Results: What We Achieved

At Transport Canada, we have three Strategic Outcomes that reflect long-term and enduring benefits to Canadians that stem from our raison d’être and vision. As we strive towards these outcomes, we report on our progress in relation to the expected resultsFootnote 4, performance indicatorsFootnote 5 and targetsFootnote 6, which are in line with the Program Alignment Architecture (PAA). What distinguishes the different levels of a PAA is the scope and reach of the Programs at those levels. The Program level has a broad scope and area of societal intervention, while the Sub-Program (SP) and Sub-Sub-Program (SSP) levels have a more limited and specific focus on a smaller target group and area of intervention.

This section:

Strategic Outcome 1: An Efficient Transportation System

An efficient transportation system supports trade, economic prosperity and a better quality of life through low costs, reliable service, and the best use of all modes and innovation in transportation. Transport Canada promotes an efficient transportation system in Canada by: modernizing marketplace frameworks so that the transportation sector can adapt, innovate and remain competitive; implementing trade corridor initiatives; ensuring the renewal of federal transportation infrastructure; encouraging innovation in the transportation sector; and partnering with provinces, territories, municipal governments, and public and private sector entities in various transportation initiatives.

The following Programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 1.1: Transportation Marketplace Frameworks

Description: The Transportation Marketplace Frameworks Program encourages transportation efficiency by fostering a competitive and viable transportation sector. The Program: sets regimes governing the economic behaviour of carriers in all modes of transportation; sets the rules of governance for all the transportation infrastructure providers falling under federal authority; monitors, analyzes, researches, and reports on the transportation system; promotes innovation in transportation; enables access to transportation for Canadians; represents the interests of Canada in trade negotiations, international transportation fora and other international bodies; promotes access to markets in the context of international trade; fosters greater cooperation to support economic activity; and fulfills certain federal responsibilities with regard to the International Bridges and Tunnels ActFootnote l.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Transportation Marketplace Frameworks Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Signed a contract for the completion of the first phase of the aviation sector analyses for the Pickering Lands and began planning for the second phase, which we expect to begin in 2017-18;
  • Provided technical and administrative support for the legislative and regulatory processes for the implementation of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, and did much preparation towards being ready to enforce transportation sector compliance;
  • Secured in Budget 2017 $278.3 million over five years, starting in 2017-18, to continue to provide safe and reliable operations of federally-funded ferry services in Eastern Canada;
  • Received approval in the fall of 2016 for federal regulations for projects on federal lands involving liquefied natural gas facilities;
  • Brought a strengthened rail liability and compensation regime into force in June 2016, and implemented all its administrative activities on schedule;
  • Worked on the due diligence of VIA Rail's “High Frequency Rail” (HFR) proposal, such as assessing VIA RailFootnote li ridership forecasts, engineering and implementation risks, interoperability (track sharing) with regional/urban rail transit operators and alternative scenarios to HFR;
  • Began the implementation of the Agreement on Land, Rail, Marine and Air Transport Preclearance with the U.S.Footnote lii, as planned. In particular:
    • The Minister of Public Safety introduced the required implementing legislation for Canada, Bill C-23, to amend the Preclearance ActFootnote liii, in the House of Commons on June 17, 2016; and
    • Canada and the U.S. continued to work jointly on outstanding operational issues required to implement the Agreement;
  • Advanced initiatives related to the Northern transportation system that deepen our understanding of climate impacts and measures that foster adaptation. We:
    • Finalized three grant and contribution agreement projects with the Yukon and Northwest Territories governments under the Northern Transportation Adaptation InitiativeFootnote liv. These are on track for completion in 2017-18, consisting of:
      • Establishing a monitoring program with the Government of Northwest Territories to collect data at established test sites;
      • Working with the Government of Yukon to monitor test sections along the Campbell Highway to evaluate wicking geosynthetics as a way to prevent pavement cracking during spring thaw; and
      • Entering a partnership with the Government of Yukon to develop a climate-resilient functional plan for the Dempster Highway, which seeks to:
        • Integrate climate change and geohazardsFootnote 7 research, industry experience and adaptation strategies into the planning process; and
        • Identify and assess potential and anticipated improvements over a 20-year planning horizon, which will help guide investments in the corridor’s improvement and development;
    • Began developing an Arctic transportation policy framework to better articulate a federal approach to the unique transportation concerns in the territorial North, which aligns with the Government of Canada's new Arctic Policy FrameworkFootnote lv. Once completed, the framework will support greater coherence in federal actions related to policy, investment and regulatory measures that support improving social and economic opportunities in Canada’s Arctic;
    • Advanced two grant and contribution agreement projects with Canada Port Authorities under the Truck Reservation System Program, including:
      • Completing the project at the Port of MontrealFootnote lvi to install radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology aimed to:
        • better manage truck flows; and
        • reduce truck wait times, idling and greenhouse gas emissions;
      • Continuing a project at the Port of VancouverFootnote lvii, with a planned 2017-18 completion, to better integrate existing reservation systems and improve truck traffic flow at the port and its container terminals;
  • Worked with the Railway Research Advisory BoardFootnote 8 (RRAB) to complete a new Strategic Plan in February 2017, which will help to:
    • Support the modernization of the rail sector; and
    • Develop project selection processes designed to ensure the best return on Research and Development investments;
  • Undertook policy analyses and extensive stakeholder consultations on key policy issues examined by the Canada Transportation Act ReviewFootnote lviii (CTAR), which included:
    • Conducting a series of Minister-led and other public consultations to hear reactions to CTAR Report findings and recommendations. These resulted in eight months of policy analysis and consultations with:
    • Proposing legislation to advance a more balanced, efficient and transparent transportation system, which included measures that will:
      • Benefit Grain handling;
      • Contain provisions to improve the air traveller experience; and
      • Increase investment and competition in the air sector;
  • Worked to foster innovation within the transportation sector by:
    • Securing in Budget 2017, proposed funding of $76.7 million (including $26.7 million in existing resources) for our department to develop regulations and standards for connected and automated vehicles (CV/AVs) and unmanned air systems (UAS);
    • Engaging and collaborating on transportation innovation and technology with:
      • The provinces and territories through the Council of Ministers of Transportation and Highway Safety and other federal/provincial/territorial counterparts;
      • Other international jurisdictions, such as at the G7 Transport Ministers' Meetings; and
      • Industry and academic/research organizations; and
  • Strengthened our partnerships with the provinces and territories to confront shared challenges by:
    • Attending federal/provincial/territorial (FPT) meetings with the Minister and senior departmental officials. Strategic agendas for meetings and briefing materials were prepared and centred around federal and departmental mandates and other priorities;
    • Initiating a discussion on how to engage Indigenous Peoples in the context of the Council of Ministers and the parameters for implementing this new relationship; and
    • Reaching an agreement at the Council of Ministers September 2016 meeting on six priority areas (including enhance safety, supporting trade corridors infrastructure and addressing climate change) for FPT collaboration. This then resulted in focussing intergovernmental work on and creating task forces related to:
      • Automated and connected vehicles;
      • Vulnerable road users around heavy vehicles;
      • Distracted driving; and
      • Trucking harmonization.

Lessons Learned

Through the significant amount of our Policy group’s analysis conducted during the year, we learned that:

  • Solid evidence-based analysis supports policy development and decision-making; and
  • Given the importance of the transportation sector in growing the Canadian economy, early stakeholder engagement is critical for policy-making and decision-making processes.
2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollarsFootnote 9) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
21,711,678 21,711,678 25,071,391 22,863,304 (1,151,626)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
158 158 0
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
1.1 Transportation Marketplace Frameworks
a) A competitive transportation sector Rail freight transportation intensity (tonne-km per locomotive) (Transportation intensity represents system usage) 120,917,636 March 2017 166,397,167 149,337,129 122,181,729
b) A competitive transportation sector Truck freight transportation intensity (tonne-km per heavy vehicle) (Transportation intensity represents system usage) 1,662,130 March 2017 1,849,307 1,853,430 1,698,561
c) A competitive transportation sector Marine freight transportation intensity (tonne-km per port call) (Transportation intensity represents system usage) 2,895 March 2017 2,866 2,871 2,875
d) A competitive transportation sector Air passenger transportation intensity (passenger-km per seat-km) (Transportation intensity represents system usage) 0.79 March 2017 0.82 0.83 0.82
e) A competitive transportation sector Rail passenger transportation intensity (passengers per available seat) (Transportation intensity represents system usage) 0.59 March 2017 0.544 0.57 0.61

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBSFootnote 10 InfoBaseFootnote lix.

Explanation of Variance

For 1.1e): The target was not reached as a result of the number of passengers growing by 4.1% versus 2015, while available seats (i.e. capacity) grew by 9.3%, leading to lower average load factor.

Response to Evaluations

Evaluation #1

Name of the Evaluation: Evaluation of Transportation Development Centre’s rail research and development

Response: This evaluation was a key input to strategic planning for Rail Research and Development (R&D) for the next three years (2017-2020). The evaluation called for:

  1. Research and Development projects to be more strategic, namely to focus on areas that potentially have the greatest impact by undertaking longer-term project planning;
  2. Improving links with international organizations; and
  3. Strengthening knowledge transfer to senior managers in industry and government of rail R&D projects and their results, including performance measurement and reporting of system condition and capacity, to support timely, effective and evidence-based decision making.

The impact of addressing these recommendations will be integral to:

  • Future rail Research and Development activities; and
  • The Railway Research Advisory Board’s (RRAB) Strategic Plan for 2017 to 2020, as it is designed to:
    • Set out the framework for ensuring that projects and activities are forward looking;
    • Anticipate trends that will affect the rail sector;
    • Understand the role science, technology and innovation can play;
    • Establish the framework within which better engagement with international partners occurs; and
    • Strengthen knowledge management and information dissemination.

Evaluation #2

Name of the Evaluation: Evaluation of the Contribution to the Canadian Transportation Research Forum Scholarship Program

Response: Our Transportation and Economic Analysis team now makes sure the scholarship selection criteria align with Transport Canada’s mandate and the government’s priorities and commitments (e.g., Transportation 2030).

Program 1.2: Gateways and Corridors

Description: Canada is a trading nation, and the efficiency and reliability of the transportation system to support this trade impacts directly on the nation’s prosperity and well-being. For this reason, it is imperative that the federal government play a role in the development of an integrated transportation network linking importers and exporters to markets and suppliers in the increasingly complex global supply chains. Guided by the National Policy Framework for Strategic Gateways and CorridorsFootnote lx, the Gateways and Corridors Program supports Canada’s international commerce by creating a more efficient, reliable and seamless trade-related transport system in Canada. The Program: develops initiatives to improve and integrate transportation networks in key regions; fosters partnerships between all levels of government and the private sector; supports and oversees projects that contribute to the increased capacity and efficiency of gateway and corridor infrastructure; develops and puts in place measures that remove impediments to the effective development of gateways and corridors; and markets the use of gateways and corridors within Canada and internationally.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Gateways and Corridors Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, did not identify key Planning Highlights as this is a sunsettingFootnote 11 Program. Nevertheless, during the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we continued to:

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
259,603,003 259,603,003 259,532,214 158,636,456 100,966,547
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
19 14 5
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
1.2 Gateways and Corridors
Gateways and corridors are efficient Total average landside transit time (number of days) of international containerized freight using Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors 7.0 days of average landside transit with a standard deviation of 0.4 days March 2017 6.8 days with standard deviation of 0.5 days Average of 8.4 days with standard deviation of 1.1 days Average of 9.0 days, standard deviation of 1 day

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Response to Evaluations

Even though the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure and Gateways and Border Crossings Funds are sunsetting, the 2017 evaluations of these two funding programs show there is an ongoing need to invest in critical trade-related transportation infrastructure. Transport Canada has efficiently delivered Gateways and Trade Corridors-related Infrastructure programming, which continues to align with federal and departmental priorities. The National Trade Corridors Fund announced in Budget 2017 will continue to address infrastructure needs across Canada in support of international trade.

Program 1.3: Transportation Infrastructure

Description: The Transportation Infrastructure Program oversees, funds and manages multimodal transportation infrastructure under Transport Canada’s mandate to improve efficiency and service delivery for the benefit of Canadian taxpayers. The Program acts as the steward of certain commercial transportation assets operated by third parties on behalf of the federal government (airport authorities, port authorities, bridges under federal authority, VIA Rail, St. Lawrence Seaway Management CorporationFootnote lxiii, Marine AtlanticFootnote lxiv); provides funding for Canada’s strategic transportation infrastructure to support federal objectives; and develops transportation infrastructure policy through consultation with stakeholders. It also manages Transport Canada ports and airports, supports essential services in remote communities, manages legacy commitments, and divests assets where possible.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Transportation Infrastructure Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Implemented the Asset Management Strategy for Transport Canada-owned and operated ports. This approach supports the transfer of these facilities to local and private interests who are better positioned to operate them. Under the Ports Asset Transfer ProgramFootnote lxv, we:
    • successfully transferred two port facilities (Liverpool in Nova Scotia and Cornwall in Ontario);
    • demolished one port facility in Quebec (Vieux Fort); and
    • continued working with interested parties for potential future transfers at a number of port facilities; and
  • Worked with Parks CanadaFootnote lxvi to expedite the transfer of an additional 2,100 hectares (5,200 acres) of surplus lands in support of the Rouge National Urban ParkFootnote lxvii. This included completing necessary due diligence.

We also secured $278.3 million over five years in Budget 2017, for the continued safe and reliable operations of the following three ferry services:

  1. Saint John, New Brunswick - Digby, Nova Scotia;
  2. Cap-aux-Meules, Quebec - Souris, Prince Edward Island; and
  3. Wood Islands, Prince Edward Island - Caribou, Nova Scotia.

Lessons Learned

We have taken steps to strengthen our oversight of vessel maintenance in view of the unexpected repairs to the ferry vessel MV Holiday Island in the summer of 2016. The MV Holiday Island is one of two vessels providing service between Wood Islands, Prince Edward Island and Caribou, Nova Scotia.

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
415,437,562 415,437,562 477,401,056 407,475,290 7,962,272
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
217 222 (5)
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
1.3 Transportation Infrastructure
Federally funded infrastructure is operational Percentage of federally funded transportation infrastructure that meets annually established operational targets 100% March 2017 100% 100% 95%

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Response to Evaluations

Name of the Evaluation: Evaluation of the Airports Operations and Maintenance Subsidy Program

Response: The evaluation demonstrated that the Airport Operations and Maintenance Subsidy Program:

  • Continues to address a need;
  • Aligns with federal policy parameters for funding airports set out in the National Airports Policy; and
  • Achieved its expected outcomes related to operations, safety and airport certification.

As a result of the findings, the Evaluation demonstrated that our plans and operations are on track and do not require adjusting.

Strategic Outcome 2: A Clean Transportation System

Transport Canada promotes a clean transportation system in Canada. This Strategic Outcome: advances the federal government’s environmental agenda in the transportation sector and complements other federal programs designed to reduce air emissions to protect the health of Canadians and the environment for generations to come; protects the marine environment by reducing the pollution of water from transportation sources; and fulfills Transport Canada’s responsibilities in working towards a cleaner and healthier environment with regard to its own operations.

The following Programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 2.1: Clean Air from Transportation

Description:  Transport Canada’s Clean Air from Transportation Program advances the federal government’s environmental agenda in the transportation sector and complements other federal programs designed to reduce air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) to improve the health of Canadians and the environment for generations to come. The Program: regulates air pollutant and/or greenhouse gas emissions from the air, marine and rail sectors; and implements Transport Canada’s Clean Air Program obligations and commitments.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Clean Air from Transportation Program, and level Sub-Programs identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
12,017,045 12,017,045 34,380,387 21,245,675 (9,228,630)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
15 62 (47)
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
2.1 Clean Air from Transportation
Measurement of the intensity of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector Percentage of transportation sector emissions covered by annual reporting on the GHG emission intensity of transportation (as measured in grams per unit of activity) 100% March 2017 100% N/A N/A

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 2.2: Clean Water from Transportation

Description: The Clean Water from Transportation Program protects the marine environment by reducing the pollution of water from transportation sources. This Program: regulates and monitors the release and impact of discharges from marine vessels into the marine environment; regulates ballast water; and contributes to setting domestic and international rules that govern limits to liability of marine pollution incidents. This Program also: advances the federal government’s clean water agenda in the transportation sector; and complements other federal programs designed to protect the marine environment for the health of Canadians and the environment for generations to come. This Program also represents Canada in discussions to set international standards to prevent pollution from vessels operating in Canada’s waters and addresses the threat of aquatic invasive species.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Reports on Plans and Priorities, the Clean Water from Transportation Program, along with its lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Identified future strategic requirements in the North, with a focus on transportation services and infrastructure that will strengthen safe and environmentally responsible transportation for all modes. We did this by continuing to work with the Canadian Coast Guard and the Canadian Hydrographic Service on:
    • Developing the Northern Marine Transportation Corridors Initiative; and
    • Supporting its adoption as a government-wide strategic policy framework to prioritize federal investments and services affecting marine transportation in Canada’s arctic waters;
  • Worked towards amending the Navigation Safety RegulationsFootnote lxxxii so the Automatic Identification System (AIS) carriage requirements apply to a greater number of vessels. We held national and regional consultations on our proposed changes so Canada’s Navigation Safety Regulations align with current St. Lawrence Seaway and United States regulatory AIS requirements;
  • Monitored and analyzed domestic and international developments related to water pollution, for potential impacts on the transportation sector, departmental policies and legislative authorities by:
  • Continued to work with domestic and international stakeholders to update Canada’s regulations for the management of ballast water by:
  • Helped promote a safe and environmentally responsible marine transportation system, which advances economic development by:
    • Supporting the Clear Seas Centre for Responsible ShippingFootnote lxxxviii, whose mandate is to be an independent source of information on best practices on the marine transportation of oil and liquefied natural gas, and Ocean Networks CanadaFootnote lxxxix (ONC), to enable them to transform their oceanographic data into navigational safety information by:
      • Contributing up to $20 million to ONC, which enabled them to:
        • Install oceanographic radars to measure ocean surface currents and vessel movements across the 5 highest traffic locations along the British Columbia coastline;
        • Install and commission ocean observatories at three new locations in British Columbia (Prince Rupert, Campbell River and Kitamaat Village); and
        • Provide a range of informational and data products to support safe and responsible marine shipping; and
      • Contributing $3.7 million to the operation of the Clear Seas Centre for Responsible Shipping;
    • Strengthening and modernizing the Environmental Response ProgramFootnote xc, by increasing the number of staff in several regions of the country and by developing new policies and training courses. This helped us exceed our planned number of compliance inspections and enforcement actions to address non-compliance for the year, as we:
      • Planned to review 47 Oil Handling Facilities (OHF) emergency plans, but actually completed 137;
      • Planned on conducting 72 OHF inspections, but actually completed 83; and
      • Planned to monitor/evaluate 19 operational exercises conducted by the OHF, but actually completed 46;
    • Completing the Area Response Planning (ARP) initiative pilot project in four locations, including:
      • The Southern portion of British Columbia;
      • The St. Lawrence area from Montreal to Anticosti Island, Quebec;
      • Port Hawkesbury and the Strait of Canso, Nova Scotia; and
      • Saint John and the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick.
      • The ARP addressed a number of gaps in the Canadian ship-source oil spill preparedness and response regime, most notably the:
      • Lack of regional risk assessments in the planning process;
      • Limited information on ecological and socio-economic factors; and
      • Absence of a mechanism to regularly examine the response capacity available for ship-source oil spills.
    • The ARP pilot project successfully assessed a full range of scenarios, including looking at worst-case scenarios (e.g., the complete loss of a tanker and its cargo oil) and addressed the capacity of response organizations and the Canadian Coast Guard to respond to oil spills; and
    • Continuing to use the National Aerial Surveillance ProgramFootnote xci to help prevent and support response to ship-source spill pollution as we:
      • Provided aerial surveillance of waters under Canadian jurisdiction to monitor shipping activities;
      • Flew a total of 2,068 patrol hours;
      • Visually observed/overflew 12,461 vessels and monitored 204,880 vessels using the Automatic Identification System;
      • Completed an average of six vessel overflights per hour; and
      • Observed 246 pollution incidents during patrols, of which:
        • 26 were of a known source; and
        • 220 were from unknown/suspected sources, where the source could not be positively identified.
      • The total volume of oil we observed from these incidents was 2,878 litres, which included 8 offshore spills.

Lessons Learned

Given the success of the Area Response Planning (ARP) initiative pilot project to address a number of gaps in the Canadian ship-source oil spill preparedness and response regime, we are currently evaluating what we learned to determine next steps for the ARP initiative.

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
29,181,758 29,181,758 27,036,666 24,307,579 4,874,179
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
82 78 4
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
2.2 Clean Water from Transportation
Prevention of pollution in the marine environment from vessels operating in waters under Canadian jurisdiction Number of releases of harmful pollutants in the marine environment by vessels identified by pollution patrol and other means 17 March 2017 26 50 37

Explanation of Variance

The Department cannot control the number of ship-source spills the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) identifies. However, once a NASP crew detects spills, we analyze and report them to the appropriate authorities.

While the number of spills observed have exceeded the target the past three years, the estimated volume of spills has decreased. This is because improved technologies in recent years now allow our crews to detect smaller spills.

Response to Evaluations

Name of the Evaluation: Horizontal Implementation Review of the World Class Prevention, Preparedness and Response for Oil Spills from Ships Initiative

Response: We have fully implemented the recommendations stated within the evaluation’s Management Action Plan.

The Oceans Protection Plan includes significant investments in science initiatives that build on the earlier World-Class Tanker Safety System science initiatives. In response to those recommendations, we established a centralized team within our department that will oversee and track the various initiatives across all the departments.

Program 2.3: Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Description: The Environmental Stewardship of Transportation Program fulfills Transport Canada’s responsibilities in working towards an environmentally responsible and resilient national transportation system for Canadians by ensuring compliance with the Department’s environmental obligations in relation to Acts, Regulations, Policies and Guidelines, and the department’s obligations towards Aboriginal peoples. The Program: ensures that Transport Canada’s lands and facilities are managed in an environmentally responsible manner in compliance with federal legislation and policies; provides functional support for environmental assessments, including for major resource projects; manages contaminated sites; advises on Aboriginal consultation, engagement and treaty negotiations and implementation; and seeks to increase the national transportation system’s resilience to the current and anticipated future climate and extreme weather events.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Environmental Stewardship of Transportation Program identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
13,132,224 13,132,224 61,411,655 35,517,316 (22,385,092)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
115 108 7
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
2.3 Environmental Stewardship of Transportation
a) Compliance with Transport Canada’s obligations in relation to Acts, regulations, policies and guidelines Percentage of Departmental commitments achieved under the Federal Sustainable Development StrategyFootnote ci (FSDS) 100% March 2017 100% 100% 100%
b) Compliance with Transport Canada’s obligations in relation to Acts, regulations, policies and guidelines Number of instances where Transport Canada was not in compliance with applicable environmental legislation 0 March 2017 0 0 0
c) Compliance with Transport Canada’s obligations in relation to Acts, regulations, policies and guidelines Number of instances Transport Canada was found to have failed to meet its legal duty to consult Aboriginal groups 0 March 2017 0 0 0
d) Strengthen Transport Canada’s adaptation knowledge and capacity and improved integration of climate considerations into decision-making Percentage of actions from the Climate Change Adaptation Plan that have been implemented, for which expected results were achieved 100% March 2017 92%Footnote 13 N/A N/A

Explanation of Variance

For 2.3d): 24 of the Climate Change Adaptation Plan's 26 commitments were completed by the Plan's end date of 2015-16. One commitment was delayed due to legislative amendments, another was superseded by another project. Originally, the Plan included 28 commitments, however, two did not proceed as responsibility for the initiatives shifted to another department.

Strategic Outcome 3: A Safe and Secure Transportation System

A safe and secure transportation system moves people and goods across Canada and to international destinations, without loss of life, injury or damage to property. Transport Canada supports a safe and secure transportation system by influencing the behaviour of the public and industry through policies, standards, regulations and laws. Harmonized and streamlined regulatory regimes, informed by the practices of multiple countries and stakeholders, promote effective, safe and secure transportation operations and a sound safety and security culture. Transport Canada ensures that Canadians and the transportation industry are in compliance with the regulatory framework through its oversight program.

The following Programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 3.1: Aviation Safety

Description: The Aviation Safety Program, under the authority of the Aeronautics ActFootnote cii, develops, administers and oversees the policies, regulations and standards necessary for the safe conduct of civil aviation within Canada’s borders, including establishment of safety standards for the design and manufacture of aeronautical products in a manner harmonized with international standards. The Program: fosters the safety of the aviation system; provides oversight of the aviation sector; and enforces international conventions signed by Canada. It also provides aviation services and related training to support Transport Canada and other government department operations.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Aviation Safety Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we took measures to strengthen aviation safety in Canada by:

  • Pursuing opportunities for regulatory changes associated with approach and landing phases of flight, with an emphasis on unstable approaches and runway overruns. We did so by pre-publishing and providing a public consultation period, for proposed amendments to the Canadian Aviation Regulations in the Canada GazetteFootnote ciii, Part I, for:
    • Seaplane Operations, which requires occupants of commercial seaplanes to wear a flotation device and introduces mandatory emergency underwater exit training for commercial seaplane pilots;
    • Minimum Take-off Performance, which requires commuter aeroplanes providing scheduled service for ten to 19 passengers to meet the take-off certification performance requirements; and
    • Airport Winter Maintenance, which requires airport operators to develop standardized procedures related to the winter maintenance of their runways;
  • We expect these proposed amendments will be adopted and published in Canada Gazette, Part II in the fall of 2017;
  • Taking steps to strengthen regulations, standards and guidance material related to human performance including fatigue and Crew Resource Management (CRM) by:
    • Starting the regulatory amendment process for “Flight Crew Fatigue Management”, which will reduce the maximum duty day and increase the minimum rest periods for flight crew. We then prepared for the anticipated publishing of the amendment into the Canada Gazette, Parts I and II in 2017-18; and
    • Preparing for a future CRM industry briefing, which focussed on applying the new standards;
  • Redirecting our focus from developing a safety promotion and education program on reducing the risks of Loss of Control In-Flight, towards an emerging priority related to mental health and substance abuse disorders. As a result, we designed and developed a “Fit to Fly” program for the aviation and aerospace sectors to address:
    • Pilot mental health and wellness challenges; and
    • Recent incidents, both in Canada and abroad, of pilots reporting for duty under the influence of alcohol.
  • We consulted with industry and medical professionals to develop a program that we launched in the spring of 2017; and
  • Continuing to collaborate regionally and internationally on the development of regulations, standards and strategies for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)Footnote 14, that are consistent with:
  • Note: We are members on various UAS panels and advisory and working groups that:
    • Continue long-term work to develop standards and recommended practices for UAS;
    • Released a UAS toolkit in December 2016, to make aviation authorities around the world aware of safety awareness best practices and approaches to governance;
    • Strengthen information-sharing; and
    • Identify future opportunities for collaboration surrounding UAS research and development and the sharing of UAS safety best practices.

In addition, our Aircraft Services Directorate:

  • Completed the introduction of two new helicopter fleets and decommissioned two old fleets for the Canadian Coast Guard;
  • Entered into a maintenance and repair services agreement with the Department of National DefenceFootnote cv for our military’s Griffon helicopters; and
  • Were key contributors to:
    • Helping with the fuel spill resulting from the sinking of the Nathan E. Stewart vessel along the coast of British Columbia; and
    • The monitoring and evacuation efforts surrounding the spring flooding in Ontario and Quebec.

Lessons Learned

Our Program’s 2016-17 lessons learned relate to Evaluation #2 outlined below.

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
179,090,581 179,090,581 176,170,682 160,176,146 18,914,435
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
1,732 1,470 262
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.1 Aviation Safety
A safe civil aviation system

Number of accidents per 100,000 hours of flight. Rolling 10-year average to be compared to the target. (Target is based on the previous 10-year average.)

(Improvement = decrease)

3% reduction in the rate as compared to the 10-year rolling average (10 year rolling average currently at 5.8) December 2016 5.2 (preliminary data) 5.4 5.5

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Response to Evaluations

Evaluation #1

Name of the Evaluation: Grant to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) for Cooperative development of Operational Safety and Continuing Airworthiness Program (COSCAP)

Description: The Government of Canada has provided financial and technical support to the COSCAP since its inception. This is done through ICAO’s Technical Cooperation Bureau. Since 2003, we have supported the COSCAP initiative for North Asia (NA), which includes:

  • The People’s Republic of China;
  • The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea);
  • The Republic of Korea (South Korea); and
  • Mongolia.

Results: Our department’s internal Evaluation and Advisory Services team conducted an evaluation of the grant program, which we published in July 2016. The evaluation found that there is an ongoing need for the program due to the increasing economic and air traffic growth in North Asia. Without the grant to ICAO, Canada would be removed from the international discussions under the COSCAP. This could:

  • Affect Canadians traveling to this sub-region; and
  • Reflect negatively on Transport Canada’s collaboration efforts in international aviation safety.

Response: The evaluation concluded that there are no recommendations for consideration in a Management Action Plan.

Evaluation #2

Name of the Evaluation: Payments to other governments or international agencies for the operation and maintenance of airports, air navigation and airways facilities (DEN-ICE Agreement)

Description: The Den-Ice Agreements were established in 1956 to cover the operation and funding of facilities and services Denmark and Iceland provide to civil aircraft flying across the North Atlantic (north of 45° N latitude). These facilities are in Greenland, Iceland and the Faroe Islands. The Den-Ice Agreements have evolved over time and Canada has been a signatory since 1956.

Results: We published the evaluation of the contribution program in July 2016. The evaluation found that there is a continuing need for the Program, as Canadian air traffic in the North Atlantic is on the rise, and that despite the growth in overall air traffic in the region covered by the Agreement, the Program achieved its safety outcomes, noting that there were no fatal accidents during the evaluation period.

The evaluation recommended that:

  • We track annual air traffic data in the North Atlantic and ensure that Transport Canada (TC) pays its fair share of the Agreements based on the number of Canadian aircraft crossing the region; and
  • TC should consider reducing the Program’s budget to better align with actual spending.

Response: Through a TC “Management Action Plan” commitment, we now validate the number of Canadian aircraft crossings and the corresponding financial figures on an annual basis using data published by ICAO in Working PapersFootnote 15.

Although data for Canada indicate that crossings in 2016 were up 11.5% for a total of 29,020 crossings north of 45°N latitude, the adjusted 2017 forecast anticipates further increases in demand. The forecasted increase in demand for 2017 does not indicate a need to reduce the Program budget at this time.

Program 3.2: Marine Safety

Description: The Marine Safety Program, under the authority of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001Footnote cvi, the Navigation Protection Act, the Safe Containers Convention ActFootnote cvii, the Pilotage Act, the Coasting Trade ActFootnote cviii and the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention ActFootnote cix, develops, implements and administers policies, regulations and standards necessary for the safe conduct of marine activities in a manner harmonized with international standards.

The Program: fosters the safety of the marine transportation system; provides oversight of the marine industry, including domestic and foreign vessels (both non-pleasure craft and pleasure craft); enforces international conventions signed by Canada; protects the public right to navigate on Canadian waterways; regulates lights or markers required for safe navigation during and/or on completion of certain works; regulates the placement of private buoys as per the Private Buoy RegulationsFootnote cx of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001; and acts as the Receiver of Wreck as per the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, Part 7.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Marine Safety Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Strengthened links between international engagement, domestic consultations and regulatory development by:
  • Implemented and/or prepared new regulations aimed at improving fishing vessel safety, vessel construction and equipment standards, and vessel safety certification and inspection oversight by:
    • Advancing work on formulating the new Vessel Construction and Equipment Regulations, including for vessels using liquefied natural gas and compressed natural gas as fuel, by developing a draft policy setting out:
    • Introducing changes to the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations that:
      • Require all small fishing vessels to have written safety procedures;
      • Provide a range of life saving appliance choices for the operator depending on the vessel length and voyage duration; and
      • Make changes to the requirements for stability assessments, as well as for new stability notices.
    • In preparation of the coming into force of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations, we also:
      • Prepared education and awareness material for the marine industry;
      • Developed program tools for our team; and
      • Provided training to our inspectors; and
    • Conducting outreach and engagement activities for the newly amended Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations with:
  • Note: Work on the Vessel Safety Certificate Regulations, now called the Vessel Certificates Regulations, did not advance due to changes in departmental priorities;
  • Brought the Vessel Fire Safety RegulationsFootnote cxvi into force on February 3, 2017, replacing the Fire Detection and Extinguishing Equipment RegulationsFootnote cxvii. For new vessels more than 24 metres long, the requirements of these regulations harmonize with the international requirements in the Safety of Life at Sea ConventionFootnote cxviii. We are developing material for training inspectors on how to use the new Regulations;
  • Supported the progressive implementation of the IMO’s Polar CodeFootnote cxix, which came into force on January 1, 2017, by:
    • Advancing work with Canadian Arctic operators, regarding the applicable provisions of the Code into Canada’s Arctic shipping regulatory regime, by drafting and reviewing instructions for the proposed Arctic Shipping Safety and Pollution Prevention Regulations. These are designed to replace the Arctic Shipping Pollution Prevention Regulations;
    • Developing standards, guidelines and courses that respect Canadian principles for safety and environmental protection in the Arctic by taking the international lead in the development and subsequent approval of two critical training courses for operations in polar waters;
    • Starting to explore options to provide funding to the IMO Technical Cooperation Committee for fiscal year 2017-18, to help other foreign governments implement the Polar Code, and consider advancing a Polar Code ‘Phase II’;
    • Undertaking preliminary work to support the re-establishment of a permanent Canadian representative at the IMO, which we anticipate completing later in 2017; and
    • Assisting with:
      • The coming into force of the Polar Code via the new Arctic Shipping Safety and Pollution Prevention Regulations, which we expect will be introduced before the end of 2018; and
      • Developing a revised Arctic Ice Regime Shipping SystemFootnote cxx standard to describe the methodologies to use to assess a vessel’s operational capabilities and limitations in icy waters;
  • Maintained a consistent level of compliance and oversight activities;
  • Continued to modernize our regulatory and oversight frameworks and responsiveness to stakeholder requirements by:
    • Assembling an internal task force to conduct an in-depth review of future options for the Technical Review Process of Marine Terminal Systems and Transshipment Sites (TERMPOLFootnote cxxi), as part of the government’s Oceans Protection Plan, including developing and amending regulations;
    • Completing two TERMPOL Review reportsFootnote cxxii to ensure the marine transportation components of the projects can be carried out safely and are consistent with Canada’s safety regulations and industry best practices. These included the:
      • Port of QuebecFootnote cxxiii Facilities Expansion Project, which concluded the project would be safe for tanker operations if the proponent follows the recommendations in the report; and
      • Bear Head Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Project in Nova Scotia, in which we found no regulatory concerns for the proposed vessels, route and cargo operations. We did, however, propose several actions that would help provide a higher level of safety for its tanker operations;
    • Providing input to environmental assessment and National Energy Board processes (panels) as they relate to navigation and marine safety for several energy-related projects, such as the:
      • Trans Mountain Expansion project that seeks to add new tanker loading facilities at its marine terminal; and
      • Energy East pipeline project, which is designed to bring crude oil from Alberta to an Eastern Canada refinery in Saint John, New Brunswick;
  • Continued to strengthen tanker safety by developing the bill proposing a tanker moratorium on British Columbia’s north coast, which was introduced in Parliament in spring 2017; and
  • Implemented several initiatives under the Joint Action Plan for the Canada–U.S. Regulatory Cooperation CouncilFootnote cxxiv to further harmonize Canada–U.S. regulatory regimes by:
2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
56,814,328 56,814,328 63,914,519 60,034,090 (3,219,762)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
553 554 (1)
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.2 Marine Safety
a) A safe marine transportation system

Number of Canadian commercial vessel (non-pleasure craft) occurrences per 1,000 vessels in the Canadian registry (five-year moving average)

(Improvement = decrease)

2% reduction based on established two-year average December 2016 24.59 = a reduction of 8.4% from the average 30.68 18.6
b) A safe marine transportation system

Number of pleasure craft fatalities per licensed pleasure craft (five-year average)

(Improvement = decrease)

1% decrease based on established five-year average December 2016 N/AFootnote 16 110 116

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Response to Evaluations

Name of the Evaluation: Horizontal Implementation Review of the World Class Prevention, Preparedness and Response for Oil Spills from Ships Initiative

Response: We have fully implemented the recommendations stated within the evaluation’s Management Action Plan.

The Oceans Protection Plan includes significant investments in science initiatives that build on the earlier World Class Tanker Safety System science initiatives. In response to those recommendations, we established a centralized team within our department that will oversee and track the various initiatives across all the departments.

Program 3.3: Rail Safety

Description:  The Rail Safety Program, under the authority of the Railway Safety Act, develops, administers and oversees the policies and regulatory instruments necessary for the safety of railway operations in a manner consistent with North American and International safety standards/levels. The Program fosters safety within the rail transportation system and provides oversight of the rail industry. It also promotes public safety at crossings, identifies the risks of trespassing and provides funds to improve safety at grade crossings.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Rail Safety Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Continued to strengthen our rail safety legislative and regulatory frameworks by:
  • Improved our rail safety oversight regime by conducting audits of railways’ Safety Management Systems (SMS) under the new regulatory regime of the Railway Safety Management Systems Regulations, 2015 framework, including completing:
    • A total of 26 targeted, comprehensive or partial comprehensive audits; and
    • 14 of the 26 as comprehensive audits, whereby we audited all components of a railway’s SMS.

We are on track to complete a comprehensive audit of all railways over our targeted five year cycle.

Lessons Learned

Formally tracking and monitoring program outcomes is a priority area for the Government of Canada. As a result, going forward, the reduction of rail accidents, incidents and fatalities, and taking action as appropriate, will be key performance metrics that we will:

  • Formally incorporate into our revised risk-based business planning methodologies; and
  • Use to inform decision making and operational planning.
2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
35,124,187 35,124,187 38,003,423 32,879,827 2,244,360
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
208 190 18
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.3 Rail Safety
a) A safe rail transportation system

Rate of rail accidents (per million train miles) that occur on railways under federal jurisdiction (includes main-track collisions, derailments, non-main track derailments and collisions, fires/explosions and others) (five-year average)

(Improvement = decrease)

5% reduction in the rate as compared to average of previous 5 years December 2016 3.7% reduction N/A N/A
b) A safe rail transportation system

Rate of rail incidents (per million train miles) that occur on railways under federal jurisdiction (includes main-track switch in abnormal position, movement exceeds limits of authority, dangerous goods leak, crew member incapacitated, runaway rolling stock, signal less restrictive than required and unprotected overlap of authorities) (five-year average)

(Improvement = decrease)

5% reduction in the rate as compared to average of previous 5 years December 2016 12.5% reduction N/A N/A

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Explanation of Variance

For 3.3 a): While we did not meet this target, there still was a reduction (3.7% instead of the 5% reduction target), which indicates an improvement. When conducting an analysis of the immediate- (monthly average), short- (12 month rolling average) and medium-term (five-year rolling average), the number of accidents is declining. We will continue to monitor this metric.

Program 3.4: Motor Vehicle Safety

Description: The Motor Vehicle Safety Program, under the authority of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act and the Motor Vehicle Transport ActFootnote cxxx, develops, administers and oversees the policies, regulations and standards necessary for the safety of motor vehicles and commercial vehicle operations in a manner that is harmonized with international and national standards. The Program contributes to reduced road deaths and injuries and provides safety oversight of the motor vehicle industry.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Motor Vehicle Safety Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
22,077,988 22,077,988 27,872,261 24,739,225 (2,661,237)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
109 79 30
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators TargetFootnote 18 Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.4 Motor Vehicle Safety
a) Safe motor vehicles based on improved crash avoidance and crash survivability

Collisions per 10,000 motor vehicles registered

(Improvement = decrease)

2% reduction in the rate for 2015 as compared to average of previous 5 years March 2017 3.9% reduction in 2015 as compared to five-year average (2010–14) 16.1% reduction in 2014 as compared to 5-year average (2009-13) 15.9% reduction in 2013 as compared to five-year average (2008–12)
b) Safe motor vehicles based on improved crash avoidance and crash survivability

Fatalities per 10,000 police-reported collisions occurring on public roads

(Improvement = decrease)

1% reduction in the rate for 2015 as compared to average of previous 5 years March 2017 10.1% reduction in 2015 as compared to five-year average (2010–14) 16.1% reduction in 2014 as compared to 5-year average (2009-13) 0.3% reduction in 2013 as compared to five-year average (2008–12)
c) Safe motor vehicles based on improved crash avoidance and crash survivability.

Serious injuries per 10,000 police-reported collisions occurring on public roads

(Improvement = decrease)

1% reduction in the rate for 2015 as compared to average of previous 5 years March 2017 8.0% reduction in 2015 as compared to five-year average (2010–14) 16.1% reduction in 2014 as compared to 5-year average (2009-13) 2.1% increase in 2013 as compared to five-year average (2008–12)

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Response to Evaluations

Name of the Evaluation: Evaluation of the Motor Vehicle Test Centre

Response: An evaluation of The Motor Vehicle Test Centre (MVTC) made three recommendations. Transport Canada (TC) should:

  1. Develop a strategic plan. Response: Work is currently underway on a strategy/vision for the test centre within the broader context of rapidly evolving technologies and innovation;
  2. Take a more proactive role in the oversight of the Centre. Response: This is underway, including more formal meetings with the contractor and revised work order practices related to capital projects. TC will consider additional improvements when the contract is renewed in 2019; and
  3. Examine ways to improve the cost-effectiveness of the MVTC as the contract for the Centre’s operation was due for retender or renewal for a five year period in 2017. Response: We opted for a two-year renewal term to allow time for:
    • Conducting more complete assessment of the Centre’s future direction and operations; and
    • Incorporating the new requirements into the contract.

This evaluation accelerated our planned improvements to MVTC oversight, resulting in more coherent processes such as, but not limited to, regular and consistent meetings with the contractor and Public Services and Procurement CanadaFootnote cxli. In addition, we have a new staff position to help develop a strategy/vision for an expanded Motor Vehicle Test Centre.

Program 3.5: Transportation of Dangerous Goods

Description: The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Program, under the authority of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992Footnote cxlii, develops, administers and oversees the policies, regulations and standards necessary for the safe transportation of dangerous goods by all modes of transport in Canada in a manner that is harmonized with international standards, and provides expertise in emergency response in the event of release of dangerous goods. This Program also works to prepare for and coordinate the response to safety and security threats and incidents that may impact the national transportation system or the Department with regard to chemical, radiological, biological, nuclear or explosive substances. The Program: fosters safety in the transport of dangerous goods; provides oversight of the transportation industry; enforces international conventions signed by Canada; and responds to emergency situations that affect the safety of Canadians.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Implemented a regulatory strategy and plan to anticipate and respond to the evolving issues faced during the transportation of dangerous goods, by publishing amendments to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods RegulationsFootnote cxliii in:
    • Canada Gazette, Part I, to update and:
    • We expect all of these amendments/updates will be published in Canada Gazette, Part II and adopted into the Regulations during the 2017-18 fiscal year;
    • Canada Gazette, Part II to update and clarify transportation of dangerous goods reporting requirements to:
      • Enable efficient data collection and improve risk analysis related to dangerous goods incidents;
      • Harmonize Canadian regulations and standards with:
        • The U.S. by sharing and comparing incident data to further collaboration during research initiatives; and
        • Our other international partners via the UN and other forums;
      • Promote public safety by collaborating with the U.S. and our other international partners; and
      • Adopt new international prohibition measures for the transportation of lithium batteries on aircraft related to:
        • Belly cargo on passenger aircraft; and
        • New packaging requirements for the transport of lithium batteries on cargo aircraft.
  • All of these amendments/updates became part of the Regulations by the end of the 2016-17 fiscal year;
  • Increased the number of inspections by 31% for high-risk dangerous goods sites. We increased our Inspector Division’s resources and capabilities by creating and implementing of a new data governance structure that is fully integrated into our inspection processes. We can now better:
  • Conducted collaborative research with the U.S. Departments of Transportation and EnergyFootnote cl, including:
    • A crude oil project, which also involved the Sandia National LaboratoryFootnote cli, to:
      • Assess sampling and analysis methods to accurately characterize how crude oils react while being transported; and
      • Investigate the fire properties of different crude oils; and
    • The completion of Phase 2 of the chlorine release study (Jack Rabbit IIFootnote clii) that assessed rapid large-scale releases of pressurized, liquefied Toxic Inhalation Hazard gases from a railcar. We expect the final reports will be completed and published online in 2017-18;
  • Addressed issues the Emergency Response Task ForceFootnote 19 (ERTF) identified, including:
    • Completing the definition of the ERTF’s mandate in March 2017, to strengthen the government’s and first responders’ response capacity to rail incidents involving flammable liquids in Canada; and
    • Establishing a steering committee and associated working groups in December 2016, tasked with developing training curriculum on flammable liquids and delivery for:
      • People handling them in facilities; and
      • First responders;
    • Releasing a new edition of the Emergency Response GuidebookFootnote cliii to help first responders:
      • Quickly identify the specific or generic hazards of the material(s) involved in an incident; and
      • Protect themselves and the general public during the initial response phase of an incident; and
    • Developing and following a Safety and Awareness Strategy that:
      • Includes transportation of dangerous goods Safety Awareness KitsFootnote cliv, which can be distributed to industry; and
      • Provides outreach and awareness information materials to first responders, municipalities and the general public.

Lessons Learned

Working closely with various partners, including other government departments and U.S. counterparts, helps to ensure that the results and outcomes of tests and evaluations will continue to inform our Program’s future regulatory development and emergency response procedures.

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
15,841,719 15,841,719 31,095,107 27,864,018 (12,022,299)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
146 246 (100)
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.5 Transportation of Dangerous Goods
a) Public safety during the transportation of dangerous goods

Number of reportable releases of dangerous goods per trillion dollars of Canadian gross domestic product (five-year average)

(Improvement = decrease)

193.5 March 2017 193.5 217.3 203.1
b) Public safety during the transportation of dangerous goods

Number of reportable releases of dangerous goods, which caused injuries or deaths per trillion dollars of Canadian gross domestic product (five-year average)

(Improvement = decrease)

3.1 March 2017 3.3 4.1 3.7

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Explanation of Variance

For 3.5a) and b): Our Program’s performance results are based on a five year average of data collected for the number of reportable releases of dangerous goods. The Lac Mégantic, Quebec tragedy in 2013 resulted in 47 deaths, influencing the five-year average of fatalities.

Consequently, the final results reported are representative of the total number of incidents over a five year period, and do not explicitly communicate the progress achieved from one yearly reporting cycle to another.

Program 3.6:  Aviation Security

Description:  The Aviation Security Program develops, administers and oversees the policies, regulations and standards to support the secure conduct of aviation activities in a manner harmonized with international standards. The Program is risked-based and fosters security within the aviation transportation system and provides security oversight of the aviation industry while ensuring that Canada complies with international standards.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Aviation Security Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • On October 17 2016, introduced a series of regulatory improvements to the Air Cargo Security Program, including amendments to the Canadian Aviation Security Regulations, 2012Footnote clv.
    These amendments:
    • Introduced new Air Cargo Security Program categories (i.e., “Known Consignors”, “Regulated Agents” and “Certified Agents”); and
    • Put in place requirements on how cargo, once screened and made secure, must be transported and stored as well as how it must be transferred between Program participants;
  • Strengthened aviation security oversight activities, including risk-based decision making, and updated and modernized data collection processes and inspection procedures by:
    • Incorporating risk into our inspection planning, to ensure we prioritize oversight activities by their level of risk; and
    • Launching, following months of development, consultation and testing, a new module for our inspectors so that tasks can be done electronically in real time;
  • As part of our department’s international commitments, renewed the current Air Cargo Security Mutual Recognition Agreement with the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to:
  • Provided aviation security expertise and support in areas such as aviation security technology, when as part of the “Beyond the Border AgreementFootnote clvii” with the United States, we helped complete the roll-out/deployment of TSA-certified Explosives Detection System technology, in partnership with Canada’s eight existing U.S. preclearance airports. The benefit is that the U.S. now recognizes Canada’s passenger baggage screening processes as being equal to their own.

Lessons Learned

Before the regulatory improvements to the Air Cargo Security Program came into force, stakeholders had a 12 month implementation period to adjust their operations. Based on lessons learned and stakeholder feedback, we deem this implementation phase not only helpful, but necessary. We will consider this type of implementation period as a best practice going forward.

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
29,781,105 29,781,105 27,047,609 25,610,408 4,170,697
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
287 249 38
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.6 Aviation Security
Canada is aligned with international aviation security standards

Percentage of aviation security regulations aligned with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards

(Improvement = increase)

100% March 2017 100% 100% 100%

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 3.7: Marine Security

Description: The Marine Security Program, under the authority of the Marine Transportation Security ActFootnote clviii, develops, administers and oversees the policies, regulations and standards necessary for the secure conduct of marine activities in a manner consistent with international standards. The Program promotes security within the marine transportation system, provides oversight of the regulated marine transportation industry and enforces international conventions signed by Canada. The Program coordinates marine security policy and regulatory development across the Government of Canada through its leadership of the interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group and associated activities.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Marine Security Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Carried out security assessment, compliance and enforcement activities including, providing education and awareness activities for and working with our stakeholders, to help them comply with the Marine Transportation Security Act’s requirements, regulations and security measures by:
    • Conducting:
      • 90 security assessments on marine facilities and ports; and
      • 242 mandatory inspections of all regulated entities; and
    • Reviewing:
      • 47 security assessments for vessels; and
      • 198 security plans and 147 security plan amendments for all regulated entities.
    • These activities helped:
    • Our stakeholders comply with the security requirements for the marine mode; and
    • Strengthen the security postureFootnote 20 of the marine industry;
  • Optimized the regulatory inspection program’s overall performance by focussing resources on higher risk areas including:
    • Adjusting the risk-assessment matrix that evaluates a foreign vessel’s risk of non-compliance; and
    • Directing our attention towards inspections of Canadian entities posing a higher risk, especially with cases where there has been previous non-compliance;
  • Drafted a policy framework for the Marine Security Operations CentresFootnote clix (MSOC) to complete the transition from the Centres being a project to an ongoing program. The policy outlines the governance framework for the Transport Canada portion of the MSOC. In addition, discussions continue with other government departments involved in the MSOCs, to develop a sustainable governance model for the program.

With regards to “Advancing, in partnership with the United States Coast Guard, the implementation of the Canada-U.S. Beyond the Border Maritime Commerce ResilienceFootnote clx Initiative in the Pacific, Great Lakes and Atlantic regions”, we remained in close contact with the United States Coast Guard to explore options for potential future collaboration.

2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
12,950,665 12,950,665 12,132,442 11,490,828 1,459,837
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
116 100 16
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.7 Marine Security
Industry has confidence in Canadian marine transportation security

Percentage of industry indicating confidence in the Canadian marine security transportation system

(Improvement = increase)

80% March 2017 80% 80% 80%

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 3.8: Surface and Intermodal Security

Description:  The Surface and Intermodal Security Program, guided by the Railway Safety Act, the International Bridges and Tunnels Act, and the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992, develops, administers and oversees the policies, regulations/voluntary frameworks, standards and guidance material necessary for the secure conduct of surface and intermodal activities. The Program fosters the security of the surface and intermodal transportation system across Canada.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Surface and Intermodal Security Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Initiated a risk-based regulatory development process to strengthen passenger rail security, which includes analyzing various options and holding preliminary consultations with key passenger rail industry stakeholders;
  • Made refinements to the proposed Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Rail Security RegulationsFootnote clxi after incorporating industry stakeholders’ input;
  • Developed and began following a risk-based inspection and oversight plan, which incorporated:
    • Government of Canada and Transport Canada intelligence products; and
    • Industry data (e.g., passenger volumes, the type and amount of goods transported by rail, etc.); and
  • Worked with industry to improve surface intermodal transportation security-related matters through regular engagement processes, including during and/or through:
2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
4,586,439 4,586,439 5,251,516 5,105,315 (518,876)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
40 41 (1)
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance IndicatorsFootnote 21 Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.8 Surface and Intermodal Security
Signatories meet the terms and conditions of the voluntary frameworks

Percentage of signatories that received a non-compliance letter being issued

(Improvement = decrease)

10% March 2017 0% 0% 0%

Program 3.9:  Multimodal Safety and Security

Description:  The Multimodal Safety and Security Program contributes to policies and standards that enhance safety and/or security in more than one transportation mode (e.g., through departmental enforcement services, integrated management systems and intelligence assessments). It also provides a technical training regime for inspectors and technical experts, ensuring the required competencies are acquired and maintained to meet or surpass nationally consistent standards. Lastly, this Program works to prepare for and coordinate the response to emerging safety and security threats and situations that may impact the national transportation system or the Department.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Multimodal Safety and Security Program, along with our lower level Sub-Programs, identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Improved the alignment and application of national risk-based inspection, oversight and enforcement regimes by:
    • Reinforcing explanations regarding how to identify risks (internal and external) as part of the updating of our oversight/inspection plan;
    • Developing a program delivery dashboard that provides an update on the risk environment and focusses on:
      • The overall implementation of the oversight/inspection plan;
      • Year-to-date expenses; and
      • Areas of concern in terms of compliance rates and oversight/inspection findings; and
    • Delivering department-wide enforcement standards for all modes (i.e., air, dangerous goods, etc.);
  • Supported standardized performance measurement of a multimodal strategic framework, for the promotion and oversight of Safety Management Systems (SMS) and Security Management Systems (SeMS) across transportation modes by:
    • Addressing the results of the February 2017 “Internal Audit of the Oversight Practices of Safety and Security Management Systems” by integrating our management team’s commitments in the approved Management Response Plan;
    • Improving performance assessment guidance and requirements for all SMS/SeMS requirements currently found in aviation, rail, and marine regulations;
  • Continued our improvements to Security Clearance production methods and processes, including:
    • Strengthening the integrity and security of transportation infrastructure by following the “Perpetual Vetting Initiative”, a technological risk mitigation tool, to:
      • Reduce insider threats (i.e., individuals linked to organized crime or with criminal associations who pose a significant threat given their knowledge and access) by identifying immediate threats in real time (every 24 hours); and
      • Vet the entire Transport Security Clearance (TSC) worker database against the Canadian Police Information Centre’sFootnote clxiii national database for criminal charges and convictions. If any new criminal charges are laid against a person, we now know about it almost immediately and can act swiftly to assess associated security threats and take appropriate action;
    • Enabling economic opportunities by processing TSC applications in a timely manner. This lowers costs to airports and employers, as they must provide escorts for employees with temporary passes while they await their full security clearances;
    • Contributing to the safety and convenience of travellers through our Security Screening Programs’:
      • Outreach efforts with partner security agencies, which has resulted in identifying more applicants as possible security risks; and
      • Discussions with airport authorities for a pilot project to place limits/restrictions on persons holding a temporary Restricted Area Identity CardFootnote clxiv pass; and
    • Generating operational efficiencies by:
      • Streamlining the existing security screening automated processes; and
      • Continuing our research of technology solutions to modernize the application process and reduce labour intensive activities;
  • As part of our department’s Regulatory Affairs modernization, developed better processes and policies to bring greater coherence, efficiency and effectiveness to the regulatory process, which included establishing:
    • A team approach to developing regulations, such as by pairing our regulatory developers with program design and delivery subject matter experts;
    • A clear responsibility framework (i.e., “who does what”) and quality control management systems (i.e., quality checks, audits and continuous improvement activities); and
    • New/updated departmental regulatory policies on various relevant topics (e.g., incorporation by reference, instrument choice and openness and transparency); and
  • Strengthened and refined oversight of the Canadian transportation system through “Transport Canada’s Directive on Safety and Security Oversight”Footnote 22, by:
    • Developing a common oversight/inspection costing methodology to:
      • Facilitate horizontal analysis (i.e., across multiple programs); and
      • Support cost-recovery initiatives;
    • Improving the national oversight/inspection plan to:
      • Include all oversight/inspection activities in a consistent manner with associated costs; and
      • Provide opportunities for in-year course corrections and year-end impact assessments;
    • Leading the response to multiple air, surface and marine transportation incidents, and to national level emergencies such as the Alberta wildfires in the spring of 2016, where our 24/7Footnote 23 Emergency Preparedness Operations National Situation Centre provided monitoring, reporting and activation support to industry stakeholders and external federal partners; and
    • Conducting exercises, training and emergency planning activities to ensure we have an adequate level of readiness within our department; and
  • Developed additional standardized multimodal and modal training programs for inspectors and expanded their delivery by:
    • Designing, developing and implementing a “Multimodal Oversight and Enforcement Fundamentals” course, including an e-learning component;
    • Conducting e-learning for Transport Canada's “Interim Order by Respecting the Use of Model AircraftFootnote clxv” course for inspectors and police officers across the country. This will help ensure they are aware of the new regulation and specifically informed of the conditions under which model aircraft can or cannot fly;
    • Designing, developing and launching multimodal e-learning courses for:
      • Incident Command Systems;
      • Acts and Regulations;
      • On-site Occupational Health and Safety;
      • Canada’s Legal and Government’s System;
      • Crown Liability and Duty of Loyalty;
      • Orientation to Safety and Security; and
      • Directives on Safety and Security;
    • Conducting training needs analyses on regulatory development, operations officer (situation centre), major case management and multimodal occupational health and safety;
    • Supporting the inspector mobility project (i.e., the use of tablets while travelling) by designing a mobile device reference guide in an e-learning format; and
    • Developing complimentary applications to track and measure an inspector’s mandatory core training, allowing them to carry out their duties.

Lessons Learned

We have learned that while our Security Screening Programs’ outreach efforts with partner security agencies have given us the opportunity to vet and identify more applicants who pose possible security risks, it has also created challenges, including:

  • Coping with the additional pressures these investigations entail; and
  • The added workload placed upon our available/unchanged resource levels.
2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
11,363,639 11,363,639 19,018,520 17,742,722 (6,379,083)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
118 159 (41)
Results Achieved – For Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015-16 Actual Results 2014-15 Actual Results
3.9 Multimodal Safety and Security
Transportation safety and security issues are managed in a consistent manner across all modes

Percentage of successful completion of multimodal activities in support of departmental priorities

(Improvement = increase)

80% March 2017 90% N/A N/A

Information on Transport Canada’s lower-level programs is available on our website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 4: Internal ServicesFootnote 24

Description: Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet the corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the ten distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The ten service categories are: Management and Oversight ServicesFootnote 25; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

In Transport Canada’s 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, Internal Services identified a number of key Planning Highlights. During the 2016-17 fiscal year, our Program recorded the following achievements as we:

  • Strengthened our department’s governance, risk management and control processes in response to recommendations made by an independent Treasury Board Secretariat advisor, as part of the Comprehensive Review exercise;
  • Hired a professional accounting firm to conduct an assessment of our Entity Level ControlsFootnote 26. The assessment concluded that key controls were present, functioning and generally operating effectively;
  • Strengthened our Financial Management monitoring and reporting processes including:
    • A more rigorous planning process;
    • Improved reporting; and
    • A new Resource Management Committee that provides oversight and recommendations for all budgetary and financial issues;
  • Began a phased approach to following the Public Service Commission’s New Direction in StaffingFootnote clxvi. In spring 2017, Transport Canada approved adopting requirements related to:
    • The areas from where we can select candidates;
    • The use of advertised and non-advertised appointments; and
    • What we need to articulate once we’ve made a selection decision to staff a position;
  • Supported our department’s Public Service Employment Survey Action Plan to focus on a stronger culture of respect and civility in the workplace, harassment prevention and improved employee performance management practices by:
    • Launching a:
      • “Respect and Wellness” page on our department’s intranet, providing a number of tools such as:
        • Harassment procedures help for our employees;
        • Scenarios for harassment prevention; and
        • Strategies for handling difficult conversations;
      • “Civility Discussion Guide” to help generate conversations within work teams to raise awareness about civility and respect in the workplace; and
    • Incorporating a commitment on civility for managers and employees into in all of our employees’ performance agreements.
  • Completed and released the Open Government Data Inventory, which has benefitted Canadians by increasing the release of transportation data by publishing 22 datasets on the open.canada.caFootnote clxvii website;
  • Launched the Transforming Mobile Applications investment project as part of Destination 2020, which will enable us to provide all of our department’s 1,400 inspectors with:
    • One-time inspection data entry, thereby eliminating the duplication of administrative work when conducting regulatory inspection activities; and
    • Real-time data management;
  • Continued working towards improving the efficiency and capacity of information management systems to ensure data completeness and consistency by:
    • Working on the multi-year System Architecture and Rationalization (SAAR) project, which aims to reduce the number of applications and increase integration amongst those that remain by introducing a modern, consistent approach to delivering and supporting applications;
    • Integrating the Directive on Open Government’s “open by default” requirements into system planning and analysis so future applications can more easily share and reuse information/data; and
    • Completing an upgrade of the Transport Canada (TC) Records Documents and Information Management System (RDIMS) to accommodate Protected B document storage; and
  • Positioned ourselves to adapt to the Government of Canada’s planning strategy for back-office transformation, including:
    • Email Transformation Initiative: We prepared for the migration of our more than 6,000 accounts to the new email system in 2016-17. However, the migration was delayed by Shared Services Canada and a new migration date is not yet scheduled;
    • My GCHR: We completed a “fit-to-standard” exerciseFootnote 27 and secured funding for the planning phase of the project. In 2016-17, the Office of the Chief Human Resources OfficerFootnote clxviii (OCHRO) and Public Services and Procurement Canada signaled a change in corporate approach to implementing My GCHR across government. As a result, we purposefully delayed implementing My GCHR but are instead undertaking critical upgrades to our current system. Business planning for 2017-18 will depend on the new direction the OCHRO wishes to pursue regarding My GCHR;
    • SAP (Finance): The migration to SAP remains a long range vision of the Office of the Comptroller GeneralFootnote clxix, so planning for a TC SAP migration is unlikely to begin before 2020. As an interim solution, we upgraded our Oracle eBusiness Suite to the most recent version in order to ensure we:
      • Remain technologically current and responsive to departmental needs; and
      • Receive continued support from the vendor; and
    • Migration to Canada.ca: We started to migrate Transport Canada’s web pages to the Canada.ca website in September 2016, and are on track to meet the December 2017 full migration deadline.
2016-17 Budgetary Financial Resources (in dollars) – For Program
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (planned minus actual)
147,193,676 147,193,676 166,387,615 155,470,585 (8,276,909)
2016-17 Human Resources (Full–time Equivalents (FTEs)) – For Program
Planned Actual Difference (planned minus actual)
1,157 1,085 72
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