Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA) Operational Evaluation Report

Revision: Initial Issue
Date: 2017-11-30

BOEING

Type Certificate Data Sheet (TCDS)* TCDS Identifier/Master Series Marketing Name Pilot Type Rating
A16WE (FAA) B-737-100
B-737-200
B-737-200C
Boeing 737
B73A
B-737 (FAA)
A-146
A16WE (FAA)
B-737-300
B-737-400
B-737-500
Boeing 737 Classic (CL) B73B
B-737 (FAA)
A-146
A16WE (FAA)
B-737-600
B-737-700
B-737-800
Boeing 737 Next Generation (NG) Boeing Business Jet (BBJ 1, BBJ 2, BBJ 3) B73C
B-737 (FAA)
A16WE (FAA) B-737-700C
B-737-900
B-737-900ER
Boeing 737 Next Generation (NG) B-737 (FAA)
A-146
A16WE (FAA)
B-737-8
B-737-9
Boeing 737 MAX B73C
B-737 (FAA)

APPROVED: DATE:

Approved by Robert Sincennes,
Director Standards
Transport Canada, Civil Aviation
Standards Branch (AAR)

MANAGEMENT CO-ORDINATION SHEET

Office of Primary Interest (OPI):

Roman Marushko
Program Manager, Flight Technical and Operator Certification (FTOC);
Chairman B73C, TCCA Operational Evaluation Board
Transport Canada Civil Aviation
Commercial Flight Standards (AARTF)
330 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0N8
Tel: (613) 698-5433
e-mail: roman.marushko@tc.gc.ca

Date:

Deborah Martin
Chief, Commercial Flight Standards
Transport Canada, Civil Aviation
Standards Branch
Commercial Flight Standards Division (AARTF)

Date:

Table of contents

1. Record of Revisions

Revision Number Sections(s) Page(s) Affected Date
Initial Issue ALL ALL 2017/11/30

2. Introduction

The Transport Canada Flight Technical and Operator Certification (FTOC) section of the Civil Aviation Standards Branch is responsible for the TCCA Operational Evaluation (OE) program. FTOC’s objectives during the operational evaluation of a new or modified aircraft are to determine:

  1. The acceptability of a manufacturers training program for use by Canadian operators;
  2. Pilot qualification and type rating requirements including training, checking, and currency requirements, and;
  3. The operational suitability of an aircraft type.

This report lists those determinations for use by:

  1. TCCA Inspectors who approve training programs;
  2. TCCA inspectors and Approved Check Pilots (ACPs) who conduct Pilot Proficiency Checks (PPCs) and issue Type Ratings; and
  3. Aircraft operators and training providers, to assist them in developing their flight-crew member training, checking and currency programs.

Determinations made in this report are based on the evaluations of specific B-737 series made in accordance with current regulations, standards and guidance. Modifications and upgrades made to the series described herein, or introduction of new related aircraft, may require amendment of the findings in this report.

3. Highlights of Change

This is the initial issue of the TCCA Boeing 737 series Operational Evaluation Report.

4. General

4.1 Scope of Report

This OE report applies to all series of the Boeing 737. Although the Boeing 737 series has been in service for many years in Canada, this is the first OE conducted by TCCA on the B-737, specifically the B-737 MAX. The contents of this report are harmonized with the FAA and EASA to the maximum extent possible.

Note:

This report refers to Boeing 737 aircraft by their TCDS/ Master Series identifier (e.g. B737-800 or B-737-8), by their marketing names (e.g. B-737 MAX or B-737 NG) or by their Pilot Type Rating designators (e.g. B73C) as necessary for convenience and clarity.

4.2 Guidance Material

The TCCA OE evaluations were conducted in accordance with FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 120-53B, Guidance for Conducting and Use of Flight Standardization Board (FSB) Evaluations, and the JAA/FAA/TCCA Common Procedures Document for Operational Evaluation Boards (CPD).

4.3 OE Report Effectiveness

Provisions of this report are effective until amended, superseded, or withdrawn by subsequent OE findings.

TCCA reserves the responsibility and authority to re-evaluate and modify sections of this report based on new or revised advisory material, amended CARs, aircraft operating experience, or the evaluation of new or modified aircraft under the provisions of the CPD or FAA AC 120-53B.

4.4 Application of OE Report

All relevant parts of this report are applicable on the effective date of this report.

4.5 Alternate Means of Compliance

The OEB Chairman, the Program Manager of FTOC and/or the Program Manager Large Aircraft Standards should be consulted when alternate means of compliance, other than those specified in this report, are proposed. An applicant will be required to submit a proposed alternate means that provides an equivalent level of safety to the provisions of the CARs and this OE report. Analysis, demonstrations, proof of concept testing, differences documentation, and/or other substantiation may be required.

In the event that alternate compliance is sought, training program credits, simulator approvals, and device approvals may be significantly limited and reporting requirements may be increased to ensure equivalent levels of training, checking, and currency are maintained. TCCA will generally not consider relief through alternate compliance means unless sufficient lead-time has been planned by an operator to allow for any necessary testing and evaluation.

4.6 AQP/OEB Report Relationship

Where an air operator has an approved Advanced Qualification Program (AQP), differences between this report and an operator’s proposed training, checking, and currency requirements under an AQP should be substantiated and documented as part of the operator’s AQP approval process. Program approvals under AQP need to ensure the provisions and requirements of this report have been addressed, and where necessary, coordination with the OEB has been completed.

4.7 Boeing 737 MAX Initial Type Training, STAR and PEC Course Evaluations

TCCA conducted a joint operational evaluation with the FAA (lead authority) and EASA of three separate B-737-8 type training courses in April and May of 2017 in Miami, FL and Seattle, WA using a T5 evaluation process.

The three courses included an initial type training course, an FAA Shortened Transition and Rating (STAR) course and an EASA Previous Experience Credit (PEC) course.

The initial type training course has a 26 day footprint, while the STAR/PEC courses have an 18 day footprint. The reduced footprint of the STAR and PEC courses is achieved by giving credit to pilots qualified on other Boeing types for commonality in flight deck layout, operational philosophy, and similar handling characteristics. Pilots from all three authorities with B-757 and B-787 experience evaluated the STAR and PEC courses.

The three courses were found to be acceptable by TCCA for use as the basis of an air operator’s or private operator’s training program. All additional CAR 705, and CASS 725, or CAR 604 pilot qualification, training and checking requirements must be met to qualify pilots using the Boeing training courses.

4.8 Differences between Boeing 737 MAX and Boeing 737 NG

In August 2016, TCCA participated jointly with the FAA (lead authority) and EASA to evaluate differences from the Boeing 737 NG (B-737-800) to the Boeing 737 MAX (B-737-8) using a T2/T3 evaluation process.

Note:

The B-737-800 (Serial Number YT951) used to compare differences with the B-737-8 incorporated the Short Field Performance (SFP) enhancements of the B-737-800SFP.

Master Training and Checking Differences of B/B respectively were established in the transition from the Boeing 737 NG to the Boeing 737 MAX. The same B73C Pilot Type Rating as the Boeing 737 NG was assigned to the B-737-8.

In September 2017, TCCA, the FAA and EASA jointly evaluated differences from the B-737 MAX (B737-8) to the B-737 NG (B-737-800) using a T2/T3 evaluation process. Master Level B/B differences were established in the transition from the B-737 MAX to the B-737 NG.

4.9 Differences between B-737-8 and B-737-9

In September 2017, TCCA, the FAA and EASA jointly evaluated differences from the B-737-8 to the B-737-9 using a T1 evaluation process. Master Level A/A differences were established between the B-737-8 and B-737-9.

5. Acronyms

AC
Advisory Circular
ACP
Approved Check Pilot
AFCS
Automatic Flight Control System
AFDS
Automatic Flight Director System
AFM
Aircraft Flight Manual
AOC
Air Operator Certificate
APU
Auxiliary Power Unit
AQP
Advanced Qualification Program
AT
Auto Throttles
ATC
Air Traffic Control
AWM
Airworthiness Manual
CAR
Canadian Aviation Regulation
CASS
Commercial Air Service Standard
CATI/II/III
Category I/II/III ILS
Instrument Approach
CBT
Computer Based Training
CDS
Common Display System
CDU
Control Display Unit
CFIT
Controlled Flight Into Terrain
COM
Company Operations Manual
CRM
Crew Resource Management
DA
Decision Altitude
DH
Decision Height
DR
Difference Requirements
DU
Display Unit
EASA
European Aviation Safety Agency
EDFCS
Enhanced Digital Flight Control System
EFIS
Electronic Flight Instrument Systems
EFVS
Enhanced Flight Vision System
EGPWS
Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System
ER
Extended Range
ETOPS
Extended Range Operations
FAA
Federal Aviation Administration
FAR
Federal Aviation Regulation
FCOM
Fight Crew Operating Manual
FCTM
Flight Crew Training Manual
FD
Flight Director
FFS
Full Flight Simulator
FMA
Flight Mode Annunciator
FMC
Flight Management Computer
FMS
Flight Management System
FPV
Flight Path Vector
FSB
Flight Standardization Board (FAA)
FSTD
Flight Simulation Training Device
FTOC
Flight Technical and Operator Certification (TCCA)
GLS
Global Positioning System Landing System
GS
Glideslope
HAT
Height Above Threshold
HCP
HGS Control Panel
HGS
Head Up Guidance System
HUD
Head Up Display
ICAO
International Civil Aviation Organization
ILS
Instrument Landing System
IMC
Instrument Meteorological Conditions
IR
Infrared
IOE
Initial Operating Experience
LOC
Localizer
LOFT
Line Oriented Flight Training
LOS
Line Operational Simulations
MDS
MAX Display System
MEL
Minimum Equipment List
MFF
Mixed Fleet Flying
MDR
Master Differences Requirements
ND
Navigation Display
NUC
Non-Uniformity Correction
OE
Operational Evaluation
OEB
Operational Evaluation Board
OEM
Original Equipment Manufacturer
PDCS
Performance Data Computer System
PEC
Previous Experience Credit
PF
Pilot Flying
PFD
Primary Flight Display
PIC
Pilot In Command
PM
Pilot Monitoring
PMS
Performance Management Systems
POI
Principal Operations Inspector
PPC
Pilot Proficiency Check
QRH
Quick Reference Handbook
RC
Rockwell Collins
RNP
Required Navigation Performance
RNP AR
Required Navigation Performance Authorization Required
RVR
Runway Visual Range
SFP
Short Field Performance
SIC
Second In Command
SLF
Supervised Line Flying
SOP
Standard Operating Procedure
STAR
Shortened Transition and Requirements
STC
Supplemental Type Certificate
TCAS
Traffic Collision Avoidance System
TCCA
Transport Canada Civil Aviation
TCDS
Type Certificate Data Sheet
VMC
Visual Meteorological Conditions

6. Definitions

These definitions are for the purposes of this report only.

6.1 Base Aircraft - An aircraft identified for use as a reference to compare differences with another aircraft.

6.2 Current – A crewmember meets all requirements to operate the aircraft under the applicable CAR or CASS.

6.3 Differences Tables – Describe the differences between a pair of related aircraft, and the minimum levels operators must use to conduct differences training and checking of flight crewmembers. Difference levels range from A to E.

6.4 Master Differences Requirements (MDR) – Specifies the highest training and checking difference levels between a pair of related aircraft derived from the Differences Tables.

6.5 Mixed Fleet Flying – The operation of a base aircraft and one or more related aircraft for which credit may be taken for training, checking, and currency events.

6.6 Operational Evaluation – A TCCA evaluation of the pilot qualifications requirements of an aircraft type (pilot type rating, minimum flight crewmember training, checking and currency requirements, and unique or special pilot qualification requirements (e.g., specific flight characteristics, no-flap landing)), operational suitability of an aircraft type and the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) training program.

6.7 Operational Suitability – A determination during an operational evaluation that an aircraft or system may be used in the Canadian airspace system and meets the applicable operational regulations (e.g., CAR subparts 604, 605, 701,702,703,704 and 705 as applicable).

6.8 Qualified – A flight crewmember holds the appropriate licenses and ratings as required by the applicable operating regulations.

6.9 Related Aircraft – Any two or more aircraft of the same make with either the same or different type certificates that have been demonstrated and determined by TCCA to have commonality.

6.10 Seat Dependent Tasks – Maneuvers or procedures using controls that are accessible or operable from only one flight crewmember seat.

6.11 Special Emphasis Area – A training requirement unique to the aircraft, based on a system, procedure, or maneuver, which requires additional highlighting during training. It may also require additional training time, specialized training devices or training equipment.

6.12 Specific Flight Characteristics – A maneuver or procedure with unique handling or performance characteristics that TCCA has determined must be checked.

7. Pilot Type Rating

7.1 The pilot type rating designator for the B-737-100/-200/-200C (Boeing 737) is B73A.

7.2 The pilot type rating designator for the B-737-300/-400/-500 (Boeing 737 CL) is B73B.

7.3 The pilot type rating designator for the B-737-600/-700/-800/-8/-9) (Boeing 737 NG and Boeing 737 MAX) is B73C.

8. Related Aircraft

Type Certificate Data Sheet (TCDS)* TCDS Identifier/Master Series Marketing Name Pilot Type Rating
A16WE (FAA)1 B-737-100
B-737-200
B-737-200C (1)
Boeing 737 B73A
B-737 (FAA) (3)
A-146
A16WE (FAA)
B-737-300
B-737-400
B-737-500
Boeing 737 Classic (CL) B73B
B-737 (FAA)
A-146
A16WE (FAA)
B-737-600
B-737-700
B-737-800 (4)
Boeing 737 Next Generation (NG)
Boeing Business Jet (BBJ 1, BBJ 2, BBJ 3)
B73C
B-737 (FAA)
A16WE (FAA)2 B-737-700C
B-737-900
B-737-900ER (2)
Boeing 737 Next Generation (NG) B-737 (FAA)
A-146
A16WE (FAA)
B-737-8
B-737-9
Boeing 737 MAX B73C
B-737 (FAA)

Table 1
B-737 TCDS/Master Series, Marketing Name and Pilot Type Rating Names

NOTES

(1) The B-737-100/-200/-200C series aircraft are not included on TCDS A-146. These aircraft were accepted by TCCA prior to 1970, under the terms of the Canada/U.S. Bilateral Airworthiness Agreement.

(2) The B-737-700C/-900/-900ER series have never been type certified in Canada and are therefore not included on TCDS A-146.

(3) The FAA has assigned the B-737 Pilot Type rating to all series of the Boeing 737, but have grouped the series similar to the TCCA pilot type ratings (B73A, B73B and B73C).

(4) The B-737-800SFP is a Short Field Performance enhancement to the B-737-800. The B-737-800SFP has differences in auto-slats, flap load relief, flap/slat sequencing and spoiler deflection compared to the “standard” B-737-800. This enhancement is basic to the B-737 MAX.

8.1 Related Aircraft on same TCDS

The B-737-300/-400/-500 (B73B) and B737-600/-700/-800/-8/-9 (B73C) are related aircraft on TCCA TCDS A-146.

8.2 Related Aircraft on different TCDS

The B-737-100/-200/-200C (B73A) and B737-700C/-900/-900ER (B-737 (FAA Type Rating)) are related aircraft on FAA TCDS A16WE.

9. Pilot Training

9.1 Previous Experience

The provisions of this section apply to all B-737 training programs for pilots who have experience in CAR 705 airline, CAR 604 private operator or equivalent operations in multi-engine transport turbojet aeroplanes. Pilots undergoing the initial type training program for the B73C will benefit from prior experience with the systems such as AFCS, AT, and FMS and highly integrated avionics systems with electronic flight displays. Additional training requirements may be necessary as determined by the POI and the OE, for pilots not having this experience.

The STAR course requires that pilots have prerequisite experience on transport category aeroplanes equipped with EFIS, FMS and Autoflight systems. The basic EASA PEC course requirements are a current EASA type rating on B-737-300- 900, B-747-400, B-757/767, B-777 or B-787 and 500 hours experience on type.

9.2 Training Areas of Special Emphasis

Pilots must receive special emphasis training in the following areas:

9.2.1 Alternate Go-Around Flaps

9.2.1.1 Applicability

Applicable to B-737-700/-800/-800SFP/-900/-900ER/-8/-9 aircraft certified to conduct Flaps 30° approaches using Flaps 5° during go-around and flight crews current on these aircraft.

9.2.1.2 General

The use of Flaps 5° for go-around provides for a substantial increase in approach climb weights in hot and/or high environments. The Flaps 30° approach speeds for Flaps 5° go-around operations require speed additives to the standard Flaps 30° VREF speeds in order to maintain the performance requirements of FAR 25.121(d) /AWM Chapter 525.121(d).

Alternate Go-Around Flaps operations require a separate AFM Appendix, and a supplementary procedure defining flight crew actions.

Operators are encouraged to develop an approach review and briefing card for use by flight crews when conducting any Alternate Go-Around Flaps operation.

Ground and flight training is required during initial, upgrade, transition, differences, and recurrent training or as determined by the POI.

9.2.1.3 Ground Training

Ground training is established at Level B. Training may be administered via CBT, stand up lectures or video and should include performance requirements, speed additive use and effect on maneuver margins, alternate go-around procedures, flight crew callouts, and engine failure procedures.

9.2.1.4 Flight Training
  1. Flight training should include the following:
    1. A two engine flaps 30° approach to a flaps 5 go-around;
    2. A two engine flaps 30° approach to an engine failure during a flaps 5 go-around; and
    3. A two engine flaps 30° approach in icing conditions to an engine failure during a flaps 5° go-around

9.2.2 Automatic Landings

Due to the differences among B-737 AP autoland systems, ground and flight training must occur with the appropriate AP autoland systems (i.e. Fail Operational vs. Fail Passive). Flight training can occur in either a full flight simulator or airplane, and should be conducted during all training programs as applicable. The training must ensure appropriate AFM limitations are addressed and complied with.

9.2.3 EFDCS Fail Operational Autoland operations with a Fail Passive Rollout system

Ground and flight training is required when an EDFCS supports Fail Operational Autoland operations with a Fail Passive Rollout system is used, flight training can occur in either a FFS or airplane and should address both single and dual channel AP approaches. This training must be included in initial, upgrade, transition, differences and recurrent training

9.2.4 Differences Ground Training from B-737 NG to B-737 MAX

Initial differences ground training must include the following special emphasis areas:

  1. Flight Control system to address the Elevator Jam Landing Assist system.
  2. Landing Attitude Modifier (LAM) to address the two LAM system functions and associated flight spoiler deployments.
  3. Gear handle operation to address standard operating procedures.
  4. Flight crew alerting.

9.2.5 Head Up (Guidance) Display (HUD)

Training must address appropriate flight training elements for both HUD and non-HUD operations as specified in Appendix 5. This item must be included in initial, upgrade, transition, differences and recurrent training.

9.2.6 Intermittent Warning Horn

Flight crews must be trained and checked on the proper response to the activation of the intermittent warning horn, which alerts for the loss of cabin pressurization in flight and an incorrect takeoff configuration on the ground. Training and checking must be in accordance with QRH procedures: CABIN ALTITUDE WARNING or RAPID DEPRESSURIZATION, TAKEOFF CONFIGURATION, and WARNING HORN (INTERMITTENT) or WARNING LIGHT – CABIN ALTITUDE OR TAKEOFF CONFIGURATION. Training must emphasize that it is imperative for crew members to immediately don oxygen masks when the intermittent warning horn sounds in flight.

9.2.7 FMS Functionality

Ground and Flight training must address each applicable FMS mode or function, including FMS initialization, takeoff, departure, cruise, arrival, precision and non- precision approach, missed approach, holding, diversion to an alternate or route re-clearance, and pertinent non-normal scenarios. Scenarios used should include routes, airports, ATC situations, and other factors, which are representative of, or present equivalent complexity to those anticipated for a particular operator.

9.2.8 Tail Strike Avoidance

Each operator’s training program should address tail strike potential during takeoff and landing. The B737-400/-800/-900/-900ER/-8 and -9 series aircraft are slightly more susceptible to tail strike due to their increased fuselage lengths.

9.2.9 Two Position Tail Skid

The B737-900ER, B737-800 SFP, B737-8, and B737-9 have a dual tail skid configuration to protect the aft fuselage during landings (the dual tail skid is optional for the B737-800SFP, -8, and -9). Approach speeds may be reduced with the protection provided by the two-position tail skid. The resultant approach speeds and body attitudes of the B737-800SFP, -8, and -9 with the two position tail skid are similar to that of the 737-700.

9.2.10 Landing De-rotation

The B-737-800SFP has been found to have greater than normal landing de-rotation rates. In the interest of commonality with all series of the B-737s, Pilots should be trained to de-rotate the aircraft without delay on landing, and avoid attempting to hold the nose-wheels off of the runway.

9.3 Specific Flight Characteristics

There are no specific flight characteristics.

9.3.1 Level-off from Rapid Descent

The TC Appendix to the AFM, titled; APPENDIX TC; OPERATION TO TRANSPORT CANADA REQUIREMENTS; MODEL 737-8 SERIES has the following CAUTION note under the heading of Cabin Altitude Warning or Rapid Depressurization:

CAUTION: LVL CHG Flight Director mode might track speed over aggressively during this procedure. It is possible that the flight director will command a climb away from the altitude selector when selecting a lower speed than Mmo / Vmo.

This unintended deviation from the selected altitude can be avoided by following the guidance in the FCTM for conducting the Rapid Descent Maneuver, which calls for a deceleration to long range cruise speed or approximately 300 knots prior to initiating the level-off.

9.4 Seat Dependent Tasks

Pilots must receive initial, transition, upgrade, and recurrent training in these seat dependent tasks:

  1. Head Up Guidance Display (left seat)
  2. Nosewheel steering (left seat when a tiller is not installed on the right side)

9.5 Training Requirements Not Applicable to the B-737 series

  1. Tuck and Mach buffet training: B-737-300 through -500, and -600 through -900ER, and -8/-9 series of airplanes do not exhibit any Mach Tuck tendency and therefore no training is required for this flight maneuver. Demonstration of the aircraft’s overspeed protection capabilities is an acceptable substitute.
  2. Fuel Jettisoning: The B-737 Series does not have fuel jettisoning capability.
  3. Turns with and without spoilers: Not required due to aircraft design.

9.6 Flight Simulation Training Devices (FSTD)

Special device or simulator characteristics are described for training, checking, and re-establishing currency as follows:

  • Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) must be trained in a TCCA approved level C or higher B73C Full Flight Simulator (FFS) equipped with day and night visual displays and able to display a representative IR image. (Appendix 6)

9.7 Training Equipment

There are no specific systems or procedures that are unique to the Boeing 737 that require specific training equipment.

9.8 Differences Training Between Related Aircraft

Pilots must receive differences training when transitioning between each series of B-737 (e.g. B-737-800 to B-737-8 or B-737-8 to B-737-9 in accordance with the difference levels specified in Appendix 2.

NOTE

Pilots transitioning from one B-737 Pilot Type Rating to another (e.g. B73B to B73C) or conducting Mixed Fleet Flying (MFF) with different B-737 Pilot Type Ratings (e.g. B73B and B73C) require exemptions to specific provisions of CAR 705.106, CASS 725.106 and CAR 705.113. Appendices 2 and 3 provide the training and checking credits between the B-737 series.

9.8.1 PFD/ND Differences

PFD/ND differences require a minimum of 12 hours in an interactive CBT, 6 programmed hours in a level 6 FTD, and supervised line flying as described in Appendix 4. Pilots must be trained in accordance with the difference levels specified in Appendix 2. The ND is an expansion of the MAP mode and the CBT needs to only demonstrate the differences in display selections and capabilities (e.g. Center Map). The following elements should be included in the training program:

  1. FMA DIFFERENCES
  2. AFDS STATUS ANNUNCIATOR
  3. VERTICAL SPEED DISPLAY
  4. AIRSPEED BUGS AND FLAP MANEUVERING SPEEDS
  5. COMPASS ROSE
  6. PITCH LIMIT INDICATOR
  7. AIRSPEED TREND VECTOR
  8. MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM SPEEDS
  9. LANDING ALTITUDE REFERENCE BAR
  10. ALTIMETER SETTING
  11. LOC AND GS DEVIATION
  12. SELECTED ALTITUDE INDICATION (BUG)
  13. GROUND SPEED DISPLAY
  14. RADIO ALTITUDE DISPLAY
  15. TCAS RESOLUTION ADVISORIES
  16. TIME CRITICAL WARNINGS
  17. APPROACH REFERENCE AREA
  18. MARKER BEACON INDICATION
  19. SYSTEM FAILURES AND FLAGS
  20. NO “COMPACT DISPLAY” (DU SWITCHING ONLY)

9.8.2 Blended, Split Scimitar, Advanced Technology Winglet

Operators engaged in mixed fleet flying B-737 series aircraft with and without winglets must address differences at the A/A/A level including:

  1. Physical/dimensional differences, with emphasis on lower strake clearance considerations during ground operations
  2. Takeoff crosswind guidelines
  3. Landing crosswind guidelines
  4. Ground contact angles for normal landings and the avoidance of “sideslip-only” (zero crab angle) landings with more than 15 knots of crosswind.

9.8.3 Roll Control Advisory System (RCAS)

RCAS is optional equipment on the B-737-NG and standard on the B-737-MAX. Level B training is sufficient for initial, transition, and upgrade training in that series aircraft.

9.8.4 Runway Situational Awareness Tools (RSAT) System

RSAT is optional equipment on the B-737-NG and B-737-MAX. Level B training is sufficient for initial, transition, and upgrade training in that series aircraft.

9.8.5 Training for Integrated Standby Flying Display

Level A training is sufficient for all B-737 aircraft. No flight training required.

9.8.6 Universal Avionics Flat Panel Display/FMS installations

Level D differences training is required for STC (ST03355AT/ST03356AT) into -300 series or IS&S Flat Panel Display installation STC (ST03125NY) into the -400 series.

9.8.7 Universal Avionics Flight Management System installations

Level C differences training is sufficient for STC (ST03362AT) into -200 series.

9.9 Flaps 15 Landing

TCCA has certified Flaps 15 as a normal landing flap setting on the B-737-8 and -9. The use of Flaps 15 for landing requires the selection of the GROUND PROXIMITY flap inhibit switch to FLAP INHIBIT prior to landing.

9.10 Special Events Training

Special events training is intended to improve basic flight crew understanding and confidence regarding aircraft handling qualities, options and procedures as these relate to design characteristics and limitations. Special events training is not considered as required additional training. Special events training should include the following:

  1. Manual flight with minimum use of automation, including flight under degraded levels of automation;
  2. Handling qualities and procedures for the prevention of and recovery from aeroplane upset conditions;
  3. High altitude high and low speed buffet margins and flight characteristics;
  4. Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) avoidance, TCAS, EGPWS (emphasis on avoidance and escape maneuvers, altitude awareness, TCAS/EGPWS warnings, situational awareness and crew co-ordination, as appropriate).

10. Pilot Checking

10.1 Landing from a No Flap or Non Standard Flap Approach

The probability of flap extension failure on the B-737 is extremely remote due to system design. A demonstration of a partial flap approach and landing, using full slats and flaps less than 15º, during a CASS 725 Schedule 1 PPC or CAR 604 competency check is therefore required.

10.2 Specific Flight Characteristics

There are no specific flight characteristics.

10.3 Seat Dependent Tasks

During initial, transition, and upgrade checking, pilots must be checked in these seat dependent tasks:

  1. Head Up Guidance Display (left seat)
  2. Nosewheel steering (left seat; right seat when installed)

10.4 Other Checking Items

10.4.1 Precision approach using HUD and EFVS.

When HUD use is approved, checking must include suitable demonstration of HUD use for modes and phases of flight authorized; HUD vs. FD and Raw Data.

When HUD is installed, PPC maneuvers, LOFT, LOS or other demonstrations may be completed using HUD at the check pilot’s/inspector’s discretion. However, periodic assessment of non-HUD skills should be demonstrated, and at any time a check pilot/inspector may at their discretion request that authorized maneuvers be performed without use of HUD (e.g. if manual CAT I FD operations are authorized, the pilot being checked may be requested to perform the maneuver without HUD).

10.5 Equipment

There are no specific systems or procedures that are unique to the B-737 series aircraft that require specific equipment.

10.6 Differences Checking Between Related Aircraft

10.6.1 Alternating PPC for B73A, B73B and B73C

For mixed-fleet-flying between different pilot type ratings, PPCs should alternate, but are not required to alternate, each six months for PICs, and annually for other flight crewmembers.

When such alternating checks are accomplished, the differences assessment of other series applicable to that pilot type rating being checked (e.g. either B-737-100/-200 (B73A), B-737-300/-400/-500 (B73B) and/or B-737-600/-700/-800 and/or B-737-8/-9 (B73C)) may be satisfied by ground training, written questionnaire, oral review, or other method approved by the POI. However, such simplified programs may not be approved if they result in progressive loss of knowledge or skills related to particular differences over successive recurrent periods.

Note

Pilots transitioning from one B-737 Pilot Type Rating to another (e.g. B73B to B73C) or conducting Mixed Fleet Flying (MFF) with different B-737 Pilot Type Ratings (e.g. B73B and B73C) require exemptions to specific provisions of CAR 705.106, CASS 725.106 and CAR 705.113. Appendices 2 and 3 provide the training and checking credits between the B-737 series.

10.6.2 FMS Demonstration of Competency/Checks

Checking for differences related to a series having FMS must include a demonstration of competency covering both an oral/written exam and demonstration of proficiency with both normal and non-normal procedures. FMS proficiency should be demonstrated with “hands-on” operation, and address each applicable FMS mode or function. Specific items and flight phases to be checked may include initialization, takeoff, departure, cruise, arrival, precision and non- precision approach, missed approach, holding, diversion to an alternate or route re-clearance, and pertinent non-normal scenarios. Scenarios used should include routes, airports, ATC situations, and other factors, which are representative of, or present equivalent complexity to those anticipated for that operator. FMS competency may be demonstrated in conjunction with other checking.

11. Pilot Currency

There are no additional currency requirements for the B-737 other than those already specified in CAR 705 and CAR 604.

11.1 Differences Currency between Related Aircraft

Not Applicable

12. Operational Suitability

The B-737 series aircraft is operationally suitable for operations under CAR 705 and CAR 604.

13. Miscellaneous

13.1 ETOPS

The B-737-600/-700/-800/-900 and B-737-8 meet TCCA certification criteria for 180-minute ETOPS operations. TCCA operational approval is required to conduct ETOPS.

13.2 Forward Observer Seat

The B-737 series aircraft forward center observer seat has been evaluated by the FAA and determined to meet the requirements of FAR 121.581(a), FAR 125.317(b), FAR 135.75(b) and Advisory Circular (AC) 120 83. TCCA has accepted the findings of the FAA in the absence of any TCCA regulatory criteria regarding a forward observer seat.

13.3 Landing Minima Categories

Approach Category for B-737 series aircraft is as follows:

Aircraft Category
B-737-100/200/200ADV C
B-737-300/400/500 C
B-737-600/700 C
B-737-800/900/900ER C or D
B-737-8/-9 C or D

Due to the numerous maximum landing weight options among the B-737-600 through -900ER and the B-737-8/-9 series, determining an aircraft approach category may be done using the certificated maximum flap setting of 40º and the particular airplane’s AFM maximum certificated landing weight.

13.4 Normal Landing Flaps

The B-737 normal “final landing flap setting” are Flaps 15º, 30º, and 40º. Flaps 15º is primarily used for non-normal situations (e.g. engine out approach) or atypical operations (e.g. high altitude airport operations).

14. References

  1. FAA Flight Standardization Board (FSB) for the Boeing 737 at http://fsims.faa.gov/
  2. FAA Advisory Circular AC120-53B, Change 1, Guidance for Conduction and Use of Flight Standardization Board Evaluations, dated October 24, 2016
  3. JOEB OPS/FCL Common Procedures For Conducting Operational Evaluation Boards, dated June 10, 2004
  4. Transport Canada Advisory Circular, AC 700-035, Special Authorization for Take-off operations below RVR 600 down to and including RVR 300, at Issue 01, dated 2016-02-12 or later Issue
  5. Transport Canada Policy Letter, PL 173. Flight Crew Member Qualification Credits for Transition Programs and Mixed Fleet Flying Programs, dated July 25, 2007
  6. Transport Canada Publication (TP) 1490, Manual of All Weather Operations (Categories II and III) Fourth Edition, 06/2011, or later edition of this manual
  7. Transport Canada Publication (TP) 6327, Safety Criteria for Approval of Extended Range Twin-Engine Operations (ETOPS) dated June 2007

Appendix 1 Differences Legends

Training Differences Legend

Differences Level Type Training Method Examples Conditions
A Self-instruction
  • Operating manual revision (HO)
  • Flight crew operating bulletin (HO)
  • Crew has already demonstrated understanding on base aircraft (e.g. updated version of engine).
  • Minor or no procedural changes required.
  • No safety impact if information is not reviewed or is forgotten (e.g. different engine vibration damping mount).
  • Once called to attention of crew, the difference is self-evident.
B Aided instruction
  • Audiovisual presentation (AV)
  • Tutorial computer based instruction (TCBI)
  • Stand-up instruction (SU)
  • Systems are functionally similar.
  • Crew understanding required.
  • Issues need emphasis.
  • Standard methods of presentation required.
C Systems Devices
  • Interactive (full-task) computer based instruction (ICBI)
  • Cockpit procedures trainers (CPT)
  • Part task trainers (PTT)
  • Level 4 or 5 flight training device (FTD 4-5)
  • Training can only be accomplished through systems training devices.
  • Training objectives focus on mastering individual systems, procedures, or tasks versus highly integrated flight operations or “real-time” operations.
  • Training devices are required to assure attainment or retention of crew skills to accomplish more complex tasks usually related to aircraft systems.
D Maneuvers Devices
  • Level 6 or 7 flight training device (FTD 6-7)
  • Level A or B full flight simulator (FFS A-B)
  • Training can only be accomplished in flight maneuver devices in a real-time environment.
  • Training requires mastery of interrelated skills versus individual skills.
  • Motion, visual, control loading, and specific environmental conditions may be required.
E Level C/D FFS or Aircraft
  • Level C or D full flight simulator (FFS C-D)
  • Aircraft (ACFT)
  • Motion, visual, control loading, audio, and specific environmental conditions are required.
  • Significant full task differences that require a high fidelity environment.
  • Usually correlates with significant differences in handling qualities.

Checking Differences Legend

Differences Level Checking Method Examples Conditions
A None None
B
  • Oral or written exam
  • Tutorial computer based instruction self-test (TCBI)
  • Individual systems or related groups of systems.
C
  • Interactive (full-task) computer based instruction (ICBI)
  • Cockpit procedures trainers (CPT)
  • Part task trainers (PTT)
  • Level 4 or 5 flight training device (FTD 4-5)
  • Checking can only be accomplished using systems devices.
  • Checking objectives focus on mastering individual systems, procedures, or tasks.
D
  • Level 6 or 7 flight training device (FTD 6-7)
  • Level A or B full flight simulator (FFS A-B)
  • Checking can only be accomplished in flight maneuver devices in a real-time environment.
  • Checking requires mastery of interrelated skills versus individual skills.
  • Motion, visual, control loading, and specific environmental conditions may be required.
E
  • Level C or D full flight simulator (FFS C-D)
  • Aircraft (ACFT)
  • Significant full task differences that require a high fidelity environment.

Appendix 2 Master Differences Requirements (MDR) Table

These are the minimum levels of training and checking required, derived from the highest level in the Differences Tables in Appendix 3. Differences levels are arranged as training/checking.

Related Aircraft ↓ Base Aircraft →




Pilot Type Rating
B73A B73A B73B B73B B73C (4) B73C

Series B-737BASIC
B-737-100/200 (SP77)
B-737-200
ADV
B-737-300,400,
500 (NON-EFIS)
B-737-300,400,500 (EFIS) B-737-600,700,800,
900, -900ER
B-737-8,9
B73A B-737 BASIC
B-737-100/200 (SP77)
A/A
NAV - B/B
PMS - C/B
B/A
NAV - B/B
PMS - C/B
C*/C* C*/C* D/D NOT EVALUATED
B73A B-737-200 ADV B/A
PDCS - C/B NAV - B/B AFCS - C/B PMS - C/B
A/A
PDCS - C/B NAV - B/B AFCS - C/B PMS - C/B
C*/C*
PDCS - B/B NAV - B/B (1) LIMITED FMS- C/B
C*/C*
PDCS - B/B NAV - B/B
D/D
PDCS - B/B NAV - B/B
NOT EVALUATED
B73B B 737 300, 400, 500 (NON EFIS) C*/C
(1) LIMITED FMS - C/B
C*/C*
(1) LIMITED FMS - C/B
A/A C/B (2) C/B NOT EVALUATED
B73B B 737 300, 400, 500 (EFIS) C*/C*
(1) LIMITED FMS - C/B
C*/C*
(1) LIMITED FMS - C/B
C/B A/A (2) C/B
PFD/ND - D/C
NOT EVALUATED
B73C (4) B 737 600, 700, 800, 900,
-900ER
D/D D/D (2)C/B
PFD/ND – D/C
(2) C/B
PFD/ND – D/C
A/A
(2) EFIS to PFD/ND- C/B
PFD/ND to EFIS– D/C EDFCS – C/C
B/B (3)
B73C B-737-8, 9 NOT
EVALUATED
NOT
EVALUATED
NOT
EVALUATED
NOT
EVALUATED
B/B (3) A/A
 

C* - Level C training or checking which requires use of a Level 5 FSTD or higher.

(1) Limited FMS pertains to 737-300/-400/-500 airplanes which retain partial FMS functions.

(2) C level training requirement may be satisfied by interactive CBT.

(3) The B-737-8/-9 were not evaluated relative to aircraft B-737-100, -200, -200ADV, -300, -400, and -500. Differences from B-737-NG to B 737 MAX, and B-737-MAX to B-737-NG have been evaluated. Operator-specific Difference Tables (DT) must be developed when transitioning from the B-737-600/-700/-800 to the B-737-8/-9 to identify any additional training requirements.

(4) The B-737-700C/-900/-900ER are not type certified in Canada and are not included in the B73C pilot type rating designator. Refer to Note 2 in Section 8.0, following Table 1.

Appendix 3 Difference Tables

This Design Differences table, from the Boeing 737-800 to the Boeing 737-8, was proposed by The Boeing Company and validated by TCCA. It lists the minimum differences levels operators must use to conduct differences training and checking of flightcrew members.

FROM BASE AIRCAFT: B 737 800
TO RELATED AIRCRAFT: B 737 8
DESIGN REMARKS FLT CHAR PROC CHNG TRAINING CHECKING

CONFIGURATION Nose Landing Gear Lengthened 8” Dual Tail Anti-Collision/Position Lights No No A A

PANEL LAYOUT New MAX DISPLAY SYSTEM (MDS) No No B B

PANEL LAYOUT New 2 Position Landing Gear Control Lever No Yes B B

LIMITATIONS Size/type/system limitations No No A A

LIMITATIONS Ground wind operating envelope No No A A

WEIGHTS Increased to:
Max Taxi Weight 181,700 lbs
Max Takeoff Weight 181,200 lbs
Max Landing Weight 152,800 lbs
Max Zero Fuel Weight 145,400
No No A A

21-AIR CONDITIONING and PRESSURIZATION PACKS:
Electronic Pack Flow Control System
No No B B

21-AIR CONDITIONING and PRESSURIZATION PACKS:
Revised PACK light logic
No Yes A A

21-AIR CONDITIONING and PRESSURIZATION EQUIPMENT COOLING: EQUIP SMOKE light and Detection System No Yes B B

24- ELECTRICAL POWER Relocated 4 circuit breakers from aisle stand to P-6 No No A A

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS
Fly by Wire Spoiler System
No No B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS Maneuver Load Alleviation No No B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS Landing Attitude Modifier (LAM) No No B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS Elevator Jam Landing Assist No No B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS FLAPS/SLATS Position indicator relocated to MDS No No B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS SPEEDBRAKES/SPOILERS Emergency Descent Speedbrakes (EDS) No No B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS SPEEDBRAKES/SPOILERS SPEEDBRAKE EXTENDED light logic No No B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS SPEEDBRAKES/SPOILERS SPOILERS light added No Yes B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS SPEEDBRAKES/SPOILERS ASSIST ON light added No Yes B B

27- FLIGHT CONTROLS STABILIZER TRIM: Stab Trim cutout switches panel nomenclature No No B B

28- FUEL CONTROLS AND INDICATORS:
Additional System Alerts (see section Navigation)
No Yes B B

28- FUEL CONTROLS AND INDICATORS:
Revised fuel FILTER BYPASS light logic
No Yes B B

29 – HYDRAULIC POWER CONTROLS AND INDICATORS:
System indications relocated to MDS Systems Page
No No A A

30- ICE AND RAIN ENGINE ANTI-ICE
ADDITIONAL ENG ANTI-ICE alert
No Yes B B

30- ICE AND RAIN ENGINE ANTI-ICE
REVISED COWL VALVE NOMENCLATURE AND COLOR (AMBER)
No Yes B B

30- ICE AND RAIN WING ANTI-ICE
L / R VALVE ALERTS COLOR (AMBER)
No Yes B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS Incorporation Of MAX DISPLAY SYSTEM (MDS)
4 Large Display LCD Units
No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS LIGHTING CONTROLS
Updated And Relocated Engine Display Control Panel
No Yes B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS LIGHTING CONTROLS
Revised Display Brightness, Display Select Switch Panels, Master Dim and Test
No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS ENGINE DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL
Added Engine Transfer Switch
No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS ENGINE DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL
Added MFD Info Switch
No Yes B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS ENGINE DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL
Revised N1 and Speed Set Selectors
No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS PFD Expanded Sky Ground and Compass Display No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS EFIS CONTROL PANEL
Dedicated VSD switch
No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS EFIS CONTROL PANEL ND/WXR Range Selector- revised functionality No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS STANDBY FLIGHT INSTRUMENTSINTEGRATED STANDBY FLIGHT INSTRUMENT (ISFD) basic No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS AUX DISPLAY-Added Information Displayed No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS AUX DISPLAY-Added
Flight number, Transponder, Selcal, UTC, Date and Elapsed time
No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS AUX DISPLAY-Added Clock start/stop switches relocated to glareshield No No B B

31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS MAINT LIGHT (replaces PSEU light) No Yes B B

32- LANDING GEAR, BRAKES NOSE WHEEL STEERING switch relocated No No B B

32- LANDING GEAR, BRAKES Brake accumulator pressure indicator relocated No No B B

32- LANDING GEAR, BRAKES Auto brake switch relocated No No B B

32- LANDING GEAR, BRAKES Landing Gear Warning Cutout switch relocated No No B B

32- LANDING GEAR, BRAKES Revised landing gear lock override switch No No B B

34- NAVIGATION FLIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
FMC SOFTWARE U13 basic
No No B B

34- NAVIGATION FLIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Variable Takeoff Rating function
No No B B

34- NAVIGATION FLIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Fuel Alerting and Fuel Management
No No B B

34- NAVIGATION CDU Pages New or Revised:
Perf Init page 1/2
No No B B

34- NAVIGATION CDU Pages New or Revised:
N1 Limit
No No B B

34- NAVIGATION CDU Pages New or Revised: Fuel Progress page 5/5 No Yes B B

34- NAVIGATION FMC and Engine Display Alert Messages:
USING RSV FUEL
No Yes B B

34- NAVIGATION FMC and Engine Display Alert Messages:
FUEL DISAGREE
No Yes B B

34- NAVIGATION FMC and Engine Display Alert Messages: INSUFFICIENT FUEL No Yes B B

34- NAVIGATION FUEL FLOW (engine display only) No Yes B B

36- PNEUMATIC BLEED AIR CONTROL PANEL
Removed RAM DOOR FULL OPEN lights
No No A A

36- PNEUMATIC BLEED AIR CONTROL PANEL
Revised BLEED TRIP OFF nomenclature to BLEED
No Yes A A

36- PNEUMATIC BLEED AIR CONTROL PANEL
Revised BLEED light logic
No Yes B B

49- APU SYSTEM OPERATION
Removed APU MAINT light
No No A A

49- APU SYSTEM OPERATION
Removed APU EGT gauge
No No A A

49- APU SYSTEM OPERATION
Added retractable door
No No B B

49- APU SYSTEM OPERATION
Added APU DOOR light
No Yes B B

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANT
ENGINES:
New LEAP-1B engines
No Yes B B

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANT
EEC SYSTEM
Removal of Overboost rating
No No B B

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANT
EEC SYSTEM
Addition of Icing Idle speed
No No B B

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANTS
INDICATOR
Revised Display Format
No No B B

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANT
INDICATORS
Compact engine display removed
No No A A

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANT
INDICATORS
Added THRUST alert
No No B B

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANT
INDICATORS
Added MOTORING indication for bowed rotor logic
No No B B

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANT
THRUST REVERSER SYSTEM
Added REVERSER COMMAND and REVERSER AIR/GND alerts
No Yes B B

72, 73,77,78,80
POWER PLANT
THRUST REVERSER SYSTEM
Replaced REVERSER alert with REVERSER LIMITED
No Yes B B

This Maneuver Differences table, from the Boeing 737-800 to the Boeing 737-8, was proposed by The Boeing Company and validated by TCCA. It lists the minimum differences levels operators must use to conduct differences training and checking of flightcrew members.

FROM BASE AIRCAFT: B 737 800
TO RELATED AIRCRAFT: B-737-8
MANUEVER REMARKS FLT CHAR PROC CHNG TRAINING CHECKING

PREFLIGHT INSPECTION Optional installation of two-position tailskid No Yes A A

CLIMB After take-off checklist – Landing gear handle No Yes B B

NON-NORMAL Read and do Checklist changes due to annunciation and system changes listed in DESIGN difference tables. No Yes B B

This Design Differences table, from the Boeing 737-8 to the Boeing 737-9, was proposed by The Boeing Company and validated by the TCCA. It lists the minimum differences levels operators must use to conduct differences training and checking of flightcrew members.

FROM BASE AIRCAFT: B 737 8
TO RELATED AIRCRAFT: B 737 9
DESIGN REMARKS FLT CHAR PROC CHNG TRAINING CHECKING

GENERAL Turning radius and passenger capacity No No A A

CONFIGURATION 2 position tail skid standard No No A A

DIMENSIONS Length: 138 feet 2 inches (42.11 meters) No No A A

LIMITATIONS Revised flap placard speeds No No A A

WEIGHTS Increased to:
Max Taxi Weight 195,200 lbs
Max Takeoff Weight 194,700 lbs Max Landing Weight 163,900 lbs Max Zero Fuel Weight 156,500
No No A A

52-DOORS Added Mid Exit Doors and flight deck indications and associated Non Normal Checklist No No A A

This table was proposed by The Boeing Company and validated by TCCA. It lists the minimum differences levels operators must use to conduct differences training and checking of flightcrew members.

FROM BASE AIRCAFT: B-737-8
TO RELATED AIRCRAFT: B-737-800
DESIGN REMARKS FLT CHAR PROC CHNG TRAINING CHECKING
CONFIGURATION Nose Landing Gear 8” shorter Single Tail Anti-Collision/Position Light No No A A
PANEL LAYOUT Common Display System (CDS) 3 Position Landing Gear Control Lever No
No
No
Yes
B B
LIMITATIONS Size/type/system limitations Ground wind operating envelope removed No No A A
WEIGHTS Decreased to:
MTW 174,700 lbs
MTOW 174,200 lbs
MLW 144,000 lbs
MZFW 136,000 lbs
No No A A
21-AIR CONDITIONING and PRESSURIZATION CONTROLS AND INDICATORS




PACKS:
  • Simplified Electronic Pack Flow Control System
  • PACK light logic
No
No
No
Yes
B
A
B
A

EQUIPMENT COOLING:

  • EQUIP SMOKE light removed
No Yes A A
24- ELECTRICAL POWER Relocated 4 circuit breakers from P-6 to aisle stand No No A A
27- FLIGHT CONTROLS

FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS

  • Mechanical Spoiler System
  • Maneuver Load Alleviation removed
  • Landing Attitude Modifier (LAM) removed
  • Elevator Jam Landing Assist System removed
Minor
Minor
Minor
Minor
No
No
No
No
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B

FLAPS/SLATS

  • Fixed position mechanical indicator
No No B B

SPEEDBRAKES/SPOILERS

  • Emergency Descent Speedbrakes (EDS) removed
  • SPEEDBRAKE EXTENDED light logic
  • SPOILERS light removed
  • ASSIST ON light removed
Minor
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B

STABILIZER TRIM:

  • Stab Trim cutout switches panel nomenclature
No No B B
28- FUEL

CONTROLS AND INDICATORS:

  • Fewer System Alerts (see section Navigation)
  • Revised fuel FILTER BYPASS light logic
No
No
Yes
Yes
B
B
B
B
29 – HYDRAULIC POWER

CONTROLS AND INDICATORS:

  • System indications relocated to Lower Display Unit (DU)
No No A A
30- ICE AND RAIN

ENGINE ANTI-ICE

  • ENG ANTI-ICE alert removed
  • REVISED COWL VALVE NOMENCLATURE AND COLOR (BLUE) WING ANTI-ICE
  • L / R VALVE ALERTS COLOR (BLUE)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
B
B
B
B
B
B
31- FLIGHT INSTRUMENT DISPLAYS

Incorporation Of Common Display System (CDS)

  • 6 Display Units

LIGHTING CONTROLS

  • Updated And Relocated Engine Display Control Panel
  • Revised Display Brightness, Display Select Switch Panels, Master Dim and Test

ENGINE DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL

  • Engine Transfer Switch removed
  • MFD Info Switch removed
  • Revised N1 and Speed Set Selectors

PFD

  • Sky Ground and Compass Display changes
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
No
B
B
B
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
A
B
B
B

This table was proposed by The Boeing Company and validated by TCCA. It lists the minimum differences levels operators must use to conduct differences training and checking of flightcrew members.

FROM BASE AIRCAFT: B-737-800
TO RELATED AIRCRAFT: B-737-8
MANUEVER REMARKS FLT CHAR PROC CHNG TRAINING CHECKING
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION Optional installation of two-position tailskid No Yes A A
CLIMB After take-off checklist – Landing gear handle No Yes B B
NON-NORMAL Read and do Checklist changes due to annunciation and system changes listed in DESIGN difference tables. No Yes B B

Appendix 4 Supervised Line Flying (SLF) Table

Operating Experience for flying multiple series may be accomplished in any B-737 series. Additional SLF must be accomplished in accordance with the table below for those flightcrews flying the series listed. When differences training relates to qualification for FMS, SLF must also include use of FMS. Such FMS required SLF pertinent to each flightcrew member must be obtained while serving in a flightcrew position and include FMS operation. However, LOFT involving FMS operation in an appropriately configured Level C or Level D FFS may be substituted.

When differences training relates to qualification for PFD/ND, SLF must also include use of PFD/ND. Such PFD/ND required SLF pertinent to each flightcrew member must be obtained while serving in a flightcrew position and includes PFD/ND operation. For flightcrew members with previous EFIS experience, a 4 hour LOFT session involving PFD/ND operation in an appropriately configured FSTD (minimum of a level 5 FTD), may be substituted for 2 SLF legs as specified below.

Supervised Line Flying

Related Aircraft ↓ Base Aircraft → B73A

B-737-100/ -200
B73B

B-737-300/ -400/-500
B73B

B-737-300/ -400/-500t EFIS
B73C

B-737-600/ -700/-800
B73C

B-737-8/-9
B73A

B-737-100/-200

X 2/5 2/5 2/5 Not Evaluated
B73B

B-737-300/-400/ -500

2/5 X 2/5 2/5 Not Evaluated
B73B

B-737-300/-400/ -500EFIS

2/5 2/5 X 2* Not Evaluated
B73C

B-737-600/-700/ -800

2/5 2/5 2* X X
B73C

B-737-8/ -9

Not Evaluated Not Evaluated Not Evaluated X X
  1. * Legs of LOFT in a level 5 FTD or higher may be substituted.
  2. SLF must be accomplished by a flight instructor or check pilot.
  3. 2/5 = minimum of 5 hours of SLF which includes 2 flight segments.

APPENDIX 5 – HEAD UP DISPLAY (HUD) QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

1.0 Background

The B-737 NG and B-737 MAX (B73C) may be equipped with an optional single HUD, available through a Rockwell Collins (RC) STC. The B-737 NG may be equipped with RC HUD models HGS-2850 (early B-737-700) and HGS-4000. The B-737 MAX may be equipped with the RC HGS-6000 HUD. Both the RC HGS-4000 and HGS-6000 HUDs are equivalent in functionality. The RC HGS-4000 HUD is capable of supporting an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS).

This appendix provides the training, checking and currency requirements for the operational use by operators of a single HUD for all phases of flight the HUD is certified for and the operator is authorized to conduct. Appendix 6 provides additional pilot qualification requirements for the EFVS.

Note:

  1. For the purposes of this appendix, the term HUD is used generically to refer to a Head Up Display. The term HGS refers to a Head Up Guidance System (HGS), which is a RC HUD equipped with flight guidance for low and reduced visibility operations. This appendix refers to the terms HUD or HGS as applicable.
  2. This appendix does not apply to the RC HGS-2850 HUD.
  3. The use of an HGS for low visibility take-off, approach and/or landing by Canadian operators requires a Transport Canada Special Authorization. Section 10.0 of this appendix provides the training and checking requirements for conducting taxi and take-off operations using the HUD (HGS) during reduced and low visibility operations.

2.0 HUD Training - General

The HUD qualification requirements of this appendix are necessary to meet the requirements of CAR 705 or CAR 604, for the initial type training of Canadian pilots to operate the B73C using a single HUD in a commercial air service or by a private operator.

The HUD pilot training requirements consist of those related to initial and recurrent ground and flight training. A prerequisite to beginning this course of training is prior training, qualification and currency on the B737C.

HUD training focuses principally upon training events flown in the left seat by the Pilot-In-Command (PIC) as Pilot Flying (PF). SIC indoctrination and training is essential.

HUD training of Pilot Monitoring (PM) Second-In-Command (SIC) duties in the right seat is required, when there are SOP differences for the PM, when the PF is heads up (compared to heads down). SIC HUD familiarization flown in the left seat is recommended.

2.1 General Requirements

2.1.1 The operator should develop procedures in its Company Operating Manual (COM) for the guidance of its personnel; including:

  1. Normal, non-normal and emergency procedures for all phases of flight for which the HUD is intended to be used;
  2. Procedures for use of the HUD should include crew Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), duties and responsibilities that are specific to each crew position.

2.1.2 Ground and Flight Training should be provided in the operation of the aeroplane using the HUD in all phases of flight and weather conditions for which the operator is authorized in the operator’s Air Operator Certificate (AOC) and the HUD system is certified in the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) or supplement.

2.1.3 A TCCA approved level C or higher B73C Full Flight Simulator (FFS) equipped with the operator’s specific HUD configuration with day and night visual displays, is required for HUD flight training and checking.

3.0 HUD Initial Ground Training

3.1 General Requirements

Training for air operators should be conducted in accordance with the applicable provisions of CAR 705.124. Training for private operators should be conducted with the applicable training requirements for CAR 604.

The initial ground training program should include instructor led instruction and/or CBT training of the following elements:

3.1.1 HUD operational concepts, crew duties and responsibilities and operational procedures including preflight, normal and non-normal operations, and associated indications.

3.1.2 HUD symbology including characteristics and indications of limit conditions and failures and differences to PFD symbology.

3.1.3 Inter-relationship of HUD symbology with aeroplane aerodynamics, inertial factors and environmental conditions.

3.1.4 Function and operational use of HUD controls.

3.1.5 All modes of HUD operation during normal, abnormal and emergency operations.

3.1.6 HUD indications and alerts for low airspeed and high angle of attack, excessive airspeed, windshear, TCAS, EGPWS/TAWS and other indications and alerts.

3.1.7 Applicable publications including AFM (Supplement) limitations and procedures, FCOM and HUD pilot training manual content.

3.1.8 SOPs including, all normal, non-normal and emergency operations applicable to the use of the HUD Crew procedures.

3.1.9 Flight Crew duties and responsibilities specific to each pilot position including a clear delineation of PF and PM duties, responsibilities, procedural call-outs and responses during the phases of flight for which HUD operations are anticipated.

3.1.10 Aircraft system and navigation failures and Minimum Equipment List (MEL) items affecting HUD operation.

4.0 HUD Initial Flight Training

Unless integrated with initial or transition type rating training, flight training dedicated to HUD familiarization and proficiency is in addition to other required training.

Note

The flight training requirements within this appendix should not be construed to dictate or limit the scope or content of the course of instruction. Each operator has their own unique requirements, route structure, fleet composition and operations policies to consider in developing their training program. Therefore, what follows is to be considered a guide to operators who are tailoring a HUD training program to fit their own needs.

4.1 Ground Operations

Flight training for ground operations using HUD should include:

4.1.1 HUD deployment, set up and stowage.

4.1.2 Proper pilot eye reference position.

4.1.3 HUD Pre-flight checks including selection of required modes.

4.1.4 Setting of appropriate HUD brightness levels using all brightness controls.

4.1.5 Appropriate and effective use of HUD during ground operations and maneuvers;

4.1.6 Taxi using HUD under day, night, reduced and low visibility conditions.

4.2 Airborne Training

Flight Training for in-flight use of HUD should include:

4.2.1 Incorporation of HUD into instrument scan and integration of conventional displays into scan.

4.2.2 Demonstration and explanation of unique HUD symbology and commonality with head down displays.

4.2.3 Demonstration of effects of cross-wind including indications of drift and non-conformal displays.

4.2.4 Manual control of the aircraft including climbs, descents, turns, steep turns, accelerations and decelerations.

4.2.5 Recognition and recovery from an excessive angle of attack including stall warning and low airspeed.

4.2.6 Recognition and recovery from flight at excessive airspeed.

4.2.7 Recognition and recovery from an aeroplane upset/unusual attitude.

4.2.8 Use of HUD with an approved sunvisor or sunscreen under various daytime lighting conditions.

4.2.9 Vectors to intercept and track selected courses.

4.3 Visual Take-offs, Circuits, Approaches and Landings

Sufficient maneuvers should be flown in visual conditions to demonstrate HUD symbology and use in relation to glide path, centerline control and crosswind conditions. All visual approaches should be flown from no closer than approximately 1,000 feet AGL (3 - 4 NM) to the runway threshold. Flight Training for Visual Take-offs, Circuits, Approaches and Landings using HUD should include:

4.3.1 Take-off, Circuit, Approach and landings. Take-offs and landings should be with no wind and repeated with 10 knots crosswind day and night.

4.3.2 “Black hole effect” landings; i.e. Landing on a moonless or overcast night, over water or over dark featureless terrain where the only visual stimuli are lights on and/or near the airport.

4.3.3 Appropriate use of HUD symbology to establish desired descent angle.

4.3.4 Rejected landing and/or Low Energy Go-around

4.3.5 Visual Approaches (VMC mode) to include:

  1. One approach showing deviations above and below glideslope for symbology/runway relationship
  2. Straight-in landings with no wind, and repeated with 10 knot crosswind and at night.
  3. Circling approaches and landing (for operators authorized to conduct circling approaches) with 10 knot crosswind.

Notes:

  1. One half of these (VMC mode) approaches should be flown at different airports which have dissimilar approach and runway lighting systems.
  2. Special emphasis should be placed on optimizing circling approach techniques and procedures, for operators authorized to conduct circling approaches.
  3. Approaches with the aircraft in a non-normal flap configuration should be included.

4.4 Instrument Procedures and Approaches:

Sufficient precision and non-precision instrument approaches, missed approaches and landings with appropriate weather minimums should be flown to gain proficiency in these maneuvers. All required approaches should be flown from no closer than the final approach fix (FAF). Use of the HUD for circling approaches should be trained (for those operators conducting circling approaches.)

Flight Training for instrument procedures incorporating the use of HUD should include:

4.4.1 Instrument approaches and landing to include the following conditions:

4.4.1.1 CAT I ILS approach to 200 foot Decision Altitude, 2400 RVR visibility and calm winds.

4.4.1.2 Non-ILS approach to 600 foot ceiling and 2 mile visibility and 15 knot crosswind.

4.4.2 Setting of appropriate HUD brightness for different approach lighting systems.

4.4.3 Demonstration of failures and incorrect settings on approach; i.e., miss-set runway elevation, airspeed, selected course, etc.

4.4.4 Missed approaches from IFR minimums in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) flown using published Missed Approach.

4.5 Non-Normal/Emergency Operations

Flight Training for Non-Normal and Emergency Conditions using HUD should include:

4.5.1 Recognition and recovery from an aeroplane upset/unusual attitude.

4.5.2 Recognition and recovery from Windshear alerts and indications, including a demonstration of symbology indications in wind shear conditions, i.e., erratic wind speed and direction, flight path, flight path acceleration and speed error, etc.

4.5.3 Recognition and recovery from EGPWS/TAWS Warning alert.

4.5.4 Recognition and recovery from TCAS Resolution Advisory (RA).

4.5.5 One Engine Inoperative Take-off with engine failure at or above V1 at the lowest authorized take-off visibility.

4.5.6 Rejected Take-off with an engine failure prior to V1 at the lowest authorized take-off visibility.

4.5.7 One Engine Inoperative Instrument approach and missed approach

4.5.8 Aircraft system and navigation failures affecting HUD operation.

4.6 Rockwell Collins HGS-6000 Head-Up Guidance System with HCP Interface

The HGS-6000 is optional equipment on the B-737-NG and B-737-MAX. Level A differences training is sufficient for pilots already qualified on the Rockwell Collins HGS-4000 Head-Up Guidance System.

4.7 HUD Training Areas of Special Emphasis

4.6.1 Crew coordination, briefings, call-outs.

4.6.2 Duties of PF and PM.

4.6.3 The availability and limitations of visual cues encountered on approach both before and after minimum altitudes. This would include:

  1. Procedures for unexpected deterioration of conditions to less than minimum RVR encountered during approach, flare and rollout.
  2. Demonstration of expected visual references with weather at minimum conditions.
  3. Expected sequence of visual cues during an approach in which visibility is at or above landing minima.

4.6.4 HUD unique symbology, i.e. Flight Path Vector (FPV), flight path acceleration symbol, airspeed error tape, Angle of Attach (AOA) limit bracket, and excessive pitch chevrons. When this training is complete, the trainee should have a thorough understanding of the relationship between aircraft flight path parameters and the HUD symbology.

4.6.5 Appropriate use of the aircraft symbol vs. the FPV during stall, unusual attitude and aeroplane upset recoveries.

5.0 HUD Initial Pilot Proficiency Check

5.1 Minimum Checking Manoeuvres

The HUD should be used to the maximum extent possible during the initial Pilot Proficiency Check (PPC). The following manoeuvres using the HUD should be specifically evaluated during the PPC:

5.1.1 Engine failure on take-off (V1 cut).

5.1.2 Instrument approach and missed approach with One Engine Inoperative (OEI).

6.0 HUD Initial line training

6.1 General

HUD initial line training should be under the supervision of a line qualified training or ACP.

HUD line training should include the PF using the HUD to complete:

6.1.1 Three HUD assisted takeoffs;

6.1.2 One visual approach; and

6.1.3 Three instrument approaches in visibility not less than 1800 RVR.

7.0 HUD Consolidation Period

7.1 Requirements

Air operator’s pilots require line training and consolidation after initial qualification on the HUD. A consolidation period should apply prior to utilizing the HUD for instrument approach operations in IMC. Upon completion of the consolidation requirements, the pilot should be qualified to conduct HUD takeoffs and approaches to the approach minima authorized for the air operator.

During consolidation training, the HUD should be used by the PF to complete:

7.1.1 Five takeoffs;

7.1.2 Five manually flown approaches and landings. (The approaches may be flown in VMC.)

8.0 HUD Recurrent Training and Checking Requirements

8.1 Recurrent Ground Training

Recurrent HUD ground training should be completed as part of recurrent training or as part of the continuing qualification curriculum, as applicable. Selected HUD related ground training subjects should be reviewed on a recurrent basis.

8.2 Recurrent Flight Training

Recurrent flight training should be completed as part of recurrent training or as part of the continuing qualification curriculum, as applicable. Recurrent flight training should be in accordance with the procedures established in the operator company operations manual and should include:

8.2.1 Review of HUD system and normal operation;

8.2.2 Review of HUD operating limitations;

8.2.3 Review of selected non-normal and emergency procedures;

8.2.4 One Take-off with crosswind at the lowest authorized take-off minima using HUD Take-off guidance;

8.2.5 Engine Inoperative Take-off with engine failure at V1;

8.2.6 Rejected take-off;

8.2.7 Straight-in, ILS and Non ILS approach and landing with crosswind to the lowest authorized landing minimums;

8.2.8 Approach and Missed Approach with crosswind at the lowest authorized landing minimums in IMC;

8.2.9 One Engine Inoperative Approach and Landing;

8.2.10 Selected non-normal and emergency procedures;

8.3 HUD Recurrent PPC

The HUD should be used to the maximum extent possible during the recurrent PPC. The required manoeuvres on recurrent PPCs should include a sample of operations requiring the use of the HUD.

Recurrent PPCs should include an evaluation of PM duties related to the use of the HUD in accordance with SOPs, and in consideration of whether the aircraft is equipped with a single or dual HUD.

The following manoeuvres using the HUD should be specifically evaluated during the recurrent PPC:

8.3.1 Engine failure on take-off (V1 cut); and

8.3.2 Instrument approach and missed approach with OEI.

9.0 HUD Currency Requirements

An air operator’s 90-day takeoff, approach and landing currency requirements apply to each pilot position occupied.

A PF should have completed at least three takeoffs, approaches and landings using the HUD, in a B73C aeroplane or a TCCA approved level C (or higher) B73C FFS with day and night visual displays, within the previous 90 days before acting as PF using the HUD.

10.0 HUD REDUCED VISIBILITYAND LOW VISIBILITY TAXI, TAKE-OFF, APPROACH, LANDING AND ROLL-OUT

The B73C HUD is capable of providing take-off guidance in visibilities as low as 300 ft (75 m) RVR. The HUD is capable of providing guidance to Category IIIa ILS manually flown instrument approaches.

The following training and checking requirements for reduced and low visibility operations in are in addition to the HUD training, checking and currency requirements provided in the preceding.

Note:

The training low and reduced visibility training, checking and currency requirements are derived from the FAA FSB report for the B-737. These requirements apply to an operator authorized to use the HUD to conduct take-offs at 300 RVR and CAT IIIa ILS approaches.

10.1 Ground Training

Ground training for low and reduced visibility HUD operations should include:

10.1.1 The certified capability of the HUD for take-off, approach, landing and roll-out for low and reduced visibility operations in terms of RVR and Category of ILS Approach.

10.1.2 The operational characteristics, capabilities, and limitations of the HUD and aircraft systems for low and reduced visibility operations. Training should include the arming and activation of HUD and AFCS flight guidance and all associated controls, indications and annunciations.

10.1.3 The operational characteristics, capabilities, and limitations of ground facilities (i.e. Instrument approach systems, lighting systems, Surface Movement Guidance Control system, aerodrome procedures etc.) supporting low and reduced visibility operations.

10.1.4 Operator’s policies and procedures concerning reduced and low visibility operations, including the operator’s reporting process, MEL issues, operational considerations following an RTO or missed approach, Initial Operating Experience (IOE) and currency requirements.

10.1.5 For low and reduced visibility operations predicated on the HUD, a video demonstration complete with sound, of all modes of HUD operation, including narrative descriptions and several low weather approach demonstrations with procedural call-outs and responses. All critical procedural call-out possibilities should be covered.

10.1.6 An emphasis on the need for rigorous crew discipline, coordination and adherence to procedural guidelines for use of the HUD as a CAT II/CAT III approach and landing system.

10.2 Flight training

10.2.1 Low Visibility Take-off

Training predicated on the use of HUD for low visibility take-off to 300 RVR should include the following conditions:

  1. Normal takeoff, clear and calm, repeated with gusty winds
  2. Takeoff, 600 foot RVR; 5 knot crosswind
  3. Takeoff, 300 foot RVR; 5 knot crosswind, engine failure prior to V1
  4. Takeoff, 300 foot RVR; 5 knot crosswind, engine failure after V1
  5. Takeoff with HGS failure; 300 foot RVR

10.2.2 Low Visibility Instrument Approaches

Training predicated on the use of HUD for low visibility approaches should include the following conditions:

  1. CAT II ILS approach to 100 foot DH, 1200 RVR, 5 - 10 kts crosswind
  2. CAT IIIa ILS approach and landing from a 30 degree intercept to the ILS, below glideslope, weather clear and calm.
  3. CAT IIIa ILS with 700 RVR, wind calm - another ILS with a 10 knot crosswind.
  4. CAT IIIa ILS with 0/0 weather. After touchdown, raise weather to demonstrate position on runway.
  5. CAT IIIa ILS with various reasons for a missed approach (system downgrade, “APCH WARN”, etc.).
  6. CAT IIIa ILS with various RVRs and crosswinds, include light turbulence.

Notes:

  1. Several of the instrument approaches should include a variety of ground and airborne system failures requiring pilot recognition and appropriate procedural actions.
  2. Demonstration of system/component failures could include flap asymmetry problems, engine out operations, HGS sensor failures, etc.
  3. Demonstration of how HUD failure modes can reduce precision and increase pilot workload unless PF/PM duties and responsibilities are clearly delineated and understood.

10.3 Initial Operating Experience and Line Training

10.3.1 SICs should be observed performing Category II/IIIa PM duties by an appropriately qualified check pilot upon satisfactory completion of the HUD training program.

10.3.2 Prior to utilizing the HUD in IMC conditions below RVR 1800, each PIC must accomplish at least twenty-five manually flown HUD approaches to Category II/IIIa minima in VMC conditions. Each approach must terminate in a manually controlled HUD assisted landing or HUD assisted go-around. In addition, each PIC must accomplish at least twenty-five HUD assisted takeoffs in VMC conditions prior to using the HUD mode in IMC conditions. Upon completion of this requirement the HUD qualified pilot should then be observed to conduct HUD approaches to company authorized minima.

10.3.3 Pilots must complete their initial operating experience for HUD CAT II/IIIa operations within 60 days of completion of their HUD training. All previously qualified (in aircraft) pilots should be certified upon satisfactory completion of the HUD ground and flight training programs.

10.4 Recurrent training and checking

In addition to regular training and checking requirements, the following low visibility operations should be performed during the six-month recurrent training and PPC,:

  1. Approach and landing, 700 foot RVR, 10 knot crosswind.
  2. Approach, 700 foot RVR, 10 knot crosswind, light turbulence with missed approach.
  3. Takeoff, 300 foot RVR, 10 knot crosswind.
  4. Takeoff, 300 foot RVR, engine failure either before or after V1.
  5. Selected ground training subjects should be reviewed annually.

Appendix 6 – HGS 4000 EFVS Qualification Program

1.0 General

The Boeing Business Jet (BBJ) (B-737 NG) may be equipped with an HGS 4000 HUD with EFVS capability. The HGS 4000 EFVS provides the capability for descent below published minima using an Infrared (IR) sensor for the acquisition of the required visual references to continue the approach to a landing. The HGS 4000 EFVS is not certified for landing based on the EFVS image.

Note:

Operators seeking credit to use the EFVS for descent below published minima to acquire the required visual references to continue the approach to a landing require an exemption to the applicable provisions of CAR 602.128, Landing Minima. In addition, operators also require a Special Authorization to use the EFVS for credit for descent below published minima.

2.0 EFVS Ground and Flight Training – General

Successful completion of HUD training on the B73C is required as a prerequisite for EFVS training. HUD and EFVS training can be conducted concurrently.

A TCCA approved level C or higher B73C Full Flight Simulator (FFS) equipped with day and night visual displays and able to display a representative IR image, is required for EFVS flight training and checking.

The EFVS pilot training requirements consist of those related to initial and recurrent ground and flight training. The EFVS training program should focus upon training events flown in the left seat by the PIC (PF). EFVS training of PM duties in the right seat is required. SIC EFVS familiarization flown in the left seat is recommended.

Operators authorized to descend below published minima using the EFVS must conduct ground and flight training on low visibility and CAT II ILS procedures specific to the B73C.

3.0 EFVS Initial Ground Training

The initial ground training program should include a minimum of four hours of classroom instruction or Computer Based Training (CBT) to include:

  1. EFVS operational concepts and IR theory
  2. EFVS System Architecture
  3. EFVS specific HUD symbology and format
  4. EVS Videos of Flight Scenarios
  5. EVS Operating Procedures & Limitations
  6. FAA Part 91.176 criteria applicable to EFVS
  7. Runway markings and lighting
  8. Design eye position for proper EVS image
  9. Transition from EVS imagery to non-EVS imagery.
  10. EFVS specific visual characteristics including: Noise and "blooming", roman candle effect – rain, burlap effect, burn-iIn and elimination, NUUC, weather conditions (fog & visual reference).
  11. Flightcrew qualification & training.
  12. Crew duties and responsibilities including duties of PF and PM crew coordination.
  13. Operational procedures including normal and non-normal operations.
  14. Crew briefings and callouts
  15. All applicable EFVS AFM, pilot training and FCOM material

4.0 EFVS Initial Flight Training

The initial flight training program must include a minimum of 2 hours for the PF (left seat).

Note:

The required initial ground training must be summarized during the pre-flight briefing prior to flight training.

The following initial flight training should be provided:

4.1 Ground Operations

  1. Initialization, system use, checks and tests.
  2. Displays, modes, annunciations
  3. Design eye position
  4. Use of on/off switch and "clear" mode
  5. Taxi using EFVS under various lighting and visibility conditions.

4.2 Airwork

The airwork required for HUD training (Appendix 5) is suffcient.

4.3 Visual Take-offs, Circuits and Approaches

Flight training should include various daylight and night takeoffs and landings including:

  1. Normal Take-off and Landing with crosswind
  2. Visual approaches to runways at night with minimal lighting (“black hole” approaches) and use of FPV to achieve desired descent angle.

4.4 Instrument Approaches

  1. ILS, GLS, WAAS/LPV approach and landing (At least one of these approaches as applicable).
  2. ILS, GLS, WAAS/LPV missed approach (At least one of these approaches as applicable).
  3. Non-ILS approach and landing.
  4. RNP Approach and landing – if applicable

4.5 Non-normal/Emergency Operations

  1. Failure of EFVS, or
  2. Failure of the EFVS preventing continued approach when below published minima on a Category 1 ILS.

4.6 Special Emphasis Training

Special training emphasis should be placed in the following areas:

  1. Crew briefings, callouts and SOPs, PF and PM duties, SOPs and CRM.
  2. Transition from EFVS imagery to the unaided scene, visual conditions and runway acquisition
  3. Instrument failures and warning systems
  4. Recognition of EVFS malfunctions and misleading images

5.0 INITIAL EFVS Line Indoctrination

For air operators, PICs should complete line indoctrination employing the EFVS. This should include at least three EFVS assisted takeoffs at night, one visual approach at night, and two instrument approaches in VMC.

6.0 EFVS Consolidation Period

For air operators, a consolidation period should apply prior to utilizing the EFVS for instrument approach operations in IMC, to qualify a PIC to conduct EFVS takeoffs and approaches to the authorized minima as set forth in the operator’s operations specifications.

PICs should accomplish at least three manually flown EFVS assisted night takeoffs, approaches, and landings to the lowest authorized minima in VMC conditions. Each approach should terminate in a manually controlled EFVS assisted landing or EFVS assisted go-around.

7.0 EFVS Recurrent Training and Checking Requirements

The recurrent training requirements applicable to the HUD apply with the addition of the following requirements using the EFVS:

  1. Instrument approach and landing, or
  2. Instrument approach and landing with acquisition of EFVS image before published minima and acquisition of image without aid of the EFVS above 100 ft HAT, to provide required visual references to permit a landing; and
  3. Instrument approach with acquisition of EFVS image before published minima and failure of EFVS below published minima requiring a missed approach above 100 ft. HAT.

Selected ground training subjects should be reviewed on a recurrent basis.

For PICs, the required maneuvers on subsequent PPCs should include a sample of operations requiring the use of the EFVS. For SICs, the required maneuvers on subsequent PPCs should include a sample of PM duties related to the use of the EFVS.

8.0 EFVS Currency Requirements

An air operator’s PICs should have completed at least one night takeoff, approach and landing as PF using the EFVS; or have completed at least one night takeoff, approach and landing as PF using the EFVS in a TCCA approved level C (or higher) B73C full flight simulator with day and night visual displays and able to display a representative IR image, within the previous 90 days before acting as PF using the EFVS. The EFVS currency requirement can be credited to the HUD currency requirements.

Date modified: