Emergency Directive and Rules Respecting Key Trains and Key Routes Comparison Table

  Emergency Directive issued by Transport Canada
(in effect from 17 August 2015 to 18 February 2016)
Rules approved by Transport Canada
(effective 19 February 2016)

  CMA Definition

“Within Census Metropolitan Areas” means population centres defined by Statistics Canada as core (i.e., at least 50,000 persons) and secondary core (i.e., at least 10,000 persons) of CMAs. The list of CMAs will be amended should updates by Statistics Canada become available.

“Within Census Metropolitan Areas (CMA’s)” means population centres defined and published by Statistics Canada as core (i.e., at least 50,000 persons) and secondary core (i.e., at least 10,000 persons) of CMAs.

Key Route Definition

“Key Route” means any track on which, over a period of one year, is carried 10,000 or more loaded tank cars or loaded intermodal portable tanks containing dangerous goods, as defined in the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 or any combination thereof that includes 10,000 or more loaded tank cars and loaded intermodal portable tanks.

“Key Route” means any track on which, over a period of one year, is carried 10,000 or more loaded tank cars or loaded intermodal portable tanks containing dangerous goods, as defined in the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 or any combination thereof that includes 10,000 or more loaded tank cars and loaded intermodal portable tanks.

Key Train Definition

Key Train” means an engine with cars:

  1. that includes one or more loaded tank cars of dangerous goods that are included in Class 2.3, Toxic Gases and of dangerous goods that are toxic by inhalation subject to Special Provision 23 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations; or
  2. that includes 20 or more loaded tank cars or loaded intermodal portable tanks containing dangerous goods, as defined in the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 or any combination thereof that includes 20 or more loaded tank cars and loaded intermodal portable tanks.

“Key Train” means an engine with cars:

  1. that includes one or more loaded tank cars of dangerous goods that are included in Class 2.3, Toxic Gases and of dangerous goods that are toxic by inhalation subject to Special Provision 23 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations; or
  2. that includes 20 or more loaded tank cars or loaded intermodal portable tanks containing dangerous goods, as defined in the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 or any combination thereof that includes 20 or more loaded tank cars and loaded intermodal portable tanks.

CMAs/Additional Speed Restrictions

Not operate a Key Train at a speed that exceeds 50 miles per hour (MPH) and not in excess of 40 MPH within Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs).

Companies must restrict Key Trains to a maximum speed of 50 miles per hour (MPH). Companies must further restrict Key Trains to a maximum speed of 40 MPH within the core and secondary core of Census Metropolitan Areas.

Tank Cars and Dangerous Goods

Not operate a Key Train transporting one or more DOT-111 loaded tank cars containing UN1170 ETHANOL, UN1202 DIESEL FUEL, UN1203 GASOLINE, UN1267 PETROLEUM CRUDE OIL, UN1268 PETROLEUM DISTILLATES, N.O.S., UN1863 FUEL, AVIATION, TURBINE ENGINE, UN1993 FLAMMABLE LIQUID, N.O.S., UN3295 HYDROCARBONS, LIQUID, N.O.S., UN1987 ALCOHOLS N.O.S., UN3494 PETROLEUM SOUR CRUDE OIL, FLAMMABLE, TOXIC or UN3475 ETHANOL AND GASOLINE MIXTURE at a speed that exceeds 40 MPH in areas identified as higher risk through the risk assessment process referred to in this Emergency Directive.  The DOT-111 tank cars include those that are CPC-1232 specification.

Companies must restrict Key Trains transporting one or more DOT-111 loaded tank cars containing UN1170 ETHANOL, UN1202 DIESEL FUEL, UN1203 GASOLINE, UN1267 PETROLEUM CRUDE OIL, UN1268 PETROLEUM DISTILLATES, N.O.S., UN1863 FUEL, AVIATION, TURBINE ENGINE, UN1993 FLAMMABLE LIQUID, N.O.S., UN3295 HYDROCARBONS, LIQUID, N.O.S., UN1987 ALCOHOLS N.O.S., UN3494 PETROLEUM SOUR CRUDE OIL, FLAMMABLE, TOXIC or UN3475 ETHANOL AND GASOLINE MIXTURE to a maximum speed of 40 MPH in areas identified as higher risk through the risk assessment process as required under item 6 of this Rule.  The DOT-111 tank cars include those that are CPC-1232 specification.

Key Routes

Develop instructions to be issued to operating employees setting out the speed and mile posts within which the speed restrictions referred to in Items 1 and 2 of this Emergency Directive are applicable.  A company shall not operate a Key Train otherwise than in accordance with the instructions developed.

Companies must communicate to operating employees where speed restrictions identified in 4.1 and 4.2 apply using appropriate location information and must include mileage. This is not required when maximum track speed is lower than or equal to the speed of the restriction.

Meeting / Passing points

Have the Key Train hold the main track at meeting or passing points unless the siding track meets Transport Canada Class 2 requirements as per the Rules Respecting Track Safety.  In situations where the siding does not meet Transport Canada Class 2 requirements as per the Rules Respecting Track Safety, the Key Train may operate on the siding at a speed not exceeding 10 MPH instead of holding the main track when it is operationally infeasible or the non-Key Train is a passenger train.

 

Key Trains must hold the main track at meeting or passing points unless the siding track meets at a minimum Class 2 track requirements. In situations where the siding does not meet at a minimum Class 2 track requirements, a Key Train may operate on the siding at a speed not exceeding 10 MPH in the following situations:

  1. The non-Key Train is a passenger train; or
  2. Two Key Trains are meeting or passing; or
  3. The siding cannot accommodate the length of the non-Key Train; or
  4. There is insufficient clearance in the siding for the non-Key Train; or
  5. The main track is impassible; or
  6. The Key Train is being staged; or
  7. The crew operating the Key Train is going to be relieved because they have reached their regulated on duty time limit.

Roller Bearings

Not operate a Key Train with any cars not equipped with roller bearings

A company must only operate a Key Trains with cars that are equipped with roller bearings.

Defective Equipment

Perform an inspection of any bearing on a Key Train reported defective by a Wayside Defective Bearing Detector.  If any such inspection confirms that a bearing on a car of a Key Train is defective, companies are to set off that car from the Key Train or must only operate the Key Train at a safe speed not exceeding 15 MPH until the car with the defective bearing is set off.  If the inspection performed on a bearing of a car of a Key Train reported by a Wayside Defective Bearing Detector fails to confirm a defect in a bearing, companies must not operate the Key Train at a speed exceeding 30 MPH until the next operational Wayside Defective Bearing Detector location.  If a defect in a bearing of the same car of a Key Train is reported by two consecutive Wayside Defective Bearing Detectors, companies must set off that car from the Key Train or must only operate the Key Train at a safe speed not exceeding 15 MPH until the car with the defective bearing is set off.

A company must perform an inspection of any bearing of a Key Train reported defective by a Wayside Defective Bearing Detector (WDBD).
 

  1. When a bearing of a Key Train is reported defective by a WDBD, the company must bring the Key Train to a safe and controlled stop immediately after the full Key Train has been inspected by the WDBD site and a visual inspection must be performed.
  2. If the inspection confirms that a bearing is defective the company must set off that car.  The Key Train must be restricted to a safe operating speed not exceeding a maximum of 15 MPH until the car with the defective bearing is set off.
  3. If the inspection fails to confirm a defect in a bearing, a company must restrict the Key Train to a speed not exceeding 30 MPH until the next operational WDBD location.
  4. If the same bearing on a car in the Key Train is reported defective by two consecutive WDBDs, a company must set off that car from the Key Train. The Key Train must be restricted to a safe speed not exceeding 15 MPH until the car with the defective bearing is set off.

Track Inspections

Before the expiration of this Emergency Directive, inspect any Key Route main track on which a Key Train is operated using a Heavy Track Geometry Vehicle and Rail Flaw Detector.  In situations where a Heavy Track Geometry Vehicle is unavailable, inspect any Key Route main track on which a Key Train is operated at least once with a Rail Flaw Detector and at least twice, with no more than 100 days between inspections, with a Light Track Geometry Vehicle (only where Light Track Geometry Vehicles are allowed as defined in the Rules Respecting Track Safety).

A company must conduct rail flaw inspections not less than twice annually on main track and subdivision track portions of Key Routes.

A company must conduct an electronic geometry inspection not less than twice annually on main track and subdivision track portions of Key Routes using a heavy geometry inspection vehicle.  A light geometry inspection vehicle may be used in lieu of a heavy geometry inspection vehicle only as permitted in the Rules Respecting Track Safety.  If a light geometry inspection vehicle is used in lieu of a heavy geometry inspection vehicle, inspections must be conducted not less than three times annually.

A company must inspect joint bars on the main track and subdivision track portions of a Key Route in continuous welded rail territory by a walking inspection or electronic inspection by means of a camera or other technology capable of detecting joint bar defects.

A company must have procedures in place for the repair of joint bars in continuous welded rail territory.  When a repair is temporary, company procedures must indicate the frequency at which the repair will be inspected until it is permanently repaired.
Companies must install WDBDs on Key Routes.  Companies must ensure that Key Trains do not proceed more than 40 miles on a Key Route without having received a valid inspection by a WDBD, or a passing inspection on both sides of the Key Train as per Rule 110 of the Canadian Rail Operating Rules, or a pull-by inspection on both sides of the Key Train by the Key Train crew.  The results of the passing inspection must be communicated to the Key Train crew and recorded by the Key Train crew to be considered a valid inspection. 

Risk Assessments

Complete within six months from the date of this Emergency Directive, a Risk Assessment that will determine the level of risk associated with each Key Route over which a Key Train is operated by the company.  The risk assessment must:

  • identify safety and security risks associated with that route, including  the volume of goods moved on that route, the class of track on that route, the maintenance schedule of the track on that route, the curvature of the track on that route, the environmentally sensitive or significant areas along that route, the population density along that route, emergency response capability along that route and the areas of high consequence along the route;
  • identify and compare alternative routes for safety and security; and
  • factor potential or future railway operational changes such as new customers moving goods subject to an Emergency Response Assistance Plan under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 or municipal changes due to population growth, for routing restrictions. 

Item 8 does not apply to a company that has already completed a risk assessment as per Item 7 of the Emergency Directives issued on April 23, 2014, October 23, 2014, February 16, 2015, March 26, 2015 or June 19, 2015.

Companies shall conduct risk assessments and periodic updates based on significant change to determine the level of risk associated with each Key Route over which Key Trains are operated by the company.  These Key Route Risk Assessments must be conducted for all Key Routes, at a minimum, every three (3) years and must, at a minimum:

  1. define each Key Route using appropriate location information such as subdivision or spur names and relevant mile ranges;
  2. identify and describe all relevant safety and security related risks associated with each Key Route;
  3. identify, evaluate and compare alternative routes, over which the company has authority to operate;
  4. identify areas of higher risk where the speed restriction referred to in 4.2 may apply;
  5. factor potential or future significant railway operational changes such as new customers moving goods subject to an Emergency Response Assistance Plan under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 and population growth;
  6. identify and define the factors taken into account in assessing the safety and security related risks associated with each Key Route including:
    1. Annual volumes and types of dangerous goods being transported by class and division;
    2. Rail traffic density;
    3. Trip length for route;
    4. Presence and characteristics of railway facilities;
    5. Track type, class, and maintenance schedule;
    6. Track grade and curvature;
    7. Presence or absence of signals and train control systems along the route (“dark” versus signaled territory);
    8. Presence or absence of wayside hazard detectors;
    9. Number and types of grade crossings;
    10. Single versus double track territory;
    11. Frequency and location of track turnouts;
    12. Proximity to iconic targets and natural hazards;
    13. Environmentally sensitive or significant areas;
    14. Population density along the route;
    15. Venues along the route (stations, events, places of congregation);
    16. Emergency response capability and capacity along the route including training of local fire services and municipalities with respect to the volumes and types of dangerous goods being transported;
    17. Areas of high consequence along the route;
    18. Presence of passenger traffic along route (shared track);
    19. Speed of train operations;
    20. Proximity to en-route storage or repair facilities;
    21. Known threats, including any non-public threat scenarios;
    22. Measures in place to address apparent safety and security risks including those pertaining to situations and locations where unattended equipment could move uncontrollably should its means of securement fail;
    23. Availability of practicable alternative routes;
    24. Past incidents;
    25. Overall times in transit;
    26. Training and skill level of crews;
    27. Impact on rail network traffic and congestion; and
    28. Geohazards.

 

Consultation with municipalities and other local governments

n/a

Companies will incorporate input from municipal and other levels of local government on safety and security concerns in Key Route risk assessments using the following process.

  1. Companies will provide contact information through a publicly-accessible web site, as well as to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. The Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) or designate of a municipal or other level of local government can use the contact information to submit safety and security concerns for companies to consider in Key Route risk assessments.
  2. Companies will respond to municipal or other levels of local government regarding, for example, how the risks they have identified are being mitigated. In all cases, companies will acknowledge receipt.
  3. Paragraph (b) does not require companies to disclose information that is deemed confidential by the company if the CAO, or the designate, of the municipal or other level of local government has not undertaken in writing to:
    1. Disclose the information only to those persons who need to know; and,
    2. Keep the information confidential and ensure any person to whom the CAO, or the designate, has disclosed the information keeps it confidential, to the maximum extent permitted by law.
  4. Companies will keep records of comments and concerns regarding safety and security from municipal or other levels of local government, as well as any company responses to the municipal or other levels of local government regarding these comments and concerns for a period of seven years. 
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