Transport Canada 2019-2020 Departmental Plan

The original version was signed by
The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

Table of Contents

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Transport, 2019. Ottawa, Canada

Catalogue No. T1-27E-PDF

ISSN 2371-8420

This document is available on the Transport Canada website.

This document is available in alternative formats upon request.

Minister’s Message

I am pleased to present Transport Canada’s Departmental Plan for 2019 20. It provides parliamentarians and Canadians with information on what Transport Canada does and the results we aim to achieve during the upcoming year.

I am committed to delivering on my mandate set out by the Prime Minister while ensuring the prudent and responsible management of resources and Canadian taxpayers’ money. Transport Canada’s Departmental Results Framework guides departmental planning and reporting for each fiscal year and beyond. The departmental mandate continues to be ensuring access to a safe, secure, innovative and integrated transportation system that promotes trade, economic growth and a cleaner environment.

Transportation 2030, our government's long-term vision announced in November 2016, looks to the future, to create a highly integrated transportation system that supports economic growth, job creation, and Canada’s middle class.

The Oceans Protection Plan, the largest-ever investment to protect Canada’s coasts and waterways, is a major element of Transportation 2030. Through the Oceans Protection Plan, we are:

  • building a world-leading marine safety system while preserving ecosystems;
  • forging stronger partnerships with Indigenous Peoples and engaging coastal communities, industry and other stakeholders; and
  • learning more about our oceans.

It is important to highlight how much consultation and collaboration feed into the work we do. We are working with our partners and stakeholders, including scientific experts, Indigenous Peoples, other levels of government, the private sector, and Canadians in communities big and small, all across our country.

The future is bringing us new technology, with changing demographics and evolving markets, and change is coming faster than many of us realize. Transport Canada is at the forefront of these changes, because we know that we must be ready for them. Advances like connected and automated vehicles must be introduced safely. We must have a regulatory environment that ensures the highest level of safety and security while promoting innovation and reducing administrative burden.

To adapt to a changing world, Transport Canada is modernizing how we deliver programs and services to Canadians. This includes implementing a digital strategy, advancing regulatory changes, and using data and evidence to target and assess current and emerging risk in Canada’s transportation sector.

For example, on June 1, 2019, new rules that we put forward are coming into force for remotely piloted aircraft. These rules strike an important balance between practicality and safety – allowing for innovation and new opportunities, but still clearly defining how recreational and non-recreational drone pilots can safely operate within Canadian airspace.

I continue to work with Transport Canada to build on the key commitments set out in my mandate letter from the Prime Minister. We continue our important work on priorities including reinforcing railway safety; investments in roads, bridges, transportation corridors, ports and border gateways; and supporting marine safety, through actions like a moratorium on crude oil tanker traffic on British Columbia’s North Coast and the Navigation Protection Act.

I encourage you to follow our progress toward a modern, leading-edge transportation system that will support Canada’s growth for years to come. Canada will be at the forefront of transportation’s evolution. This is important for our economy, it is important for our environment, and it is important for our safety and security.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

Plans at a glance and operating context

For our 2019-20 Departmental Plan, we have identified six priorities we aim to fulfil. These are in support of the Minister’s mandate letter (priorities 1 through 6 below), Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, such as Transportation 2030, and our Department’s three Core Responsibilities. Each priority is outlined below, along with the actions we plan on undertaking to fulfil each priority.

Priority 1: Improve the performance and reliability of Canada’s transportation system to get products to market and grow our economy

Key Planning Highlights for 2019-20:

  • Expedite federal transportation infrastructure initiatives, including accelerating the National Trade Corridors Fund, as announced in the Fall Economic Statement; the Trade and Transportation Information System, including ongoing development of the Transportation Data and Information Hub; and Supply Chain Visibility projects.
  • Continue work on the Ports Modernization Review with a view to optimizing their current and future role in the transportation system as innovative assets that support inclusive growth and trade.
  • Advance implementation of legislative amendments to improve access, transparency, efficiency and long-term investment in the Canadian freight rail system.
  • Develop a strategy to address the labour shortage in the transportation sector, with an initial focus on increasing representation of women and Indigenous Peoples in the aviation sector.

Priority 2: Provide greater choice, better service, lower costs and enhanced rights for consumers.

Key Planning Highlights for 2019-20:

  • Advance finalization and implementation of the Air Passenger Protection Regulations.
  • Finalize the Cost Recovery regulations and bring into force the new legislative provisions allowing the Minister to consider any applications for Joint Ventures from Canada’s air carriers.
  • Support the World Economic Forum in the development of a passenger Known Traveler Digital Identity prototype.
  • Advance the review and assessment of VIA Rail’s High Frequency Rail Proposal and examine proposals on the future of intercity passenger rail services.
  • Support the Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility in advancing C-81, An Act to Ensure a Barrier-Free Canada, and the Canadian Transportation Agency’s Regulatory Modernization Initiative.

Priority 3: Build world-leading marine corridors that are competitive, safe and environmentally sustainable, and enhance Northern transportation infrastructure, while respecting commitments to Indigenous communities

Key Planning Highlights for 2019-20:

  • Continue to develop and implement measures to protect whales from the negative effects of vessel traffic on Canada’s coasts.
  • Collaborate on Arctic and Northern Policy Framework by Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC) to advance Arctic Transportation Policy Framework (ATPF).
  • Continue to advance the Oceans Protection Plan to enhance marine safety and environmental protection.
    • Continue work to modernize the Pilotage Act further to the recent review of that legislation.
    • Implement the national strategy to address Canada’s abandoned and wrecked vessels, including bringing into force Bill C-64.
    • Complete the accession to the Nairobi Convention.
  • Advance the development of partnerships with Indigenous peoples.
  • Enhance TC’s engagement efforts with provincial counterparts and representatives from the fishing sector to reduce risk and initiate a culture change in the fishing industry.
  • Under the Arctic Transportation Policy Framework, develop strategies that support Transportation Infrastructure in the North, including strategies to advance the project to construct National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) facilities (Hangar and Accommodation Unit) in Iqaluit.
  • Evaluate projects and undertake funding decisions for the northern call for proposals under the National Trade Corridors Fund (NTCF).

