Appendix B - Cartography Addendum

Table of Contents

Estimated Tonnage of all modes by Province of Origin, 2011

Estimated Tonnage of all modes by Province of Origin, 2011

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[Detailed description of this image]

The map extents show Canada (all provinces and territories) with a pie chart for each province. These pie charts show the proportion of tonnage originating for each province/territory that is Intra-Provincial, Inter-Provincial, Exports to USA and Exports to the Rest of the World. The idea is to show that in the larger provinces Intra-provincial tonnages moved dominate the overall tonnages moved by all modes in the province. Ontario and Quebec followed by Alberta and BC have the largest tonnages originated. For most provinces Exports to USA tonnages tend to be more significant than Exports to the Rest of the World.

 

Note: Each tonne is counted once through the transportation system by the estimates with an attempt to match to the true origin/destination for the entire voyage of the good.

Source: Transport Canada estimates

Estimated Tonnage of all modes by Province of Destination, 2011

Estimated Tonnage of all modes by Province of Destination, 2011

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[Detailed description of this image]

The map extents show Canada (all provinces and territories) with a pie chart for each province. These pie charts show the proportion of tonnage destined for each province that is Intra-Provincial, Inter-Provincial, Imports from USA and Imports from the Rest of the World. The idea is to show that in the larger provinces Intra-provincial tonnages moved dominate the overall tonnages moved by all modes in the province. Ontario and Quebec followed by Alberta and BC have the largest tonnages terminated. For most provinces Imports from USA tonnages tend to be more significant than Imports from the Rest of the World.

 

Note: Each tonne is counted once through the transportation system by the estimates with an attempt to match to the true origin/destination for the entire voyage of the good.

Source: Transport Canada estimates

Total Merchandise Trade with Continental U.S. States by Value, 2011

Total Merchandise Trade with Continental U.S. States by Value, 2011

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The map features the forty eight states of the continental USA. Each state is filled in with one of four shades of green, from light to dark, representing dollar value ranges for two-way merchandise trade with Canada for the entire year 2011. The shades of green get darker as the dollar value of two-way trade increases. Michigan and Illinois are the only states found in the highest range, between forty-five and seventy billion dollars. The broad pattern shows that Canada trades extensively with states in regions including the US Northeast, Great Lakes, Midwest, Pacific coast, and Texas. The least trade is done with states in regions including the US southwest, mid-Atlantic, Gulf coast and southeast.

 

Note: 2011 data is preliminary. See tables EC6, EC8, and EC11 for additional information.

Source: Transport Canada, adapted from Statistics Canada, International Trade database

Total Merchandise Trade With the World by Value, 2011

Total Merchandise Trade With the World by Value, 2011

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The map shows every country in the world. Each country is filled in with one of five shades of green, from light to dark, representing dollar value ranges for two-way merchandise trade with Canada for the entire year 2011. The shades of green get darker as the dollar value of two-way trade increases. The United States is the sole country filled in with the darkest shade, representing five hundred and fifty one billion dollars. This reflects their overwhelming importance to Canadian trade. China, Mexico, the U.K., and Japan form a group of Canada's next most important trading partners, between twenty and seventy five billion dollars per nation. South Korea and the major Western European nations along with Southeast Asia and South America are found in ranges between one and five billion dollars or between five and twenty billion dollars each. Finally, the majority of nations in Eastern Europe, Africa, Central America, and the Middle East had less than one billion dollars of two-way trade with Canada in 2011.

 

Note: 2011 data is preliminary. See table EC18 for additional information.

Source: Transport Canada, adapted from Statistics Canada, International Trade database

Passenger Traffic at National Airport System (NAS) Airports and Top 10 Non-NAS Airports in 2010

Passenger Traffic at National Airport System (NAS) Airports and Top 10 Non-NAS Airports in 2010

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The map of Canada shows all the airports that are a part of Canada's National Airport System (NAS) as well as the top 10 non-NAS airports. The airports, represented by green dots for NAS airports and burgundy ones for non-NAS, vary in size according to the the number of enplaned and deplaned passengers handled at the airport. The are 5 size rages for the NAS airports and 3 for the non-NAS. The largest NAS range between 16.5 million and 30.4 million; Toronto Pearson is the only airport is group. The second range is between 6 and 16.5 million and includes vancouver, Calgary and Montreal. The smallest range is between 90 and 650 thousand and includes airports such as Whitehorse, Prince George, Thunder bay and Saint John, NB. The largest non-NAS range is between 360 thousand and 1.3 million and includes Toronto Billy Bisho, Abbotsford and Fort McMurray.

