Guide for Reporting Dangerous Goods Incidents

TP 15294E
December 2016

Contents

Introduction

This guide is for any person involved in any way with the transport of dangerous goods. During such activities, incidents may occur that may lead to spills.

In these cases, the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 (TDG Act) provides that any person who has the charge, management or control of a means of containment (you, e.g. a driver, a company representative, a shipmaster, a train operator etc.) shall report any release or anticipated release (e.g. spills, accidents), loss or theft of dangerous goods that is, or could be, in excess of a quantity or concentration specified by regulation from the means of containment if it endangers, or could endanger, public safety.

Note: This guide is for reference only, and has no legal force or effect. Consignors, carriers and consignees are responsible for consulting the TDG Regulations to determine exact requirements. If there is a conflict between the guide and the TDG Regulations, the TDG Regulations takes precedence.

Types of Reports Required by Transport Canada

Part 8 of the TDG Regulations (Reporting Requirements) requires a number of different report types. When certain conditions are met, persons subject to the TDG Regulations must submit one of the report types below.

This guide presents the conditions for each type of report for reference only. To be certain whether or not you need to make a report, please consult Part 8 of the TDG Regulations.

Must I Make an Emergency Report by Telephone (Road, Rail or Marine)?

The flowchart below should help you answer this question (Section 8.2 of the TDG Regulations). Annex F contains a list of local authorities responsible for responding to emergencies. For a list of information to provide, please refer to Annex A (Section 8.3 of the TDG Regulations).

  • Text description of image

    Flowchart for Emergency Report – Road, Rail or Marine

    Does the release or anticipated release exceed the quantity in the table and endanger or could it endanger public safety?

    • No : Report not required
    • Yes : Emergency Report by telephone must be done to local authorities responsible for responding to emergencies, Refer to Release or Anticipated Release Report - Road Rail or Marine.
Class Packing Group or Category Quantity
1 II Any quantity
2 Not applicable Any quantity
3, 4, 5, 6.1 or 8 I or II Any quantity
3, 4, 5, 6.1 or 8 III 30 L or 30 kg
6.2 A or B Any quantity
7 Not applicable A level of ionizing radiation greater than the level established in section 39 of the "Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015"
9 II or III, or without packing group 30 L or 30 kg

When Should I Make a Release or Anticipated Release Report - Road, Rail or Marine by Telephone?

The flowchart below should help you answer this question (Section 8.4 of the TDG Regulations). For a list of information to provide, please refer to Annex A (Section 8.5 of the TDG Regulations).

Note: This report is only required if an emergency report was made and it meets the requirements of Section 8.4.

  • Text description of image

    Flowchart for Release or Anticipated Release Report - Road, Rail or Marine

    Did the release or anticipated release resulted in: the death of a person; the treatment of a person's injuries by a health care professional; an evacuation or shelter in place; the closure of a facility, road, main railway line, main waterway

    Or if: the means of containment has been damaged so that its integrity is compromised; the centre sill or stub sill of a tank car is broken or has a crack in the metal of at least 15 cm (6 in)?

    • No : Report not required
    • Yes : Release or Anticipated Release Report – Road, Rail or Marine (Section 8.4 of the TDGR) must be submitted to : CANUTEC at 1-888-CAN-UTEC (226-8832), 613-996-6666 or *666 on a cell phone; and the consignor. Are the dangerous goods included in Class 7?
      • No: Are you considered marine transport?
        • No : Are you considered Road transport?
          • No : refer to the 30-Day Follow-Up Report (Form TP16-0086)
          • Yes : Please take note that the company policy may require you to make a telephone report to: the employer; or for a road vehicle, the vehicle's owner, lessee or charterer. Refer to the 30-Day Follow-Up Report (Form TP16-0086).
        • Yes : A report must be made to a Vessel Traffic Services Centre or a Canadian Coast Guard radio station. Refer to the 30-Day Follow-Up Report (Form TP16-0086).
      • Yes : A report must be made to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. Refer to the 30-Day Follow-Up Report (Form TP16-0086).

When Should I Make a Dangerous Goods Accident or Incident - Air Report by Telephone?

The flowchart below should help you answer this question (Section 8.9 of the TDG Regulations). For a list of information to provide, please refer to Annex A (Section 8.10 of the TDG Regulations).

  • Text description of image

    Does the release or anticipated release endanger or could it endanger public safety?

    Does the release or anticipated release exceed the quantity in the table?

    Does the release or anticipated release results in: death or injury to a person; property or environmental damage; serious jeopardy to persons or aircraft; an evacuation or shelter in place; the closure of an air cargo facility, aerodrome or runway?

    Are there are signs that the integrity of the means of containment is compromised?

    • No : No further action required from a TDG perspective
    • Yes : Dangerous Goods Accident or Incident Report – Air (Section 8.9 of the TDGR) must be made to : CANUTEC at 1-888-CAN-UTEC (226-8832), 613-996-6666 or *666 on a cell phone. Are the dangerous goods included in Class 7?
      • No : Refer to the 30-Day Follow-up Report (Form TP16-0086)
      • Yes : A report must be made to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. Refer to the 30-Day Follow-up Report (Form TP16-0086).
Class Quantity
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 or 9 Any quantity
7 A level of ionizing radiation greater than the level established in section 39 of the "Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015"

Must I Make an Undeclared or Misdeclared Dangerous Goods Report - Air?

The flowchart below should help you answer this question (Section 8.14 of the TDG Regulations). For a list of information to provide, please refer to Annex A (Section 8.15 of the TDG Regulations).

  • Text description of image

    Discovery of dangerous goods that have none of the documentation or dangerous goods marks set out in Parts 1 to 6 and Part 8 of the ICAO Technical Instructions after it's been accepted for transport.

    Report of Undeclared or Misdeclared Dangerous Goods (Section 8.14 of the TDGR) - CANUTEC at 1-888-CAN-UTEC (226-8832), 613-996-6666 or *666 on a cell phone.

When Should I Make a Loss or Theft Report (All Modes of Transport) by Telephone?