Priority 4: Build a safer and more secure transportation system that Canadians trust.

Key Planning Highlights for 2019-20:

  • Develop rules and regulations to reinforce railway safety in the areas of fatigue management, passenger equipment, track safety, and railway employee qualifications and training.
  • Develop a whole of government approach and guiding principles on automated/connected vehicles (AV/CVs).
  • Continue formulating a response to recommendations of the statutory review of the Railway Safety Act.
  • Develop regulations for locomotive voice and video recorders.
  • Commence legislative amendments to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act.
  • Undertake a multi-department review of Marine Security Operations Centres.
  • Increase the availability of marine inspectors in the North.
  • Address the threat of invasive species by continuing work to give effect to the International Maritime Organization’s International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004.
  • Implement amendments to the Motor Vehicle Safety Act.
  • Undertake a review of Aviation Security.

Priority 5: Reduce environmental impacts and embrace new technologies to improve Canadians’ lives.

Key Planning Highlights for 2019-20:

  • Participate in the National Energy Board Reconsideration of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, notably on project-related marine shipping and Crown consultation with Indigenous groups.
  • Continuing to implement new measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from domestic and international transportation, and supporting whole of government priorities under the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change.
  • Undertake rigorous testing and evaluation of emerging, disruptive technologies to support the development of timely safety standards, codes and regulations.
  • Advance activities for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems, including regulations for safe operations, pilot projects, and strategies to increase interdepartmental collaboration.
  • Enable the development and adoption of operational measures and technologies to reduce underwater noise from vessel traffic and its impact on endangered whales.
  • Support opportunities to contribute to the Government of Canada’s national strategy of zero plastic waste through domestic and international initiatives.

Priority 6: Transform the design and delivery of programs and services to Canadians in order to adapt to a changing world.

  • Enhance online service experience and increase the number of services accessible through digital channels.
  • Adopt innovative, user-centric approaches in the design of priority programs and services, leveraging data analytics and emerging technologies.
  • Advance Fee Modernization by implementing the Service Fees Act requirements and planning for digital implementation of fee management to improve existing processes.
  • Continue to modernize oversight and regulatory delivery practices by developing common, risk-informed digital inspection processes, and by providing inspectors with optimized data and tools.
  • Support innovation with new and emerging technologies to understand impacts on the transportation system and influence appropriate policies, regulations and processes.
  • Develop a data strategy that focuses on enhancing transparency and public trust, open and accessible transportation data, evidence-based decision making, targeting of public risk, reporting on results and service delivery.
  • Continue to address barriers towards a responsive, coherent, and agile program and service delivery, as well as barriers to innovation and data-sharing through regulatory and legislative modernization and policy design.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibility 1 – Safe and Secure Transportation System

Description

The programs within this Core Responsibility (CR) are responsible for ensuring a safe and secure transportation system in Canada. This is achieved by enacting, updating and enforcing all laws, regulations, policies and oversight activities (e.g., inspections) related to transportation safety and security.

