2018-19 Departmental Results Report

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Transport, 2019, Ottawa, Canada

Catalogue No. T1-28E-PDF

ISSN 2561-1615

This document is available on the Transport Canada website.

This document is available in alternative formats upon request.

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Table of contents

Minister’s message

Marc Garneau

I am pleased to present Transport Canada’s Departmental Performance Report for 2018–19. It outlines the department’s achievements in ensuring Canada’s transportation system continues to be safe and secure, efficient and environmentally responsible.

Important pieces of legislation received Royal Assent in 2018–19. That includes the Wrecked, Abandoned or Hazardous Vessels Act, which addresses environmental, economic, and safety hazards in coastal and inland waters across Canada. The Transportation Modernization Act is helping our economy and improving safety and security for Canadians, while strengthening air passenger rights for Canadians and mandating locomotive voice and video recorders.

There were important milestones and significant achievements in the 2018–19 fiscal year that make transportation in Canada smarter, cleaner, and safer. We now have more marine inspectors in the North. Major infrastructure investments such as the National Trade Corridors Fund are fixing bottlenecks and improving fluidity in our trade corridors. Programs such as the Rail Safety Improvement Program made significant investments in rail infrastructure, as well as in research and awareness initiatives, and making rail crossings and corridors safer. An accelerated phase-out of certain types of tank cars has improved how dangerous commodities are transported by rail in Canada. New measures introduced under the Oceans Protection Plan are protecting marine mammals such as the Southern Resident killer whale and the North Atlantic right whale.

New technology and partnerships with Indigenous and coastal communities are improving collaboration and information sharing about marine traffic. New efforts are addressing the effects of fatigue in transportation, and new safety measures are in place to protect aircraft, and their crews and passengers, from laser strikes. With more modern equipment, Transport Canada inspectors are conducting their work more efficiently and effectively. Transport Canada is helping to accelerate the safe introduction of automated and connected vehicles on Canadian roads through the Safety Framework for Automated and Connected Vehicles and the Safety Assessment for Automated Driving Systems in Canada, both of which were published in February.

Innovation drives transportation, and Transport Canada’s Innovation Centre is at the forefront, having led Canada’s first on-road truck platooning trial in November. It also began work, with industry partners, to design a one-of-a-kind underwater listening station at the Port of Vancouver, to detect and measure vessel noise, marine mammal data and ambient noise data.

Transport Canada’s excellent work is achieving significant results. We are moving forward with a safer, more secure, greener, and more efficient transportation future.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., MP
Minister of Transport

Results at a glance

For more information on Transport Canada’s plans, priorities and the results we achieved, see the Results: What we achieved section of this report.

Priority 1: Improve the performance and reliability of Canada’s transportation system to get products to market and grow our economy.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Trade Corridors to Global Markets

For this priority, we:

  • Significantly advanced our $2 billion National Trade Corridors Fund by:
    • Finishing the first call for proposals, committing over $800 million to 39 projects in every province and territory across all modes of transportation.
    • Launching two more calls for proposals, one for the North and another for trade diversification projects. For these calls for proposals, we are using innovative approaches including more collaboration and greater feedback for northern applicants, integration of a climate resilience assessment in the application guide and an online application portal to automate the intake process for trade diversification proposals.
    • Accelerating more than $750 million in funding over the next five years to help projects get results more quickly that will strengthen trade corridors to Asia and Europe. This will support the Government’s Export Diversification Strategy and its goal of increasing Canada’s overseas exports by 50% by 2025.
    • Receiving an additional $400 million in new funding through Budget 2019. We will use the funds to increase the Fund’s investments in Arctic and northern regions.
  • Started a review of Canada’s port system and Canada Port Authorities;
  • Launched new projects to help us make data-based decisions and improve the coordination and planning capacity of public/private transportation infrastructure investments. These investments include:
    • The Canadian Centre on Transportation Data.
    • The Open Transportation Data Hub.
    • The Port-City Supply Chain Visibility project.
  • Implemented Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act, which includes plans to improve access, transparency, efficiency and long-term investment in Canada’s freight rail system.

Priority 2: Offer more choices, better service, lower costs and stronger rights for consumers.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: The Traveller

For this priority, we:

  • Prepared research, analysis and advice to help develop options for the future of intercity passenger rail, including VIA Rail Canada’s High Frequency Rail proposal.
  • Helped VIA Rail Canada purchase a new accessible, environmentally-friendly, and reliable fleet for the Windsor to Quebec City corridor. This will introduce 32 trainsets into service between 2022 and 2024.
  • Worked with domestic and international partners to assess the policy and regulatory impacts that emerging technologies have on a passenger-centric approach to aviation. Our approach balanced security, efficiency, and facilitation, and supported the economic benefits of the aviation sector.
  • Worked with our partners to develop the “Known Traveller Digital Identity” prototype. The goal of the prototype is to improve security and the flow of people across borders using: biometrics, cryptography and distributed ledger technology.
  • Supported the Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility with proposed accessibility legislation and regulatory changes (Bill C-81).
  • Worked with the provinces, territories, and other government departments to develop options and recommendations in response to Greyhound Canada’s 2018 withdrawal from Western Canada and Northern Ontario.

Priority 3: Build world-leading marine corridors that are competitive, safe and environmentally sustainable, and improve Northern transportation infrastructure.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Waterways, Coasts and the North

For this priority, we have:

Priority 4: Build a safer and more secure transportation system that Canadians trust.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Safer Transportation

For this priority, we:

  • Developed:
    • A “Whole-of-Government” approach (i.e. across multiple departments) and guiding principles for Connected Vehicles (CVs) and Autonomous Vehicles (AVs).
    • Regulations for train voice and video recorders.
  • Worked on legislative amendments to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992.
  • Increased the capacity and availability of Northern marine inspectors.
  • Updated the Motor Vehicle Safety Act:
    • Guidelines for exemption applications were completed as scheduled.
    • Administrative Monetary Penalties and information gathering programs are underway.
  • Continued to identify challenges and opportunities in Canada’s aviation security system through the Aviation Security Review feedback from internal and external consultations, and created strategic recommendations for a sustainable, long-term approach to the system. A report that identifies strategic recommendations for a sustainable, long-term approach to the system is under way.
  • Implemented amendments to the Canadian Aviation Regulations to restrict pilots’ consumption of alcohol to 12 hours prior to reporting for duty – an increase from the previous 8 hours restriction.

Priority 5: Reduce environmental impacts and use new technologies to improve Canadians’ lives.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Green and Innovative Transportation

For this priority, we:

  • Explored new technologies to help us deal with threats to marine mammals, like reducing underwater vessel noise at the source and reducing the risk of whale-vessel collisions.
  • Improved the aviation regulatory framework that allows drones (Remotely Piloted Aerial Systems) and related technologies to be used in Canada.
  • Announced sales targets for zero-emission vehicles:
    • 10% of new light-duty vehicles sales by 2025.
    • 30% by 2030.
    • 100% by 2040.
    To help achieve these targets, Budget 2019 set aside $700 million in new measures to encourage Canadians to use zero-emission vehicles. This includes $300 million to help Transport Canada create a purchase incentive program.
  • Adopted strategies to accelerate the creation and use of transportation technology, including a new departmental Innovation Centre.
  • Updated the plan for our Motor Vehicle Test Centre.
  • Published Part X Greenhouse Gas Emissions from International Aviation – CORSIA in the Canadian Aviation Regulations. These regulations will help monitor, report and check the baseline phase of the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation.
  • Updated our Memorandum of Understanding with the Railway Association of Canada to reduce rail emissions for 2018–22.

Priority 6: Advance our five-year plan to:

  • Update key legislation.
  • Create modern oversight and enforcement.
  • Align Canada with international best practices.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Transport Canada’s Operations and Service Delivery

For this priority, we:

  • Presented options for updating the safety and security legislative system as part of the Legislative Modernization initiative.
  • Became more active in International Civil Aviation Organization activities and forums, to increase our influence on the organization’s agenda. We’re also bringing our regulations in line with other civil aviation authorities, and developing technical agreements with foreign authorities and key partners.
  • Began to update Canadian Aviation Regulations and Enhance Aircraft Certification processes.
  • Improved our Marine regulation oversight to protect Canada’s waterways and marine ports, by:
    • Increasing our outreach and awareness work to improve security for occasional-use marine facilities that deal with vessels in Canadian waters.
    • Analysing the security risks for foreign vessels which will help us develop regulatory instruments to reinforce security standards for unmanned marine facilities.
    • Surveying ports and marine facilities on their approaches to cyber security to identify best practices to better focus the department’s security assessment program with respect to cyber threats.
  • Completed a Government-wide aircraft services review. Evidence was found that the Government of Canada uses many cost-effective ways through its Aircraft Services Directorate to service its aircraft, and deliver:
    • Government of Canada civilian aircraft services.
    • Remotely Piloted Aerial Systems strategy.
  • Continued to modernize our cost recovery regime and fees, including:
    • Working on a new Marine Safety Fees Regulation, which would put all marine safety fees in into one regulation. This would simplify the regulatory fee system for stakeholders and clarify our marine service fees.
  • Continued to develop an approach to modernize the Canadian Transportation Agency to ensure its capacity to deliver on its mandate and the efficiency of its operations by:
    • Aiding the Agency protect and promote equal access for persons with disabilities to the national transportation system by working collaboratively to create a set of clear, consistent accessibility requirements for all types of federally-regulated transportation.
    • Working collaboratively to promote accessibility in aviation at the international level (e.g., the International Civil Aviation Organization).

Priority 7: Modernize our service delivery and supervision.

Transportation 2030 Theme Linked to this Priority: Transport Canada’s Operations and Service Delivery

For this priority, we:

  • Created a modernization office, and a five-year plan with policy development in its first year, that includes:
    • Creating a foundation for the Legislative Modernization initiative through a policy framework, guiding principles and a vision statement.
    • Developing legislative policy proposals to help us to modernize our program delivery.
    • Providing principles-based guidance on the legislative renewal efforts of other programs, helping them to make progress on improving their program delivery.
    • Identifying and developing new authorities for the Annual Regulatory Modernization Bill to modernize government regulation.
  • Initiating the development and implementation of an evidence-based public risk management oversight framework to enable the management of risk to the transportation system as a whole and inform resource allocation for safety and security programs.
  • Continued to strengthen our use of technology by:
    • Launching our myTC platform on May 11, 2018, our first online service for external clients.
    • Helping inspectors be more productive by giving them tablets that allow them to do inspections when they’re not connected to a network.
    • Designing and activating two key tablet features to support mobile inspections:
      • the myTC Oversight Activity Centre which provides incremental access to digital inspection processes.
      • the Reference Centre, which provides direct access to all inspection documentation and references for all modes, online or offline.
  • Starting a project to create a modern platform for business intelligence and enterprise data analysis, including a procurement strategy for a data catalogue.

Results: what we achieved

Core Responsibilities

Core Responsibility 1: A Safe and Secure Transportation System

Description

The programs in this Core Responsibility are responsible for making sure that Canada’s transportation system is safe and secure. They meet this goal by creating, updating and enforcing all laws, regulations, policies and supervision activities (like inspections) related to transportation safety and security.

Results

To support this Core Responsibility, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we:

  • Updated the Canadian Aviation Regulations so it can respond to the aviation community’s priorities.
  • Completed and published in Part II of the Canada Gazette Remotely Piloted Aircraft System regulations for drones that weigh between 250 grams and 25 kilograms and operate within Visual Line of Sight rules (January 2019).
  • Improved our aviation safety certification team’s ability to meet the service demands of industry through the “Aircraft Certification Enhanced Activity initiative”. These improvements will help Canada's aerospace sector be even more competitive.
  • Improved aviation safety surveillance, including:
    • Creating new inspector education and training.
    • Giving inspectors better tools to help them do their work efficiently and effectively.
    • Updating our risk-based surveillance methods.
  • Approved new project documents used to acquire more surveillance aircraft in 2019-20 as part of the National Aerial Surveillance Program.
  • Introduced marine regulatory amendments to expand carriage requirements for Automatic Identification System on smaller vessels. These were published in the Canada Gazette, Part I in February 2019.
  • Continued to modernize our marine safety regulatory and supervision systems by focusing on policies related to possible changes to the Marine Personnel Regulations. We’ve also worked with the United States Coast Guard to update the Memorandum of Understanding for the “Mutual Recognition of Domestic Mariner Qualifications”.
  • Continued to promote the safety and environmental protection of Canadian waters by:
    • Increasing fishing supervision through the Small Vessel Compliance Program in fiscal year 2018-19. We’re also increasing the number of small vessel inspections under the Comprehensive Review.
    • Continuing to put in place the Arctic Shipping Safety and Pollution Prevention Regulations by developing policies, procedures and work instructions for marine shippers.
    • Working domestically and internationally with the International Maritime Organization to keep improving safety and environmental protection in the Arctic.
  • On December 13, 2018, Parliament approved amendments to the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, which governs the safety of marine transportation, environmental damage, health and safety on board vessels, inspection and enforcement, and international obligations. The amendments include enhancing deterrence and encouraging compliance with marine safety and environmental regulatory requirements by increasing the maximum amount of Administrative Monetary Penalties to $250,000 per infraction.
  • Prepared for the consideration and passing of the Canadian Navigable Waters Act by:
    • Engaging with Indigenous peoples and key stakeholders about policy and regulatory developments related to the Act.
    • Developing program procedures, policies, officer training, outreach strategies and web data interface.
    • Creating a communications package, including a detailed web strategy, for when the Act comes into force in 2019-20.
  • Started a Maritime Domain Awareness Partnership Charter with the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand. This partnership will strengthen our awareness of the marine sector and set agreements for responding to marine incidents.
  • Began reviewing and updating Marine Security oversight processes by:
    • Increasing outreach and awareness efforts to help ensure greater security for unmanned and occasional-use marine facilities by vessels travelling in Canadian waters.
    • Conducting a security risk analysis for foreign vessels to inform the development of regulatory instruments of choice to reinforce security standards related to unmanned marine facilities.
    • Surveying ports and marine facilities on their approaches to cyber security and to identify best practices to better focus the Department’s security assessment program with respect to cyber threats.
  • Hosted the 9th Canada-United States Maritime Stakeholders Conference, which produced recommendations to improve collaboration and information sharing between Canada and the United States on Maritime Domain Awareness.
  • Increased outreach and awareness efforts to help ensure better security for unmanned and occasional-use marine facilities used by vessels travelling in Canadian waters.
  • Conducted a security risk analysis for foreign vessels that will feed into developing regulations to reinforce security standards for unmanned marine facilities.
  • Surveyed ports and marine facilities for their approaches to cyber security and to identify best practices to help focus our security assessment program on cyber threats.
  • Started putting in place the Railway Safety Act Review Panel Report’s recommendations, including launching new rail safety content on our website.
  • Strengthened the rail safety legislative and regulatory system by:
    • Developing regulations that will require train video and voice recording devices to be installed.
    • Developing new draft regulations for the revised Railway Employee Qualifications and Training requirements.
    • Working with the rail industry on engineer fatigue, specifically around the Work Rest Rules for Canadian rail operators.
    • Preparing for future changes to track safety rules and regulations in 2019-20.
  • Focused on improving rail safety oversight by:
    • Creating the “National Oversight Plan” which includes inspections and audits chosen using the Rail Safety risk-based business planning method.
    • Following up on audit and inspection results to make sure that we’re properly dealing with rail safety risks.
    • Encouraging discussions with industry stakeholders (municipalities, operators, provinces) to reduce crossing and trespassing deaths.
  • Reduced injuries and deaths near rail infrastructure through the Rail Safety Improvement Program by approving:
    • 90 infrastructure and crossing improvement projects ($21.7 million)
    • 3 research projects
    • 8 crossing closures
    • 7 awareness project across Canada
  • Worked closely with the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) and provinces/territories to develop a white paper which includes best practices for addressing distracted driving along with useful research and statistics, and an estimation of the impact of the use of electronic devices on the probability of collisions. In addition, the white paper assesses currently available technologies that mitigate distracted driving (published December 2018).
  • With respect to impaired driving, Transport Canada has worked with Provinces and Territories to conduct roadside surveys within their jurisdictions by providing roadside alcohol testing equipment and assisting with expertise to ensure national consistency. In addition, Transport Canada worked with stakeholders including provinces, territories and facility operators, to install signage that advised travellers that it is illegal to take cannabis across any international border (including the Canada/US border). This included ferry terminals, cruise facilities, airports, rail stations and high volume roadway border crossings.
  • Issued Guidelines to Reduce Distraction from Visual Displays in Vehicles based on consultation with experts, government and industry stakeholders (published February 2019).
  • Delivered the Safety Measures for Cyclists and Pedestrians Around Heavy Vehicles - Summary Report (PDF, 5.1 MB) to create a springboard for action and support all jurisdictions as they address safety challenges within their communities. This is the result of extensive consultation with road safety experts, government and industry stakeholders, and a joint effort of Transport Canada, Provinces and Territories (published October 2018).
  • Developed and published new regulations on seat belts for commercial busses and Lighting and Retroreflective Devices (March 2018).
  • Developed and published Motor Vehicle Safety Act regulations including:
  • Completed staffing actions necessary to maintain the capacity and ability to conduct oversight activities of vehicles, equipment and innovative technologies, based on their risk level.
  • Acted on the rest of the Emergency Response Task Force’s recommendations as part of our Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Programs, including:
    • Updating the Regulations to improve the Emergency Response Assistance Plan program and improve public safety in case of an incident.
    • Adopting new requirements for transporting dangerous goods by rail, these include better specifications for transporting dangerous goods that are toxic by inhalation.
    • Consulting stakeholders on the proposed TDG Client Identification Database to:
      • Help identify the regulated TDG community.
      • Enable rigorous risk-based assessments of dangerous goods sites.
      • Allow for targeted outreach, awareness and regulatory consultations.
  • Continued collaborative research projects with other jurisdictions and government departments on crude oil, containers and packaging of dangerous goods by assessing the combustion characteristics of crude oil to improve responses to emergencies.
  • Improved proposed packaging test standards transporting lithium batteries by air; and studied the behaviours of a United Nations portable tank and its contents when exposed to fire.
  • Maintained a strong oversight program by conducting over 5,000 inspections and 186 enforcement actions, as well as:
    • Launching emergency response assistance plan (ERAP) Online Services, a secure and easy to use web-based system for applicants and delegates to submit an ERAP for approval. This also aligns with our digital strategy to modernize program and service delivery.
    • Distributing outreach and awareness materials to first responders, municipalities and the general public, including the “You’re Not Alone!’’ guide.
  • Worked with emergency responders through CANUTEC (Canadian Transport Emergency Centre) for over 8,000 requests for technical information or support.
  • Participated in over 1,800 emergencies and 300 simulations to ensure the safety and security of first responders.
  • Coordinated the development of the next edition of the Emergency Response Guidebook which includes best practices based on research results, and is being produced in collaboration with the United States and other international partners.
  • Advanced the Canadian flammable liquid curriculum, which will help first responders protect the public’s safety following an incident involving flammable liquids transported by rail.
  • Developed an oversight program for the planned TDG by Rail Security Regulations, including standard operating procedures for inspectors and outreach strategy for industry stakeholders.
  • Completed year two of the Office of Incident Management’s activities with more than 2,200 people trained in the internationally recognized Incident Command System, which ensures interoperability and role clarity across industries.
Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our programs in Core Responsibility 1, “A Safe and Secure Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues we’re either working on, have recently completed or are planning for the next fiscal year and beyond, notably:

  • Our Aviation Security Program promoted gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness when working with the international community, including the International Civil Aviation Organization, to develop international aviation security and laws.
  • Our Marine Safety and Security and Protecting Oceans and Waterways Programs created the Marine Training Program to help underrepresented groups, including women, Northerners, Indigenous peoples, access marine training. The program is currently offered through:
Experimentation

We have identified the following Core Responsibility 1 initiatives totalling $0.5 million (equivalent to 0.1% of CR1’s 2018-19 planned expenditures), that involve experimentation. The initiatives include:

  • Our Aviation Security Program finished the Proof of Concept and Data Parsing phases of the Pre-load Air Cargo Targeting and Artificial Intelligence (PACT+AI) initiative.
    • These phases showed that air cargo data can be analyzed using natural language processing techniques that support machine learning processes.
    • The next phases, Digital Capacity Development and A/B Testing, will build departmental skills and test current and near-end states. This initiative will help the department provide more effective security and an efficient oversight system of our client’s operations.
    • We’re also looking at reducing more administrative burden by having industry submit the data to comply with multiple requirements from the Government of Canada.
Results achieved – A Safe Transportation System

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual results

1a) A safe transportation system

Ten-year aircraft accident rateFootnote 1 (average per year, per 100,000 aircraft movements)

Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year

2019–03–31

3.2 per 100,000 movements

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

1b) A safe transportation system

Ten-year aircraft fatality rate (average per year, per 100,000 aircraft movements)

Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year

2019–03–31

0.7 per 100,000 movements

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

1c) A safe transportation system

Ten-year marine accident rate (average per year, per 1,000 commercial vessels)Footnote 2

Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year

N/A - New Indicator

8.8 per 1,000 commercial vessels

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

1d) A safe transportation system

Ten-year marine fatality rate (average per year, per 1,000 commercial vessels)

Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year

N/A - New Indicator

0.45 per 1,000 commercial vessels

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

1e) A safe transportation system

Ten-year rail accident rate (average per year, per million-train miles)

5% reduction in the rate as compared to the average of previous five yearsFootnote 3

2018–12–31

5.2% reduction

3.7% reduction

N/A - New Indicator

1f) A safe transportation system

Ten-year rail fatality rate (average per year, per million-train miles)

5% reduction in the rate as compared to the average of previous five years

2018–12–31

26% reduction

12.5% reduction

N/A - New Indicator

1g) A safe transportation system

Rate of reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled)

1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years

2019–03–31

5.2% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012–16)

6.8% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011–15)

2.9% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010–14)

1h) A safe transportation system

Rate of serious injuries in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled)

1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five yearsFootnote 4

2019–03–31

13.4% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012–16)

6.8% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011–15)

7.0% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010–14)

1i) A safe transportation system

Rate of fatalities in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled)

1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years

2019–03–31

10.9% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012–16)

9.5% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011–15)

12.7% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010–14)

1j) A safe transportation system

Number of reportable dangerous goods accidents per yearFootnote 5

A 2% decrease from the previous year’s rate

TBDFootnote 6

465Footnote 7

147.2

193.6

Results achieved – A Secure Transportation System

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual results

2a) A secure transportation system

Aviation Security: National compliance rates of Canadian regulated entities with transportation security regulationsFootnote 8

90%

2019–03–31

91.8%

90.08%

88.94%

2b) A secure transportation system

Marine Security: National compliance rates of Canadian regulated entities with transportation security regulationsFootnote 9

80%

2019–03–31

76%

84%

77%

2c) A secure transportation system

Rate of refusals of new Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 new Transportation Security Clearance applications)

N/A

N/AFootnote 10

91.74

89.25

113.17

2d) A secure transportation system

Rate of suspensions of new Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 Transportation Security Clearance holders)

N/A

N/AFootnote 11

10.29

8.68

9.30

2e) A secure transportation system

Rate of cancellations of new Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 Transportation Security Clearance holders)

N/A

N/AFootnote 12

5.46

6.90

5.63

Results achieved – A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual results

3a) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Percentage of Transport Canada aviation security regulations that align with international transportation standards

90%

2019–03–31

100%

100%

100%

3b) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Percentage of Transport Canada marine safety and security regulations that align with international transportation standards

Target to be established by March 2021

TBD

N/A - New indicator

N/A - New indicator

N/A - New indicator

3c) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Percentage of Transport Canada security regulations aligned with international transportation standards (Transportation of Dangerous Goods)

Target currently being established for presentation in the 2020–21 Departmental Plan

TBD

N/A - New indicatorFootnote 13

N/A - New indicator

N/A - New indicator

3d) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Percentage of aviation client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standardsFootnote 14

79%Footnote 15

2019–03–31

84%

71%

79%

3e) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Percentage of marine client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards

80%

2019–03–31

N/AFootnote 16

N/A - New indicator

N/A - New indicator

3f) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Percentage of transportation of dangerous goods client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards

Target currently being established for presentation in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan

To be determined

N/A

N/A - New indicator

N/A - New indicator

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use

2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used)

2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

$440,882,904

$440,882,904

$464,043,706

$422,517,720

($18,365,184)

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

3,339

3,371

32

Explanation for difference in spending

The Core Responsibility Safe and Secure Transportation System spent about $18M less than planned. This change is mostly due to project delays related to capital projects and lapses in transfer payments (such as the Rail Safety Improvement Program) as the department matches actual spending.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Core Responsibility 2: A Green and Innovative Transportation System

Description

The programs in this Core Responsibility are responsible for advancing the Government of Canada’s environmental and innovation agendas in the transportation sector by:

  • Reducing harmful air emissions.
  • Protecting Canada’s ocean and marine environments by reducing the environmental impacts of marine shipping.
  • Promoting and encouraging innovation in the transportation sector.
Results

To support this Core Responsibility, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we:

  • Published regulations on domestic monitoring, reporting and verification requirements for the International Civil Aviation Organization’s “Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Civil Aviation” in Canada Gazette II before the January 1, 2019 start date.
  • Ensured the preservation and restoration of marine ecosystems with new research tools and new ways to deal with abandoned and wrecked vessels such as the Wrecked, Abandoned or Hazardous Vessels Act (Bill C-64), which will strengthen vessel owner accountability and liability for their vessels. At the same time we’ve improved federal powers to take proactive measures on vessels causing danger in Canadian waters.
  • Worked with stakeholders on proposed regulations for a Ballast Water Management Convention in Canada.
    • In 2018-19, all vessels entering the Seaway from outside of Canada's exclusive economic zone were inspected per current ballast water requirements, including for level of salt in ballast water.
  • Expanded the National Aerial Surveillance Program by increasing the program’s flight hours, vessel monitoring, and targeting through the Automatic Identification System aboard the aircraft; as well as:
    • Responded to 18 search and rescue cases across Canada.
    • Supported for the May 2018 floods in New Brunswick, the G7 Summit in Quebec City, and the Ottawa tornados.
    • Observed over 600 pollution incidents, mainly spills from unknown sources in Canadian waters.
  • Participated and engaged in environmental assessments from the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency’s Northern Projects Management Office.
  • Provided policy development and leadership through our Transportation Innovation Program, including:
    • Discussing how to encourage consumers to use zero-emission vehicles, since this technology has the potential to significantly reduce Canada's GHG emissions.
    • Receiving endorsement for an Automated and Connected Vehicles Policy Framework for Canada to coordinate an approach to test and deploy zero-emission vehicles on Canadian roads.
    • Developing partnerships with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada which led to the “Vehicle of the Future” Advisory Committee.
    • Promoting Canadian expertise in transportation technology by starting and advancing strategies in new car technologies that will encourage innovation in future mobility by:
      • Supporting competitiveness.
      • Attracting investment.
      • Using Canadian industrial and research strengths.
Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our programs in Core Responsibility 2, “A Green and Innovative Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on or have recently been completed in the past fiscal year, most notably:

  • Our Transportation Innovation Program is working to develop partnerships with industry and academia (both in Canada and abroad), to look at how we can achieve gender equality in the transportation and technology workforces. The Program is also supporting the use of advanced transportation technologies like Connected Vehicles and Autonomous Vehicles. In the long-term, the vehicles could make it easier for seniors and some Canadians with disabilities to safely drive a car.
Experimentation

We’ve identified the following Core Responsibility 2 initiatives totalling $10 million (representing 5.3% of CR2’s 2018-19 planned expenditures), that involve experimentation. The initiatives include:

  • The creation of an Innovation Centre that will be a hub for the innovation, experimentation, technology development across all modes of transportation, and be a centre of expertise that will allow us to integrate expertise from across our programs.
Results achieved – Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual results

4a) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced

Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for domestic aviation

Improve the total fuel efficiency for Canadian airlines’ combined domestic and international operations by a 1.5% annual average until 2020, from the 2008 baseline year

2020–12–31

2018 data not yet available

860 grams per revenue tonne kilometre for 2017 – a 1.87% annual average improvement from 2008

885 grams per revenue tonne kilometre for 2016 – a 1.73% annual average improvement from 2008

4b) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced

Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for domestic marine transportation

To be established by March 31, 2023, in line with the development of new IMO regulatory requirements (2021-22) and long-term strategy to reduce GHG emissions (2023).

2023-03-31

2018 data not available

2017 data not available

25 grams per tonne-kilometre for 2016

4c) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced

Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for freight rail transportation

A Memorandum of Understanding with the Railway Association of Canada to reduce locomotive emissions from 2018-2022 was renewed. It includes a target to improve the GHG emission intensity of Class 1 freight by 6% from a 2017 baseline.

2022

2018 data not yet available

2017 data not yet available

14 kilograms per 1000 revenue tonne kilometresFootnote 17 in 2016 – a 15% reduction from 2010

Results achieved – Canada’s oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual results

5a) Canada’s oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts

Rate of spills, per hour, into Canada’s oceans and marine environment (per 1,000 commercial vessels)Footnote 18

5% reduction in spills from one year to the next.

2019–03–31

0.15/hr

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

Results achieved – Transportation system that supports innovation

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual results

6a) A transportation system that supports innovation

Number of new aeronautical products certified

Target to be established in 2020–21 Departmental PlanFootnote 19

2020–03–31

820

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

6b) A transportation system that supports innovation

The number of motor vehicle features introduced in Canada through the use of Transport Canada’s regulatory tools that facilitate innovative technologies

Target to be established in 2020–21 Departmental Plan

N/A - New Indicator

N/A – New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2018–19 Main Estimates

2018–19 Planned spending

2018–19 Total authorities available for use

2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used)

2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

$187,851,477

$187,851,477

$236,621,573

$165,832,698

($22,018,779)

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

516

571

55

Explanation for difference in spending

The Core Responsibility Green and Innovative Transportation System spent about $22M less than planned. This difference is mostly the result of lapses in transfer payments (such as the Program to Protect Canada’s Coastlines and Waterways) as the department matches actual expenses to client requirements. These differences were balanced by increased spending in the Operating vote (and in FTEs) as a result of funding for new initiatives and internal reallocations.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Core Responsibility 3: An Efficient Transportation System

Description

The programs in this Core Responsibility are responsible for:

  • Supporting market access to products by investing in Canada’s trade corridors.
  • Adopting rules to make sure Canadian air travellers have enough choice and better levels of service.
  • Managing transportation assets to ensure value for Canadians.
Results

To support this Core Responsibility, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we:

  • Supported the passage of the Transportation Modernization Act, which received Royal Assent on May 23, 2018. The Act strengthens and modernizes passenger rights, data obligations, joint ventures, as well as international ownership:
    • Allowing international investors to own up to 49% of Canadian air carriers and up 25% of a Canadian air carrier’s voting shares (as of June 2018), which protects the competitiveness of our air sector and prevents monopolies of foreign investment.
    • Consulting, along with the Canadian Transportation Agency, on air passenger protection regulations and data obligations ahead of pre-publishing and coming into force in December 2019.
    • Holding detailed consultations with stakeholders on the guidelines for joint ventures and new cost recovery obligations ahead of finalizing them in 2019-20.
    • Strengthening the definition of adequate and suitable rail service and improved timeliness and accessibility of shipper remedies administered by the Canadian Transportation Agency.
    • Enabling reciprocal financial penalties to be included in arbitrated service level agreements.
    • Creating a new competitive access measure, Long-Haul Interswitching (LHI).
    • Requiring for weekly reporting of freight rail service and performance metrics on the Transportation Data and Information Hub; also began consultations and a regulatory process to further refine those metrics.
    • Making it easier to collect and maintain detailed rail traffic data to enable evidence-based freight rail policy development and enable the LHI remedy.
  • Supported the safe operation of small government-owned airports and ports that mainly serve remote communities. We addressed key health and safety requirements through ongoing capital investments.
  • Created data management and public reporting requirements related to the Transportation Modernization Act, that include new data on freight rail and air traveller, along with:
    • Detailed freight rail waybill information, including secure transfer to the Canadian Transportation Agency.
    • Freight rail service and performance metrics on the Transportation Data and Information Hub on a weekly basis since December 2018.
    • Developing data collection strategies and tools to report on air passenger experience and quality of service, starting in 2019-20.
    • Developing appropriate infrastructure to help with the collection of joint venture information to enable evidence-based analytical efforts.
  • Provided investments through the National Trade Corridors Fund for transportation infrastructure projects that strengthen Canada’s trade infrastructure, including ports, airports, roads, bridges, border crossings, rail networks, and the interconnectivity between them, including:
    • Completing the first call for proposals and, committing over $800 million in federal funding for 39 projects, located in every province and territory, and involving all modes of transportation, which will leverage a total investment of $1.9 billion.
    • Designing and launching two more calls for proposals, one for projects in the territorial North and another for trade diversification projects that will improve trade corridors to Asia and Europe in support of the Government of Canada’s Export Diversification Strategy.
    • Receiving $400 million in new funding to increase National Trade Corridors Fund investments in Arctic and northern regions through Budget 2019.
  • Continued to work on negotiations with interested parties to divest port facilities and pursue the closure and demolition of ports that do not have strategic value, under the Ports Asset Transfer Program.
  • Continued to pursue a long-term approach to provide ferry services in Eastern Canada.
Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our programs in Core Responsibility 3, “An Efficient Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake in the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • Our Transportation Policy groups are in the process of developing regulations to change the Transportation Information Regulations to collect rail data currently collected under the Transportation Modernization Act. It will also refine and potentially expand the data that’s collected. The development of these regulations will include analysis of potential GBA+ considerations.
Results achieved – Transportation corridors get products reliably to market

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual results

7a) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market

End-to-end transit time of containerized freight arriving from ports in AsiaFootnote 20

Average 25 days of end-to-end transit time

2019–03–31

27.4 days

Result Unavailable

23.8 Days (2016)

7b) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market

End-to-end transit time of grains departing from the Canadian Prairies to ports in AsiaFootnote 21

Average 38.5 days of end-to-end transit time

2019–03–31

39 days

Result Unavailable

38.4 Days (2016)

Results achieved – Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual resultsFootnote 22

8a) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Number of scheduled passenger air service routes within Canada (domestic routes)

0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017

2018–12–31

610

(Year over year – 0.008%)

615

N/A

8b) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Number of scheduled passenger air service routes between Canada and the United States (transborder routes)

0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparison: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017

2018–12–31

223

(Year over year - +4.7%)

213

N/A

8c) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Number of scheduled passenger air service routes between Canada and other countries (international routesFootnote 23)

1% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017

2018–12–31

439

(Year over year - +1.6%)

432

N/A

8d) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Number of scheduled passenger flights within Canada (annual grand total, domestic flight segments)

1% increase in the 10-year average comparison: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017

2018–12–31

856,927

(Year over year +12.3%)

851,927

N/A

8e) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Number of scheduled passenger flights between Canada and the United States (annual grand total, transborder flight segments)

0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparison: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017

2018–12–31

400,119

(Year over year - +3.2%)

387,549

N/A

8f) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Number of scheduled passenger flights between Canada and other countries (annual grand total, international flight segments)

1% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017

2018–12–31

172,828

(Year over year - +6.4%)

162,389

N/A

Results achieved – Transport Canada manages its assets effectively

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2018–19 Actual results

2017–18 Actual results

2016–17 Actual results

9a) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively

Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed airports

100% (certain types of events are excluded from the calculation)

2020–03–31

100%

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

9b) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively

Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed ports

100% (certain types of events are excluded from the calculation)

2020–03–31

100%

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

9c) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively

Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed ferries

100% (certain types of events are excluded from the calculation)

2020–03–31

100%

N/A - New Indicator

N/A - New Indicator

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

$712,185,680

$712,185,680

$735,637,202

$443,958,943

($268,226,737)

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents

2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

425

471

46

Explanation for difference in spending

The Core Responsibility Efficient Transportation System spent about $268M less than planned. This difference is mostly due to lapses in transfer payments (such as the National Trade Corridors Fund, the Gateways and Border Crossings Fund, and the Ports Asset Transfer Program). The department matches actual expenses to client requirements. These lapses were balanced by increased spending in the Operating vote (and in full-time equivalents) as a result of funding for new initiatives and internal reallocations.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

  • Acquisition Management Services
  • Communications Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Legal Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Real Property Management Services
Results

To support our Internal Services programs, the Minister’s mandate letter and Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we:

  • Continued modernizing departmental services (which began with the development of the Department’s 2016-17 Comprehensive Review) through the following steps:
    • Increasing the number of online payment services from 45 to 86.
    • Completing development and initial delivery of a two-day mandatory Financial Management Training Program to strengthen the management of financial resources for financial officers and delegated manager; participant surveys indicated a high level of satisfaction with course content, relevance, and instructors. Ongoing delivery commenced April 1, 2019.
    • Advancing the use of data analytics through the creation of a suite of interactive dashboards to monitor trends and provide improved information for decision-making. increased data analytic capacity across TC, positioning the department to expand its use of data analytics tools.
    • Office space in Dorval could not be modernized due to the withdrawal of key partners. Alternatives are being explored.
  • Completed a Proof of Concept using robotics process automation (RPA) tools that demonstrated feasibility and the opportunity to achieve efficiencies and optimize salary management (planning, budgeting and forecasting) processes across HR and Finance; launched a project to implement RPA for selected finance and related administrative processes; shared experiences with other government departments.
  • Launched our new Innovation Hub to build our ability to create user-centred designs and experiment with digital technologies.
  • Developed a Digital Roadmap (as part of our transformation efforts) and held engagement sessions, and increased awareness through:
    • Nationwide engagement sessions.
    • Tools.
    • Change management training for employees.
    • The launch and promotion of a GCpedia page.
    • Stories from employees and digital ambassadors on how intelligent policies and programs, data and evidenced based decision making, service innovation and new tools are making a difference in their work and services and our operations.
  • Collaborated with the Canadian Center of Transportation Data to maximize data and information published to both the public and the transportation industry.
  • Completed the analysis of implementation requirements for Bill C-58 which requires that information be published proactively.
  • Migrated all Proactive Disclosure publication processes and content to the Open Government portal.
  • Improved our employees’ data literacy skills by showing how different sources of data can be used to support better decision making.
  • Created an Analytics Centre of Expertise program, Data Science program, Business Intelligence Project solution delivery team, and a Data Governance Committee.
  • Launched a project to deliver a modernized enterprise business intelligence and data analytics platform that aligns with priority needs, including a procurement strategy for a Data Catalogue.
  • Revised our Project Management Framework, focusing on better project management practices and financial accountability. The new approach lets employees in different sections of the department be aware of projects at the departmental level. This increases opportunities for collaboration and reduces the risk of duplicated efforts.
  • Developed a multi-year strategy to invest in the skills, competencies, and workspaces needed by employees in the digital era. We’re actively using innovative hiring approaches and creating collaborative working environments by implementing virtual teams, remote working abilities, and making Wi-Fi and digital tools more available.
  • Launched the myTC Account platform in May 2018 with a base set of features and a first online service for external clients (Small Vessel Manufacturers - Declaration of Conformity). Since the launch, the platform has grown to include more features to improve the user experience and the ability to introduce more complex services onto the platform.
  • Gave tablets to all Inspectors with two key functionalities designed and activated on tablets in support of mobile inspections (on and offline):
    • The myTC Oversight Activity Centre (access to digital inspection processes).
    • The Reference Centre, which contains all inspection documentation and reference material for all modes, accessible online and offline.
  • Became a sponsor partner for the Public Service Centre of Excellence in Mental Health.
  • Made the LifeSpeak wellness program available to all Transport Canada employees.
  • Supported the Mental Health Champion in working with Transport Canada bargaining agent representatives in a Working Group to develop and introduce Transport Canada’s Mental Health Action Plan.
  • Proposed integrating wellness into current initiatives (e.g. Mental Health and Diversity Action Plans).
  • Supported the Clerk of the Privy Council’s priorities of mental health and public service renewal, for our employees by sharing any changes to policies and services that affect them; and providing information to staff, through various channels (e.g. email, face-to-face engagement, etc.), of the programs that support career development and wellness.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our Internal Services Programs have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake in the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • Our Communications Program, as required under the Government of Canada’s Policy on Communications and Federal Identity, provides information in different formats to:
    • Accommodate the diverse needs of Canadians.
    • Make sure that information is equally accessible to all audiences, including Indigenous, ethno-cultural and official language minority communities.
  • We will continue to:
    • Apply the policies and regulations of the Official Languages Act and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
    • Make sure that communications materials show the diverse nature of Canadians in a fair, representative and inclusive manner, including a balance of gender and ethnicity.
    • Follow the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Standard on Web Accessibility and provide published information on request that is substantially equal for a diverse audience and people with disabilities.
Experimentation

We have not identified any Internal Service experimentation initiatives for 2018-19.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use

2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used)

2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

$174,032,977

$174,032,977

$212,594,787

$196,621,941

($22,588,964)

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents

2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

1,193

1,377

184

Explanation for difference in spending:

Internal Services spent about $23M more than planned mostly as a result of new funding in the Operating vote (and in full-time equivalents) received after the main estimates and an internal reallocation of capital funds.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

The following graph shows actual expenses in dollars from 2016-17 to 2018-19 and planned expenses from 2019-20 to 2021-22:

Departmental spending trend graph

Actual expenses in dollars from 2016-17 to 2018-19 and planned expenses from 2019-20 to 2021-22.
Text version
Fiscal year Total Voted Statutory
2016–17 1,191,158,784 936,775,036 254,383,748
2017–18 1,205,720,765 987,036,619 218,684,146
2018–19 1,228,931,304 1,024,910,737 204,020,567
2019–20 1,700,337,335 1,490,266,881 210,070,454
2020–21 1,555,826,419 1,344,350,077 211,476,342
2021–22 1,429,900,458 1,220,598,107 209,302,351

As shown in the departmental spending graph, actual expenses stayed relatively stable between 2016-17 and 2018-19.

Spending is expected to increase in 2019-20 mostly because of increased grants and contributions funding for:

This will be offset by the end of operating funding for initiatives that are finishing such as funding to enhance the safety of railways and the transportation of dangerous goods (Budget 2016) and motor vehicle safety.

Looking ahead to 2020–21 and 2021-22, planned spending is declining due to initiatives that will be less in-demand or are reaching their maturity dates, such as:

The 2019-20 and ongoing levels are based on information given in the 2019-2020 Departmental Plan. Because of this, they do not include the Budget 2019 funding which included items like funding to improve the safety of railways and the transportation of dangerous goods and motor vehicle safety or the zero emissions vehicle initiative.

* Before 2018-19, our Core Responsibilities (CR) were referred as Strategic Outcomes (SO).

Numbers may not add due to rounding.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used)

CR 1

Safe and Secure Transportation System

440,882,904

440,882,904

374,213,870

360,686,469

464,043,706

422,517,722

N/A

N/A

SO 3: A Safe and Secure Transportation System

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

444,241,305

365,642,579

CR2

Green and Innovative Transportation System

187,851,477

187,851,477

252,398,761

201,088,259

236,621,573

165,832,698

N/A

N/A

SO 2: A Clean Transportation System

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

113,335,925

81,070,570

CR 3

Efficient Transportation System

712,185,680

712,185,680

879,349,998

799,291,644

735,637,202

443,958,943

N/A

N/A

SO 1: An Efficient Transportation System

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

455,318,523

588,975,050

Subtotal

1,340,920,061

1,340,920,061

1,505,962,629

1,361,066,372

1,436,302,481

1,032,309,363

1,012,895,753

1,035,688,199

Internal Services

174,032,977

174,032,977

194,374,706

194,760,047

212,594,787

196,621,941

192,825,012

155,470,585

Total

1,514,953,038

1,514,953,038

1,700,337,335

1,555,826,419

1,648,897,268

1,228,931,304

1,205,720,765

1,191,158,784

* Before 2018-19, our Core Responsibilities (CR) were referred as Strategic Outcomes (SO).

Numbers may not add due to rounding.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)

Core Responsibilities and Internal Services

2016–17 Actual full-time equivalents

2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents

2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents

2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents

2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents

2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents

CR 1

Safe and Secure Transportation System

N/A

N/A

3,339

3,371

3,134

3,139

SO 3: A Safe and Secure Transportation System

3,088

3,242

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

CR2

Green and Innovative Transportation System

N/A

N/A

516

573

606

561

SO 2: A Clean Transportation System

248

325

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

CR 3

Efficient Transportation System

N/A

N/A

425

471

463

435

SO 1: An Efficient Transportation System

394

426

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Subtotal

3,730

3,993

4,280

4,415

4,203

4,135

Internal Services

1,085

1,221

1,193

1,378

1,188

1,180

Total

4,815

5,214

5,473

5,792

5,391

5,315

* Numbers may not add due to rounding.

Transport Canada’s actual full-time equivalent (FTE) count peaked in 2018-19 at 5,792. At that time, the Department had several initiatives reaching their final phase, and with the related decrease in funding, the Department has decreased our planned FTE levels.

The planned FTE information in our Departmental Results Report was based on historical information and adjusted for government decisions that either increase (e.g., new programs) or decrease (change in mandate or priorities) the number of FTEs in Transport Canada.

The decrease between 2018-19 and 2019-20 planned FTEs is mainly because of the ending of funding for items such as the improvement of the safety of railways and the transportation of dangerous goods (Budget 2016) and motor vehicle safety. This decrease was offset by Budget 2019 funding that was not included in the plans at the time the 2019-20 Departmental Plan was produced. Once factored in, the full-time equivalents for 2019-20 are expected to be in-line with the figures for 2018-19.

Expenditures by vote

For information on Transport Canada’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018–2019.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of Transport Canada’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

Transport Canada’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)

Financial information

2018–19 Planned results 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results Difference (2018–19 Actual results minus 2018–19 Planned results) Difference (2018–19 Actual results minus 2017–18 Actual results)

Total expenses

1,668,355,285

1,405,740,298

1,237,058,750

(262,614,987)

168,681,548

Total revenues

70,572,713

76,410,828

73,169,556

5,838,115

3,241,272

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

1,597,782,572

1,329,329,470

1,163,889,194

(268,453,102)

165,440,276

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)

Financial Information

2018–19

2017–18

Difference (2018–19 minus 2017–18)

Total net liabilities

1,199,056,552

1,292,883,718

(93,827,166)

Total net financial assets

394,354,595

514,185,030

(119,830,435)

Departmental net debt

804,701,957

778,698,688

26,003,269

Total non-financial assets

2,820,957,563

2,805,978,735

14,978,828

Departmental net financial position

2,016,255,606

2,027,280,047

(11,024,441)

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport

Institutional head: Michael Keenan, Deputy Minister

Ministerial portfolio: Transport Canada

The Transport Canada Portfolio includes:

Grouping these organizations into one portfolio allows for integrated decision making on transportation issues.

Enabling instrument: Department of Transport Act (R.S., 1985, c. T-18)

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1936

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Transport Canada’s “Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on our website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.

Operating context and key risks

Conditions Affecting Our Work

Canadians need a transportation system that allows them to safely and efficiently reach their destinations and receive goods for their daily lives. Businesses and customers expect a transportation system they can trust to deliver resources and products to market, and for the jobs they depend on. Transportation touches on other important challenges like air and marine pollution, public safety and security, and economic opportunities for all Canadians. Overall, transportation-related activities make up for around 10% of Canada’s gross domestic product.

In order to continue to fulfil our mandate, the department develops and puts in place federal transportation policies, regulations and programs. This is to make sure that Canada’s transportation system is:

  • Safe and secure
  • Green and innovative, and
  • Able to support trade, economic growth, a cleaner environment, and Canadians’ well-being

To better serve Canadians, we’re modernizing how we deliver our programs and services. Our modernization initiatives will allow us to:

  • Respond to the demands of the transportation sector
  • Encourage innovation, and
  • Make sure that our officials have the skills and tools they need to succeed in a fast-changing environment.

For 2018-19, we will continue implement many key initiatives that were launched in 2017-18, including:

  • The Oceans Protection Plan, aimed at strengthening marine safety
  • Transportation 2030, focused on improving Canada’s transportation system; and
  • Investing in trade and transportation corridors, through transportation infrastructure projects in communities across Canada and at strategic points throughout the transportation system.

We will continue to respond to:

  • Safety-related and other risks
  • Industry needs
  • The environmental impact of the transportation sector
  • Changing demographics; and
  • Increasing the volume of travellers and freight (including freight that contains dangerous goods).
Key Risks: What’s Keeping Us from Meeting Our Goals

Risk management helps us make decisions and improves business practices, including:

  • Policy development
  • Setting priorities
  • Assigning resources
  • Delivering programs; and
  • Evaluating activities that broadly support our mandate.

Under the department’s approach to risk management, senior management receives a semi-annual report on the progress and overall performance of our risk response strategies.

The update to our 2018-19 Corporate Risk Profile began with analysis of the department’s operating, environmental, and financial context. In the risk identification phase, we reviewed:

A risk identification exercise noted four corporate risks for 2018-19:

  1. Federal transportation policies, programs, and infrastructure investments may not properly support an efficient, innovative, and resilient system that can transport goods and people, and use new technologies.
  2. Transportation-related security incidents – such as those caused by cyber threats – may not be addressed properly due to communication gaps at critical points.
  3. Federal transportation programs and regulations may not help to reduce the environmental impacts of transportation-related activities, including those that affect Indigenous Peoples, coastal and northern communities.
  4. Canada’s regimes for transportation laws, regulations, and oversight may not correctly address emerging safety and security issues, industry practices, and increasing demands.

We have made significant progress by identifying new ways in which that we can reduce the impact of risks to Canada’s transportation system.

Risks

Risk Response Strategy

Link to the Department’s Programs (or Core Responsibilities)

Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities (as applicable)

Federal transportation policies, programs, and infrastructure investments may not effectively support an efficient, innovative, and resilient system for the transportation of goods and people, and the adoption of new technologies.

Making sure that Canada can compete to getting products, services, and people to key markets is still a challenge for the Canadian transportation system. Canadians are also increasingly concerned about travel costs, accessibility, and the level of services. The transportation systems continues to be impacted by climate change.

Under Transportation 2030, we will address these concerns by improving the transportation system’s ability to get products to market, to grow Canada’s economy, and offer greater choice, better service, lower costs and new rights for consumers. Our adaptation initiatives contribute to the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change objectives related to infrastructure resilience and protecting vulnerable populations, including Canada’s North.

Other ways we will responded to these risks include:

  • Improving the transparency of rail supply chains, taking a balanced approach for stakeholders, and supporting a more competitive and efficient rail sector
  • Working with industry to develop fair and easy to understand consumer protection for air travellers
  • Pursuing legislation to change international ownership restrictions, from 25% of voting interests for Canadian air carriers to 49%
  • Continuing an in-depth assessment of VIA Rail’s high frequency rail proposal for the Toronto-Quebec City corridor
  • Working with funding recipients to make sure that federal funding is being spent on eligible costs
  • Creating merit-based funding programs to target investments where needs are most aligned with federal priorities;
  • Delivering policy and program elements of the Trade and Transportation Corridors Initiative, including the $2-billion National Trade Corridors Fund, which will build stronger, more resilient and efficient corridors to international markets
  • Reviewing Canada Port Authorities and the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway system, to make sure these assets can to support an innovative and inclusive Canadian economy
  • Working with international partners and the World Economic Forum to assess how emerging technologies can positively impact a passenger-centric approach to aviation that balances security, efficiency, and facilitation and allows for industry innovation to enhance the competitiveness of Canada’s aviation sector
  • Investing in projects to assess federally owned transportation assets’ climate risks and support innovative adaptation technologies and capacity-building efforts to increase transportation resilience in the North
  • Developing a new climate change adaptation plan for Transport Canada, strengthening adaptation knowledge and capacity, and integrating climate considerations into departmental decision-making
  • Working with provinces and territories on road safety and policy issues to support the use of automated and connected vehicles in Canada
  • Launching the Trade and Transportation Information System, for more informed decision-making, coordination, and planning related to capacity and public/private transportation infrastructure investments (with the Canadian Centre on Transportation Data and the Open Data Portal providing authoritative transportation information in Canada, and the Port-city Supply Chain Visibility project for the performance of the supply chain)
  • Establishing an Innovation Centre, to help us anticipate changes in technology and identify solutions
  • Supporting innovation in aviation, strengthening technical and certification capacity and international engagement activities by engaging, collaborating and participating in international aviation working groups and panels, and directly working with the International Civil Aviation Organization on all matters related to Civil Aviation
  • Continuing to help develop and maintain new and existing bilateral and multilateral arrangements
  • Working with groups like the Federal Aviation Administration, and the European Aviation Safety Agency and other aviation authorities to make sure that Canada’s regulations and certifications reflects those of other countries.
  • Increasing Canada’s ability to secure market access for Canadian aeronautical products and services and contributing to Canada’s global reputation as an aviation leader.

This risk is linked to the following Core Responsibilities:

  • Efficient Transportation System
  • Green and Innovative Transportation System

Priority 1: Improve the performance and reliability of Canada’s transportation system to get products to market and grow Canada’s economy.

Priority 2: Provide greater choice, better service, lower costs and enhanced rights for consumers.

Priority 3: Build world-leading marine corridors that are competitive, safe, and environmentally sustainable, and enhance Northern transportation infrastructure.

Transportation-related security incidents – such as those caused by cyber threats – may not be effectively addressed due to communication gaps at critical points.

Canada’s transportation system faces complex and multi-faceted security threats. We will review existing processes and find opportunities to engage and share information with our stakeholders and partners, both nationally and internationally, to make sure that security information is being transmitted securely.

The use of digital and connected systems in transportation has introduced cyber security threats. We reviewed and updated procedures, as required, to make sure there is a strong and repeatable process for sharing information about transportation security incidents.

Other risk responses included:

  • Conducting and participating in exercises to validate procedures, and improve employees understanding and use of those procedures
  • Working with other government departments to improve cyber security for the transportation system
  • Sharing intelligence reports, for the situational awareness of senior management, staff, and industry stakeholders, to help them understand the cause(s) of an incident, evaluate security risks related to their work, and make well-informed decisions
  • Educating employees on roles, responsibilities, and procedures related to reporting and responding to transportation security incidents
  • Coordinating Transport Canada’s participation in whole-of-government exercises with industry stakeholders
  • Conducting background checks and providing Transportation Security Clearances (TSC) to help verify that individuals who work in secure areas of airports and marine ports are reliable and do not pose a risk to the transportation system or to those who use it.
  • Reviewing Canada’s aviation security system, to ensure policies and programs reflect innovation and remain modern, efficient, and effective, and
  • Developing performance indicators by setting reduction targets for incidents, and making sure we are engaging with railway companies and other relevant stakeholders.

This risk is linked to the following Core Responsibility:

  • Safe and Secure Transportation System

Priority 4: Build a safer and more secure transportation system that Canadians trust.

Federal transportation programs and regulations may not effectively contribute to reducing the environmental impacts of transportation-related activities including their adverse effects on Indigenous Peoples, and Coastal and Northern communities.

Approximately 23% of Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions comes from transportation.

Marine shipping activities threaten Canada’s fragile ecosystems and marine species at risk. Through the Pan-Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change, we’re working with provinces and territories to support Canada’s transition to a low-carbon transportation system.

In collaboration with Indigenous groups, coastal communities, provinces and territories we’re acting on the Oceans Protection Plan. The Plan includes a number of innovation and transformation initiatives that are being put in place by five federal organizations. It supports responsible shipping and restoring and preserving marine ecosystems. It strengthens partnerships with Indigenous and coastal communities, and invests in evidence-based emergency preparedness and response measures, to keep Canadians safe and protect Canadian coasts.

We continued the moratorium on crude oil tanker traffic on British Columbia’s north coast, and will continue to work with partners to build marine corridors that are competitive, safe, and environmentally sustainable.

Other risk responses included:

  • Working with other federal departments to promote federal priorities such as carbon pricing, the Clean Fuel Standard, and other measures in the Pan-Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change
  • Putting in place a multi-year plan to demonstrate Transport Canada’s commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from its own operation
  • Conducting research and regulatory development, to ensure that motor vehicle safety standards allow clean technologies for greenhouse gas emission vehicle regulations
  • Developing a Canada-wide zero-emission vehicle strategy with provinces and territories, and in consultation with industry and other stakeholders
  • Addressing greenhouse gas emissions from aviation and shipping by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s and the International Maritime Organization’s creation of new international standards and recommended practices, as well as with new domestic regulations, and, in collaboration with the Canadian aviation sector, through Canada’s Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation
  • Learning more about the impacts of marine transportation on ecosystems, and developing mitigation strategies
  • Implementing a strategy to deal with abandoned and wrecked vessels in Canadian waters, including new legislation, enhancing vessel owner identification systems, and establishing a long-term approach to fund the clean-up of abandoned and wrecked vessels
  • Administering the Abandoned Boats Program, including education outreach and research into recycling, vessel design, and small vessel removal components
  • For both short-term action and a longer-term strategy to improve the recovery of the Southern Resident Killer Whale, the North Atlantic Right Whale, and other endangered whales, continuing to work with stakeholders on research, evaluation methods, and to develop and implement proposals
  • Introducing legislative changes to strengthen environmental protection and response in Canada’s waters
  • Actively implementing the Oceans Protection Plan in collaboration with Indigenous groups, coastal communities, provinces and territories
  • Partnering with Indigenous and coastal communities to improve responses to marine-related matters, like emergency preparedness and response
  • Working with northern communities to address the unique challenges of transportation corridors in Canada’s North, and
  • Implementing merit-based funding programs to target investments to where they’re most needed and aligned with federal priorities.

This risk is linked to the following Core Responsibility:

  • Green and Innovative Transportation System

Priority 3: Build world-leading marine corridors that are competitive, safe and environmentally sustainable, and enhance Northern transportation infrastructure.

Priority 5: Reduce environmental impacts and embrace new technologies to improve Canadians’ lives.

Canada’s transportation legislative, regulatory and oversight regimes may not effectively address emerging safety and security issues, industry practices and increasing demands.

We have built a world-class regulatory regime. But new technology, demographics, markets, and business environments continue to evolve quickly.

In response to these challenges, and to maintain our status as a world-class regulator and economic enabler, the department has launched an ambitious Transformation Agenda. This included:

  • Modernizing the department’s legislative framework to better support efficiency, facilitate and respond to innovations, and provide for a leading-edge, risk-based safety and security oversight framework that leverages professional expertise and digital technologies to oversee, manage, and minimize existing and emerging risks to the transportation system
  • Enhancing analytical capabilities and use of data to strengthen risk management practices, to maximize the impact of oversight activities on the safety and security of the Canadian transportation system
  • Establishing an Innovation Centre, improve how Transport Canada anticipates technological changes, shares expertise in technology and research, and identifies solutions, while influencing technology development
  • Reviewing how cyber security can impact Canada’s transportation system, and developing strategies to combat this emerging threat.
  • Other risk responses included:
  • Strengthening specific legislative and regulatory regimes, including:
    • In rail safety, proposing legislative amendments and regulations related to locomotive video and voice recorders, addressing fatigue issues, and updating railway employee training and qualification regulations, including a statutory review of the Railway Safety Act
    • In marine safety, working to restore protections and incorporate modern safeguards through the Canadian Navigable Waters Act
  • Developing a range of regulatory and non-regulatory tools and guidelines to facilitate safe testing and deployment of emerging technologies in the automotive sector (such as connected and automated vehicles)
  • Developing performance indicators by setting accidents/incidents reduction targets and ensuring ongoing engagement with railway companies and other relevant stakeholders
  • Dedicating resources over the next four years to review and update the Canadian Aviation Regulations, to address outstanding and emerging aviation safety regulatory issues
  • Strengthening the regulatory framework for safe integration of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems into Canadian airspace, to support innovation
  • Implementing the regulatory framework for the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations, which came into force on July 13, 2017; and the International Maritime Organization’s mandatory Code for ships operating in polar waters (Polar Code), by introducing the new Arctic Shipping Safety and Pollution Prevention Regulations
  • Creating guidelines for cruise ships and tour operators using Northern marine transportation corridors
  • Establishing the Civil Aviation National Oversight Advisory Board, to allow for more timely and effective enforcement action
  • Modernizing the oversight system for the transportation of dangerous goods, to promote industry compliance and ensure emerging issues are identified and addressed
  • Developing regulations, in consultation with stakeholders, to improve security for passenger rail and security for the transportation of dangerous goods by rail
  • Modernizing the cost recovery regime so we can respond better to industry demand, and implementing cost recovery for 24 different program lines over the next five years, to establish sustainable funding for the department’s services
  • Accelerating the implementation of recommendations from the Emergency Response Task Force
  • Contributing to a strong regulatory and oversight regime, by delivering training that will improve the competencies of our technical teams, as well as those who play a key role in designing and developing regulatory policies and regulations
  • Developing a robust risk-based National Oversight Plan, which includes a comprehensive exercise to identify safety and security risks in the rail industry.

This risk is linked to the following Core Responsibility:

  • Safe and Secure Transportation System
  • Green and Innovative Transportation System

Priority 4: Build a safer and more secure transportation system that Canadians trust.

Priority 6: Advance Transport Canada’s five-year plan to reform key outdated legislation to allow more modern oversight and enforcement, and alignment with international best practices.

Reporting Framework

Transport Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below.

Core Responsibility 1: Safe and Secure Transportation System

Result 1: A safe transportation system

Result Indicator: (air, marine, rail) Accident rate over a 10-year period, and fatality rate over a 10-year period.

Result Indicator: Rate of reportable road traffic collisions in Canada. Rate of fatalities in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada. Rate of serious injuries in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada.

Result Indicator: Rate of releases of reportable dangerous goods per year.

Result 2: A secure transportation system

Result Indicator: (air, marine) Rate of compliance of sector operators with Transport Canada’s security regulations.

Result Indicator: Rate of refusals/ suspension/ cancelations of Transportation Security Clearances. Rate of revocations of Transportation Security Clearances.

Result 3: A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Result Indicator: (air, marine, transportation of dangerous goods) Percentage of Transport Canada's security regulations aligned with international transportation standards.

Result Indicator: (air, marine, transportation of dangerous goods) Percentage of client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards.

Program Inventory under Core Responsibility 1:
  • Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework
  • Aviation Safety Oversight
  • Aviation Safety Certification
  • Aircraft Services
  • Marine Safety Regulator Framework
  • Marine Safety Oversight
  • Marine Safety Certification
  • Navigation Protection Program
  • Rail Safety Regulatory Framework
  • Rail Safety Oversight
  • Rail Safety Improvement Program
  • Motor Vehicle Safety Regulatory Framework
  • Motor Vehicle Safety Oversight
  • TDG Regulatory Framework
  • TDG Oversight
  • TDG Technical Support
  • Aviation Security Regulatory Framework
  • Aviation Security Oversight
  • Marine Security Regulatory Framework
  • Marine Security Oversight
  • Intermodal Surface Security Regulatory Framework
  • Intermodal Surface Security Oversight
  • Multimodal Safety and Security Services
  • Security Screening Certification
  • Emergency Management

Core Responsibility 2: Green and Innovative Transportation System

Result 4: Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced

Result Indicator: GHG emissions intensity for domestic aviation. GHG emissions intensity for domestic marine transportation. GHG emissions intensity for freight rail transportation.

Result 5: Canada's oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts

Result Indicator: Rate of spills into Canada's ocean and marine environments per thousand commercial vessels.

Result 6: A transportation system that supports innovation

Result Indicator: Number of new aeronautical products certified.

Result Indicator: Number of innovative motor vehicle features introduced in Canada through the use of Transport Canada’s regulatory tools that facilitate innovative technologies.

Program Inventory under Core Responsibility 2
  • Climate Change and Clean Air
  • Protecting Oceans and Waterways
  • Environmental Stewardship of Transportation
  • Transportation Innovation
  • Indigenous Partnerships and Engagement

Core Responsibility 3: Efficient Transportation System

Result 7: Transportation corridors get products reliably to market

Result Indicator: End-to-end transit time of containerized freight arriving from ports in Asia.

Result Indicator: End-to-end transit time of a select grouping of commodities, such as grains, departing from Canada to Asia

Result 8: Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Result Indicator: Number of air service routes within Canada and between Canada and other countries.

Result Indicator: Frequency of flights on air service routes within Canada and between Canada and other countries.

Result 9: Transport Canada manages its assets effectively

Result Indicator: Percentage of Transport Canada owned and managed transportation assets that remain operational.

Program Inventory under Core Responsibility 3
  • Transportation Marketplace Frameworks
  • Transportation Analysis
  • National Trade Corridors
  • Transportation Infrastructure

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Transport Canada’s website:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more
  • Gender-based analysis plus
  • Horizontal initiatives
  • Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Transport Canada welcomes your comments on this report.

Email: Questions@tc.gc.ca
Phone: 613-990-2309
Toll Free: 1-866-995-9737
Teletypewriter (TTY): 1-888-675-6863
Fax: 613-954-4731

Mailing Address:
Transport Canada (ADI)
330 Sparks Street
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0N5

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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