project management requirements and guidelines, management database, recipient audit approach)
Program’s Achieved Results/Performance Summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Consulted with over 30 representatives from industry stakeholders on final program design in 4 consultation sessions held in Vancouver, Halifax, Montreal and Toronto.
  • Developed application guidelines, a program fact sheet, a draft contribution agreement template and applicants guide.
  • Developed program web site - which went live when the program was announced.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $448,164 $394,818

Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative

Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

1.4 - Transportation Innovation and 2.3 - Environmental Stewardship

Program Description
 

Background

Canada's northern regions depend on reliable transportation links for their social and economic development and prosperity. However, transportation infrastructure in the North is particularly sensitive to environmental change. Increases in ground temperatures and a corresponding loss of integrity in permafrost terrain threaten Canada's northern transportation systems. The systems' safety and effectiveness are being compromised by deteriorating infrastructure and increasing maintenance costs-for roads, airstrips, terminal buildings, and other infrastructure. Northern marine infrastructure is also affected through sea level rise, higher and more violent tides, and shoreline erosion. Other impacts include an increase in winter temperatures, increases in winter precipitation (snow and rain) and more frequent freeze-thaw cycles, all of which have significant impacts on infrastructure.

The Northern Strategy, through its four pillars (economic and social development, governance, environmental protection, and sovereignty), recognizes that Canada's ability to meet the upcoming opportunities and challenges that exist in the North will shape its future. Science and technology underpin the pillars of the Northern Strategy, especially in support of its economic and social development, and environmental objectives. Economic interest in the North has intensified because of the potential for resource development and the opening of new transportation routes, both facilitated and challenged by the growing impacts of climate change. This initiative will complement the Northern Strategy by taking measures to increase our understanding of the vulnerability of the transportation system and associated infrastructure in the North; enabling the department to effectively identify approaches to assist the northern transportation system in adapting to climate change (such as technology implementation); and allowing transportation systems to remain safe, secure and efficient.

Program Description

This initiative will study, develop, and introduce innovative science-based technologies to help improve the resiliency and adaptability of existing and future northern transportation infrastructure. This will be done through strategic partnerships with other federal government departments, territorial and provincial governments, academia and industry to ensure that the limited northern resources are maximized and that knowledge, best practices and adaptive solutions are shared amongst stakeholders.

Building on existing research, this adaptation initiative will focus on increasing capacity among Northerners to adapt transportation infrastructure to a changing climate, thereby ensuring the safety, efficiency and environmental sustainability of that infrastructure.

More specifically, objectives of the initiative include:

  • improved knowledge of the impacts of climate change on transportation infrastructure;
  • an understanding of the future costs associated with maintenance of existing infrastructure in light of climate change impacts;
  • building new science-based capacity;
  • conducting research and development on the technical challenges of adapting northern transportation infrastructure;
  • supporting research to develop and test science-based technologies that address effects of climate change across northern transportation infrastructure; and
  • ensuring that the necessary knowledge is available and provide the appropriate adaptive tools to enable planners and practitioners to make strategic choices in support of Canada's northern transportation system.

Support of Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Target(s)

While this initiative has no direct links to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy , it is linked to other government initiatives and reports. In particular, this initiative will play a role in addressing gaps identified by the DM CCEE Building Resilience to Climate Change policy paper:

1. Improving our understanding of climate change

Technology applications in surface, marine and air transportation will increase our knowledge of the effects climate change is having on northern transportation infrastructure and help identify the most appropriate future measures to manage the risks associated with these changes. It will ensure that essential services continue to be provided to northern communities; increase the safety and security of the northern transportation system; and ultimately lower the risk of disturbing the everyday activities of northern communities. The initiative will contribute to an overall understanding of the vulnerability of the transportation system and associated infrastructure in the North.

2. Building priority-driven partnerships

The initiative necessitates close partnerships with territorial and other governments to address pressing transportation infrastructure risks that are occurring from climate change (e.g., permafrost thaw, seasonal temperature variations, increased precipitation, etc.)

3. Developing policy tools

The initiative will produce valuable knowledge along with technological tools that will inform future policy development and investment decisions in the North.

The initiative will address these key resilience domains by ensuring that existing and new infrastructure for surface, marine and air transportation can withstand new climatic conditions; maintaining the integrity of northern transportation infrastructure and therefore prolonging the lifetime of the infrastructure while minimizing maintenance costs; ensuring northern communities have access to a transportation system that is safe, secure and accessible; and maintaining the efficient flow and movement of people and goods on northern transportation systems.

Program's Expected Results
 

Immediate outputs of this initiative include:

  • Practices, guidelines and maintenance activities to respond to risks and opportunities of climate change;
  • Reports to support future policy development and decision making;
  • Scoping studies to help inform the priorities for funding research and development during the program;
  • Multi-year pilot research and development projects;
  • Testing, deployment and installation of new adaptive technologies;
  • Workshops and case studies that focus on specific problems (e.g., increased ground water flow, airstrip and marine infrastructure vulnerabilities);
  • Working groups, workshops and conferences that foster relationships and knowledge sharing between stakeholders and industry members; and,
  • Training and exchange seminars that help disseminate knowledge or build capacity.
The long term outcome of this initiative is to have increased capacity among Northerners to adapt transportation infrastructure to a changing climate thereby ensuring the safety, efficiency and environmental sustainability of that infrastructure. Where little infrastructure exists at present (as is the case with northern marine infrastructure), adaptation knowledge and technologies will be important for the design, construction and maintenance of infrastructure over the coming decades. Ultimately, this initiative will offer added value toward northern transportation infrastructure choices that optimize resources and justify associated costs.

Program's Expected Achievements and Planning Highlights for 2011-2012
 

In 2011-2012, the initiative’s expected achievements include:

  • Establish a Network of Expertise on Transportation in Arctic Waters and develop research areas for the Network of Expertise on Permafrost. The objectives of the Networks include fostering relationships and knowledge sharing between federal, provincial and territorial representatives, academia and industry, and advising on priority research needs and potential Grants and Contributions projects to be supported by the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative.
     
  • The preparation of a work plan (for execution of work on site  and monitoring in 2012-2016) to conduct research to:
    1. Adapt underground and storm water networks to northern changing climate conditions;
    2. Adapt pavement (macro-texture and grooving) to northern changing climate conditions; and
    3. Adapt reflective pavement surfaces in to reduce heat accumulation in foundation and slow down permafrost thawing.
Program’s Achieved Results/Performance Summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, Transport Canada:

  • Transport Canada established the Network of Expertise on Transportation in Arctic Waters. The Network of Expertise on Transportation in Arctic Waters held its first meeting in Halifax in February 2012.
  • The Network of Expertise on Permafrost identified five research areas for its activities: Baseline identification; Identification of critical location in infrastructure; Fundamental knowledge of in-ground factors affecting permafrost; Innovative adaptation solutions; and Capacity building.
  • In fall 2011 the Network of Expertise on Permafrost recommended a set of projects to Transport Canada for funding approval. Proposed projects are intended to improve our knowledge of the impacts of climate change on transportation infrastructure and associated costs, test technologies to mitigate these impacts, provide the appropriate tools to planners and practitioners to adapt northern transportation infrastructure and build science-based capacity.
  • In February 2012, a contract was allocated to a company in order to get a work plan proposition. Researchers were consulted in March 2012. The work plan is progressing well but, due to the project complexity, some elements are still under development. 

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012 Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $356,490 $358,625

ecoTransport Strategy (2007-2008 to 2010-2011)

Marine Shore Power Program

Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program Description
 

The Marine Shore Power Program demonstrated the installation and use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Canadian ports to reduce emissions idling ship auxiliary engines.  This program concluded on March 31, 2012.

Program's Expected Results
 

The program expected to improve the industry’s knowledge of the level of funding required to build this type of infrastructure, the level of emissions reduction that can be expected, the partnerships required to deliver shore power (e.g. electricity provider) and to document the business case for this technology in Canadian ports. 

The program’s immediate outcomes were as follows:

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions or criteria air contaminants;
  • Increased participation by Target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by Target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances.

The intermediate outcome was as follows:

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse or criteria air contaminants.
  •  The final outcome was as follows:
  • Reductions in energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants from transportation.

Program's Expected Achievements and Planning Highlights for 2011-2012
 

In 2011-2012, the program’s expected achievements included:

  • Finalizing the management and implementation of the Prince Rupert Port Authority project and initiating its measurement strategy.
Program’s Achieved Results/Performance Summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012:

  • The Marine Shore Power Program completed its $1.8 million investment in a marine shore power facility at the Prince Rupert Port Authority.  To date, no ships have connected to the completed shore power system as the shipping line calling at Prince Rupert with shore power capable ships was forced to redeploy these ships to other ports for commercial reasons. Prince Rupert Port Authority is working with the ship owners and the ship operator to bring shore power capable ships to the port of Prince Rupert.
  • The Prince Rupert Port Authority hired a consultant to develop an estimate of the potential greenhouse gas savings that can be achieved by the shore power installations. 
  • Transport Canada initiated discussions with Prince Rupert Port Authority and developed a plan to follow-up with the Port Authority to obtain actual emission reductions once ships have begun to use the facilities.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012

Adjusted Reference
Levels 2011-2012
(includes approved
re-profiling requests and additional TB decisions)

Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $300,000 $1,198,968 $1,037,741

ecoMOBILITY Program

Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program Description
 

The ecoMOBILITY program worked with municipalities to help cut urban-passenger transportation emissions by encouraging Canadians to choose public transit or other sustainable transportation options. Working with cities across Canada, this initiative helped develop programs, services and products that improved sustainable transportation options in urban areas. This program concluded on March 31, 2012.

Program's Expected Results
 

The program’s immediate outcomes were as follows:

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased participation by Target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, Greenhouse Gas or criteria Air Contaminants; and
  • Increased capacity by Target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances.

The program’s intermediate outcome was as follows:

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants.

The program’s final outcome was as follows:

  • Reductions in energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants from transportation.

Program's Expected Achievements and Planning Highlights for 2011-2012
 

In 2011-2012, the program’s expected achievements included:

  • The finalization of projects with municipalities;
  • The review of final reports; and
  • The initiation of the final stage of the measurement strategy.
Program’s Achieved Results/Performance Summary in 2011-2012

In 2011-2012, ten municipalities finalized their eleven Transportation Demand Management projects and Transport Canada:

  • Completed its review and accepted the submitted final reports;
  • Initiated the final stage of the measurement strategy to collect information on the outcomes of the program; 
  • Posted Transportation Demand Management best practices generated by the program on its website and disseminated information through learning events; and
  • Provided a comprehensive compendium of urban transportation best practices results to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (Green Municipal Funds) so that information will continue to be disseminated following completion of the program.

                        2011-2012 Financial Performance
Spending Category Planned Spending 2011-2012

Adjusted Reference
Levels 2011-2012
(includes approved
re-profiling requests and additional TB decisions)

Actual Spending 2011-2012
Total $1,100,000 $1,100,000 $449,236
Date modified: