11. Maintenance Practices: Protection and Caution Recommendations

TCCA together with the other participating regulatory authorities identified some specific maintenance and servicing tasks for which more robust practices are recommended to be adopted by air carriers, air operators, maintenance providers, repair stations. These recommendations apply to all tasks, including those performed on an unscheduled basis without an accompanying routine job instruction card. Performance of these maintenance practices will help prevent contamination of EWIS that result from contact with harmful solids (such as metal shavings) or fluids during maintenance, modifications, and repairs of aircraft structures, and components. In addition the training of maintenance and servicing personnel should address the potential consequences of their actions on the wiring in the work vicinity.

Item 1: Installation, Repair, or Modification to Wiring.

Wiring and its associated components (protective coverings, connectors, clamping provisions, conduits, etc.) often comprise the most delicate and maintenance sensitive portions of an installation or system. Extreme care should be exercised and proper procedures used during installation, repair, or modification of wiring to ensure safe and reliable performance of the function supplied by the wiring.

Proper wire selection, routing/separation, clamping configurations, use of splices, repair or replacement of protective coverings, pinning/de-pinning of connections, etc., should be performed in accordance with the applicable sections of the Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM), Wiring Practices Manual (WPM), or other documents authorized for maintenance use. In addition, special care should be taken to minimize disturbance of existing adjacent wiring during all maintenance activities. When wiring is displaced during a maintenance activity, special attention should be given to returning it to its normal configuration in accordance with the applicable maintenance instructions.

Item 2: Structural Repairs, STCs, Modifications

Structural repair, STC or modification activity inherently introduces tooling and residual debris that is harmful to aircraft wiring. Structural repairs or modifications often require displacement (or removal) of wiring to provide access to the work area. Even minor displacement of wiring, especially while clamped, can damage wire insulation, which can result in degraded performance, arcing, or circuit failure.

Extreme care should be exercised to protect wiring from mechanical damage by tools or other equipment used during structural repairs, STCs or modifications. Drilling blindly into the aircraft structure should be avoided. Damage to wire installation could cause wire arcing, fire and smoke. Wiring located adjacent to drilling or riveting operations should be carefully displaced or covered to reduce the possibility of mechanical damage.

Debris such as drill shavings, liberated fastener pieces, broken drill bits, etc., should not be allowed to contaminate or penetrate wiring or electrical components. This can cause severe damage to insulation and potential arcing by providing a conductive path to ground or between two (2) or more wires of different loads. Once contaminated, removal of this type of debris from wire bundles is extremely difficult. Therefore, precautions should be taken to prevent contamination of any kind from entering the wire bundle.

Before initiating structural repair, STC or modification activity, the work area should be carefully surveyed to identify all wiring and electrical components that may be subject to contamination. All wiring and electrical components in the debris field should be covered or removed to prevent contamination or damage. Consideration should be given to using drills equipped with vacuum aspiration to further minimize risk of metallic debris contaminating wire bundles. Clean electrical components and wiring after completion of work per applicable maintenance instructions.

Item 3: Aircraft De-Icing or Anti-Icing.

To prevent damage to exposed electrical components and wiring in areas such as wing leading and trailing edges, wheel wells, and landing gear, care should be exercised when spraying de/anti-icing fluids. Direct pressure spray onto electrical components and wiring can lead to contamination or degradation and thus should be avoided.

Item 4: Inclement Weather.

Electrical wiring interconnection systems in areas below doorways, floors, access panels, and servicing bays are prone to corrosion or contamination due to their exposure to the elements. Snow, slush, or excessive moisture should be removed from these areas before closing doors or panels. Remove deposits of snow/slush from any items (e.g., cargo containers) before loading in the aircraft. During inclement weather, keep doors/panels closed as much as possible to prevent ingress of snow, slush, or excessive moisture that could increase potential for EWIS degradation.

Item 5: Component Removal/Installation (Relating to Attached Wiring).

Excessive handling and movement during removal and installation of components may be harmful to aircraft wiring. Use appropriate connector pliers (e.g., soft jawed) to loosen coupling rings that are too tight to be loosened by hand. Alternately pull on the plug body and unscrew the coupling ring until the connector is separated. Do not use excessive force, and do not pull on attached wires. When reconnecting, special care should be taken to ensure the connector body is fully seated, the jam nut is fully secured, and no tension is on the wires.

When equipment is disconnected use protective caps on all connectors (plug or receptacle) to prevent contamination or damage of the contacts. Sleeves or plastic bags may be used if protective caps are not available. Use of sleeves or plastic bags should be temporary because of the risk of condensation. It is recommended to use a humidity absorber with sleeves or plastic bags.

Item 6: Pressure Washing.

To prevent damage to exposed electrical components and wiring in areas such as wing leading and trailing edges, wheel wells, and landing gear, care should be exercised when spraying water or cleaning fluids. Direct high-pressure spray onto electrical components and wiring can lead to contamination or degradation and should be avoided. When practical, wiring and connectors should be protected before pressure washing. Water rinse should be used to remove cleaning solution residue after washing. Breakdown of wire insulation may occur with long-term exposure of wiring to cleaning solutions. Although these recommendations are good practice and technique, the aircraft maintenance manual or STC holder's instructions for continued airworthiness should be consulted for additional detailed instructions regarding pressure washing.

Item 7: Cleaning of Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems (In-situ).

Extreme care should be exercised and proper procedures used during cleaning to ensure safe and reliable performance of the function supplied by the wiring.

Care should be taken to avoid displacement or disturbance of wiring during cleaning of non-aggressive contamination. However, in the event of contamination by aggressive contaminants (e.g., livestock waste, salt water, battery electrolyte, etc.) such displacement may be necessary. In these cases wiring should be released from its installation so as to avoid undue stress being induced in wiring or connectors. Similarly, if liquid contamination enters the bundle then ties should be removed before separating the wires. Although these recommendations for cleaning of EWIS are considered good practice and technique, the aircraft maintenance manual or STC holder's instructions for continued airworthiness should be consulted for additional detailed instructions.

Clean only the area and items that have contamination. Before cleaning, make sure that the cleaning materials and methods will not cause more contamination. If a cloth is used, make sure that it is clean, dry, and lint-free. A connector should be completely dry before mating. Any fluids remaining on a connector can have a deteriorating affect on the connector or the system or both.

Item 8: Servicing, Modifying, or Repairing Waste Water Systems.

Electrical wiring interconnection systems in areas adjacent to waste/water systems are prone to contamination from those systems. Care should be exercised to prevent any fluids from reaching electrical components and wiring while servicing, modifying, or repairing waste/water systems. Cover exposed electrical components and wiring during waste/water system modification or repair. Operator practice may call for a weak acid solution to be periodically flushed through lavatory systems to enhance reliability and efficiency of operation. In view of the effect of acid contamination on systems and structure, the system should be confirmed to be free of leaks before using such solutions.

Item 9: Servicing, Modifying, or Repairing Oil Systems.

Electrical wiring interconnections in areas adjacent to oil systems are prone to contamination from those systems. To minimize the attraction and adhesion of foreign material, care should be exercised to avoid any fluids from reaching electrical components and wiring while servicing, modifying, or repairing oil systems. Oil and debris in combination with damaged wiring can present a fire hazard.

Item 10: Servicing, Modifying, or Repairing Hydraulic Systems.

Electrical wiring interconnection system in areas adjacent to hydraulic systems are prone to contamination from those systems. To minimize the attraction and adhesion of foreign material, care should be exercised to avoid any fluids from reaching electrical components and wiring while servicing, modifying, or repairing hydraulic systems.

Item 11: Gaining Access (Entering Zones).

When entering or working on the aircraft, care should be exercised to prevent damage to adjacent or hidden electrical components and wiring, including wiring that may be hidden from view (e.g., covered by insulation blankets). Use protective boards or platforms for adequate support and protection. Avoid using wire bundles as handholds, steps and supports. Work lights should not be hung or supported by wiring. If wiring must be displaced (or removed) for work area access, it should be adequately released from its clamping (or other restraining provisions) to allow movement without damage and returned after work is completed.

Item 12: Application of Corrosion Preventions Compounds (CPC).

When applying CPC in aircraft zones containing wire and associated components (i.e., clamps, connectors and ties), care should be taken to prevent CPC from coming in contact with the wire and components. Dust and lint is more likely to collect on wire that has CPC on it. Application of CPC should be done in accordance with the aircraft manufacturer's recommendations.

Date modified: