ATA 52 Doors

LEGEND

Procedures Required

(O) – An operational procedure
(M) or (M#) – A maintenance procedure
(O)(M) or (O)(M#) – Both operational and maintenance procedures

Repair Interval Categories

Category A

Items in this category shall be repaired within the time interval specified in the "Remarks or Exceptions" column of the air operator's approved MEL. Whenever the proviso in the "Remarks or Exceptions" column of the MMEL states cycles or flight time, the time interval begins with the next flight. Whenever the time interval is listed as flight days, the time interval begins on the flight day following the day of discovery.

Time Limited Dispatch - Some MMEL's for aircraft that are equipped with FADEC engines have relief that is subject to time limited dispatch expressed as a specific number of engine hours, and will start in accordance with the times established by the engine manufacturer or as indicated in the remarks column of the MMEL. Time limited relief cannot be extended.

Category B

Items in this category shall be repaired within 3 consecutive calendar days excluding the day of discovery.

Category C

Items in this category shall be repaired within 10 consecutive calendar days, excluding the day of discovery.

Category D

Items in this category shall be repaired within 120 consecutive calendar days, excluding the day of discovery. To be considered for placement in Category D, the item must be of an optional nature, or excess equipment which an air operator may, at his/her discretion, deactivate, remove from or install on an aircraft.

To be approved for Category D, the item must meet the following criteria:

  1. the absence of the item does not adversely affect crew member's workload;
  2. the crew members do not rely on the function of that item on a routine or continuous basis; and,
  3. the crew members' training, subsequent habit patterns and procedures do not rely on the use of that item.

Category D relief will generally not be approved for equipment which is considered to increase the level of safety, even if that equipment is of an optional nature.

ITEM:  52-10-1  EMERGENCY EXITS AND ESCAPE SLIDES (PASSENGER CARRYING OPERATIONS)

System and Sequence No. Item Repair
Interval
Category
Number
Installed
Number
required
for
dispatch
Procedures
required
Remarks or Exceptions
Emergency Exits and Escape Slides (Passenger Carrying Operations) A/B (M)(O)

One emergency exit/slide may be inoperative for one flight day provided:

a) Affected door is not used for passenger loading,

b) Affected exit is verified closed, latched and locked prior to each flight. Inoperative slide must be removed or deactivated or secured,

c) A conspicuous placard indicating that the exit is inoperative is attached to the exit in accordance with Note 2,

d) Emergency exit signs and lights associated only with the inoperative exit are obscured (Note 3),

e) Flight crew members and flight attendants are advised of the nature (emergency exit and slide availability) and extent of the unserviceability and that evacuation procedures do not include affected exit, though opposite exit may be used,

f) Passenger capacity limitations and blocked seating layouts are developed by the air carrier and approved by Transport Canada (Note 4) for inclusion in the carrier’s MEL,

g) Restricted seating areas are clearly indicated by blocking with barrier tape prior to passenger boarding (Notes 5 and 6),

h) Main passenger aisle(s), (cross aisles if applicable), and exit access areas are not blocked,

i) A video pre-departure safety briefing that includes emergency exits is not conducted. The live pre-departure briefing must include:

1. Identification of the inoperative exit,

2. Instructions that the affected exit is not to be used,

3. Instructions regarding the most appropriate evacuation routing, and

4. Identification of the area which is prohibited from use during takeoff and landing.

j) Persons other than assigned flight attendants are not seated in the blocked area for taxi, takeoff and landing,

k) A flight attendant is stationed at the emergency exit opposite to the inoperative exit during take-off and landing (Note 7), and

l) Smoke removal procedures are not predicated on the use of the affected exit.

NOTES:
1. Relief is only permitted for a forward or overwing exit which can be readily opened. Relief for an aft exit does not require it to be readily opened.

Relief is not permitted for an evacuation slide which is fed by two exits.

2. The placard shall consist of the following (or approved equivalent):

a) A white circular disc of at least 25 cm in diameter with a red band around its periphery, and a red diagonal line across its diameter at a 45 degree angle ascending from left to right. The thickness of the red band and line is to be a minimum of 2.5 cm.

b) The following text below the disc - “NO EXIT” “SORTIE INUTILISABLE” in red letters at least 3.5 cm in height on a white background.

c) The placard shall be affixed by a means that will prevent it from being dislodged under the dynamic forces expected during an emergency landing (AWM 525.561 or equivalent depending on certification basis). It must not obscure the emergency exit window.

3. Exit locator signs and emergency aisle path markings which are shared between two exits must not be obscured.

4. Any application for MEL relief of this item must be accompanied by all supporting data including a configuration drawing indicating the seats that will be blocked. The request for relief must be submitted to the MEL approval authority for approval coordination.

5. If infrangible, the barrier tape must be removed after passenger boarding and after the announcement that the indicated areas are prohibited from use. If frangible, the tape may remain in place for takeoff and landing but must easily tear so as not to become a means of entanglement during an evacuation.

6. The seating capacity shall be determined by the use of the analysis method described in the Performance Standards Working Group Emergency Evacuation Subcommittee - Aviation Rule making Advisory Committee (ARAC) Report: ”Emergency Evacuation Requirements and Compliance Methods that Would Eliminate or Minimize the Potential for Injury to Full Scale Evacuation Demonstration Participants” dated 93.04.02. In addition to the foregoing, a review of the cabin interior layout shall be conducted in order to identify appropriate zonal division lines.

7. A flight attendant may be stationed at the inoperative exit during taxi, take-off and landing.

8. For extended overwater operations, occupancy must not exceed the normal rated capacity of the remaining slide rafts, or the rated overload capacity of the slide rafts remaining after loss of one additional slide raft of greatest capacity, whichever is less. The minimum number of required ditching exits must be available as per AWM 525.807 or equivalent depending on the basis of certification.

9. Weight and balance manifest must be revised as necessary to ensure proper loading limits are observed.

10. On all-cargo and combination passenger/cargo aircraft, exit(s) located in the cargo area may be inoperative except, where applicable at least one exit must be operative for flight crew evacuation purposes.

11. The carrier must keep a record, for examination by Transport Canada, of each instance where this relief has been exercised. This record must be forwarded quarterly to the MEL approval authority. Following is a list of data which must be included in that record:

a) Carrier

b) Aircraft type, series and registration number

c) Location of aircraft

d) Date

e) Exit involved

f) Seating capacity, number of passengers offloaded and number of passengers carried

g) Cause (including occupation of person involved) and nature of occurrence

h) Point in itinerary (departure, arrival, servicing, maintenance)

i) When and where repairs made

j) Corrective action taken (e.g. training, procedures, design) to preclude recurrence

k) Number of hours inoperative

l) Flight itinerary to repair base

m) Estimated cost (including details) if relief had not been available.

n) Cumulative total of occurrences per 1000 departures

References:  FAA PL 1 (Rev. 3, 4 Jan. 2008)

Since the initial door/slide relief was granted by the FAA and TCCA for the B747, DC10, L1011 and A300 aircraft, considerable discussion has taken place between industry and the regulatory authorities regarding the possible extension to other aircraft.  After extensive discussion with industry and within Transport Canada, further relief for passenger carrying operations is permitted under the following conditions:

1. The conditions under which short term relief is granted are based on the TC Guidance Book MMEL Working Group guidelines as detailed above.

2. Relief is only applicable to aircraft equipped with at least four Type I or greater floor level door exits arranged essentially at the front and rear of the airplane as facing pairs.  The analysis method shall be used to determine seating capacity and arrangement in applications for new aircraft (not including 747, L1011, A310 and DC 10), although the method may also be used in determining seating capacity and arrangement for these four aircraft.  All other details of this relief are also applicable to the B747, DC10, L1011 and A300 except for the categorization (B) which will remain unchanged.  It must be noted that the category B only applies to inoperative doors in the cargo compartment of freighter and combi aircraft. (Ref. Note 10 of provisos).

3. The initial intention of TCCA was that all MMEL/MEL relief for emergency exits/slides would have terminated on August 1, 1996.  This was to provide short term relief to operators while defining a time frame during which Transport Canada expected operators and manufacturers to identify and correct the problems which are causing these safety critical systems to be unavailable.  Although TCCA and Industry have not resolved all interested parties concerns, it is considered appropriate to continue with the relief.

4. Operators are to continue reporting each instance when this relief is utilized and provide detailed information concerning the occurrence.  This information should also include the impact on their operation.  This data bank will allow Transport Canada to closely track the problems being experienced and progress on their resolution, and to understand the implications if this relief is withdrawn.

5. TCCA will continue participating in domestic and international forums on this issue.

A door that is certified as an emergency exit is considered an emergency exit for MMEL purposes.

FAA Differences:  The FAA does not provide door/slide relief for narrow body aircraft.  TCCA uses the ARAC process to determine the seats to be blocked off while the FAA uses different techniques to determine the seats to be blocked off.

ITEM:  52-10-2  EMERGENCY EXITS AND ESCAPE SLIDES (AIRCRAFT CREW ONLY)

System and Sequence No. Item Repair
Interval
Category
Number
Installed
Number
required
for
dispatch
Procedures
required
Remarks or Exceptions
Emergency Exits/Escape Slides (Aircraft Crew Only) A - - (M)(O)

One emergency exit/slide may be inoperative for three flight days provided:

a) Only the aircraft crew are carried,

b) Affected emergency exit is verified closed, latched and locked prior to each flight,

c) Aircraft crew are advised of the nature (emergency exit and slide availability) and extent of the unserviceability and that evacuation procedures do not include affected exit, though opposite exit may be used,

d) A conspicuous sign or placard indicating that the exit is inoperative is attached to the exit, and

e) Emergency exit signs and lights associated only with the inoperative exit are obscured (NOTE 3).

NOTES:
1. For the purpose of this item, “aircraft crew” includes the operating crew members including the flight crew members, flight attendants, aircraft maintenance personnel and supervisory crew members.

2. The operator’s MEL must state the maximum number of aircraft crew permitted.

3. Exit locator signs and emergency aisle path markings which are shared between two exits must not be obscured.

DISCUSSION:

References:   FAA PL 1 (Rev. 3, 4 Jan. 2008)

This relief pertains to large aircraft with multiple entries on each side of the aircraft.  It is intended for the aircraft crew only, to facilitate flying to a maintenance facility with only the aircraft crew on board.

NOTE #2 requires the operator to state the maximum number of aircraft crew permitted.  The maximum number of aircraft crew would be determined by adding the number of the operating crew members that would likely be scheduled on the aircraft type, plus the number of maintenance personnel who would likely be scheduled to remain with the aircraft when flying to destinations where the air operator does not have any contracted maintenance agreement, plus the maximum number of supervisory crew members who would likely be carrying out an in-flight check ride at one time.

Emergency Exit/Escape Slide (Aircraft Crew Only) relief is not intended for all cargo operations.

This relief would not be applicable to aircraft such as the CL 600 which have no cockpit escape routes and no multiple emergency exits on each side of the aircraft.  If this relief were granted for the CL 600, safety would be significantly reduced for the crew trying to escape with one emergency exit inoperative.

There must be at least a cockpit roof escape hatch or an escape path on each side of the cockpit; OR only flight crew members (pilots, and engineer if appropriate) are carried and there is at least one operative emergency exit on each side of the aircraft.

A door that is certified as an emergency exit is considered an emergency exit for MMEL purposes.

FAA Differences:  FAA only addresses all cargo aircraft.  FAA allows all slides except L1 and R1 to be inoperative, cat C.  Exit L1 or R1 can be inoperative, cat B.  FAA specifies essential crew members whereas TCCA is more specific.  FAA does not assign (O) or (M).

ITEM:  52-10-3  NARROW-BODY ALL CARGO AIRCRAFT SLIDE RELIEF

System and Sequence No. Item Repair
Interval
Category
Number
Installed
Number
required
for
dispatch
Procedures
required
Remarks or Exceptions
Narrow-Body All Cargo Aircraft Slide Relief
Main Cabin Slides (All Cargo Configuration) C - -

All slides in the cargo area with the exception of L1 and R1 may be inoperative provided:

a) Exits L1 and R1 are accessible to all crew members, and

b) The aisle(s) between the flight deck and the cargo crew members’ assigned seating location are not wholly or partially blocked by cargo.