 

Note: Toronto refers to Pearson and Billy Bishop; Vancouver refers to the International & Harbour airport; Victoria refers to the International & Harbour airport.

Source: Statistics Canada; Transport Canada

Total Aircraft Movements at 20 Busiest Canadian airports, 2011

Total Aircraft Movements at 20 Busiest Canadian airports, 2011

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The map of Canada shows the 20 busiest airports based of total aircraft movements in 2011. The airports are represented by pie charts that vary in size according to the total number of aircraft movements, and use colors to distinguish between itinerant (green) and local (red) movements. The map illustrates that local movements play a very small role at the busiest airports like Toronto - Pearson, Montreal - Trudeau and Vancouver, but are important at secondary airports like Toronto - Buttonville, Montreal - St. Huburt and Abbotsford.

 

Source: Statistics Canada; Transport Canada

Annual Air Passenger Traffic on the 20 Busiest Domestic Routes & Other Routes in 2010

Annual Air Passenger Traffic on the 20 Busiest Domestic Routes & Other Routes in 2010

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The map of Canada shows the locations of airports that provide scheduled air services and how they are connected with one another via air routes. In total, there are two-hundred and fifty-three airports shown as well as five-hundred and forty-two routes between these airports that are displayed like a web. The twenty busiest routes, based on the total number of enplaned and deplaned passengers for 2010, have thicker lines and a unique colour scheme in order to highlight their importance. These twenty routes encompass thirteen airports which include Toronto Pearson, Montreal Trudeau, Vancouver International, along with ten other large airports from coast to coast.

 

Source: Statistics Canada; Transport Canada

The 20 Busiest Transborder Air Routes, 2010

The 20 Busiest Transborder Air Routes, 2010

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The map of Canada and the Continental United States illustrates the 20 busiest transborder air routes based on enplaned and deplaned passenger traffic in 2010. The 20 busiest routes, depicted by 4 unique colors for each value range, involve 4 Canadian cities (Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver) and 13 in the United States. The U.S. cities include, for example, New York, Atlanta, Miami-Fort Lauderdal, Chicago and Los Angeles. Toronto has the most routes in the top 20 with 10.

 

Source: Statistics Canada; Transport Canada

The 15 Busiest International Air Routes, 2010

The 20 Busiest Transborder Air Routes, 2010

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The map of the world shows the 15 busiest routes betweem Canada and the world (excluding the U.S.) based on enplaned and deplaned passsenger traffic in 2010. The 20 busiest routes, depicted by 4 unique colors for each value, involve 4 Canadian cities (Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver) and 10 cities in Europe, Gulf and Carribean and East Asia (China and Japan). Toronto has the most routes in the top 15 with 9.

 

Source: Statistics Canada; Transport Canada

Connectivity of Canadian Airport Hubs to U.S. Airport Hubs and Seat Capacity by Airline Alliance, 2011

Connectivity of Canadian Airport Hubs to U.S. Airport Hubs and Seat Capacity by Airline Alliance, 2011

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The map of Canada and the Continental United States Illustrates the connectivity of Canada's 4 major airport hubs (Montreal - Trudeau, Toronto - Peason, Calgary and Vancouver) to 23 major hubs airports in the U.S. Both the Canadian and U.S. airports are represented by pies charts that vary in size based on the number of departing seats, and are divided by colors that represent the market share of airlines alliances. The is a color group for each of the 3 world airline alliances (Star Alliance, Oneworld and Skyteam) and a group repsented all non-alliance airlines. In addition, there are lines show the direct flights from Canadian airport hubs to American ones. The map clearly shows how each airline alliance has airport hubs that they dominate, and that non-alliance airlines typically have their largest market share at popular U.S. tourist destinatation (e.g. Las Vegas, Fort Lauderdale) and secondary airport hubs (e.g. Calgary, Boston).