As soon as possible after discovering the loss or theft of dangerous goods referred to in items 1, 2 and 3 while they were being imported, offered for transport, handled or transported, a report must be made to the following persons (Section 8.16 of the TDG Regulations):

  • CANUTEC, at 1-888-CAN-UTEC (1-888-226-8832) or 613-996-6666 or *666 on a cell phone
  • If dangerous goods are Class 1 (Explosives) or listed in Item 1 below, a Natural Resources Canada inspector at 613-995-5555
  • If dangerous goods are Class 7 (Radioactive Materials), the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
    1. Any quantity of one of these dangerous goods:
      • UN1261, NITROMETHANE,
      • UN1357, UREA NITRATE, WETTED with not less than 20% water by mass,
      • UN1485, POTASSIUM CHLORATE,
      • UN1486, POTASSIUM NITRATE,
      • UN1487, POTASSIUM NITRATE AND SODIUM NITRITE MIXTURE,
      • UN1489, POTASSIUM PERCHLORATE,
      • UN1495, SODIUM CHLORATE,
      • UN1498, SODIUM NITRATE,
      • UN1499, SODIUM NITRATE AND POTASSIUM NITRATE MIXTURE,
      • UN1511, UREA HYDROGEN PEROXIDE,
      • UN1796, NITRATING ACID MIXTURE with more than 50% nitric acid,
      • UN1826, NITRATING ACID MIXTURE, SPENT, with not more than 50% nitric acid,
      • UN1942, AMMONIUM NITRATE with not more than 0.2% combustible substances, including any organic substance calculated as carbon, to the exclusion of any other added substance,
      • UN2014, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, AQUEOUS SOLUTION with not less than 20% but not more than 60% hydrogen peroxide (stabilized as necessary),
      • UN2015, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, AQUEOUS SOLUTION, STABILIZED with more than 60% hydrogen peroxide; or HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, STABILIZED,
      • UN2031, NITRIC ACID, other than red fuming,
      • UN2032, NITRIC ACID, RED FUMING,
      • UN3149, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND PEROXYACETIC ACID MIXTURE with acid(s), water and not more than 5% peroxyacetic acid, STABILIZED,
      • UN3370, UREA NITRATE, WETTED, with not less than 10% water by mass;
    2. Any quantity of dangerous goods in the following primary and subsidiary classes:
      • Explosives included in Class 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3,
      • Toxic gases included in Class 2.3,
      • Organic peroxides included in Class 5.2, Type B, liquid or solid, temperature controlled,
      • Toxic substances included in Class 6.1 and Packing Group I,
      • Infectious substances included in Class 6.2,
      • Radioactive materials included in Class 7;
    3. A total quantity of 450 kg or more, in the case of dangerous goods in the following primary and subsidiary classes:
      • Explosives included in Class 1.4 (except for 1.4S), 1.5 or 1.6,
      • Flammable gases included in Class 2.1,
      • Flammable liquids included in Class 3,
      • Desensitized explosives included in Class 3 or 4.1,
      • Substances liable to spontaneous combustion, pyrophoric solids or liquids, included in Class 4.2 and Packing Group I or II,
      • Water-reactive substances included in Class 4.3 and Packing Group I or II,
      • Oxidizing substances included in Class 5.1 and Packing Group I or II,
      • Corrosives included in Class 8 and Packing Group I or II.

For a list of information to provide, please refer to Annex B (Section 8.17 of the TDG Regulations).

When Should I Make an Unlawful Interference Report (All Modes of Transport) by Telephone?

As soon as possible after the discovery of unlawful interference with dangerous goods, while they were being imported, offered for transport, handled or transported, (Section 8.18, TDG Regulations) a report must be made to:

  • CANUTEC, at 1-888-CAN-UTEC (1-888-226-8832) or 613-996-6666 or *666 on a cell phone
  • In the case of dangerous goods included in Class 1, Explosives included in Class 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 (except for 1.4S), 1.5 or 1.6, a Natural Resources Canada inspector at 613-995-5555
  • In the case of dangerous goods included in Class 7, Radioactive Materials, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
    1. One of these dangerous goods:
      • UN1261, NITROMETHANE,
      • UN1357, UREA NITRATE, WETTED with not less than 20% water by mass,
      • UN1485, POTASSIUM CHLORATE,
      • UN1486, POTASSIUM NITRATE,
      • UN1487, POTASSIUM NITRATE AND SODIUM NITRITE MIXTURE,
      • UN1489, POTASSIUM PERCHLORATE,
      • UN1495, SODIUM CHLORATE,
      • UN1498, SODIUM NITRATE,
      • UN1499, SODIUM NITRATE AND POTASSIUM NITRATE MIXTURE,
      • UN1511, UREA HYDROGEN PEROXIDE,
      • UN1796, NITRATING ACID MIXTURE with more than 50% nitric acid,
      • UN1826, NITRATING ACID MIXTURE, SPENT, with not more than 50% nitric acid,
      • UN1942, AMMONIUM NITRATE with not more than 0.2% total combustible material, including any organic substance calculated as carbon, to the exclusion of any other added substance,
      • UN2014, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, AQUEOUS SOLUTION with not less than 20% but not more than 60% hydrogen peroxide (stabilized as necessary),
      • UN2015, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, AQUEOUS SOLUTION, STABILIZED with more than 60% hydrogen peroxide; or HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, STABILIZED,
      • UN2031, NITRIC ACID, other than red fuming,
      • UN2032, NITRIC ACID, RED FUMING,
      • UN3149, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND PEROXYACETIC ACID MIXTURE with acid(s), water and not more than 5% peroxyacetic acid, STABILIZED; and
      • UN3370, UREA NITRATE, WETTED, with not less than 10% water by mass.

For a list of information to provide, please refer to Annex B (Section 8.19 of the TDG Regulations).

Overview

Why Use This Guide?

This guide aims to familiarize you with report requirements and to help you prepare the 30-Day Follow-up Report using the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Directorate's 30-Day Follow-up Report form if the person required to report wishes to use it.

Please note: While the 30-Day Follow-up Report is a TDG Regulations requirement, using the form is voluntary. We created this form to help you meet the 30-day follow-up report requirements. It provides space for all information required under Section 8.7 and 8.12 of the TDG Regulations. The form and Guide will also offer spaces to provide voluntary information that will be used by Transport Canada (TC) for research and evaluation. The guide tells you clearly when the information is to be provided voluntarily.

Remember: This guide is for reference only and has no legal force or effect. Consignors, carriers and consignees are responsible for consulting the TDG Regulations to determine exact requirements. If there is ever a conflict between the guide and the TDG Regulations, the TDG Regulations takes precedence.

Mirrors the Form

The form is easy to complete, and the guide follows the same format to make it easy for you to find sections where you may need advice or assistance.

To better understand the form's definitions and basic concepts, we strongly suggest you read "Understanding Part 8, TDG Regulations Reporting Requirements".

Provides resources

Throughout the guide we provide information and tips for completing the form. Each section also includes links to:

  • The relevant section of the TDG Regulations; or
  • Any other available information or resources.

Understanding Part 8, TDG Regulations Reporting Requirements

Before you start to complete the form, we suggest you become familiar with:

  • the terms most often used in the incident report involving dangerous goods; and
  • various important concepts to understand TDG Regulations Part 8 reporting requirements.

You can find the official definitions in Section 1.4 of the TDG Regulations or in the TDG Act, both of which have force of law. Undefined words have the same meaning as in the dictionary.

What is an aerodrome?

The online tool "Termium Plus" defines an aerodrome as:

A defined area on land or water (including any buildings, installations and equipment) intended to be used either wholly or in part for the arrival, departure and surface movement of aircraft. (Definition officially approved by ICAO)

What is an air cargo facility?

An air cargo facility is used to receive or transfer cargo that is transported or to be transported by aircraft.

What is an anticipated release?

Anticipated release means that, for example:

  1. An incident has occurred and dangerous goods will likely have to be transferred to another means of containment;
  2. A means of containment is damaged to the extent that its integrity is compromised and dangerous goods could be released; or
  3. A means of containment is lost in navigable waters.
For example:
  • Package of lithium batteries with signs of overheating.
  • Rail tank car with a dent on the side.
  • Gas cylinder with a damaged valve.
  • Container of infectious material with damaged outer packaging.
  • Waves breaking over the deck in a storm swept a container out to sea.

What is CANUTEC?

CANUTEC means the Canadian Transport Emergency Center of the Department of Transport. It is operated by TC's Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Directorate.

In the event of an emergency involving dangerous goods, call CANUTEC at 1-888-CAN-UTEC (226-8832), 613-996-6666 or *666 on a cellular phone. CANUTEC's emergency response advisors provide immediate advice over the phone about the actions to take and to avoid during a dangerous goods emergency. They can also send technical information to local authorities responsible for responding to emergencies by email or fax during an incident.

What is meant by closure?

Facility

In the transport of dangerous goods, a facility closure refers to the full or partial closure of any facility where dangerous goods are handled.

For example:
  • A release occurs on loading dock No. 10 of a plant. The plant closes one dock for the day for cleaning, though the plant's other departments continue operations.
  • A derailment occurs in the yard of a plant. The lines are closed for a few hours while responders transfer the cargo to another tank car and place the first car back on the rails.
Railway Line

In the transport of dangerous goods, a railway line is considered closed when movements are impossible for any period of time (whether for a few minutes, a few hours or a few days) due to a release or anticipated release of dangerous goods.

For example:
  • A train carrying dangerous goods derails on the main railway line, causing a release due to damage to the tank car. Trains cannot use the line until the site is cleaned up.
  • A tank car carrying dangerous goods is involved in a collision at a level crossing. Transportation routes are closed until the site is cleaned up.
Road

In the transport of dangerous goods, a road closure is any change in the traffic patterns of a private or public roadway including its full or partial closure, whether due to the release of dangerous goods or their transfer in the event of an anticipated release.

For example:
  • After a release occurs on the westbound highway 417, one westbound lane is temporarily closed while the two eastbound lanes remain open to traffic.
  • A tank truck is on its side in a ditch on a rural road and the dangerous goods are transferred to a second tank truck. After creating a buffer zone with pylons, traffic is allowed through one lane at a time.
  • A train derails, and a release occurs on the railway lines near a road. The road is closed to all traffic to protect the public, secure the perimeter and do cleanup.
Waterway

In the transport of dangerous goods, a waterway closure refers to the full or partial closure of a waterway where dangerous goods are transported.

What is a compliance mark?

The TDG Act defines a compliance mark as:

A symbol, device, sign, label, placard, letter, word, number or abbreviation, or any combination of those things, that is to be displayed on a means of containment used or intended to be used in importing, offering for transport, handling or transporting dangerous goods to indicate compliance with a safety standard that applies under the regulations

For example:

Box marked with UN1090 acetone presenting the compliance mark number

What is a consignor?

Under the TDG Regulations, a consignor:

Means a person in Canada who:

  1. Is named in a shipping document as the consignor;
  2. Imports or who will import dangerous goods into Canada;
  3. If paragraphs (a) and (b) do not apply, has possession of dangerous goods immediately before they are in transport.

A person may be both a consignor and a carrier of the same consignment, for example, a manufacturer who also transports the dangerous goods he or she produces.

What are dangerous goods?

Under the TDG Act, dangerous goods:

Means a product, substance or organism included by its nature or by the regulations in any of the classes listed in the schedule to the Act.

Schedule to the Act

  • Class 1
    Explosives, including explosives within the meaning of the "Explosives Act"
  • Class 2
    Gases: compressed, deeply refrigerated, liquefied or dissolved under pressure
  • Class 3
    Flammable and combustible liquids
  • Class 4
    Flammable solids; substances liable to spontaneous combustion; substances that on contact with water emit flammable gases
  • Class 5
    Oxidizing substances; organic peroxides
  • Class 6
    Poisonous (toxic) and infectious substances
  • Class 7
    Nuclear substances, within the meaning of the "Nuclear Safety and Control Act", that are radioactive
  • Class 8
    Corrosives
  • Class 9
    Miscellaneous products, substances or organisms considered by the Governor in Council to be dangerous to life, health, property or the environment when handled, offered for transport or transported and prescribed to be included in this class

In the TDG Regulations, the words "Class 7, Radioactive Materials" are used rather than the words that are used in the schedule to the Act, "Class 7, Nuclear Substances within the meaning of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, that are radioactive" so that the Regulations are more easily read in conjunction with international documents incorporated by reference in them.

What is a dangerous goods mark?

The TDG Act defines a dangerous goods mark as:

A symbol, device, sign, label, placard, letter, word, number or abbreviation, or any combination of those things, that is to be displayed to indicate the presence or nature of danger on dangerous goods, or on a means of containment or means of transport used in importing, offering for transport, handling or transporting dangerous goods.

For example:

  • Placard showing the primary class and UN number for gasoline:
    Red square on a point placard, with GASOLINE UN number (1203) in a white rectangle and the number 3 in the lower corner representing the Dangerous Goods Class.

What is an ERAP?

The TDG Regulations defines an ERAP as:

A plan that outlines what is to be done if there is an accident involving certain dangerous goods and that is in accordance with Part 7, Emergency Response Assistance Plan.

What is a facility?

In the transport of dangerous goods, a facility is a permanent or temporary building (or part of a building) used for the handling of dangerous goods.

What is handling?

Under the TDG Act, handling:

Means loading, unloading, packing or unpacking dangerous goods in a means of containment for the purposes of, in the course of or following transportation and includes storing them in the course of transportation.

What is a means of containment (MOC)?

The TDG Regulations defines a means of containment as:

Means a container or packaging, or any part of a means of transport that is or may be used to contain goods.

For more information on means of containment, please see Part 5 of the TDG Regulations (force of law) and visit the Containers section of TC's Transportation of Dangerous Goods Directorate Web site.

What is a means of transport?

Under the TDG Act, a means of transport is:

A road or railway vehicle, aircraft, ship, pipeline or any other contrivance that is or may be used to transport persons or goods.

What is a release?

Under the TDG Act, a release means:

in relation to dangerous goods,

  1. a discharge, emission, explosion, outgassing or other escape of dangerous goods, or any component or compound evolving from dangerous goods, from a means of containment being used to handle or transport the dangerous goods, or
  2. an emission, from a means of containment being used to handle or transport dangerous goods, of ionizing radiation that exceeds a level or limit established under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act;

Any smoke or gases coming from lithium batteries constitutes a release.

For example:
  • A tank is punctured in an accident and gasoline drizzles out.
  • A test tube containing infectious material falls to the ground and breaks during preparation for transport.
  • A pallet of damaged lithium batteries releases hydrogen and catches fire.
  • Gases endanger public safety while venting the container.

What is a runway?

A runway is the strip of ground on a landing field that aircraft use for landing and takeoff.

What are undeclared or misdeclared dangerous goods?

Undeclared or misdeclared dangerous goods are those:

  • Whose safety marks are incorrect on or missing from the means of containment, or
  • Not identified according to the rules for shipping documents.

Note: For air transport, only dangerous goods that have been discovered after they were accepted by the air carrier must be reported. For example, a report is NOT required if dangerous goods have been detected at security and have been confiscated as they were not accepted by the carrier.

For example:
Undeclared Consignment:
  • Hair spray or perfume in a "care package" after it's been accepted by the carrier.
  • A box of 16 cans of spray paint from one seller to another.
Misdeclared Consignment:
  • Shipment containing a battery charger and lithium batteries (declared as UN3481, LITHIUM ION BATTERIES PACKED WITH EQUIPMENT instead of UN3480, LITHIUM ION BATTERIES).
  • The information identifying the dangerous goods (either on the shipping document, or the safety marks on the means of containment) has been purposely altered.

What is unlawful interference?

Here are some examples you could consider as an unlawful interference:

  • A cylinder valve is purposely damaged or altered.
  • The dangerous goods in a container do not match the safety marks displayed on it (ammonia in propane cylinders for making of illegal drugs).
  • A means of containment is purposely damaged or altered.
  • The composition of dangerous goods in a container is purposely altered to lower their value.
  • Shipping document information is purposely altered.
  • A means of containment (tank, etc.) is vandalized.

Who needs to report (i.e. you)

The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 (TDG Act) provides that any person who has the charge, management or control of a means of containment (e. g. a driver, a company representative, a shipmaster, a train operator etc.) shall report any release or anticipated release (e.g. spills, accidents), loss or theft of dangerous goods that is or could be in excess of a quantity or concentration specified by regulation from the means of containment if it endangers, or could endanger, public safety.

30-Day Follow-Up Report

When Must I Make a Written 30-Day Follow-Up Report?

When the person who has the charge, management or control of a means of containment:

When the person who made a 30-Day Follow-up Report:

  • Must make an addition or amendment to a 30-Day Follow-up Report.

Who Should Make the 30-Day Follow-Up Report?

The person who made a report referred to in sections 8.4 and 8.9 (or the employer) must complete the 30-Day Follow-up Report and submit it in writing to the Director General of the TDG Directorate within 30 days after the date of said Release or Anticipated Release Report – Road, Rail or Marine, or Dangerous Goods Accident or Incident Report – Air. You can send the 30-Day Follow-up Report by mail, by fax or by email to:

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Directorate
Transport Canada
Place de Ville, Tower C, 9th Floor
330 Sparks Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0N5
Fax: 613-990-2917
Email: dor-rcd@tc.gc.ca

Form (TP16-0086) – Detailed Breakdown of Each Section

The following sections provide information and examples to help you complete the form. But if you have questions about what to include in the form, please email our TDG Safety Research and Analysis team at dor-rcd@tc.gc.ca.

Note: All reporting requirements for the 30-Day Follow-up Report are listed in the TDG Regulations under Sections 8.7 and 8.12. While the TDG Regulations requires you submit a 30-day follow-up report, using the form is voluntary.

Part I: Reporting Timeline

Box 1 – Applicable Dates and Type of Report (TDG Regulations 8.7(r) or 8.12(p))

Please enter the date that you initially reported the incident to CANUTEC in the following format: yyyy-mm-dd

Please enter the date your 30-Day Follow-up Report was completed and submitted to the TDG Director General in the following format: yyyy-mm-dd.

Please check the applicable box:

  • If this is the first time you are submitting a 30-Day Follow-up Report for a particular incident, please check "30-Day Follow-up Report"
  • If you are making an update or amendment to an existing 30-Day Follow-up Report for a particularly incident, please check "Date original 30-Day Follow-up Report submitted", and please provide the date you submitted to the TDG Director General in the following format: yyyy-mm-dd.
For example:

January 2, 2016 would be entered as 2016-01-02.

Part II: Contact Information

Box 2 – Information of the Person Completing this Report (TDG Regulations 8.7(a) or 8.12(a))

In the top row of Box 2, select your role and your organization's role in the shipment of the dangerous goods, and input your contact information.

Note: It is possible to be consignor, consignee and carrier/aircraft operator at the same time.

Remember that in the transportation cycle:

The consignorFootnote 1 is the person who handles or offers dangerous goods for transport.

The consigneeFootnote 1 is the intended receiver of the dangerous goods the consignor has offered for transport.

The carrierFootnote 1 is the person or company that accepts possession of, handles and transports dangerous goods from the consignor (person offering them for transport) to the consignee (person who will receive them).

The aircraft operatorFootnote 1 is a person certified to operate a commercial air service.

Please ensure that all contact information is accurate and up-to-date. It is of particular importance to include an email address.

Box 3 – Information on the Consignor, Consignee and Carrier/Aircraft Operator (TDG Regulations 8.7(b) or 8.12(b))

Though the person in one or all of these fields may be the same as that in Box 2, we ask that the complete information be repeated.

Information on the various parties involved in the shipment of dangerous goods assists our analysts in better understanding the means of transportation and allows for further communication if clarification is needed.

Part III: Incident Information

Box 4 – Date and Time of the Incident (TDG Regulations 8.7(c), 8.7(d), 8.12(c) or 8.12(d))

The TDG Regulations requires in the case of a release or of an anticipated release of dangerous goods, the date and time of the release. We recognize that the release of a dangerous good may occur as a result of another incident and be discovered at a later date. In these cases, please provide an approximate date and time of the release.

For example:
  • A tank carrying flammable liquid Class 3, leaked during a journey that began at 8:00 and ended around 13:00.
  • A tank car carrying a corrosive liquid left an installation at 14:00 on July 22nd, and arrived at 00:05 on July 23rd, emptied of its content due to a valve failure.

In the case of an anticipated release, provide the date and time of the incident that led to the anticipated release. Remember to write dates in the following format: yyyy-mm-dd.

For example:

You would record January 2, 2016 as 2016-01-02.

We also ask that you record the incident's time, at the incident location, using the 24-hour system.

For example:
  • If a box of vials containing Class 6.2 Infectious Substance fell and released its contents during loading at 9 pm at a Montreal facility in winter, you would record it as having occurred at 21:00.
  • If you discover at 2 pm that a tank truck transporting a Class 3 flammable liquid between Winnipeg and Sandy Lake in July has leaked while en route, you would record that the incident was to have occurred at 14:00.

Box 5 – Geographic Location Of Incident (TDG Regulations 8.7(c), 8.7(d), 8.12(c) Or 8.12(d))

Address Footnote 2

We understand that incidents can occur in areas where there are no street addresses, so complete this section to the best of your ability.

For example:

If you have a spill on a long stretch of uninhabited road (let's call it Nowhere Rd.), you may provide the approximate location as follows:

23 km east of Nothingsville on Nowhere Rd, Nothingsville, Ontario (postal code unknown)

GPS Position

Please provide this position in latitude by longitude coordinates. We also accept a military grid reference with at least eight figures and includes the grid zone designation.

For example:

An incident occurring at 330 Sparks Street in Ottawa, Ontario would have:

  • the GPS coordinates 45.4192577 and -75.7048762 (latitude and longitude); or
  • a military grid reference of 18TVR 4484 2976.
Tip

If you do not have access to this information, you can use free online tools such as Google Maps – GPS Coordinates Footnote 3 to find the GPS position in latitude and longitude.

Rail Information

If you were transporting dangerous goods by rail, be sure to include the nearest milepost (or mileage) and the subdivision of line where the incident occurred or was discovered.

Box 6 – Geographic AreaFootnote 2

Please check only one box. This information helps us assess the potential impacts on people, places and the environment, based on land use.

Box 7 – Mode of Transport (TDG Regulations 8.7(e))

Check all applicable boxes. The mode of transport should be the type of vehicle/mode of transport by which the dangerous goods were carried, loaded and unloaded.

For example:
  • A pallet, if left on a loading dock overnight with the intention of loading onto a tractor trailer the next day, would still be considered "road" transport.
  • Dangerous goods being unloaded from a highway tank into a rail tank car would be considered both "road" and "rail" transport.

Box 8 – Marine TransportFootnote 2

If the incident occurred on a ship or other water-going vessel, please include:

  • The exact GPS position of the vessel at the time of the incident
  • The next location where the vessel will be anchored or docked

Box 9 – Phase of TransportFootnote 2

Please check only one box to indicate if the dangerous goods were being transported, loaded, unloaded or temporarily stored at the time of the incident.

Box 10 – Type of Incident (TDG Regulations 8.7(k) or 8.12(j))

It is possible for more than one incident to occur in the same event. For instance, a rail car can derail, overturn and then be struck by another object or vehicle. To provide an accurate account, select all incident types that apply in this case. In this case, the boxes for Derail, Overturn and Struck would all be checked.

Box 11 – Type of Release (TDG Regulations 8.7(k), 8.7(l), 8.12(j) or 8.12(k))

The TDG Regulations requires specifications on the occurrence of an explosion or a fire. Multiple boxes can be checked in this instance should more than one type of release occur.

For example:

A tank car that overturns after derailing may cause a spill, then catch fire, and explode soon after. In this case, the boxes for Spill, Explosion and Fire would be checked.

This section can also be used to indicate a case of Anticipated Release, meaning that there was a reasonable belief at the time of the incident that a release of dangerous goods was imminent.

Box 12 – Information on the Dangerous Goods (TDG Regulations 8.7(f), 8.7(g), 8.7(h) 8.12(e), 8.12(f) or 8.12(g))

Under Part 3 of the TDG Regulations, all shipments or consignments of dangerous goods MUST travel with the appropriate shipping documents. You may use these documents and the information in Schedule 1 of the TDG Regulations to fill this section.

Enter all dangerous goods involved in a release or an anticipated release for road, rail and marine, and all dangerous goods involved in a dangerous goods accident or incident for air.

If you need extra space, you may attach other sheets of paper to the form. Remember to include the packing group or category of the shipment. Consult Schedule 1 of the TDG Regulations if necessary.

Box 13 – Means of Containment (TDG Regulations 8.7(g), 8.7(i), 8.7 (j) or 8.12(h), 8.12(i))

Please complete the appropriate means of containment form(s) in Annex E to ensure that all relevant information is provided when submitting the 30-Day Follow-up Report.

Refer to the definition of "means of containment" in the Overview section and in Section 1.4 of the TDG Regulations.

Part IV: Consequences

Box 14 – Consequences of the IncidentFootnote 2

Please indicate the types of consequences caused by the incident, checking all boxes that apply.

Human consequences include injury, death, the evacuation of an area, or sheltering in place.

Property consequences include any property damage or destruction, regardless of the owner or operator. This also applies if the incident leads to the evacuation of a facility or the closing of a road, main waterway or main railway line.

Environmental consequences include environmental and ecosystem damage in the area. Environmental effects can relate to land, air or water.

For example:
  • A chemical spill seeps into groundwater that sustains a local ecosystem.
  • A toxic plume of smoke, vapours or fumes affects air quality or damages plants or animals.

Box 15 – Evacuation of People and Buildings/Shelter in Place (TDG Regulations 8.7(o) or 8.12(m))

If there was an evacuation during or after the reported incident, check the YES box in the Evacuation section.

If people were sheltered in place during or after the reported incident, check the YES box in the Shelter in place section.

If you checked YES for either of these options, follow the form's instructions and indicate the number of people evacuated or sheltered in place for four location categories:

  • Private residences;
  • Public buildings;
  • Workplaces; and
  • Public outdoor areas such as parks, etc.
For example:

Imagine a burning container created a cloud of smoke that forced the evacuation of a roughly 30-acre area over a three-hour period. Within these 30 acres were 21 homes, a community center, about a dozen local restaurants, and people in the streets nearby. Emergency responders estimate they evacuated some 35 people from their homes, 52 people from the community center, and 216 people from local restaurants. While not known for certain, they estimate that 40 people were on the streets at the time of evacuation. A further 30 people were advised to take shelter in their homes for 3 hours.

Evacuation of People and Buildings / Shelter in Place
  Private Residences Public Buildings Workplaces Public (Outside) Areas
Estimated number of people evacuated 35 52 216 +/- 40
Estimated number of people sheltered in place 30 0 0 0
Estimated number of buildings evacuated 21 1 12 -
Size of evacuation area:         121,406 m2
Duration of Evacuation:          3 hours
Duration of Shelter in place:  3 hours

Note: The TDG Regulations requires that you provide the number of people evacuated or sheltered in place and the duration of the evacuation or shelter in place. Any other information may be voluntarily given for statistics and research purposes.

Box 16 – Injuries and/or Deaths (TDG Regulations 8.7(p) or 8.12(n))

To help us understand the risks of transporting dangerous goods, this section explores the impact of dangerous goods incidents on human health and safety.

Note: The TDG Regulations requires that you provide the number of deaths and the number of persons who sustained injuries that required immediate medical treatment by a health care provider. Any other information may be voluntarily given for statistics and research.

Please carefully read the description for each injury type.

Minor injury

A person with minor injuries requires immediate first aid at the scene but no immediate follow-up at a hospital or by a physician.

For example:
  • A person has a minor cut, but doesn't need stitches.
  • A person becomes dizzy after inhaling fumes from a release, but the symptoms disappear when the person is away from the scene.

Moderate injury

A person with moderate injuries requires immediate medical treatment by a health care provider at a health care facility, but does not require a hospital stay.

For example:
  • After suffering burns to his hands from a release of dangerous goods he was delivering, an employee goes to the plant infirmary where health care professionals bandage his hands.
  • A driver loses control of his tank truck and suffers a gash to his forehead from the windshield. His gash requires a visit to the emergency room for stitches and a few hours of observation.

Major injury

A person with major injuries requires immediate treatment and an overnight stay in hospital.

For example:
  • A person suffers burns after a train derailment where a tank car carrying dangerous goods explodes, and must stay in hospital for several days.

Cause of injury

In this section it is important to identify the cause of each category of injury.

If injuries are attributed to:

  • Dangerous Goods exposure, record the number of people injured and/or number of deaths in the "Attributed to Dangerous Goods" column.
  • the incident itself, record the number of people injured and/or number of deaths in the "Attributed to incident" column.

Please note: To protect victims' privacy, we wish to know only the number of injured or dead. Do not include the names or identities of victims.

Box 17 – Estimate of Incident-Related Costs (TDG Regulations 8.7(s) or 8.12(q))

Take all necessary measures to provide a cost estimate in dollars to the best of your knowledge of:

  • material loss of dangerous goods
  • damage incurred by the carrier
  • damage to property, regardless of ownership (repairs)
  • emergency response operations cost
  • cleanup cost

If completed electronically, the form will automatically calculate the total of all listed costs.

Record all costs in Canadian Dollars (CAD).

Box 18 – Infrastructure Closure and Duration (TDG Regulations 8.7(m), 8.7 (n), or 8.12(l))

Since dangerous goods can threaten a larger area than the incident scene, authorities must often immediately shut down and quarantine surrounding infrastructure. This section of the form concerns the impact of dangerous goods incidents on nearby infrastructure.

To complete this section, please select all options that apply. It is possible for a single incident, however severe, to result in the closure of all listed infrastructure types.

For each infrastructure type, indicate the number of hours it was closed.

For example:

A road several kilometers from a railway line may close for a few hours if a spill on the line poses a danger to automobile traffic. And while the railway line may be shut down for days, the road may only close for a few hours. In this case, the Roadway and Railway boxes would be checked.

Box 19 – Geographic Location of Closure (TDG Regulations 8.7(m), 8.7(n) or 8.12(l))

AddressFootnote 2

We understand that incidents can occur in areas where there are no street addresses, so complete this section to the best of your ability.

For example:

If you have a spill on a long stretch of uninhabited road (let's call it Nowhere Rd.), you can provide the approximate location as follows:

23 km east of Nothingsville on Nowhere Rd, Nothingsville, Ontario (postal code unknown).

GPS Position

Please provide this position in latitude by longitude coordinates. We also accept a military grid reference with at least eight figures and includes the grid zone designation.

For example:

An incident occurring at 330 Sparks Street in Ottawa, Ontario would have:

  • the GPS coordinates 45.4192577 and -75.7048762(latitude and longitude); or
  • a military grid reference of 18TVR 4484 2976

Note: In the military grid reference, the first five characters (18TVR) represent the grid zone.

Tip

If you have no access to this information, you can use free online tools such as Google Maps – GPS CoordinatesFootnote 3 to find the GPS position in latitude and longitude.

Rail Information

If you were transporting dangerous goods by rail, be sure to include the nearest milepost (or mileage) and the subdivision of the line where the incident occurred or was discovered.

Box 20 – ERAP Requirements (TDG Regulations 8.7(q) and 8.12(o))

The TDG Regulations prescribes when a shipment requires an Emergency Response Assistance Plan (ERAP). Some dangerous goods are so hazardous in certain quantities that the TDG Regulations requires consignors or carriers to possess approved ERAPs detailing how they will intervene in an emergency or incident.

TC reviews each ERAP before the consignment is transported, and upon approval, provides a reference number to the ERAP holder. Also, as noted in Part 7, certain consignors and carriers share the same ERAP under agreements with other companies where applicable. This is why it is so important to accurately record the name, number and address of the ERAP holder (or owner).

If the incident involves a consignment for which an ERAP is required, select "Yes" and complete the table to indicate the level of response provided at the scene.

Part V: Incident Description

Box 21 – Description Of Incident (TDG Regulations 8.7(k) or 8.12(j))

This is where you explain what happened in your own words.

You can write as much as you like by attaching extra pages, though you must include:

  • A detailed chronology of events, including the period up until you discovered the incident and what happened next.
  • A detailed description of how the means of containment was damaged, failed (a release) or why you believed it likely to fail (an anticipated release). We recommend including photographs and diagrams.
  • A detailed description of what you or other responders did to minimize the effects of the release or anticipated release.
  • Any other contributing factor or initiating event, such as: human error, mechanical, equipment, packaging, infrastructure, external, weather, etc.
  • A description of the physical environment (school, residential, business/commercial, industrial, rural, forest, etc.)
  • A description of the road's appearance:
    • flat, straight, inclined or curved (issue for the movement of liquid in tank trucks);
    • intersection, between intersections.

Please estimate the length of time over which the release and the incident occurred.

Giving a detailed account of your communications with responders and your organization is ideal. This approach helps us understand how the incident was perceived on the ground.

Remember, the more information you can include in this section, the better.

Please email your questions to the TDG Data Governance Accident Team at dor-rcd@tc.gc.ca.

Part VI: Incident Description – Air Only

Box 22 – Description of Route (TDG Regulations 8.12(r), 8.12(s) or 8.12(t))

This section applies only to dangerous goods incidents that occur during transport or handling (before and after air transport), or to any serious endangerment of an aircraft or the people on board. This includes air cargo facilities, aerodromes and aircraft.

Describe in full detail:

  • The serious endangerment of the aircraft or the people on board;
  • The damage to property or the environment; and
  • The route by which the dangerous goods were to be transported, including:
    • the name of the aircraft operator;
    • the name of the aerodromes throughout the route;
    • any air cargo facility where the aircraft would have been loaded or unloaded.

Annexes

Annex A – Information to be Included in the Different Safety Reports

Emergency Report — Road, Rail or Marine (Section 8.3)

  • The name and contact information of the person making the report;
  • In the case of a release of dangerous goods, the date, time and geographic location of the release;
  • In the case of an anticipated release of dangerous goods, the date, time and geographic location of the incident that led to the anticipated release;
  • The mode of transport used;
  • The shipping name or UN number of the dangerous goods;
  • The quantity of dangerous goods that was in the means of containment before the release or anticipated release;
  • In the case of a release of dangerous goods, the quantity of dangerous goods estimated to have been released; and
  • If applicable, the type of incident leading to the release or anticipated release, including a collision, roll-over, derailment, overfill, fire, explosion or load-shift.

Release or Anticipated Release Report — Road, Rail or Marine (Section 8.5)

  • The name and contact information of the person making the report;
  • In the case of a release of dangerous goods, the date, time and geographic location of the release;
  • In the case of an anticipated release of dangerous goods, the date, time and geographic location of the incident that led to the anticipated release;
  • The mode of transport used;
  • The shipping name or UN number of the dangerous goods;
  • The quantity of dangerous goods that was in the means of containment before the release or anticipated release;
  • In the case of a release of dangerous goods, the quantity of dangerous goods estimated to have been released;
  • If applicable, the type of incident leading to the release or anticipated release, including a collision, rollover, derailment, overfill, fire, explosion or load-shift;
  • If applicable, the name and geographic location of any road, main railway line or main waterway that was closed;
  • A description of the means of containment containing the dangerous goods;
  • If applicable, an estimate of the number of people evacuated or sheltered in place; and
  • If applicable, the number of deaths and the number of persons who sustained injuries that required immediate medical treatment by a health care provider.

Dangerous Goods Accident or Incident Report — Air (Section 8.10)

  • The name and contact information of the person making the report;
  • In the case of a release of dangerous goods, the date, time and geographic location of the release;
  • In the case of an anticipated release of dangerous goods, the date, time and geographic location of the incident that led to the anticipated release;
  • The name of the aircraft operator, aerodrome or air cargo facility;
  • The shipping name or UN number of the dangerous goods;
  • The quantity of dangerous goods that was in the means of containment before the release or anticipated release;
  • In the case of a release of dangerous goods, the quantity of dangerous goods estimated to have been released;
  • If applicable, the type of incident leading to the release or anticipated release;
  • A description of the means of containment containing the dangerous goods;
  • If applicable, the number of deaths and the number of persons who sustained injuries; and
  • If applicable, an estimate of the number of people evacuated or sheltered in place.

Undeclared or Misdeclared Dangerous Goods Report – Air (Section 8.15)

  • The name and contact information of the person making the report;
  • The name of the aircraft operator, aerodrome or air cargo facility;
  • The names and contact information of the consignor and consignee;
  • The date of the discovery of the dangerous goods;
  • The shipping name or UN number of the dangerous goods;
  • A description of the means of containment containing the dangerous goods;
  • The total quantity or capacity of the means of containment and, if applicable, the total number of means of containment; and
  • A description of the route by which the dangerous goods were to be transported, including the names of any aerodromes along the route.

Annex B – Information to be Included in the Different Security Reports

Loss or Theft Reports – All Modes (Section 8.17)

  • The name and contact information of the person making the report;
  • The names and contact information of the consignor, the consignee and the carrier;
  • Information as to whether the dangerous goods were lost or stolen;
  • The shipping name or UN number of the lost or stolen dangerous goods;
  • The quantity of the lost or stolen dangerous goods;
  • A description of the means of containment containing the lost or stolen dangerous goods; and
  • The approximate date, time and geographic location of the loss or theft.

Unlawful Interference Report – All Modes (Section 8.19)

  • The name and contact information of the person making the report;
  • The names and contact information of the consignor, the consignee and the carrier;
  • A detailed description of the unlawful interference;
  • The shipping name or UN number of the dangerous goods;
  • A description of the means of containment containing the dangerous goods, and the number of means of containment; and
  • The approximate date, time and geographic location of the unlawful interference.

Annex C – Conditions for Making a Release or Anticipated Release Report

Release or Anticipated Release Report – Road, Rail or Marine (Section 8.4)

  1. Subject to Subsection (2), any person required to make an emergency report under Section 8.2 must, as soon as possible thereafter, make a report to the persons listed in Subsection (4).
  2. Subject to Subsection (3), the person is not required to make a report under Subsection (1) if the release or anticipated release did not result in:
    1. The death of a person;
    2. Injury to a person requiring immediate medical treatment by a health care provider;
    3. An evacuation or shelter in place;
    4. The closure:
      1. either of a facility used for loading and unloading of dangerous goods; or
      2. of a road, main railway line or main waterway.
  3. The person must make the report referred to in Subsection (1) if, as applicable:
    1. Damage to a means of containment has compromised its integrity; or
    2. A rail tank car's centre sill or stub sill is broken or the metal has a crack of at least 15 cm (6 in).
  4. For the purposes of Subsection (1), the person must make a report to:
    1. CANUTEC at 1-888-CAN-UTEC (1-888-226-8832) or 613-996-6666;
    2. The consignor of the dangerous goods;
    3. In the case of dangerous goods included in Class 7, Radioactive Materials, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission; and
    4. In the case of a ship, a Vessel Traffic Services Centre or a Canadian Coast Guard radio station.

Annex D – Conditions for Making a Dangerous Goods Accident or Incident Report – Air

Dangerous Goods Accident or Incident Report – Air (Section 8.9)

  1. Subject to Subsection (3), any person required to make a report under Subsection 18(1) of the Act for a release or anticipated release of dangerous goods offered for transport, handled or transported to an aerodrome, to an air cargo facility or on board an aircraft must, as soon as possible after the release or the anticipated release, make a report if the quantity of dangerous goods is or could be in excess of the quantity set out in the following table:
    Class Quantity
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 or 9 Any quantity
    7 A level of ionizing radiation greater than that set out in Section 39 of the "Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations (2015)"
  2. The report referred to in Subsection (1) must be made to CANUTEC at 1-888-CAN-UTEC (1-888-226-8832) or 613-996-6666 (and for dangerous goods included in Class 7, Radioactive Materials, to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission).
  3. The person is not required to make a report under Subsection (1) if the release or anticipated release did not result in:
    1. Death or injury to a person;
    2. Damage to property or the environment;
    3. Signs that the container's integrity has been compromised, including signs of fire, a break or rupture, or fluid or radiation leakage;
    4. Serious endangerment of the aircraft or the people on board;
    5. An evacuation or shelter in place;
    6. The closure of an aerodrome, air cargo facility or runway.

Annex E – Container Specifications

Means of Containment – Cylinders, Spheres and Tubes - (16-0099E)

Means of Containment – Highway Tanks - (16-0097E)

Means of Containment – Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBC) and Large Packagings (LP) - (16-0100E)

Means of Containment – Portable Tanks - (16-0098E)

Means of Containment – Small Containers - (16-0101E)

Means of Containment – Tank Cars - (16-0094E)

Means of Containment – TC Portable Tanks and Nurse Tanks - (16-0095E)

Means of Containment – Ton Containers - (16-0096E)

Annex F – Emergency Phone Numbers of Local Authorities Responsible for Responding to Emergencies

Province Authority
Alberta 911 (or local police) and relevant provincial authorities (1-800-272-9600) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-889-8852)
British Columbia 911 (or local police) and Provincial Emergency Program (1-800-663-3456) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-889-8852)
Prince Edward Island 911 (or local police) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-565-1633)
Manitoba 911 (local police or fire department) and Sustainable Development (1-855-944-4888) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-889-8852)
New Brunswick 911 (or local police) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-565-1633)
Nova Scotia 911 (or local police) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-565-1633)
Ontario 911 (or local police) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-265-0237)
Quebec 911 (or local police) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-363-4735)
Saskatchewan Local police, Spill Control Centre (1-800-667-7525) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-889-8852)
Newfoundland and Labrador 911 (or local police) and Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-563-9089)
Nunavut Territory 911 (or local police) and relevant authorities (867-920-8130)
Nunavut Territory and arctic waters (waters north of the Northwest and Yukon Territories) Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-265-0237)
Yukon Territory 911 (or local police) and relevant authorities (867-667-7244) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-889-8852)
Northwest Territories 911 (or local police) and relevant authorities (867-920-8130) or Canadian Coast Guard (1-800-889-8852)
CANUTEC 1-888-CAN-UTEC (226-8832), 613-996-6666, or *666 on a cellular phone
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission CNSC duty officer emergency line (613-995-0479)
Natural Resources Canada 613-995-5555
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