Planning highlights

  • Building a safer and more secure transportation system that Canadians trust;
  • Strengthening and enhancing the governance and modernization of emergency management across Transport Canada, ensuring alignment within a broader Whole of Government emergency framework;
  • Continuing to provide 24/7 operations and support (Transport Canada Situation Centre) as well as improving monitoring, coordination and response capacity through Emergency Management training and the development of digital tools;
  • Continuing to monitor and analyze threats related to the transportation system, and improving information and intelligence sharing;
  • Completing the Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Rail Security Regulations for publication in Canada Gazette Part II;
  • Advancing the development and implementation of the oversight program for the planned Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Rail Security Regulations;
  • Investing in projects to support safety-related rail improvement, and public education and awareness;
  • Advancing strategies for restoring navigation protections and incorporating modern safeguards, including the addition of navigable waters to the Schedule of the Navigation Protection Act, launching a public registry of works on navigable waters, and pursuing new partnerships with Indigenous groups;
  • Finalizing the Aviation Security Review Report with recommendations and beginning the next phase, which involves identification of a range of short, medium and long-term initiatives;
  • Continuing to work with the World Economic Forum, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and industry partners, on the “Known Traveler Digital Identity” pilot project, with a view to allowing passengers to share information with entities across the air travel continuum, in order to facilitate the traveler experience, while maintaining high security standards. Envisioned activities for the 2019-20 planning cycle include:
    • working to develop and deploy a mobile application and supporting platform to achieve the project vision; and
    • Continuing work on the regulations for cargo-only screening, which is linked to the need for the Explosives Detection Dog Handler Teams (EDDHT) certification program. Work will be focused on further developing protocols and identifying regulatory instruments to address the anticipated increase in cargo volumes and difficult to screen commodities that will be present in the coming years.
  • Advancing our aviation safety regulatory framework by:
    • Continuing to modernize the Canadian Aviation Regulations to support a regulatory framework that responds to emerging priorities; and
    • Building on current momentum to further engage with the international aviation community and continuing to strengthen Canada’s influence and aviation regulatory expertise on the international stage.
  • Advancing activities for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS), including regulations for safe operations, pilot projects and interdepartmental collaboration;
  • Enabling projects with Canada’s RPAS industry to validate RPAS technologies, and spur innovation and collaboration to collect necessary safety data to inform the next phase of regulatory development for RPAS;
  • Strengthening our aviation safety certification team’s capacity to meet industry service demands through the “Aircraft Certification Enhanced Activity initiative”, whose improvements will help support the economic competitiveness of Canada's aerospace sector, while ensuring the highest levels of safety are maintained; and
  • Continuing to modernize Marine Safety and Security’s regulatory and oversight frameworks by:
    • Amending the Navigation Safety Regulations to expand the Automatic Identification System (AIS) carriage requirements to a wider category of passenger vessels (smaller vessels) and implementing these rigorous requirements which will support the protection and recovery of the Southern Resident Killer Whales and other endangered species and further enhance navigation safety in terms of search and rescue efforts and collision avoidance;
    • Strengthening the navigation safety and radio communication network through the expansion and consolidation of existing regulations, which will reduce risks and facilitate search and rescue operations, further align with international requirements, and respond to recommendations regarding the carriage of navigation safety equipment on board vessels;
    • Increasing opportunities for collaboration with domestic and international maritime security partners for information exchange, tabletop exercises, and coordinated responses to maritime security threats including emerging issues in the Arctic;
    • Amending the Marine Personnel Regulations by having properly certified and trained seafarers and by protecting the health and well-being of individuals, as well as ensuring that regulations are consistent with standard practices in the marine industry;
    • Advancing the implementation of the Vessel Construction and Equipment Regulations, which will ensure that Canadian requirements for the construction and equipment of new vessels are consistent with modern standards and best industry practices;
    • Amending the Safety Management Regulations to require additional companies and vessels to develop and implement safety management systems, thereby reducing the number of shipping fatalities and injuries and to better adapt to the evolving technologies in the marine industry;
    • Amending the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations to improve overall safety in the marine industry;
    • Increasing security for vessels and Canadian marine facilities and ports, and ensuring that Canada meets its international marine security obligations through harmonized regulatory requirements; and
    • Carrying out 100% of foreign tanker inspections in addition to risk-based inspections under the Paris and Tokyo Memorandum of Understanding.
  • Continuing to implement the Railway Safety Act Review Panel Report’s recommendations;
  • Bringing regulations related to locomotive voice and video recorders; and
  • Advancing work on fatigue management in the rail industry.
  • Continuing to implement a regulatory plan to anticipate and respond to evolving issues faced when transporting dangerous goods that will:
    • Allow for regulatory consultations regarding more stringent requirements for those who transport and handle dangerous goods;
    • Support harmonization with international codes; and
    • Improve the emergency response scheme.
  • Conducting collaborative research with domestic/international partners including the United Nations and the United States Department of Transportation (DOT), which includes:
    • Assessing the hazard, flammability and behavior properties of crude oil;
    • Assessing lithium battery packaging for transportation as cargo by air;
    • Evaluating means of containment under non-ideal conditions;
    • Monitoring the emergence of liquefied natural gas as an alternative fuel; and
    • Selecting annually new scientific research projects based on emerging trends and program needs.
  • Developing and maintaining safety standards for means of containment such as tank cars, highway tanks, intermediate bulk containers and cylinders which are incorporated by reference in the TDG Regulations;
  • Modernizing the Transportation of Dangerous Goods oversight regime for transporting dangerous goods by designing:
    • Strategies for key oversight activities, such as compliance inspections, supply chain analysis; and
    • A thorough monitoring system that strengthens transportation of dangerous goods compliance rates.
  • Increasing the consistency, quality, efficiency and effectiveness of our transportation of dangerous goods enforcement activities by:
    • Developing database systems and methodologies to effectively measure compliance rates;
    • Examining ways to improve the inspection process for low-risk regulated entities so that we can dedicate more oversight resources to higher risk areas;
    • Providing training, tools and resources to support the inspectorate; and
    • Maintaining and strengthening the outreach program and supporting awareness material for the industry, communities/municipalities, first responders and the general public.
  • Collaborating with the US, Argentina and Mexico in the development of the 2020 version of the Emergency Response Guidebook; and
  • Working with first responders, municipalities, Indigenous groups, industry and training schools to advance the development of a Canadian flammable liquid curriculum, which will help first responders protect the public’s safety following an incident involving flammable liquids transported by rail.
  • Strengthening multimodal oversight policies and processes to maintain the timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency and consistency of training, oversight, enforcement and regulatory development approaches across all transportation modes;
  • Continuing the implementation of legislative amendments to the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (MVSA) by iteratively enhancing enforcement authorities to align with legislative amendments in Bill S-2 and evaluating stakeholder applications for exemptions from safety standards, and informing regulatory amendments to the MVSA pertaining to information gathering, administrative monetary penalties, and exemptions;
  • Identifying and assessing potential measures to strengthen school bus safety, both inside and outside the bus, with a particular emphasis on seatbelts, along with strengthening commercial vehicle safety through the development of a standard for entry-level training for commercial drivers in Canada. This will also include advancing a harmonized national technical standard for electronic logging devices which are used to record driving hours on commercial vehicles;
  • Addressing impaired and distracted driving though a range of initiatives, such as public awareness messaging and updates to the criminal code; and
  • Continuing the development of modernized, flexible and innovative safety policies for new and emerging technologies. This will include ongoing research, as well as developing and updating key documents, such as Canada’s Safety Framework for Automated/Connected Vehicles (AV/CVs), Safety Assessment for Automated Driving Systems, Canada-Wide Cyber Security Guidance for AV/CVs, and collisions investigation protocols for automated vehicles.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our programs within Core Responsibility 1, “A Safe and Secure Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake within the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • Considering GBA+ analysis in delivery of Safety and Security Group regulatory support services and promoting gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness when working with the international community to develop aviation security rules and laws;
  • Strengthening the regulatory framework of programs, including the safe integration of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems into Canadian airspace, by assessing the impact that proposed regulations could have on Canadians from identifiable groups including by gender, age, geographic location, and Indigenous peoples;
  • Continuing to utilize gender-neutral terms in legislation and programming, such as Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems, and promoting gender-neutral terminology internationally (such as revising the term “Unmanned” Aerial Vehicles);
  • Providing leadership at international fora such as the International Maritime Organization to encourage the marine industry to move from a male-dominated workforce to increasing the representation of women; and
  • Implementing initiatives, such as the Marine Training Program under Oceans Protection Plan, in order to reduce barriers to marine training for underrepresented groups in the marine labour force, such as women and Indigenous peoples.

Experimentation

  • Continuing the Pre-load Air Cargo Targeting (PACT) pilot project which tests the capability of using Pre-loading Advance Cargo Information (PLACI) to identify high risk air cargo shipments. Using artificial intelligence, PACT assesses risk by analyzing data elements in shipment information at the earliest point possible to identify high-risk cargo and work with the air carrier to mitigate the risk prior to loading overseas;
  • Working with the World Economic Forum, the Kingdom of the Netherlands and private industry, on the “Known Traveller Digital Identity” pilot project, which aims to improve security and the seamless flow of people across borders using biometrics, cryptography and distributed ledger technology. The goal of this experimentation project is to provide travellers with the ability to voluntarily share their information with authorities in advance of travel for expedited or more seamless service, while strengthening trust between public authorities around the globe to improve risk and threat detection;
  • Advance novel approaches to test innovative technologies and processes that will inform the development of regulations or non-regulatory measures to ensure safety and security such as:
    • Commercial Testing of remotely-piloted aircraft systems RPAS beyond the Visual Line-of-Sight through pilot projects;
    • Cooperative Truck Platooning Pilot Project;
    • Smart City Test bed;
    • Test Pilot for Increased Delegation of Authority to Manufacturers for Issuing Flight Permits; and
    • Regulatory Sandbox for Dangerous Goods Electronic Shipping Documents.

Risk

As the department implements activities to ensure a safe and secure transportation system for Canadians, we foresee the risk that Canada’s transportation legislative, regulatory and oversight regimes may not address emerging safety and security issues (including cyber security), industry practices nor increasing demands.

Our risk response strategies to deal with these potential risks include the modernization of our legislative framework, enhancing our analytical capabilities and the use of data to strengthen risk management, and continuing the review of intelligence reports and procedures to foster a robust and repeatable process for the dissemination of information related to security incidents.

We will continue monitoring the risks against Canada’s transportation legislative, regulatory, and oversight regimes in 2019 and 2020 to ensure that Canada maintains a safe and secure transportation system.

Planned Results - Result 1: A Safe Transportation System

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
1a) A safe transportation system Ten-year aircraft accident rate (average per year, per 100,000 aircraft movements) Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year 2020-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
1b) A safe transportation system Ten-year aircraft fatality rate (average per year, per 100,000 aircraft movements) Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year 2020-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
1c) A safe transportation system Ten-year marine accident rate (average per year, per 1,000 commercial vessels) Target to be established using 2018-19 data as the baseline year N/A- New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
1d) A safe transportation system Ten-year marine fatality rate (average per year, per 1,000 commercial vessels) Target to be established using 2017-18 data as the baseline year N/A- New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
1e) A safe transportation system Ten-year rail accident rate (average per year, per million-train miles) 5% reduction in the rate as compared to the average of previous five years 2019-12-31 N/A N/A 3.7% reduction
1f) A safe transportation system Ten-year rail fatality rate (average per year, per million-train miles) 5% reduction in the rate as compared to the average of previous five years 2019-12-31 N/A N/A 12.5% reduction
1g) A safe transportation system Rate of reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years Target has been set using 2017-18 baseline data and will continue to be tracked through the end of fiscal year 2021-2022. 2.9% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14) 6.8% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011-15) 5.2% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012-16)
1h) A safe transportation system Rate of serious injuries in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years Target has been set using 2017-18 baseline data and will continue to be tracked through the end of fiscal year 2021-2022. 7.0% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14) 6.8% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011-15) 13.4% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012-16)
1i) A safe transportation system Rate of fatalities in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years Target has been set using 2017-18 baseline data and will continue to be tracked through the end of fiscal year 2021-2022. 12.7% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14) 9.5% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011-15) 10.9% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012-16)
1j) A safe transportation system Rate of reportable releases of dangerous goods per year (the number of reportable releases divided by the nominal Canadian Gross Domestic Product for the year) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous year 2020-03-31 154.3 147.2 193.6

Planned Results - Result 2: A Secure Transportation System

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
2a) A secure transportation system Rate of compliance of air sector operators with Transport Canada’s security regulations 90% 2020-03-31 89.4% 88.94% 90.08%
2b) A secure transportation system Rate of compliance of marine sector operators with Transport Canada’s security regulations 80% 2020-03-31 85% 77% 84%

Planned Results - Result 3: A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
3a) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada aviation security regulations that align with international transportation standards 90% 2020-03-31 100% 100% 100%
3b) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada marine safety and security regulations that align with international transportation standards Target to be established using 2018-19 data as the baseline year since this is a new indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
3c) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada transportation of dangerous goods by rail security regulations that align with international transportation standards Footnote ** Target currently being established for 2019-20 Footnote ** N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator
3d) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of aviation client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards 83% 2020-03-31 88% 89% 79%
3e) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of marine client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards 80% 2020-03-31 N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator
3f) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of transportation of dangerous goods client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards Target currently being established for 2019-20 Footnote ** To be determined once the target is established N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator
3g) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of new Canadian Rail Safety operating and equipment safety rules aligned with the US Rail Safety operating and equipment rules Rail Safety has established the alignment target at 80%.

As this is a new indicator based on new rules with a baseline starting on March 31, 2019, the target date to achieve has been set at March 31, 2020
2020-03-31 N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator
3h) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada safety regulations aligned with international transportation standards (air) 100% (subject to change based on initial result and based on a decision by Transport Canada (TC) “that is acceptable to ICAO to file a difference to the requirements in lieu of addressing the non-compliance.” 2020-03-31 N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator
3i) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada safety regulations aligned with international transportation standards (marine) To be established in 2019-2020 since this is a new indicator 2020-03-31 N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
$374,213,870 $374,213,870 $360,686,469 $355,806,241

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
Planned full-time equivalents
3,134 3,139 3,126

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Endnote i

Core Responsibility 2: Green and Innovative Transportation System

Description

The programs within this Core Responsibility are responsible for advancing the Government of Canada’s environmental and innovation agendas within the transportation sector by:

  • Aiming to reduce harmful air emissions;
  • Protecting Canada’s ocean and marine environments by reducing the environmental impacts of marine shipping; and
  • Promoting and encouraging innovation within the transportation sector.

Planning highlights

To support this Core Responsibility, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we plan on:

  • Supporting the Government’s reconciliation agenda through consultation and engagement and by building relationships with Indigenous peoples;
  • Building world-leading marine corridors that are competitive, safe and environmentally sustainable, and enhancing Northern transportation infrastructure;
  • Reducing environmental impacts and embracing new technologies, including Zero-emissions vehicles, that improve Canadians’ lives; including:
    • Continuing to work through international fora to develop approaches to reduce environmental impacts from international transportation.
  • Continuing work to modernize the legislative framework for pilotage to support the delivery of safe and efficient pilotage services into the future;
  • Advancing initiatives under the Oceans Protections Plan (OPP) to improve marine safety, responsible shipping, and strengthen the environmental stewardship of Canada’s coasts, including:
    • Preserving and restoring marine ecosystems by using new tools and research and taking measures to address abandoned, hazardous and wrecked vessels. These actions will help restore marine habitats and ecosystems in key strategic areas. Under the Oceans Protection Plan, the government aims to address at least 275 abandoned and wrecked vessels by 2022.
  • Supporting domestic and international efforts to prevent and reduce marine plastic litter from ship based activities;
  • Advancing the development of new knowledge and tools, including climate risk assessment processes and adaptive technologies and practices, that position the transportation sector to better adapt to climate change and build resiliency into its infrastructure and operations;
  • Through the Build in Canada Innovation Program (BCIP), the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) has initiated a two-year project to develop new technology for observing and analyzing pollution;
  • Expanding the capacity of the NASP to help prevent and deter ship-source pollution and support the response during oil spills; and
  • Continuing to collaborate with Canadian industry and international partners to work towards:
    • Enacting fair, practicable and environmentally protective ballast water regulations;
    • Implementing the Ballast Water Management Convention in Canada; and
    • Amending the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations to further align Canada with the Ballast Water Management Convention.
  • Promoting and encouraging innovation in the transportation sector with the introduction of the Automated/Connected Vehicle (AV/CV) Gateway (the Gateway), which provides an innovative opportunity to improve consultation and engagement on automated/connected vehicles with government (federal, provincial, territorial and municipal), industry, academia, non-profit organizations and other key stakeholders through the use of digital tools that facilitate ongoing collaboration in a secure environment; and
  • Developing and advancing non-regulatory and policy guidance to promote the safe testing and deployment of AV/CV and development of truck platooning.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Our programs within Core Responsibility 2, “Green and Innovative Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake within the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • Under the Oceans Protection Plan we will continue to address the underrepresentation of women and Indigenous persons in the marine sector via new training and learning opportunities.

Experimentation

  • Transport Canada will be expanding on its 2018 Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) – or drone – trial to detect North Atlantic Right Whales. The 2019 trial will focus on higher resolution image capture and continued development of artificial intelligence to increase its accuracy and reduce the manual analysis. Ultimately, Transport Canada is looking to integrate RPAS into its whale monitoring activities as part of vessel speed reduction measures to protect endangered right whales in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
  • Transport Canada will also provide $1.3 million in grant funding to support the Government of Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan, by designing challenges to Canadian industry, academia and individuals to develop proposals that lead to innovative solutions, specifically for:
    • developing economically viable and environmentally sustainable methods for recycling glass fiber-reinforced plastic used in vessel hulls to avert disposing vessels in landfills; and
    • developing affordable after-market technology solutions for commercial vehicles to aid in the detection of vulnerable road users (i.e. cyclists, pedestrians) and alert the driver of potential collisions.

Risk

Transport Canada is constantly evaluating the risks associated with movement towards a Green and Innovative Transportation System. For 2019-20, we have identified the risk that federal transportation programs and regulations may not effectively contribute to reducing the environmental impacts of transportation related activities.

To reduce the risk from having adverse effects on fragile ecosystems and not supporting a green transportation system, Transport Canada is committed to supporting the Pan-Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change and continuing to implement the Oceans Protection Plan.

To improve the climate resilience of Canada’s transportation system, the department is investing in projects to assess climate risks for federally-owned transportation assets and supporting innovative adaptation technologies and capacity-building efforts to increase transportation resilience in the North. It is also developing a new departmental climate change adaptation plan and will advance efforts to further integrate climate considerations into departmental decision-making.

We will also conduct research and regulatory development to ensure that motor vehicle safety standards allow for the use of clean technologies and will continue to work with Indigenous and Northern communities in order to address the unique challenges of northern transportation corridors.

Planned Results - Result 4: Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced.

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
4a) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for Canadian commercial air carriers Average annual improvements in aviation fuel efficiency of at least 1.5% per year until 2020 from a 2008 baseline 2020-12-31 1.52% improvement (2015 calendar year) 1.73% improvement (2016 calendar year) 1.87% improvement (2017 calendar year)
4b) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for domestic marine transportation To be established by March 31, 2023, in line with the development of new IMO regulatory requirements (2021-22) and long-term strategy to reduce GHG emissions (2023). 2023-03-31 37% reduction in grams CO2e per tonne-kilometre from 2010 (2015 calendar year) 41% reduction in grams CO2e per tonne kilometre from 2010 (2016 calendar year) Data not available
4c) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced Greenhouse gas emissions intensity for freight rail transportation A new Memorandum of Understanding with the Railway Association of Canada is currently being negotiated To be determined 14% reduction in kg CO2e per 1000 revenue tonne kilometres from 2010 - 2015 17% reduction in kg CO2e per 1000 revenue tonne kilometres from 2010 - 2016 Data not available

Planned Results - Result 5: Canada’s oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
5a) Canada’s oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts Rate of spills into Canada’s oceans and marine environment (per 1,000 commercial vessels) Target will be set once the 2018-19 results are available Date to achieve target will be set once the 2018-19 results are available N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator

Planned Results - Result 6: A transportation system that supports innovation

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
6a) A transportation system that supports innovation Number of new aeronautical products certified Target will be set once the 2018-19 results are available 2020-12-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
6b) A transportation system that supports innovation The number of motor vehicle features introduced in Canada through the use of Transport Canada’s regulatory tools that facilitate innovative technologies Target will be set once the 2018-19 results are available N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
$252,398,761 $252,398,761 $201,088,259 $165,212,755

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
Planned full-time equivalents
606 561 544

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Endnote ii

Core Responsibility 3: An Efficient Transportation System

Description

The programs within this Core Responsibility are responsible for:

  • Supporting efficient market access to products through investments in Canada’s trade corridors;
  • Adopting rules to ensure Canadian air travellers have sufficient choice and increasing levels of service; and
  • Managing transportation assets to ensure value for Canadians.

Planning highlights

To support this Core Responsibility, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we plan on:

  • Providing greater choice, better service, lower costs and enhanced rights for consumers; and,
  • Improving the performance and reliability of Canada’s transportation system to get products to market and grow our economy.
  • Investing in trade corridors that will allow Canadians to compete in key global markets.
  • Working with Canadians to divest ports to new owners who are better placed to manage and operate these ports.
  • Continuing to pursue a long-term approach for providing ferry services in Eastern Canada.
  • Ensuring Transport Canada’s airports and ports remain available for use through health and safety related capital investments, including five urgent projects funded by Budget 2018 at four regional and remote airports.
  • Introducing the final regulations governing joint ventures for airlines, which will result in a more streamlined and predictable approach to the consideration of joint venture applications.
  • Finalizing the regulations to implement a standardized passenger protection regime for air travellers, which will ensure clearer, more consistent passenger rights by establishing minimum requirements, standards of treatment, and in some situations, minimum levels of compensation that all air carriers travelling to, within and from Canada must provide.
  • Implementing a predictable path to assist Airport Authorities that apply for administrative designation and/or new or additional screening services on a cost recovery basis with CATSA under the Transportation Modernization Act.
  • Continuing to work with stakeholders to identify challenges and solutions for intercity bus transportation.
  • Continuing to assess VIA Rail’s High Frequency Rail (HFR) proposal. The due diligence work includes several research pieces, including reviewing the revenue and ridership forecasts and HFR’s business case. The due diligence work undertaken in 2018 and 2019 will provide evidence to advise the Government on options for advancing HFR.
  • Continuing implementation of the Trade and Transportation Information System (TTIS) to better inform decision making and improve the coordination and planning of capacity and public/private transportation infrastructure investments, namely:
    • The Canadian Centre on Transportation Data;
    • The Trade Data and Information Hub
    • Supply Chain Visibility projects
  • Implementing the Transportation Modernization Act public reporting requirements through the establishment and management of effective data governance and capacity.
  • Implementing funding decisions for the northern call for proposals as well as the continuous call for proposals for trade diversification projects under the NTCF.
  • Addressing labour shortages in aviation by working with industry and stakeholders to improve outreach to women and Indigenous Peoples, collecting data and conducting additional research on the barriers they face, and supporting training institutions and individuals in order to support job creation, and ensure we have a fully capable and diverse aviation workforce.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

The programs within this Core Responsibility have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues which the department is currently working on, has recently completed or plans to undertake within the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

When improving the economic policy framework to better serve air travellers, TC will continue to take into consideration any new opportunities or differential impacts offered by the proposed way forward on diverse groups of male and female travellers. One of these opportunities involves seeking ways to lower costs to users, which is a part of the proposal through increased accountability and transparency measures, as well as a modification to the airport authority rent formula. The propensity to travel is roughly equivalent between men and women but tips more toward middle and upper income individuals. Therefore, lowering costs and enhancing the traveller experience would benefit those individuals more so, but would also help to make air travel generally more financially accessible.

Typical spending is also slightly correlated with income, but to a lesser degree since air travel has limited price flexibility (i.e. prices are relatively fixed, with those with more income likely spending more on higher fare classes, or more frequent travel). This further supports the concept that air travel is generally more expensive in Canada: despite the income bracket one is in, if you are going to fly, it is going to be expensive. Therefore, the benefits accrued from lowering costs would be spread to the traveller at large and make air travel more accessible.

Both the Trade and Transportation Information System and the Bill C-49 public reporting requirements are not expected to have impacts that marginalize or negatively affect Canadians based on gender or relative vulnerability. Improving evidence gathering is expected to help all those who depend on the transportation system, regardless of whether they belong to a particular class or group of the Canadian population. Further, Transportation and Economic Analysis (TEA) is currently developing a TEA Data Strategy which is expected to address data gaps related to gender disaggregated data which will be posted on the Canadian Centre on Transportation Data, whenever possible.

The National Trade Corridors Program is not expected to have impacts that marginalize or negatively affect Canadians based on gender or relative vulnerability. Increasing the fluidity and resiliency of the Canadian transportation system and improving evidence gathering to support that system is expected to help all those who depend on it, regardless of whether they belong to a particular class or group of the Canadian population. As part of the public reporting, data collection and evidence gathering we undertake for continuous monitoring and improvement purposes of the National Trade Corridors Program, we will review the collected data to determine whether there is any data pointing to barriers or opportunities associated with GBA+ concerns (e.g., income, age, geographic location such as northern communities). To date, no GBA+ concerns have been identified for the program, so we do not expect the data to show negative impacts in that area.

Once the Ports Modernization Review is complete and potential options or measures are being examined, we will bring the GBA+ view into the analysis and promote gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness;

Risk

In support of our commitment to innovation, we are continuing with our Transportation 2030 agenda, a major initiative to improve the transportation system’s performance to get products to market in order to grow the Canadian economy. We are also working to ensure that allocated funding is going towards innovative infrastructure projects that remove efficiency and infrastructure impediments along strategic transportation corridors.

These efforts will help to mitigate the risk that federal transportation policies, programs and infrastructure investments may not effectively support an efficient, innovative and resilient system for goods and people and the adoption of new technologies. Our continued efforts to modernize the Canadian transportation system will help to reduce the risk that Canadians may experience challenges in getting products, services and people to key markets at an affordable cost.

Reducing these risks helps to support the government and department’s priorities related to improving the performance and reliability of Canada’s transportation network; providing greater choice, better service and lower costs while enhancing consumer rights, and building high quality and sustainable marine corridors in Canada’s North and Coastal communities.

Planned Results - Result 7: Transportation corridors get products reliably to market

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
7a) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end transit time of containerized freight arriving from ports in Asia Average 25 days of end-to-end transit time 2020-03-31 25.2 Days (2015) 23.8 Days (2016) Result unavailable
7b) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end transit time of a select grouping of commodities, such as grains, departing from Canada to Asia Average 38.5 days of end-to-end transit time 2020-03-31 38.0 Days (2015) 38.4 Days (2016) Result unavailable
7c) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end, rail transit time of containers along the trade corridor from Canadian west coast ports to Chicago, including border crossing time 3-year average annual end-to-end transit time to Chicago via Canadian West Coast Ports 2020-03-31 New Indicator New Indicator New Indicator
7d) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end, Canada-side, truck transit time of general freight along the Toronto to United States trade corridor, including border crossing time 3-year average annual end-to-end transit time from Toronto to Sarnia/Windsor plus the border crossing time for all captured transits from Toronto to The United States via Sarnia/Windsor 2020-03-31 New Indicator New Indicator New Indicator

Planned Results - Result 8: Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
8a) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger air service routes within Canada (domestic routes) 0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2019-12-31 785 740 Result not available
8b) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger air service routes between Canada and the United States (transborder routes) 0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2019-12-31 460 395 Result not available
8c) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger air service routes between Canada and other countries (international routes) 1% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2019-12-31 427 423 Result not available
8d) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger flights within Canada (annual grand total, domestic flight segments) 1% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2019-12-31 845,916 851,927 Result not available
8e) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger flights between Canada and the United States (annual grand total, transborder flight segments) 0.2% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2019-12-31 386,119 387,549 Result not available
8f) Canadian air travellers benefit from choice and increased service Number of scheduled passenger flights between Canada and other countries (annual grand total, international flight segments) 1% increase in the 10-year average comparisons: 2009-2018 versus 2008-2017 2019-12-31 151,240 162,389 Result not available

Planned Results - Result 9: Transport Canada manages its assets effectively.

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results
9a) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed airports 100%

(certain types of events are excluded from the calculation)
2020-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
9b) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed ports 100%

(certain types of events are excluded from the calculation)
2020-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
9c) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed ferries 100%

(certain types of events are excluded from the calculation)
2020-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
$879,349,998 $879,349,998 $799,291,644 $726,959,023

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
Planned full-time equivalents
463 435 430

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Endnote iii

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
$194,374,706 $194,374,706 $194,760,047 $181,922,439

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
Planned full-time equivalents
1,188 1,180 1,160

Planning highlights

To support all of our core responsibilities, the Minister’s mandate letter, as well as Transport Canada and government-wide priorities, we plan on:

  • Advancing TC’s five-year plan to reform key outdated legislation to allow more modern oversight and enforcement, and alignment with international best practices;
  • Modernizing TC services delivery framework for Canadians;
  • Establishing a Centre of Excellence on Strategic Investments to provide expertise and leadership on the commercial components (financial analysis and terms, risk allocation, corporate structure, and transaction execution) of large-scale transportation infrastructure investment priorities;
  • Continuing Fee Modernization by advancing regulatory changes, implementing Service Fees Act requirements, and planning for digital implementation of new fees through improvements in processes and new tools for the long term;
  • In 2019-2020, Audit will continue to provide ongoing oversight of key initiatives such as the Oceans Protection Plan, Transport Canada Transformation, and new this year, digitalization, data governance and TC’s Organizational Culture;
  • Evaluation and Advisory Services will assess, in collaboration with Internal Audit, the performance measurement structures of Marine Safety and Security and Rail Safety Programs, conduct an evaluation of the Rail Safety Improvement Program, and begin evaluations of key TC initiatives such as TC’s Savings and Reallocations as a Result of the Comprehensive Review, the Fee Modernization, and the Trade and Transportation Corridor Initiative;
  • The Communications Group will support the key priorities of the Minister and the department’s programs and initiatives using various communications platforms to effectively inform and engage Canadians.
  • Communications will be “digital first” and will support the department in informing and engaging audiences in a transparent manner to help Transport Canada serve its stakeholders and Canadian citizens;

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

As required under the Government of Canada’s Policy on Communications and Federal Identity, the Communications Group will communicate information in multiple formats to accommodate the diverse needs of Canadians and ensure it is equally accessible to all audiences, including Indigenous, ethno cultural and official language minority communities. To ensure we meet the information needs of all Canadians, we will:

  • Apply the policies and regulations of the Official Languages Act and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms;
  • Ensure that communications materials depict the diverse nature of Canadians in a fair, representative and inclusive manner, including a balance of gender and ethnicity;
  • Adhere to the Standard on Web Accessibility and provide published information on request that is equal for a diverse audience and those with disabilities.

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph - Text version

2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22
Statutory 254,383,748 218,684,146 226,389,615 210,070,454 211,476,342 209,302,351
Voted 936,775,036 987,036,619 1,112,024,696 1,490,266,881 1,344,350,077 1,220,598,107
Total 1,191,158,784 1,205,720,765 1,338,414,311 1,700,337,335 1,555,826,419 1,429,900,458

Spending Analysis

As illustrated in the departmental spending trend graph, Transport Canada’s expenditures increased from fiscal year 2016-17 to 2017-18. The increase is mainly due to the renewals of the collective agreements, and funding for new initiatives such as the Oceans Protection Plan and the Trade and Transportation Corridor Initiative. The increase is offset by a decrease in the Gateways and Border Crossings Fund.

Expenditures continue to increase in 2018-19 mainly related to new initiatives from Budget 2018 such as Strengthening Airports Serving Remote Communities, Protecting Marine Life and Transitioning to new impact assessment and regulatory processes, as well as increases in existing funding for the Oceans Protection Plan, and the Trade and Transportation Corridors Initiative.

Planned spending continues to increase in 2019-20 as a result of increased funding for various initiatives such as the:

  • National Trade Corridors Fund;
  • Ports Asset Transfer Program;
  • Oceans Protection Plan; and
  • Gateways and Border Crossings Fund.

Spending Plans for 2020-21 and 2021-22

Spending plans decline after 2019-20 mostly due to sunsetting funding for initiatives such as the:

  • Ports Asset Transfer Program;
  • Gateways and Border Crossings Fund;
  • Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan; and
  • Ferry Services Contribution Program.

A decrease in funding is also expected for various initiatives such as the Oceans Protection Plan.

Capital expenditures are also expected to decrease as a result of sunsetting infrastructure funding. These decreases are partially offset by an increase in planned spending for the National Trade Corridors Fund (peaking in 2020-21).

Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016–17
Expenditures
2017–18
Expenditures
2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
An Efficient Transportation System 588,975,050 455,318,523          
Efficient Transportation System     501,878,152 879,349,998 879,349,998 799,291,644 726,959,023
A Clean Transportation System 81,070,570 113,335,926          
Green and innovative Transportation System     198,815,680 252,398,761 252,398,761 201,088,259 165,212,755
A Safe and Secure Transportation System 365,642,579 444,241,305          
Safe and Secure Transportation System     437,297,922 374,213,870 374,213,870 360,686,469 355,806,241
Subtotal 1,035,688,199 1,012,895,754 1,137,991,754 1,505,962,629 1,505,962,629 1,361,066,372 1,247,978,019
Internal Services 155,470,585 192,825,011 200,422,557 194,374,706 194,374,706 194,760,047 181,922,439
Total 1,191,158,784 1,205,720,765 1,338,414,311 1,700,337,335 1,700,337,335 1,555,826,419 1,429,900,458

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)

Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016–17
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Forecast full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020-21
Planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
Planned full time equivalents
An Efficient Transportation System 394 426        
Efficient Transportation System     491 463 435 430
A Clean Transportation System 248 325        
Green and innovative Transportation System     583 606 561 544
A Safe and Secure Transportation System 3,088 3,242        
Safe and Secure Transportation System     3,456 3,134 3,139 3,126
Subtotal 3,730 3,993 4,530 4,203 4,135 4,100
Internal Services 1,085 1,221 1,431 1,188 1,180 1,160
Total 4,815 5,214 5,961 5,391 5,315 5,260

As illustrated in the above table, FTEs increased from 2016-17 to 2018-19. This increase is mostly due to the Oceans Protection Plan and the Trade and Transportation Corridor Initiative.

Estimates by vote

Information on the Transport Canada’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2019–20 Main Estimates.Endnote iv

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Transport Canada’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management. The forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis; as a result, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Transport Canada’s website.

Future Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2020 (in dollars)

Financial information 2018–19
Forecast results
2019–20
Planned results
Difference (2019–20 Planned results minus 2018–19 Forecast results)
Total expenses 1,484,721 1,861,380 376,659
Total revenues 77,303 77,952 649
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,407,418 1,783,428 376,010

Note: Due to rounding, the figures may not agree with the totals or details provided elsewhere. These figures are prepared on an accrual basis and therefore differ from the planned spending in other sections of this Departmental Plan.

Additional information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport

Institutional Head: Michael Keenan, Deputy Minister

Ministerial Portfolio: Transport Canada

The Transport Portfolio includes:

Grouping these organizations into one portfolio allows for integrated decision making on transportation issues.

Enabling Instrument: Department of Transport Act (R.S., 1985, c. T-18)

Transport Canada administers over 50 laws related to transportation and shares the administration of many others. Justice Canada is the federal department responsible for maintaining the Consolidated Statutes of Canada and provides access to the full text of federal acts and regulations.

Year of incorporation / Commencement: 1936

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on the Transport Canada Website.

Reporting framework

The Transport Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below.

Concordance table

2019-20 Core Responsibilities and Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: A Safe and Secure Transportation System
Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework Aviation Safety Oversight
Aviation Safety Certification Aircraft Services
Marine Safety Regulatory Framework Marine Safety Oversight
Marine Safety Certification Navigation Protection Program
Rail Safety Regulatory Framework Rail Safety Oversight
Rail Safety Improvement Program Multimodal and Road Safety, Regulatory Framework
Multimodal and Road Safety Programs, Oversight Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulatory Framework
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Oversight Transportation of Dangerous Goods Technical Support
Aviation Security Regulatory Framework Aviation Security Oversight
Marine Security Regulatory Framework Marine Security Oversight
Intermodal Surface Security Regulatory Framework Intermodal Surface Security Oversight
Emergency Management Security Screening Certification
Core Responsibility 2: A Green and Innovative Transportation System
Climate Change and Clean Air Protecting Oceans and Waterways
Environmental Stewardship of Transportation Transportation Innovation
Indigenous Partnerships and Engagement  
Core Responsibility 3: An Efficient Transportation System
Transportation Marketplace Frameworks Transportation Analysis
National Trade Corridors Transportation Marketplace Frameworks

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Endnote v

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Transport Canada's website:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more
  • Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million
  • Gender-based analysis plus
  • Horizontal initiatives
  • Status report on transformational and major Crown projects
  • Up front multi year funding

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Endnote vi This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Transport Canada welcomes your comments on this report.

Email: Questions@tc.gc.ca
Phone: 613-990-2309
Toll Free: 1-866-995-9737
Teletypewriter (TTY): 1-888-675-6863
Fax: 613-954-4731

Mailing Address:
Transport Canada (ADI)
330 Sparks Street
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0N5

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.

experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, Program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance Information Profile (profil de l’information sur le rendement)
The document that identifies the performance information for each Program from the Program Inventory.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.

Program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

Program Inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s Core Responsibilities and Results.

result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, Program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, Program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, Program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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