 

Source: International Air Transport Association, (IATA) Scheduled Reference Service

Recipient Airports from Airport Capital Assistant Program (ACAP), 2007–2011, $500,000 or more

Recipient Airports from Airport Capital Assistant Program (ACAP), 2007–2011, $500,000 or more

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The map of Canada shows the recipient airports from the Airport Capital Assitant Program (ACAP) for the years 2007-2011 combined. The airports are represented by pie charts that vary in size based on the total amount of spending and are divided in two slices with green representing infrastructure spending and red spending on equipment. The map illustrates that most the ACAP subsidies were invested in airport infrastructure, and that most of the recipient airport were small and located in remote regions.

 

Source: Transport Canada

Tonnage Loaded and Unloaded at Canada Port Authorities (CPA) and Top-5 Non-CPA ports in 2010

Tonnage Loaded and Unloaded at Canada Port Authorities (CPA) and Top-5 Non-CPA ports in 2010

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The map of Canada shows the approximate location of each port with a pie chart for each. The chart shows the total tonnage loaded and unloaded at the port. This is broken down to show the tonnage of containerized and non-containerized (i.e. bulk and break-bulk) cargo. The CPA ports are (in alphabetical order): Belledune, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, Nanaimo, Port Alberni, Prince Rupert, Quebec, Saguenay, Saint John, Sept-Îles, St. John's, Thunder Bay, Toronto, Trois-Rivières, Vancouver Fraser and Windsor. The non-CPA ports shown are (in alphabetical order): Come-By-Chance, Nanticoke, Port Cartier, Port Hawkesbury and Sorel. As noted on the map, Roll-On/Roll-Off cargo is not included. What can be noticed is that the CPA designation does not have to equate with high levels of cargo volumes as the non-CPA ports shown handled much higher tonnage than several CPA ports.

 

Note: The tonnage shown does not include roll-on/roll-off cargo. See table M23 for more information.

Source: Transport Canada

Rail Infrastructure of Canadian Class 1 Rail Freight Carriers

Rail Infrastructure of Canadian Class 1 Rail Freight Carriers

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The map of Canada shows the layout and extent of the rail mainlines belonging to the Class I freight carriers. It does not show lines that are designated as connection lines, spurs or yards. It also does not show other rail lines that are owned by non-Class I freight carriers to which CN or CP may have track usage rights. The major intermodal yards shown are those that are estimated to have handled over 50,000 TEU on average per year from 2008-2010. A TEU is a industry wide standard of measuring containerized cargo. Many of these facilities are located at or near the major sea ports.

 

Note: Only mainlines shown. The major intermodal yards shown are those that are estimated to have handled over 50,000 TEU on average per year from 2008–2010.

Source: Transport Canada

Tonnage Carried on Rail Network by Province of Origin and by Type of Rail Traffic

Tonnage Carried on Rail Network by Province of Origin and by Type of Rail Traffic

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The map of Canada shows a pie chart for each province and for the Northwest Territories. These pie charts show the average amount of Tonnes carried, by point of origin, on the rail network to its destination on the network. The breakdown for this tonnage is by Intraprovincial, Interprovincial, Rail - Land Exports, Rail - Land Imports, Rail - Marine Exports and Rail - Marine Imports. As would be expected there is a lot of Tonnage of heavy bulk goods from Prairies and Western Canada that is being shipped overseas through BC. The large tonnage of rail marine exports for Newfoundland and Labrador is from the iron mines located in Labrador and shipping through Port Cartier and Sept-Îles.

 

Note: Data shown as provided by some rail carriers. Final destination may differ if an additional mode of transportation is used. See tables RA13 and RA24 for more information.

Source: Transport Canada, Rail Traffic Database

Tonne-km by Canadian Class I and Class II Railways by type of Traffic, 2010

Tonne-km by Canadian Class I and Class II Railways by type of Traffic, 2010

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The map extents show Canada (all provinces and territories) with a pie chart for each province. These pie charts show the amount of Tonne-km accumulated by railway freight movements and the breakdown by Intra-Provincial, Originated in the province, Terminated in the province or that flow through the province (not either originating or terminating in the province). As would be expected there is a lot of Tonne-km in BC that is either Intra-provincial or terminating in BC compared to loading or transiting. The prairies primarily have Tonne-km for loading or passing through. Ontario has a lot of Tonne-km passing through (like US and Quebec/Atlantic pairings). Quebec is quite balanced for all 4 types.

 

Note: The tonne-km are provided for some carriers and estimated for some Class II carriers. The breakdown of the tonne-km by province is estimated.

Source: Transport Canada, Rail Traffic Database

Network and Weekly Frequency of Intercity Passenger Rail

Network and Weekly Frequency of Intercity Passenger Rail

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The map of Canada show the extent and coverage of the passenger rail network. Also shown in various line thicknesses is the weekly regularly scheduled service of that service network. Amtrack is the American passenger rail service provider and they provide stand alone service between Vancouver and Seattle WA, and Montreal and New York NY. VIA and Amtrack offer a shared service for the Toronto and Buffalo NY service. The majority of the passenger rail service in Canada, by volume of passenger and frequency of service, lies in the Windsor to Quebec City corridor.

 

Source: Transport Canada and rail company web sites

Weekday Frequency of Scheduled Commuter Rail Service for Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver

Weekday Frequency of Scheduled Commuter Rail Service for Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver

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The maps of the three major metropolitan regions of Canada show the extant and coverage of the local commuter rail lines. These rail commuter lines operate in conjunction with local transit authorities to transport commuters to and from work daily. The frequency shows the number of regularly schedule trips during a typical work week (no weekend service, if provided, is shown). The location and name of the stations served by the commuter line is also shown. Not shown are subways, street cars or other municipal level light rail trains.

 

Source: Transport Canada and commuter rail web sites

National Highway System and Annual Two-Way Traffic Volume at Major Road Border Crossings, 2010

National Highway System and Annual Two-Way Traffic Volume at Major Road Border Crossings, 2010

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The map of Canada shows the locations of the National Highway System and the busiest land border crossings with the United States. The NHS includes over thirty-eight thousand kilometers of Canada’s most important highways from coast to coast, separated into three categories: Core, Feeder, and Northern & Remote. Each of the seventeen land border crossings featured has a pie chart with two slices. The size of each pie is the total number of vehicles that used the crossing in 2011 in both directions. One slice shows the number commercial trucks and the other slice shows passenger vehicles and buses. Southern Ontario has the land border crossings with the highest bi-directional traffic volume, including Ambassador Bridge in Windsor, Bluewater Bridge in Sarnia, and Peace Bridge in Fort Erie. Lacolle, Quebec and Pacific Highway, BC are two other high volume land border crossings.

 

Note: Two-way traffic volumes were estimated by doubling one-way flows northbound into Canada.

Source: NHS system from Transport Canada based on the National Road Network created by Natural Resources Canada. Traffic volumes from Transport Canada, adapted from Statistics Canada, International Travel section, and other unpublished statistics.

Tonne-km by Large Canadian For-Hire Trucking Firms by type of Traffic, 2009

Tonne-km by Large Canadian For-Hire Trucking Firms by type of Traffic, 2009

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[Detailed description of this image]

The map extents show Canada (all provinces and territories) with a pie chart for each province. These pie charts show the amount of Tonne-km accumulated by For-hire Canadian trucking firms by province by their size and the breakdown by Intra-Provincial, Originated in the province, Terminated in the province or that flow through the province (not either originating or terminating in the province). Quebec is shown as having a larger share of its Tonne-km being Intra-provincial than Ontario. Manitoba and Saskatchewan have a large proportion of traffic going through the province than any of the other breakdowns. Ontario, Quebec and Alberta have the most Tonne-km’s accumulated for the Road mode.

 

Note: The data is waybill based so the tonne-km are estimated by Statistics Canada and the division by province are estimated by Transport Canada.

Source: Statistics Canada, Truck Commodity Origin-Destination Survey, 2009.

Weekly Frequency of Intercity Bus Service by Route and at Key Stations (Dec. 2011)

Weekly Frequency of Intercity Bus Service by Route and at Key Stations (Dec. 2011)

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The map of Canada shows the network of highways and roads over which scheduled intercity bus carriers are traveling, as well as the locations of key bus stations. The thickness of each road segment is variable based on the number of buses per week traveling on it. The roads featuring a high weekly frequency of bus trips include the 400 Series highways in Ontario, Autoroutes 20 and 40 in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II Highway in Alberta, and Highway 1 in British Columbia. The cities with the most available weekly bus trips are Toronto, Montreal, Quebec City, Vancouver, and Ottawa; where a total of at least five-hundred buses are available per week.

 

Source: Various bus schedules (from bus lines themselves or from Russell’s Guide, Fall 2011).

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