B - 0

All slides may be inoperative provided:

a) All crew members are on the flight deck, and

b) An alternate means of egress is available

DISCUSSION:

References:  CAR 705, CAR 602.86(2)(a), AWM 525.809(a), AWM 525.810(a)(2), FAA PL 99 (Rev. 1, 4 Jan. 2008)

Narrow-body all cargo slide relief is intended for aircraft with multiple exits on both sides of the aircraft.  Narrow-body all cargo aircraft require emergency exits for the flight crew to be a door or hatch in the external wall of the fuselage (AWM 525.809(a)).  One of these must be located on each side or alternately an overhead hatch.  These exits may be equipped with a rope as a means to assist personnel to ground level (AWM 525.810(2)).  Generally, the flight crew emergency exits are the sliding cockpit windows, equipped with ropes stored in a compartment in the upper sidewall above each sliding window.  Relief is only applicable to all cargo operations conducting operations in an air transport service pursuant to Airline Operations regulated by CAR 705.

FAA Differences:  FAA relief has been granted in accordance with Policy Letter 99.  TCCA relief is more restrictive, as it does not provide for relief without restrictions for the L1 or R1 exits.

ITEM:  52-50-1  ENHANCED FLIGHT DECK SECURITY DOOR

System and Sequence No. Item Repair
Interval
Category
Number
Installed
Number
required
for
dispatch
Procedures
required
Remarks or Exceptions
Enhanced Flight Deck Security Door

Primary Locking System (Passenger and Combi Aircraft Only)

1) Decompression Function Dependent on Primary Door Locking System

A 1 0 (M)(O)

May be inoperative provided:

a) Primary locking system is deactivated,

b) Secondary locking system operates normally and is used to lock the door,

c) Alternate procedures are established and used for locking and unlocking the door using the secondary locking system, and

d) Repairs are made within two flight days.

2) Decompression Function Independent of Primary Door Locking System

C 1 0 (M)(O)

May be inoperative provided:

a) Primary locking system is deactivated,

b) Secondary locking system operates normally and is used to lock the door, and

c) Alternate procedures are established and used for locking and unlocking the door using the secondary locking system.

Secondary Locking System (Passenger and Combi Aircraft Only)

C 1 0 May be inoperative provided primary locking system operates normally.

DISCUSSION:

References:  AWM 525.795, CAR 705.80, FAA PL 112 (Rev. 1, 29 Jan. 2004)

According to the design standards specified by AWM 525.795 (applicable to Transport Category Aeroplanes), a flight deck door, as required by CAR 705.80, must meet specific intrusion and penetration resistance requirements.  In addition, CAR 705.80(2) requires that such door be equipped with a locking device.

Relief cannot be granted either to the flight deck door as a whole system or to its locking system.  However, relief for specific sub-systems/items is granted taking into consideration the next probable failure condition, providing the level of safety, as defined by the design standards, is maintained.

FAA Differences:  FAA relief is identical to TCCA.

ITEM:  52-70-1  EXTERNAL DOOR(S) INDICATION SYSTEM

System and Sequence No. Item Repair
Interval
Category
Number
Installed
Number
required
for
dispatch
Procedures
required
Remarks or Exceptions
External Door(s) Indication System N/A 1 1 No relief for a red door warning light, if opening of the door during takeoff would present a hazard.
C 1 0 Relief may be granted for an amber door caution light but this assumes that the choice of an amber light during the certification of the aircraft was correct (see DISCUSSION). If, however, an immediate hazard could be present if a door were to become unsafe then no relief should be granted no matter what the light colour.

DISCUSSION:

References:  FAA Internal Letter (17 Nov. 1989), FAA PL 69 (Rev. 2, 24 Sep. 2003)

A red visual warning shall be used for all outward opening doors whose opening during takeoff could present an immediate hazard to the airplane.

An amber caution light shall be used for all other doors, including plug door designs.  Clearly, the colour of the warning indication light(s) must be based on an assessment of hazard and MMEL relief approved accordingly.

For EICAS it is unacceptable to dispatch with an amber message visible to the pilot, i.e. there must be a capability to hide the message.

FAA Differences:  FAA relief is similar to TCCA.

Date modified: