Chapter 6 - Aircraft Critical Surface Contamination Examination Questions

4.0  Preventative Measures and Deicing Procedures

4.01  Cold snow is falling onto a cold wing and swirling across the surface. Under these conditions

  1. anti-icing fluid should be applied to the critical surfaces.
  2. Deicing fluid should be applied to the critical surfaces.
  3. the pilot may assume the accumulated snow will blow off on take-off.
  4. the application of deicing or anti-icing fluid may not be prudent.

4.02  When deicing an aircraft, it is important to know

  1. the kind of contamination.
  2. the concentration is correct for the conditions.
  3. the recommended holdover times and keep track of the time.
  4. all of the above.

4.03  The areas that should be de iced or anti iced first are

  1. the engine ducts.
  2. the tailplane.
  3. the fuselage top.
  4. surfaces that are visible from the cockpit.

4.04  Select the correct statements regarding the use of Type I deicing fluid.

  1. With the types of deicing fluid now in use, the entire aircraft may be sprayed.
  2. As a guideline, start at the top and work down, but work symmetrically.
  3. Some aircraft require specific control surface settings for deicing.
  4. Deicing fluid may be sprayed directly on windows.
  1. A, B.
  2. A, D.
  3. B, C.
  4. C, D.

4.05  When deicing windows

  1. spray the fuselage above the windows and allow the fluid to flow down.
  2. use only hot water to avoid damage from the deicing fluid.
  3. spray directly on the top of the windows and allow the fluid to flow down.
  4. use anti icing fluid as it is the only approved de icer for windows.

4.06  Select the correct statements regarding ground deicing and anti-icing with the main engines running.

  1. The engine should be operated at high power.
  2. The air conditioning should be selected ON.
  3. Avoid spraying fluid directly into the APU inlet.
  4. Minimize the generation of spray in the vicinity of the engine intakes.
  1. A, B, D.
  2. A, C.
  3. B. D.
  4. C. D.

4.07  Where variances in deicing procedures are noted, the final authorities are the

  1. company operations manual and the Airworthiness Manual.
  2. company Operating Certificate and the Airworthiness Manual.
  3. CARs, the company operations manual and the manufacturer's flight and maintenance manuals.
  4. CARs, the A.I.P. Canada, and the company Operating Certificate and Safety Awareness Program data.

4.08  To make an informed decision on deicing/anti icing of an aircraft, a pilot requires a knowledge of the

  1. procedures available.
  2. capabilities and limitations of procedures in various weather conditions.
  3. use and effectiveness of FPD fluids.
  4. all of the above.

4.09  Holdover times for FPD fluids should be considered

  1. as guidelines only, unless the Operator's Ground Icing Operations Program allows otherwise.
  2. valid only for the 100% concentration time in the holdover tables.
  3. valid for the longest times shown on the holdover tables.
  4. guidelines in all cases.

4.10  Holdover time is calculated as beginning at the

  1. start of the final application of deicing/anti icing fluid and ending when the fluid shears on take off.
  2. end of the final application of deicing/anti icing fluid and ending when the fluid shears on take off.
  3. end of the final application of deicing/anti icing fluid and expiring when the fluid is no longer effective.
  4. start of the final application of deicing/anti icing fluid and expiring when the fluid is no longer effective.

4.11  Which methods should be used to remove heavy, wet snow or ice from an aircraft?

  1. Undiluted Type I FPD fluid.
  2. A broom or squeegee.
  3. A rope sawed across the surface.
  4. Heated solutions of FPD fluids and water.
  1. A, C, D.
  2. A, C.
  3. B, C.
  4. B, D.

4.12  Pure propylene glycol fluids

  1. may be used in non precipitation conditions.
  2. are not to be used in non precipitation conditions.
  3. are not to be used in precipitation conditions.
  4. are applied heated as the second step in the two step process.

4.13  Ice or frost that has formed on a wing as a result of the cold soaking phenomenon may be prevented from reforming by

  1. refueling the wing tanks with warm fuel.
  2. Deicing within ten minutes of take off.
  3. Deicing with undiluted Type I fluid.
  4. using all of the above methods.

4.14  Pre-take-off contamination inspections should be concentrated on

  1. surfaces at the mid-chord section of the wing.
  2. the leading edge in conjunction with the trailing edge of the wing.
  3. representative surfaces.
  4. surfaces where anti-icing fluid was last applied.

4.15  Which statement is correct regarding the inspection of the critical surfaces immediately before take-off during conditions of heavy snow.

  1. The inspection is required irrespective of the elapsed time since anti-icing.
  2. Take-off must be initiated within 15 minutes of the inspection.
  3. The inspection is not required where the operator is using a program in accordance with the Ground Icing Operations Standard.
  4. The inspection is not required where a remote deicing facility is used and the take-off is initiated within the holdover time.

4.16  Which statement is correct regarding take-off after holdover times have been exceeded.

  1. Operations must cease immediately.
  2. Inspections are not required after deicing at a Central De-ice Facility.
  3. There must be at least 5 minutes of holdover time remaining after the pre-take-off inspection.
  4. Take-off must be within 5 minutes of completion of the pre-take-off inspection.
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