Small vessel compliance program (SVCP) – Guidance notes for the detailed compliance report for small fishing vessels not more than 15 gross tonnage (2018) – TP 15356E

From Transport Canada

If you own or operate a small commercial fishing vessel in Canada, there are safety and environmental requirements in the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations that apply to you. The Small Vessel Compliance Program (SVCP) is an option available to owners of small commercial vessels. This Transport Canada program helps vessel owners and operators understand and meet their legal obligations.

On this page

Important note

The purpose of this Guideline is to assist the owners of small commercial fishing vessels, not more than 15 gross tonnage, to complete their Small Fishing Vessel Detailed Compliance Report (Form 85-0509E). Each guidance note is associated with a question on the Small Fishing Vessel Detailed Compliance Report, a copy of which can be found at Form Search.

This Guideline do not replace the regulations and the final authority for any regulatory requirement is the latest relevant regulations. References to regulations and standards are included in this document, however, this list is not exhaustive of all relevant regulations and standards. Please consult the Department of Justice website for a comprehensive list of the latest regulations under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001

Year built

If you do not know the year that your vessel was built, indicate “1900” as the year built.

Length interpretation for fishing vessel under fishing vessel safety regulations (FVSR)

  • Hull length: in respect of a fishing vessel, means the distance measured from the forward end of the foremost outside surface of the hull shell to the aft end of the aftermost outside surface of the hull shell
  • Length: in respect of a fishing vessel, means, in Parts I and II of FVSR
    1. the distance from the fore part of the uppermost end of the stem to the aft side of the head of the stern post, except that if a stern post is not fitted to the vessel, the measurement must be taken to the foreside of the head of the rudder stock or
    2. if the vessel has no rudder stock or has a rudder stock situated outside the hull at the stern, the distance from the foreside of the foremost permanent structure of the vessel to the aft side of the aftermost permanent structure of the vessel, not including guards or rubbing strakes

Hull length: The hull length of your vessel is the distance measured from the outside of the forward end (A) to the outside of the aft end (B) of the hull shell (see figure 1).


Figure 1: Example of Hull length.

Description

Monohull Powerboat with Add-on Swim Platform

Multihull/Pontoon

Inflatable/Rigid Inflatable

Gross tonnage

Gross tonnage is the measure of the overall size of a vessel as determined in accordance with the Vessel Registration and Tonnage Regulations and the Standard for the Tonnage Measurement of Ships (TP 13430), by using one of the following:

  • Assigned formal tonnage;
  • Form 4A: Simplified Method of Tonnage Measurement. (PDF, 845 KB)
  • Form 4B; Tonnage Measurement of a Simple Multihull Vessel. (PDF, 1.5 MB), or
  • A duly appointed Tonnage Measurer.

The form and additional information are available at Registering a Vessel.

Area of operation

Sheltered waters voyage means a voyage

  1. that is in Canada on a lake, or a river above tidal waters, where a vessel can never be further than one nautical mile from the closest shore;
  2. that is on the waters listed in Schedules 1 and 2 of the Vessel Certificate Regulations.

Near coastal voyage, Class 2 means a voyage

  1. that is not a sheltered waters voyage; and
  2. during which the vessel engaged on the voyage is always
    1. within 25 nautical miles from shore in coastal waters of Canada, the United States (except Hawaii) or Saint Pierre and Miquelon, and
    2. within 100 nautical miles from a place of refuge.

Near coastal voyage, Class 1 means a voyage

  1. that is not a sheltered waters voyage or a near coastal voyage, Class 2;
  2. that is between places in Canada, the United States (except Hawaii), Saint Pierre and Miquelon, the West Indies, Mexico, Central America or the northeast coast of South America; and
  3. during which the vessel engaged on the voyage is always
    1. north of latitude 6°N, and
    2. within 200 nautical miles from shore or above the continental shelf.

Unlimited voyage means a voyage that is not a sheltered waters voyage, a near coastal voyage, Class 2 or a near coastal voyage, Class 1.

Note: You can find the definitions of the voyage classifications in the Vessel Certificates Regulations, section 1.

Principal operator certification and training

Fishing Master, First Class. The general requirements for Fishing Master, First Class are in section 139 of the Marine Personnel Regulations. The Fishing Master, First Class training program description is in Chapter 21 of Transport Publication (TP) 2293 which may be obtained at Marine Publications Abstracts.

Fishing Master, Second Class. The general requirements for Fishing Master, Second Class are in section 140 of the Marine Personnel Regulations. The Fishing Master, Second Class training program description is in Chapter 22 of Transport Publication (TP) 2293 which may be obtained at Marine Publications Abstracts.

Fishing Master, Third Class. The general requirements for Fishing Master, Third Class are in section 141 of the Marine Personnel Regulations. The Fishing Master, Third Class training program description is in Chapter 23 of Transport Publication (TP) 2293 which may be obtained at Marine Publications Abstracts.

Fishing Master, Fourth Class. The general requirements for Fishing Master, Fourth Class are in section 142 of the Marine Personnel Regulations. The Fishing Master, Fourth Class training program description is in Chapter 24 of Transport Publication (TP) 2293 which may be obtained at Marine Publications Abstracts.

Certificate of Service as Master of a Fishing Vessel of Less Than 60 Gross Tonnage. The general requirements for Certificate of Service as Master of a Fishing Vessel of Less Than 60 Gross Tonnage are in section 143 of the Marine Personnel Regulations. The Certificate of Service as Master of a Fishing Vessel of Less Than 60 Gross Tonnage training program description is in Chapter 25 of Transport Publication (TP) 2293 which may be obtained at Marine Publications Abstracts.

SVOP – Small Vessel Operator Proficiency. The SVOP training program description is in Transport Publication (TP) 14692E.

PCOC – Pleasure Craft Operator Card. The PCOC is obtained after passing an accredited boating safety test. To find a course provider in your area, visit Office of Boating Safety.

MED A3 – Marine Emergency Duties A3 / SDV-BS-Small Non-Pleasure Vessel Basic Safety. The MED A3 / SDV-BS training program description is in Transport Publication (TP) 4957 which may be obtained at Marine Publications Abstracts.

MED A1 – Marine Emergency Duties A1 / MED-DVS – Domestic Vessel Safety. The MED A1 / MED-DVS training program description is in Transport Publication (TP) 4957 which may be obtained at Marine Publications Abstracts.

ROC-M - Restricted Operator’s Certificate (Maritime). The ROC-M is required by anyone using a marine VHF radio or other marine radios (each person on the boat who will use the radio needs their own card).

ROC-MC – Restricted Operator’s Certificate – Maritime Commercial. The ROC-MC is intended for mariners serving on compulsorily-fitted non-pleasure vessels within the North American A1 Sea Area as defined in Radio Aids to Marine Navigation (RAMN).

1. Vessel registration

Question 1

Section 46 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (CSA 2001) requires that all vessels (with the exception of those listed below) be registered in either the Canadian Register of Vessels or in the Small Vessel Register. This includes government vessels. No vessel shall operate without a valid Certificate of Registry if it is required to be registered.

The following vessels are NOT required to be registered:

  1. Vessels used solely for pleasure (pleasure craft may need to be licensed – see the Office of Boating Safety website for more information – Office of Boating Safety)
  2. Vessels registered in another country
  3. Sailing vessels and small vessels (including government vessels) fitted with propulsion motors less than 7.5kW (10 horsepower)

You can register your vessel by one of two methods:

  1. Registration in the Small Vessel Register. For this option, you must send all registration documentation to Ottawa (Transport Canada, Vessel Registration, Marine Safety, 330 Sparks Street, Ottawa, ON K1A 0N8, 1-877-242-8770). This address is indicated on Forms 19 (84-0177) and 20 (84-0166); OR
  2. Apply for registration at one of the Ports of Registry in the Canadian Register of Vessels. (Each region has several Ports of Registry – please contact your local Transport Canada office or click here for more details)
Applicable Registration Forms (Small Vessel Register)
Form 20
Registration
Form 3
Statement of Qualification
Form 4A or 4B
Tonnage
Form 14
Authorized Representative
Form 19
Registration Govt. Vessels
Bill of Sale or Affidavit
(note 1)
Fee Fleet of 2 or more vessels
(note 2)
Individual Yes Yes Yes If more than 1 owner No Yes $50 Yes
Company Yes Yes Yes If more than 1 owner No Yes $50 Yes
Federal Government No No Yes No Yes Yes $50 No
Provincial Government No No Yes No Yes Yes $50 No
Municipal Government Yes Yes Yes No No Yes $50 No

Note 1: “A Bill of Sale” is a document attesting to the sale of the vessel from a legally qualified vendor and that you are identified as the purchaser. If you do not have the bill of sale, you must provide an Affidavit/Declaration (you can find a sample on the Registration of Small Commercial Vessels website).

Note 2: Provided that all vessels are 5 gross tons or less and all applications are received together, registration of two or more vessels is $50 total (see CSA 2001 section 75.01 and 75.02).

For more information about vessel registration, call 1-877-242-8770. For any additional documents required, please refer to the Procedures for Registration in Canada.

Question 2

The Certificate of Registry is not valid until you mark the vessel according to the instructions on the Certificate of Registry. For example, you must mark a vessel registered in:

  • The Small Vessel Register, with the Official Number or commercial registration number (registration Number always starts with “C” followed by 5 numerical digits followed by two letter identifying province or territory) in block characters not less than 75 mm high and in a color that is in contrast with the background. This registration number must be located on each side of the bow of the vessel, or on a board permanently attached to the vessel as close to the bow as practicable.
  • The large commercial vessel register, with the name of the vessel in block characters not less than 100 mm high and in a color that contrasts with the background. This registered name must be located on each side of the bow and the vessel name and port of registry must be marked across the stern of the vessel.

Question 3

To ensure that your certificate remains valid, you must report in writing, any change(s) to the information shown on the certificate, including a change of address, to the Vessel Registration in Ottawa within 30 days of the change.

You must also record any modifications to the vessel on the fishing vessel modification history form as described in Ship Safety Bulletin (SSB) 01-2008.

Failure to report may result in Transport Canada Marine Safety and Security (TCMSS) suspending or cancelling your vessel’s registry and rendering your Certificate of Registry invalid.

Question 4

Once issued, you must carry the Certificate of Registry on board at all times.

Operating a vessel without a valid certificate is in contravention of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

2. General requirements - operations

Question 5

Your fishing vessel must be “fit for purpose”. Seaworthy means your fishing vessel is:

  • Properly constructed;
  • Equipped with all necessary life-saving and navigation equipment;
  • Sufficiently manned; and
  • Good enough to travel and operate safely at sea.

Question 6

You must maintain your fishing vessel, its machinery and equipment in good working order and keep records of maintenance on board. This reduces the likelihood of having unexpected breakdowns at sea and keeps your vessel seaworthy.

Question 7

If you intend to operate your fishing vessel in freezing spray conditions when ice build-up on the superstructure is likely to occur, your vessel’s stability assessment must demonstrate that the vessel has the capability to operate safely in those conditions.

A fishing vessel should not operate in ice unless:

  • Its hull has been designed or adequately strengthened to resist damage from anticipated conditions;
  • Its machinery and steering equipment has been protected against damage and the effects of slush ice choking; and
  • It is capable of navigating safely through the waters.

For more information on requirements for operating in ice, see:

Question 8

If your area of operation includes areas where ice can build up on your vessel, you must carry de-icing equipment on board such as mallets, shovels, picks, or other de-icing means.

Question 9

This question applies to a fishing vessel which is being put into service for the first time. A fishing vessel must not operate unless the authorized representative has informed the Minister of:

  1. The intention to operate the fishing vessel or permit its operation;
  2. The physical characteristics of the fishing vessel; and
  3. The nature of its operation.

Question 10

No one must operate or permit another person to operate a fishing vessel under circumstances that exceeds its design limitations. One method to determine your vessels design limitations is to use ISO Design Categories.

ISO Design Categories

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has established four design categories for small craft: A, B, C and D. Assessment to the standard ISO 12217 determines a vessel’s design category. The design category establishes the environmental operating limits for stability and buoyancy, as shown in the table below.

Summary of design conditions
Design category
Parameter A B C D
Maximum wave height approx. 7 m significant 4 m significant 2 m significant 0.3 m significant
0.5 m maximum
Typical Beaufort wind force ≤ 10 ≤ 8 ≤ 6 ≤ 4
Maximum average wind speed for 10 min (m/s) 24.4 20.7 13.8 7.9
NOTE: The definition of these design categories align with those used in the Recreational Craft Directive of the European Union, EU Directive 94/25/EC as amended by Directive 2003/44/EC.

You can find out your vessel’s design category from the builder so you can operate with a better understanding of your vessel’s stability limitations.

To learn more about the ISO stability standards or vessel stability in general, visit the vessel stability page on the Transport Canada Marine Safety website.

Question 11

No one shall operate a fishing vessel in a careless manner, without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other persons.

Question 12

No one shall operate or permit a person to operate a fishing vessel in environmental conditions or in circumstances that may cause a danger or a risk to the safety of persons on board unless a lifejacket required by these Regulations, or a personal flotation device that meets the requirements set out in section 3.20 of the FVSR is worn,

  1. by all persons on board, in the case of a vessel that has no deck or deck structure; or
  2. by all persons on the deck or in the cockpit, in the case of a vessel that has a deck or deck structure.

Question 13

Watertightness and weathertightness.

Watertight, in respect of a structure, means capable of preventing the passage of water through the structure in any direction under a head of water for which the structure is designed.

In practical terms, watertightness refers to the ability of a vessel or any of its fixtures and appliances to keep out water under the head of pressure to which it is exposed. No water shall enter a vessel for example, through the hull. (One standard for determining whether your deck appliances are watertight and fit for their intended purpose, is ISO standard 12216: Small craft – Windows, port lights, hatches, deadlights and doors – Strength and watertightness requirements.)

Weathertight, in respect of a fishing vessel, means that in any sea conditions water will not penetrate into the vessel.

Weathertightness, in practical terms, means that in any sea condition water will not penetrate into the vessel through the appliance. With a weathertight door for example, tested with a normal garden hose a few drops may penetrate after being exposed for a few minutes. To avoid downflooding, all appliances above the deck (i.e., deck hatches, windows and doors) must be designed and fitted to prevent the substantial ingress of water when closed. These appliances, on fishing vessels, must be able to provide protection against the ingress of water when subject to temporary immersion.

The watertightness of the hull and deck structures of a vessel is of great importance because these spaces provide the reserve buoyancy and the subsequent reserves of stability for the vessel, at various angles of heel. Secure all watertight openings (doors, hatch covers, windows, etc.) in the hull and deck structure when not in use, to prevent downflooding. All watertight openings must be inspected regularly to ensure their tightness.

Keeping water out of a vessel is of great importance from a stability perspective. Unwanted water entry reduces stability in several ways:

  • The added weight will reduce freeboard
  • Water will accumulate on the low side of a listed vessel, increasing the list

Question 14

As a minimum, the vessel must carry the manufacturer’s recommended spares for any vessel equipment. Suggested additional equipment, as applicable, includes the following:

Suggested Tools and spares that may be carried as required
Combination wrench set 8-24 mm Fuel injector with sealing washer
Adjustable wrenches 6" and 10" Fuel injection pipe with end fitting
Pipe wrench 18" 1 set of spare parts for engine waterpump
Ballpein hammer 0.5 kg V-belt for alternator, waterpump, etc.
Combination pliers 6" Cartridge for fuel and lub-oil filters
Pump pliers 12" Gland packing for stern tube with special wrench
Vice grip 10" Spare parts for manual pump
Diagonal cutting plier 6" Coil of copper wire, stiff steel wire
Hacksaw with spare blades Insulating tape, tape for pipe threads
Cold chisel Spare bulbs and fuses
Flat single-cut file fine Engine oil 2.5 litres, oil squirt can
Flat screwdrivers 3 mm, 6 mm, 10 mm Grease gun
Pozdrive screwdrivers no. 2 and 3, Philips, type 1 Gasket cement, epoxy glue
Hand drill Assorted bolts, nuts, washers, screws, hoseclips
One set of different drill sizes high speed 3-10 mm Waterproof Flashlight

Questions 15, 16, and 17

  1. If your fishing vessel is gasoline-powered and fitted with a portable fuel tank, you must remove it from the vessel before refueling. When refueling, do not top off tanks. Clean up any spilled fuel. You should follow proper refueling procedures. Persons must not carry liquid fuel on board a fishing vessel in a portable container that has not been designed to carry the fuel. The container must be an approved type.
  2. If your fishing vessel is gasoline-powered and fitted with a fixed fuel tank, the person fueling the vessel should be the only person on board during refueling.
  3. Before refueling begins, all electrical equipment must be switched off, all doors, windows and ports must be closed, all engines shut off and all open flames, including pilot lights extinguished.
  4. A portable fuel-burning equipment carried on board a fishing vessel must be fully secured to prevent movement at sea and must be placed in a well-ventilated area where there is no possibility of fuel vapors accumulation.
  5. A portable fuel tank containing fuel and carried on board a fishing vessel must be stored as far away as practical from heat and ignition sources, machinery spaces and crew’s quarters.

Questions 18

Most boat fires are the result of electrical problems, fuel leaks or vapours, unwatched portable heaters, improper engine exhaust installation and poor housekeeping. Never leave any combustible material in contact with the engine exhaust or any other hot surfaces.

3. General requirements – safety procedures

Questions 19 and 20

You must have on board written safety procedures. According to section 3.16 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations, you must implement and familiarize persons on board with:

  1. the location and use of all safety equipment
  2. all the measures they must take to protect persons on board, in particular measures to
    • prevent persons from falling overboard,
    • retrieve persons who have fallen overboard,
    • protect limbs from rotating equipment, and
    • avoid ropes, docking lines, nets and other fishing equipment that may pose a safety hazard to persons on board;

In the case of beam trawling and purse seining operations, the quick release of loads they can activate in an emergency;

All the firefighting measures they must take to prevent fires and explosions on the vessel;

If the vessel has a deck or deck structure, all the measures they must take to maintain watertightness and weathertightness and to prevent flooding of the interior spaces of the hull or, if the vessel has no deck or deck structure, all the measures they must take to prevent swamping of the vessel;

All the measures they must take to ensure safe loading, stowage and unloading of fish catches, baits and consumables; and

The operation of towing and lifting equipment and the measures they must take to prevent overloading of the vessel

Transport Canada has created operational and safety procedure templates that you can download and adapt for your use.

Question 21

Enclosed gasoline engine and fuel tank compartments must have a blower and an underway ventilation system in accordance with the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations Part 0.1 sec 3.13 and FVSR Part II Sub-section 56(8) and (9). Immediately before every start up, the blower must be operated for at least four minutes or the length of time recommended by the vessel manufacturer, whichever is longer.

Check that the blower works properly and verify that the associated ductwork is free from leaks.

You should post a notice similar to the one below at the normal operation positions.

Warning: Gasoline vapour may explode resulting in injury or death. Before starting the engine, operate blower for 4 minutes and verify blower operation.

Question 22

No person shall permit fuel leakage within or from a fishing vessel.

4: Vessel navigation equipment

Question 22

All vessels under 12 m length overall without a fitted sound-signaling appliance must carry a sound-signaling device. This can be a pea-less whistle, a hand held compressed gas horn or an electric horn.

All vessel of 12 m or more in length shall carry a whistle.

You can find additional information in Collision Regulations Rule 33.

Questions 24, 25 and 26

The vessel must carry the navigation lights and shapes required for it to comply with the Collision Regulations. A summary of the requirements for small fishing vessels is in the table below. The full requirements are in Part C of the Collision Regulations. The navigation lights must be designed and manufactured for that purpose. Navigation lights must be properly installed: use only those bulbs recommended by the light manufacturer for the required range of visibility and ensure there is sufficient power for the lights throughout the duration of the voyage. Batteries providing power for the lights must be adequately protected and firmly secured.

Required Lights and Shapes
Vessel Operation Lights and Shapes to be Exhibited
Vessel underway
  1. A masthead light
  2. Sidelights
  3. A sternlight
Engaged in trawling (underway or at anchor)
  1. Two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being green and the lower white, or
  2. A shape consisting of two cones with their apexes together in a vertical line one above the other; and
  3. When making way through the water, sidelights and a sternlight.
Engaged in fishing other than trawling
(underway or at anchor)
  1. Two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being red and the lower white, or
  2. A shape consisting of two cones with their apexes together in a vertical line one above the other;
  3. When there is outlying gear extending more than 150 m horizontally from the vessel, an all-round white light or a cone apex upwards in the direction of the gear;
  4. When making way through the water, sidelights and a sternlight.
When at Anchor
  1. An all-round white light or one ball where it can best be seen
When aground
  1. In addition to anchor light, shall exhibit where they can best be seen
  2. two all-round red lights in a vertical line,
  3. three balls in a vertical line.
  4. A vessel less than 12 m in length shall not be required to exhibit the lights and shapes prescribed above.
When not under command
  1. Two all-round red lights in a vertical lines where they can best be seen;
  2. Two balls or similar shapes in a vertical line where they can best be seen;
  3. When making way through the water, in addition side lights and stern light;
  4. A vessel less than 12 m in length shall not be required to exhibit the lights and shapes prescribed above.


Vessel 12-20m in length

"Masthead light" means a white light placed over the fore and aft centerline of the vessel showing an unbroken light of 225 degrees, fixed to show the light from right ahead to 22½ degrees aft of the beam on either side of the vessel.

"Sidelights" means a green light on the starboard side and a red light on the port side each showing an unbrokenlight of 112½ degrees, fixed to show the light from right ahead to 22½ degrees aft of the beam on its respective side.

"Stern light" means a white light placed as near as practicable at the stern showing an unbrokenlight of 135 degrees, so fixed as to show the light to 22½ degrees aft of the beam on each side of the vessel.


Vessel less than 12m in length

"All-round light" means a light showing an unbroken light of 360 degrees.

All shapes must be black in color.

If the vessel is less than 12 m in length the vessel may exhibit an all-round white light instead of a masthead light and stern light.

Note: The masthead light or all-round white light on a power-driven vessel of less than 12 m in length may be offset from the fore and aft centerline of the vessel if centerline fitting is not practicable, provided that the sidelights are combined in one lantern which must be carried on the fore and aft centerline of the vessel or located as nearly as practicable in the same fore and aft line as the masthead light or the all-round white light.

Your vessel documentation should include information to show the make and rating of the navigation lights. If not, the lights may be marked or stamped with approval information. The stated visibilities in the navigation light information must meet the requirements below.

Visibility of Lights:

  1. In vessels of 12 m or more in length but less than 50 m in length:
    1. a masthead light, five miles; except that where the length of the vessel is less than 20 m, three miles
    2. a sidelight, two miles
    3. a stern light, two miles
    4. a towing light, two miles
    5. a white, red, green or yellow all-round light, two miles
  2. In vessels of less than 12 m in length:
    1. a masthead light, two miles
    2. a sidelights, one mile
    3. a stern light, two miles
    4. an all-round light, two miles


A radar reflector

The vessel must be equipped with a radar reflector or other means to enable the vessel’s detection by other vessels navigating by radar.

Questions 27 and 28

A vessel over 8m must be fitted with a compass. This compass should be one you are able to adjust and correct for deviation, as well light up for night viewing. If the vessel is not more than 8m in length and navigates within sight of seamarks, it must carry at minimum, a hand-held compass.


A hand-held compass

Question 29

Every ship should have on board, in respect of each area in which the ship is to be navigated, the most recent editions of the charts, documents and publications required by the Charts and Nautical Publications Regulations.

Every ship that is required to carry charts and nautical publications must be fitted with navigating accessories such as parallel rulers, dividers and binoculars

A ship of less than 100 tons is not required to have on board these charts, documents and publications if the person in charge of navigation has sufficient knowledge of the following information, such that safe and efficient navigation in the area where the ship is to be navigated is not compromised:

  1. The location and character of charted
    1. Shipping routes
    2. Lights, buoys and marks, and
    3. Navigational hazards; and
  2. The prevailing navigations conditions, taking into account such factors as tides, currents, ice, and weather patterns

If regulations do not require you to carry these charts, documents and publications on your ship, you should consider carrying them as a safety best practice.

Question 30

Suitable means of determining water depth can be a hand lead line or echo sounding equipment or other electronic means for measuring and displaying available depth of water.

Questions 31, 32, 33 and 34

Every vessel must be equipped with one non-portable VHF radiotelephone if the ship is of closed construction and more than 8 m in length. If the vessel is of closed construction, more than 8m in length, and operating in Sea Area A1, it must be equipped with a VHF radio installation capable of receiving and transmitting voice communications and communications using Digital Selective Calling) (DSC). If the VHF radio installation is capable of DSC, the vessel must also be fitted with a receiver for a global navigation satellite system or a terrestrial radio navigation system. The receiver may be integral to the VHF radio installation capable of DSC. For more information, refer to the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999 and the Navigation Safety Regulations.

VHF/DSC equipment must be programmed with the correct Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) numbers. MMSI number must be displayed near the VHF radio. For more information on Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) numbers contact Industry Canada.

A VHF radiotelephone on a vessel must be capable of transmitting and receiving communications on:

  1. the distress and safety frequency of 156.8 MHz (channel 16)
  2. the primary inter-ship safety communication frequency of 156.3 MHz (channel 6)
  3. the bridge-to-bridge communication frequency of 156.65 MHz (channel 13)
  4. the public correspondence frequency specifically assigned for the area in which the ship is navigating, and
  5. any other VHF frequencies that are necessary for safety purposes in the area in which the ship is navigating

However, for an open construction vessel, it is good practice to carry a portable VHF radiotelephone with a source of energy sufficient for the duration of the voyage.

Radio installations should have a reserve battery with a capacity sufficient for the duration of the voyage. The reserve source of energy should be independent of the vessel’s engine and electrical system.

Question 35

Self-explanatory answer, yes or no.

Note: Ensure that if you carry on board an EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon), that it is registered properly, as it facilitates the task of the SAR authorities in an emergency and helps to eliminate false alarms.

Question 36

The validity of required safety equipment is given in the table below.

Validity of required safety equipment
Safety Equipment Validity
EPIRB battery As indicated on battery
EPRIB Hydrostatic Release Unit As indicated on unit

Question 37

Every vessel must have a card of instructions, visibly displayed, setting out a clear summary of the radio distress procedures.

5: Vessel manning and crew qualifications

Question 38

The minimum qualification required by the master of a fishing vessel not more than 15 gross tonnage is determined by the length of the vessel and the area of operation, as presented in the table below.

Required Nautical Certificate
Area of Operation Unlimited Voyage Near Coastal 1 Near Coastal 2 Sheltered Waters
>2 Nm. from shore ≤2 Nm. from shore
Minimum Required Qualification Fishing Master,
First Class
Fishing Master,
Fourth Class
SVOP (Small Vessel Operator Proficiency) for vessels not more than 12 m in overall length PCOC (Pleasure Craft Operator Card) for vessels not more than 12 m in overall length PCOC (Pleasure Craft Operator Card) for vessels not more than 12 m in overall length

A Certificate of Service as Master of a Fishing Vessel of less than 60 Gross Tonnage is valid for any voyage class as long as the vessel and voyage are in accordance with the validity specified on the certificate.

A Certificate of Service as Master of a Fishing Vessel of not more than 100 tons, gross tonnage is valid for any voyage class as long as the vessel and voyage are in accordance with the validity specified on the certificate.

The holder of a Watch-keeping Mate of a fishing vessel of less than 24 metres in length overall certificate of competency may act as master of a fishing vessel of up to 15 GT or not more than 12 metres in length overall engage on near coastal voyage, class 2 or sheltered water voyages.

The master of a fishing vessel of up to 15 gross tonnage or not more than 12 m in overall length who has acquired at least 7 fishing seasons, with no two of those seasons occurring in the same year, as master of a fishing vessel before the coming into force of this section (MPR Sub-Sec 212(1)) is not required to hold the training certificate SVOP.

PCOC (Pleasure Craft Operator Card). Person holding a PCOC will not require a MED A3 or SDV-BS certificate.

SVOP (Small Vessel Operator Proficiency). Person holding a SVOP will require a valid MED A3 or SDV-BS.

Marine Medical certificate is required for Fishing Master Third Class and higher, a medical is valid for 2 years.

At least one member of the complement of the fishing vessel must have a valid Marine Basic First Aid or Provincial/Territorial Recognised First Aid Training.

A fishing vessel of not more than 15 gross tonnage engaged on a voyage less than 25 nautical miles from shore, every member of the complement must have a valid MED A3 or SDV-BS certificate.

A fishing vessel engaged on a voyage beyond the limits of a near coastal voyage, Class 2, every member of the complement must have a valid MED A1 or DVS certificate.

A fishing vessel of not more than 15 gross tonnage engaged on a voyage less than 25 nautical miles from shore, if fitted with a VHF radio, at least one member of the complement must have a valid ROC-M certificate obtained after January 1, 2005.

A fishing vessel engaged on a voyage beyond the limits of a near coastal voyage, Class 2 or Sea Area A1, if fitted with a VHF radio, at least one member of the complement must have a valid ROC-MC certificate.

Engineering Certificates

  1. An engineer certificate is not required for small fishing vessels with propulsion power less than 750 kW 1000 HP
  2. Requirement for an engineer certificate does not apply to vessel equipped with outboard engines

Note: 1HP = 0.749 kW

For more detailed information on vessel manning and crew qualification, please refer to the Marine Personnel Regulations or contact your local TCMSS office.

Question 39

Every vessel must have a sufficient crew to respond to the following foreseeable emergencies on board: fire, man overboard, engine failure, flooding, grounding, pollution, distress calls and launching life rafts.

The crew may be required to do many of these tasks simultaneously, such as fighting a fire, operating the vessel’s pumping and emergency power system, sending out distress messages and launching the life raft if applicable.

Question 40

Before being assigned any duty on board, owner, authorized representative or master of the fishing vessel must provide each member of the crew with written instructions that describe the procedures to follow to ensure their competency with:

  1. The shipboard equipment specific to the vessel
  2. The operational instructions specific to the vessel
  3. Their assigned regular and emergency duties
  4. The effective performance of assigned duties when performing duties vital to safety or to preventing or reducing pollution

Question 41

The master must ensure crew members receive appropriate training and familiarization at the beginning of their employment onboard.

6: Notices, records and documents

Question 42

The vessel must have maintenance records that demonstrate that the vessel, its machinery and equipment are maintained in a safe operating condition.

Question 43

The authorized representative is responsible to ensure that a record is kept of any modification or series of modifications that affects the stability of the vessel. The record is to be kept in the form and manner specified by the Minister.

Question 44

Owner or authorized representative must keep a record of the vessel maintenance and the drills on the safety procedures for a period of seven years.

Question 45

In the case of a fishing vessel that has undergone a stability assessment, a record of a modification or series of modifications that affects the stability of the vessel must be kept until the vessel undergoes a new stability assessment that takes into account the modification or series of modifications. Please refer to ship safety bulletin 01/2008 and please use the fishing vessel modification history sheet to keep track of any modifications. To help understand what a modifications is and how it can affect your vessel’s stability.

Note: this question applies to a fishing vessel that has undergone a stability assessment.

Question 46

If you need a stability notice for your fishing vessel, the competent person conducting the stability test will provide the following information:

  1. the stability standards that were applied to the vessel for the stability assessment
  2. a graphical representation, including a description or legend, of the operational practices necessary to operate the vessel with the safe operating limits set out in the vessel’s stability booklet or record of stability, and
  3. a statement indicating whether the vessel has been assessed for operations in freezing spray conditions

You must keep the stability notice up to date.

Question 47

The authorized representative must ensure that a copy of the stability booklet or record of stability stays on board the vessel.

The competent person who conducts a stability assessment, either full or simplified, must provide the authorized representative with a stability booklet or with a record of stability which contains specific documentation. See FVSR section 3.57 for the requirements of the stability assessment.

Question 48

A record of training on the subject-matter and training referred to in Canada Shipping Act 2001 paragraph 106(1)(c) and Marine Personnel Regulations subsection 205(1) that includes the following information must be kept readily available for inspection by a marine safety inspector, on board the vessel or, if the vessel does not travel more than five nautical miles from its home port, in its home port:

  1. the name of each member of the complement who has been trained
  2. the equipment they were trained on
  3. the subject-matter they were trained on
  4. the days on which they were trained

7. Stability

Question 49

Stability refers to a vessel’s ability to resist capsizing by returning to an upright position after being heeled over (tilted to one side due to wind or sea conditions). Many forces affect vessel stability and each type of vessel reacts differently to heeling forces. The owner is responsible for ensuring that the vessel has adequate stability to safely carry out its intended operations. As a result, you need to know how your vessel with its load interacts with outside forces of nature and what affects its stability. For example, open boats and vessels with large well decks may tend to ship water and/or down flood (when water enters the hull from above deck or over the gunwale), making them less stable.

A properly designed and loaded vessel will resist heeling forces when operated within its design limitations. Adding weight above a boat’s center of gravity will raise the center of gravity and decrease stability. As the center of gravity is raised, less heel force is required to capsize the vessel

The best way to prevent a boat from capsizing is to operate a well-designed, maintained and loaded vessel with an experienced crew. Preventing unstable vessel conditions and being able to recognize the warning signs when such conditions do occur can save lives. Be on constant watch for loss of stability (see Warning Signs of Instability). Consult a marine professional to determine the impact on stability of modifications you are thinking of doing before you go ahead.

Precautions

Of all accident types, founders and capsizes caused by a loss of stability are the most likely to lead to death on the water. It is possible to avoid many of these accidents. A well-designed vessel will resist capsizing or foundering in severe conditions if it is operated properly. Keep these rules in mind:

  • Be aware of outside forces: wind, waves and water depth. Always check the weather forecast before setting out and avoid rough weather conditions.
  • Don’t overload your vessel. Be aware of the amount of weight added to your vessel and available freeboard. Place people and cargo evenly.
  • Make sure that all cargo, tools and equipment are well secured during the entire voyage. It is a lot safer and simpler to remove well-prepared lashings after a successful voyage, than to try to add lashings in poor weather while a vessel is rolling and pitching. Store cargo below deck if you can.
  • Reduce both the amount of liquids/cargo that are able to move and the area in which they can slosh back and forth by using smaller tanks and by subdividing cargo holds. Partly-filled water and fuel tanks and cargo holds can make your vessel unstable.
  • Prevent water from getting into your vessel by keeping hatches, doors and windows closed, as much as you can, when underway. Regular maintenance of seals and fastening devices will help to ensure water tightness.
  • Remove water as quickly as possible. Scuppers and drains must meet design standards and be kept in good working order.
  • Do not perform operations such as lifting or towing unless the stability of your vessel has been assessed under these conditions.
  • Adjust course, speed, or both if you can, to reduce the vessel’s rolling motion.
  • Avoid sharp turns or turns at high speed.
  • Consult a marine professional before making changes, because modifications to your vessel may affect its stability. Have the stability information revised to reflect any changes you make to the vessel.

Warning signs of instability

  • Your vessel’s handling changes. For example, it seems sluggish, rolls more or rolls more slowly.
  • Your vessel is listing to port or starboard or is trimmed more than usual by the bow or stern.
  • There is less freeboard than you would expect normally. If so, check tanks and holds for flooding or cargo shift.
  • The bilge pumps are working more frequently than usual. If it happens, check the bilge for water and the bilge pumps and alarms working properly.
Stability

With no heel the downward force of gravity is equal and opposite the upward force of buoyancy.
Heeling

When vessel is heeled by external forces buoyancy and gravity bring the boat upright.
Added Load

Weight added above the centre of gravity reduces the righting ability of the vessel.
Capsizing

Centre of gravity located too high will cause the boat to capsize.

Freeboard

Freeboard is the distance between the water and the watertight deck of your vessel, or the gunwale (upper edge of the hull) if it’s an open boat without scuppers. If the deck edge goes under water when the vessel heels, its stability will decrease rapidly and the danger of capsizing will increase. If the gunwale of an open boat is going under water, there is an imminent risk of capsizing. An overloaded vessel’s freeboard will be smaller and the deck edge or gunwale may go under water with even a slight heel. You need a safe freeboard height, so take care not to overload your vessel.

Freeboard is the distance between the water and the watertight deck of your vessel, or the gunwale (upper edge of the hull) if it’s an open boat without scuppers.

Free Surface Effect

When a vessel with a full tank heels over, the tank’s center of gravity does not change, so the vessel’s stability is not affected. Water on deck, liquids in holds and partly filled tanks and bilge water, however, will shift with the movement of the boat. When this happens, the center of gravity will also shift, making the vessel less stable. This “free surface effect” reduces stability and increases the danger of capsizing. If you want to test the “free surface effect” in your own home, fill an ice cubes tray with water and walk across the kitchen. You should have no trouble doing so without spilling any water. Next, pour the same amount of water into a cookie sheet and carry it across the kitchen. It’s harder to keep the water in or on the cookie sheet. That’s because the large free surface allows the water to slosh over a greater surface. It is good practice to reduce free surface effect by dividing tanks with baffles and fluid cargo holds with bulkheads, and by having as few partly filled tanks and holds as you can.

Freeboard effect cross-section.

Free Surface Effect Cross-Section

Vessel stability and safety guidelines are available to help you answer the question of whether your vessel has adequate stability. Please note that using these guidelines is voluntary and does not guarantee whether your fishing vessel has adequate stability or not. These guidelines aid fishing vessel owners and operators to take preventative measures aimed at improving their vessel’s stability as well as to provide owners and operators with guidance on best operational practices. With regards to adequate buoyancy and flotation, the requirement is directed at small fishing vessels of open construction that may be affected by swamping. If your fishing vessel is an open construction or open deck, your vessel must have adequate buoyancy and flotation to help prevent it from being swamped and sunk.

Note: Vessel Stability and Safety Guidelines are posted on the TC fishing vessel webpages: Small Fishing Vessel Safety.

Note: Buoyancy and flotation only apply to small fishing vessels of open construction that maybe affected by swamping.

Question 50

The question and requirement applies to new fishing vessels of between 6 and 9 m hull length.

Note: “New” “in respect of a fishing vessel, means that construction of the vessel started — or that a contract was signed for the construction of the vessel or that the vessel was imported into Canada and registered for the first time in Canada — more than one year after the day on which these Regulations come into force.”

Examples of some of the recommended practices and standards are;

  • IMO Safety recommendations for decked fishing vessels of less than 12 m in length and undecked fishing vessels
  • ISO 12217 Small Craft - Stability and Buoyancy Assessment and Categorization
  • Australian National Standard for Commercial Vessels, Part C, Section 6, Subsection 6C - Stability Tests and Stability Information
  • UK MCA Stability guidance for fishing vessels of under 15m overall length
  • TP 14619

The definition of “recommended practices and standards,” is “the recommended practices and standards for marine use issued by a marine classification society, standards development organization, industrial or trade organization, government, government agency or international body.”

Note: You should keep your stability documentation on board. A TC inspector may ask the authorized representative of the fishing vessel to demonstrate that the vessel’s stability conforms to the selected recommended practices and standards.

If you are not sure, contact the builder of your fishing vessel.

Question 51

The question and requirement applies to new fishing vessels of less than 6 m hull length. For more details, see TP 1332 (PDF, 2.39 MB) Construction Standards for Small Vessels, Section 4.

Note: You should keep your stability documentation on board. A TC inspector may ask the authorized representative of the fishing vessel to demonstrate that the vessel’s stability conforms to the standards for buoyancy, flotation and stability that are set out in Section 4 of TP 1332.

If you are not sure, contact the builder of your fishing vessel.

Question 52

The question applies to new fishing vessels of more than 9 m in hull length. The type of stability assessment, either full or simplified depends on various factors. See Division 3 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations to determine which stability assessment applies to your fishing vessel.

You can check with the builder of your fishing vessel for a copy of your vessels stability assessment.

Question 53

The question applies to existing fishing vessels of more than 9 m in hull length which have undergone a major modification or a change in activity that is likely to adversely affect its stability. Recall the definition of “major modification” which states, “a modification or repair, or a series of modifications or repairs that substantially changes the capacity or size of a fishing vessel or the nature of a system on board a fishing vessel that affects its watertight integrity and or its stability.”

A change to a new or different fishing activity, that the vessel has not previously been used for, can sometimes have a negative and adverse effect on a vessel’s stability. You should be aware of the potential effect on the vessel’s stability before considering any change in the fishing activity. Before undertaking any modification to a fishing vessel, carefully consider the potential effects it could have on its stability characteristics.

As a vessel owner or operator, you should consult with Transport Canada Marine Safety or contact a naval architect before doing any changes to your vessel which may affect its stability.

Please also refer to Ship Safety Bulletin 01/2008 Fishing Vessel Safety Record of Modifications for additional information and a copy of the Fishing Vessel Modification History form. Please use this form to log any stability related changes you may do to your vessel. A TC inspector may ask to see it.

Question 54

The competent person must:

  1. Verify whether the vessel conforms to the stability standards that are applied to the vessel and assess the impact of those activities on the stability of vessel, if necessary
  2. Provide the authorized representative with stability booklet or with a record of stability that sets out:
    1. the stability standards that were applied to the vessel
    2. information respecting the characteristics of the vessel
    3. the vessel’s safe operating limits
    4. a signed declaration confirming that the stability characteristics of the vessel conform to the standards that were applied to the vessel, and
  3. Prepare a stability notice

Question 55

The question applies to fishing vessels which must undergo a full stability assessment. If applicable, your fishing will be required to be permanently marked, forward and aft, with draft marks or other means of accurately identifying the draft.

Question 56

The question applies to a fishing vessel which has applied to be exempt from undergoing a stability assessment according to the requirements of sections 3.63, 3.64, 3.65, 3.66, and 3.67 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations.

If you answer yes to this question, you have an obligation to ensure that you maintain the factors outlined in section 3.63(2) Factors – Similar Vessels of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations.

  1. it is operated or is to be operated in the same fishery, in the same environmental conditions and with the same fishing gear as the representative vessel;
  2. its physical characteristics are similar to those of the representative vessel; and
  3. its stability characteristics are equivalent to those set out in the stability booklet of the representative vessel.

8. Vessel safety equipment general

Question 57

Marine pyrotechnic distress signals must be marked with a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Pyrotechnic distress signals are only good for four years from the date of manufacture (not purchase), which is stamped on every pyrotechnic distress signal. Pyrotechnic distress signals must be kept within reach and stored vertically in a cool, dry location (such as a watertight container) to keep them in good working condition.


Rocket Parachute Flare

Multi-Star Flare

Hand-Held Flare

Smoke Signal

There are four types of approved pyrotechnic distress signals:

  • Type A: Rocket Parachute Flare
  • Type B: Multi-Star Flare
  • Type C: Hand-Held Flare
  • Type D: Smoke Signal (Buoyant or Hand-Held)

Question 58

A first aid kit must be packed in a waterproof case able to be tightly closed after use and must be either:

  • A first aid kit that meets the requirements of the Marine Occupational Safety and Health Regulations or of provincial regulations governing workers’ compensation, with the addition of a resuscitation face shield and two pairs of examination gloves if the kit is not required to contain them, or
  • An approved marine emergency first aid kit that contains the following:
    1. An up-to-date first aid manual or up-to-date first aid instructions, in English and French
    2. 48 doses of analgesic medication of a non-narcotic type
    3. Six safety pins or one roll of adhesive first aid tape
    4. One pair of bandage scissors or safety scissors
    5. One resuscitation face shield
    6. Two pairs of examination gloves
    7. 10 applications of antiseptic preparations
    8. 12 applications of burn preparations
    9. 20 adhesive plasters in assorted sizes
    10. 10 sterile compression bandages in assorted sizes
    11. 4 m of elastic bandage
    12. Two sterile gauze compresses
    13. Two triangular bandages
    14. A waterproof list of the contents, in English and French

Question 59

You must have a re-boarding device on board. For example a folding ladder which when unfolded, the two lower steps should be below the water level.


A re-boarding ladder

Your vessel meets this requirement if it has transom ladders or swim platform ladders. You may not use an outboard engine as a re-boarding device.

Question 60

You must have a person overboard retrieval device on board, unless the vessel carries a recovery boat or if the vessel is single-handed.

Question 61

You must check your watertight flashlight before each trip and replace batteries annually or as required.


A watertight flashlight

Question 62

A fishing vessel that has a hull length of not more than 9 m must carry on board a bailer or a manual bilge pump. If your fishing vessel has a hull length of more than 9 m, it must carry on board a manual bilge pump.


A bailer

A manual bilge pump

Bailers must hold at least 750ml (just over 1½ pints), have an opening of at least 65 cm2 (10 in2) and be made of plastic or metal.

For a manual bilge pump, the pump, hose or pipe must be long enough to reach the bilge and discharge water over the side of the boat. The manual pump must be capable of being operated from a position above the deck of the fishing vessel.

Question 63

Fishing vessels with no deck or deck structure and are not more than 6m must carry on board an alternative means of propulsion, such as oars or paddles to propel the vessel.

Question 64

Every fishing vessel must carry appropriate anchors and anchoring equipment in accordance with recommended practices and standards, arranged in such a way that it is possible to deploy and retrieve an anchor efficiently and reliably.

In addition to manufacturer recommendations on anchors and anchoring equipment, the following organizations and publications set out minimum standards which can be applied:

  1. IMO SLF 51/5 – Safety of Small Fishing Vessels
  2. “Safety Guide for Small Fishing Boats”, FAO/SIDA/IMO/BOBP-IGO
  3. Nordic Boat Standards – Commercial Boats less than 15 m
  4. ABYC
  5. Classification Societies (ABS, BV, DNV, GL, LR)
  6. SEAFISH Construction Standards for New Fishing Vessels less than 15 m length overall
  7. SEAFISH Construction Standards for Steel and Aluminum Fishing Vessels 15 m length overall to 24 m registered length

The anchor must be positioned where it can be used when necessary.

The anchor end must be securely and permanently attached to the hull. The attachment must be strong enough so the quick deployment of the anchor will not damage the vessel. The anchor rope must be protected against chafing.

9: Safety equipment – life saving

Question 65

No person shall operate, or permit another person to operate, a fishing vessel unless the safety equipment required by this Division is carried on board the vessel and the equipment meets the requirements of this Division (FVSR Part 0.1 section 3.18).

Question 66

The safety equipment required by these Regulations must be in good working order, readily accessible and available for immediate use (FVSR Part 0.1 section 3.22(1) (a) (b)).

Question 67

The safety equipment required by these Regulations must be maintained and replaced in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions or recommendations (FVSR Part 0.1 section 3.22 (1) (c)).

For example, immersion suits must be inspected monthly for damage and ease of operation, and have an air pressure test as per manufacturer recommendation. Any damaged immersion suits must be removed from service until they have been repaired.

The life raft hydrostatic release units must be inspected for correct installation, and replaced when their validity period is expired.

Questions 68 and 69

A fishing vessel must carry on board a lifejacket of an appropriate size for each person on board. However, the lifejacket must not be a Class 2 lifejacket or a small vessel lifejacket if the voyage is beyond the limits of near coastal voyage, Class 2.

If your fishing vessel has a hull length of not more than 12 m and is engaged on a near coastal voyage Class 2, you may carry on board a PFD (personal flotation device) device that meets the requirements of section 3.2 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations if;

  1. The PFD
    1. Provides at least 100 N of buoyancy and has a turning capability, or
    2. Is designed to provide thermal protection; and
  2. in the case of a fishing vessel with no deck or deck structure and that is underway, the personal flotation device is worn by everyone on board or, in the case of a fishing vessel with a deck or deck structure and that is underway, it is worn by the persons on deck or in the cockpit

If your fishing vessel has a hull length of not more than 12 m and is engaged on near coastal voyage, Class 2, restricted to 2 nautical miles, or a sheltered water voyage, you may carry a PFD that meets the requirements of section 3.2 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations provided that;

  1. The PFD is worn by everyone onboard if the fishing vessel is underway and has no deck or deck structure
  2. The PFD is worn by the persons on deck or in the cockpit if the fishing vessel is underway and has a deck or deck structure

There are three Canadian-approved lifejacket types;

A SOLAS Lifejacket
  1. Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) lifejackets CLASS I meet very high performance standards and are approved for all vessels. They:
    1. will turn a person on their back in seconds to keep their face out of the water, even if they are unconscious;
    2. come in two sizes: for those over 32 kg (70 lbs.) and those less than 32 kg; and,
    3. are available in comfortable and compact inflatable configurations that can be automatically, manually or orally inflated.
A Standard Type Lifejacket
  1. Standard Type lifejackets CLASS I are approved for all vessels, except SOLAS vessels. They:
    1. will turn a person on their back to keep their face out of the water, even if they are unconscious; and,
    2. come in two sizes: for those less than 40 kg (88 lbs.) and those greater than 40 kg.
A Small Vessel Lifejacket
  1. Small Vessel lifejackets (CLASS II) are approved for small vessels. They:
    1. have less flotation than Standard Type lifejackets;
    2. will turn a person on their back, but may do so more slowly;
    3. come in two models: keyhole and vest; and
    4. come in three sizes

Question 70

The Regulations provide fishing vessel owners and operators some choice of life-saving appliance carriage requirements based on hull length and voyage class. Please see section 3.28 and section 3.29 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations to determine what your carriage requirements are. A copy of the table is provided below. Review the following carriage requirements table and determine whether you carry the required life-saving appliances.

Life-rafts and Other Life-saving Appliances
Voyage Hull Length Life rafts, Recovery Boats and Alternatives
1.Unlimited Any Length
  1. Two or more SOLAS-type life-rafts or reduced capacity life rafts with a total capacity that is sufficient to carry, on each side of the vessel, the total number of persons on board;
  2. one recovery boat; and
  3. an immersion suit of an appropriate size for each person on board.
2.Near Coastal Voyage Class 1 Any Length
  1. one of more SOLAS life rafts or reduced capacity life rafts with total capacity that is sufficient to carry the number of persons on board; and
  2. an immersion suit of an appropriate size for each person on board.
3.Near Coastal Voyage Class 2 More than 12 m
  1. One or more life rafts, or a combination of life rafts and recovery boats, with a total capacity that is sufficient to carry the number of persons on board;
  2. an EPIRB, unless the vessel is carrying on board an EPIRB required by the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999, and
  3. If the water temperature is less than 15 oC, an immersion suit or an anti-exposure work suit of an appropriate size for each person on board
4.Near Coastal Voyage Class 2 Not more than 12 m
  1. One or more life rafts, or a combination of life rafts and recovery boats, with a total capacity that is sufficient to carry the number of persons on board; or
  2. the following equipment:
    1. An EPIRB or means of two-way communications, unless the vessel is already carrying an EPIRB required by the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999, and
    2. If the water temperature is less than 15 oC, an immersion suit or an anti-exposure work suit of an appropriate size for each person on board.
5. Sheltered Waters Voyage or Near Coastal Voyage Class 2, restricted to 2 nautical miles. Any Length
  1. One or more life rafts or recovery boats with a total capacity that is sufficient to carry the number of persons on board; or
  2. the following equipment:
    1. An EPIRB or means of two-way communication, unless the vessel is carrying on board an EPIRB required by the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999, and
    2. If the water temperature is less than 15 oC, an immersion suit or an anti-exposure work suit of an appropriate size for each person on board.
Note: For vessels operating in unlimited and Near Coastal Voyage Class 1 voyages, EPIRB are required as per Ship Station (Radio) Regulation, 1999.

The period of validity of the required safety equipment is provided in the table below.

Safety Equipment Validity
Life rafts Serviced annually (or as per the Life Saving Equipment Regulations)
Immersion Suits Air pressure test as per recommended by manufacturer
Locating Light Battery As indicated on battery
Life raft Hydrostatic Release Unit As indicated on unit
EPIRB battery As indicated on battery
EPRIB Hydrostatic Release Unit As indicated on unit
Distress Flares 4 years from date of manufacture

Appliances or written procedures.

Part 0.1, Section 3.28(2) of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations states, “Instead of carrying on board the appliances referred to in subparagraph 5(b)(ii) of the table, a fishing vessel engaged on a sheltered waters voyage may carry on board appliances or written procedures, or a combination of both, for protecting all persons on board from the effects of hypothermia or cold shock resulting from swamping, capsizing or falling overboard.”

Substitute for recovery boat.

Part 0.1.Section 28(3) of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations states, “A fishing vessel referred in subsection (1) is not required to carry on board a recovery boat if the vessel carries on board an emergency boat, a rescue boat, or a seine skiff that is ordinarily used in the fishing vessel’s fishing operations.”

In addition to the requirements of life saving appliances, a Class II EPIRB (less than 15 GT) must be carried on any ship that is 8m or more in length and is engaged on a voyage greater than a Home Trade III Voyage.

An EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio-Beacon) must be:

  • A type approved by Transport Canada, be in a readily accessible area, and be able to be manually released and carried into a survival craft.
  • Located in a manner and place that would allow it to float free should the ship sink. They must not be fitted under ledges or structures that would impede their ability to float free.
  • Tested every 6 months, and the test be recorded in the radio log.

EPIRB battery packs and hydrostatic release units must be replaced per the manufacturer’s recommendations.

Immersion suits must be a type approved by Transport Canada.

A life raft must be:

  • A type approved by Transport Canada,
  • Serviced as recommended by the manufacturer,
  • Be located in a readily accessible area, and be able to be launched quickly and easily (either manually or via a suitable launching device).
  • Able to float free and self-actuate in the event of capsizing.
  • Stowed in an optimum position where they can be easily accessed and deployed in an emergency. The life rafts should not be stowed under booms, masts, or other gear that could prevent it from floating free. To ensure the float free capability, life rafts must be:
    1. Placed in deep chocks, without lashing, so that they float free automatically if the vessel sinks, or
    2. Secured by lashing fitted with a hydrostatic release unit, or
    3. Placed or secured such that they will automatically float free.

Note: You can find more information on life raft location and storage in SSB 07-2007.

Question 71

A life raft or recovery boat must be a type approved by Transport Canada, located in a readily accessible area and be serviced as recommended by the manufacturer.

Question 72

A life raft must be serviced at the intervals (for example, annually or every two years) set out in section 2 of Schedule IV to the Life Saving Equipment Regulations at a service station accredited by the life raft manufacturer. The location and last date of service must be clearly marked on the life raft.

Question 73

Except in the case of a life raft packed in a valise-type container, you should store your life raft in a manner and fitted with hydrostatic release unit that allows it to automatically float free if the vessel sinks.

Question 74

A life raft or recovery boat must be equipped with a launching appliance, unless it is capable of being launched safely and rapidly by manual means.

10: Safety equipment – fire fighting

Question 75

Fire extinguishers must be kept fully charged, checked monthly and serviced at required intervals.

Question 76

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no

Question 77

Brackets are essential for securing the fire extinguisher and ensuring its accessibility.

Fire extinguisher secured in brackets.

Question 78

Fire extinguishers in accommodation spaces must not be CO2, halon or any other gas type.

Question 79

A 23 kg fire extinguisher is approximately 50 lbs. Lighter weight fire extinguisher are easier to use.

Question 80

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

Question 81

Reference section 3.4 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations “Exception”

A table of equivalence is provided. As stated in the regulations, certain fire extinguishers can be fitted onboard in lieu of the fire extinguishers stated in Column 1 of the Table. See Table for details.

Table of Equivalents
Item Column 1
Classification
Column 2
Multi-purpose
Dry Chemical (ammonium phosphate)
Net Weight
Column 3
Regular Dry
Chemical (sodium bicarbonate)
(Class B and C fires only)
Net Weight
Column 4
Carbon Dioxide
(Class B and C fires only)
Net Weight
kg lb. kg lb. kg lb.
1. 1A:5B:C 1.5 3
2. 2A:10B:C 2.25 5
3. 2A:20B:C 4.5 10
4. 5B:C 1.5 3 1.5 3 2.25 5
5. 10B:C 2.25 5 2.25 5 4.5 10
6. 20B:C 4.5 10 4.5 10 9 20

11: Pollution prevention

Questions 82 and 83

Note: Depending on the severity of the pollutant discharged in waters under Canadian jurisdiction (in this instance sewage); the Minister may commence proceedings against a person or a vessel for that discharge, in the form of a violation or an offence.

  • If proceeded as a violation under the Administrative Monetary Penalties scheme, every person or vessel that discharges a prescribed pollutant in contravention of section 187 of the CSA,2001 is liable to a penalty within the range of C$ 1250 ~25,000 dollars, as prescribed under the Administrative Monetary Penalties and Notices (CSA, 2001) Regulations.
  • If proceeded as an offence under the summary conviction process under Section 191(1) of the CSA, 2001, every person or vessel that commits an offence, is liable on summary conviction to a fine not more than C$ 1 million dollars, or to imprisonment of not more than 18 months or a combination of both.

Note: A toilet fitted on a vessel must be secured in a manner that ensures its safe operation in any environmental conditions liable to be encountered.

A holding tank’s construction:

  1. Should not compromise the integrity of the hull.
  2. Should be of structurally sound material that prevents the tank contents from leaking.
  3. Should prevent the potable water system or other systems from becoming contaminated.
  4. Should be resistant to corrosion by sewage.
  5. Should have an adequate volume for the ship’s human-rated capacity on a normal voyage.
  6. Should include a discharge connection and piping system for the removal of the tank contents at a sewage reception facility.
  7. Should be designed so you can determine the level of sewage in the tank without opening the tank and without contacting or removing any of the tank contents; or be equipped with a device that allows the determination to be made.
  8. Should include a ventilation device whose outlet is on the exterior of the ship, in a safe location away from ignition and areas usually occupied by people; and has a flame screen of non-corrosive material fitted to the vent outlet.

Example of Acceptable Facility

A system showing the intake through-hull, vent line, deck pump-out fitting, holding tank, dip tube and p-trap

12: Vessel construction - ventilation

Question 84

Every space on a fishing vessel in which machinery is located must be ventilated so that in all weather conditions where the engines and other fuel-burning appliances are operating at full power, an adequate supply of air is maintained to ensure the safety and comfort of the crew and the operation of the engines and appliances.

Ventilating provisions and openings to the engine space must provide for the supply of combustion air and must accommodate the air requirements of each propulsion and auxiliary engine in that space. Refer to the manufacturer’s documentation to determine the air requirements of each engine in a space. The openings for providing the air requirements of propulsion and auxiliary engine may also function as means of providing natural ventilation to the space.

Example of ventilation of enclosed spaces

A vessel showing examples of ventilation of enclosed spaces

Question 85

A mechanical ventilation system must be installed in a fishing vessel in accordance with Part II of FVSR, Sub-section 56(9) in:

  1. every space that is below deck and in which a gasoline-fuelled engine is located; and
  2. every other space, including bilges, in which gasoline fuel vapors may collect and may not readily dissipate

Part II Sub-section 56(9) states that; “The mechanical ventilation system referred to in subsection (8) shall meet the following requirements:

  1. System shall include both inlet and exhaust ducts.
  2. Exhaust duct opening shall be located in a low position.
  3. Exhaust outlet shall lead to a location on the open deck where fumes may safely dissipate.
  4. Blower motors shall be of a sealed type or ignition protected.
  5. Blower motors shall be of a sealed type or ignition protected and shall be suitable for installation in damp locations.

Exhaust gases contain carbon monoxide (CO), which can cause headaches, drowsiness, nausea, and lead to unconsciousness as the quantity inhaled is increased. Remember that in sufficient quantity, carbon monoxide can kill in an instant.

You must regularly check exhaust pipe joints and clamps for tightness and replace gaskets as required. It is very important to have exhaust manifolds, exhaust pipes, mufflers and tailpipes regularly checked and inspected for visible signs of corrosion or damage before an actual exhaust leak happens.

Question 86

For gasoline-fueled engines, machinery space blowers must be designed to operate for a minimum of four minutes continuous operation, more if required, to clear any space of combustible vapours, before starting the engine.

Gasoline vapours are highly explosive, particularly in confined spaces. Remember that gasoline vapours are heavier than air and will sink to the lowest point.

Immediately before every start up, you must operate the blower for at least four minutes or the length of time recommended by the vessel manufacturer, whichever is longer.

You must post a notice similar to the one shown here at the normal operation positions.

Warning:

Gasoline vapour may explode resulting in injury or death.

Before starting the engine, operate blower for 4 minutes and verify blower operation.

Question 87

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

13: Vessel construction – fuel system

Question 88

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

Question 89

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

Question 90

No person shall install or maintain a fuel tank or a fuel system on a vessel in a manner that permits or is likely to permit leakage or spillage of fuel into the hull or into the environment. All Fuel tanks must be provided with protection from leakage caused by shock, corrosion, abrasion or fire.

Question 91

Spilled fuel must not enter the vessel.

  • Prevent fuel spillage, protect fuel lines from damage, prevent leakage in the fuel system by using appropriate couplings and connectors;
  • keep save-alls clean;
  • cleanup any spilled fuel immediately; and
  • do not allow spilled fueled to accumulate in the bilge or any enclosed space

14: Personal life-saving appliances, visual signals and fire-fighting equipment-vessel hull length not more than 6m

Note: Please refer to the tables at sections 3.26; 3.27; and 3.37 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations.

Question 92

A buoyant heaving line ‘Throw Bag’ example. A 15m x 7mm 300kg test braided polypropylene floating rope. Bright orange nylon and polyester complete with self-draining bag that comes with adjustable strap and retro-reflective safety tape.

A buoyant heaving line
A buoyant heaving line

Note: A buoyant heaving line must be fitted with a buoyant mass that will help carry out the end of the line when the line is thrown.

Question 93

Marine pyrotechnic distress signals, must have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Pyrotechnic distress signals are only good for four years from the date of manufacture (not purchase), which is stamped on every pyrotechnic distress signal. Pyrotechnic distress signals must be kept within reach and stored vertically in a cool, dry location (such as a watertight container) to keep them in good working condition.


Rocket Parachute Flare

Multi-Star Flare

Hand-Held Flare

Smoke Signal

There are four types of approved pyrotechnic distress signals:

  • Type A: Rocket Parachute Flare
  • Type B: Multi-Star Flare
  • Type C: Hand-Held Flare
  • Type D: Smoke Signal (Buoyant or Hand-Held) – this type is excluded from the requirements

Note: Section 3.27 FVSR Visual Signals.

Exception;
(2) A fishing vessel is not required to carry on board pyrotechnic distress signals if the vessel is equipped with a two-way radio communication system that makes it possible to maintain communication and the vessel is operated:

  • on a river, canal or lake where it cannot at any time be more than one nautical mile from the closest shore
  • exclusively within the confines of a manned aquaculture facility
  • within 500 m from shore

Question 94

What does the 1A: 5B: C rating mean? The letters refer to the type of fire, and the numbers refer to the size of fire the extinguisher can put out.

Fire Class Appropriate for fires involving: Number refers to:
A Combustible materials such as wood, cloth, paper, rubber or plastic.

How much water the extinguisher is equal to – the standard uses a formula of 1 ¼ gallons (US) multiplied by the rating number.

For example, a 1A: 5B: C extinguisher is equal to 1 ¼ gallons of water to fight a Class A fire.

B Flammable or combustible liquids such as oil, gasoline or grease.

The amount of square feet of a Class B fire that should be extinguished if the extinguisher is used correctly by an untrained person.

For example, a 1A: 5B: C extinguisher should be able to extinguish 5 square feet of a Class B fire.

C Electrical equipment such as appliances and wiring. No number, the “C” only denotes that the extinguisher is safe for a Class C fire.

Class A ratings indicate how much water the extinguisher is equal to fight a Class A fire. (Wood, paper, solid material). The standard uses a formula of 1 ¼ gallons (US) multiplied by the rating number.

Class B ratings refer to the amount of square feet of a Class B fire (Oil, gasoline, liquid) that should be extinguished if the extinguisher is used correctly by an untrained person (i.e. 10 square feet)

Class C does not have a rating and only denotes that it is safe (non-conducting) for a Class C fire. (Electrical)

Fire extinguishers are to be maintained in good working order and serviced (tagged) by approved technicians as per the manufacturers recommended schedule and practice.

Fire extinguishers in accommodation spaces should not be CO2, halon or any other gas type

Section 3.37(1) FVSR Firefighting Equipment

Table for Firefighting Equipment
Item Column 1
Hull Length
Column 2
Firefighting Equipment
1 Not more than 6 m
  1. a 1A:5B:C portable fire extinguisher; and
  2. a 1A:5B:C portable fire extinguisher, if the vessel is equipped with a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigerating appliance
2 More than 6 m but not more than 9 m
  1. a 2A:10B:C portable fire extinguisher;
  2. a 2A:10B:C portable fire extinguisher, if the vessel is equipped with a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigerating appliance; and
  3. a 10B:C portable fire extinguisher at the entrance to the engine space
3 More than 9 m but not more than 15 m
  1. a 2A:10B:C portable fire extinguisher;
  2. a 2A:10B:C portable fire extinguisher at each access to a space fitted with a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigerating appliance;
  3. a 10B:C portable fire extinguisher at the entrance to the engine space;
  4. a fire axe; and
  5. a bucket
4 More than 15 m
  1. a 2A:20B:C portable fire extinguisher;
  2. a 2A:20B:C portable fire extinguisher at the following locations:
    1. at each access to a space fitted with a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigerating appliance, and
    2. at the entrance to each accommodation space;
  3. a 20B:C portable fire extinguisher at the entrance to the engine space
  4. a fire axe; and
  5. two buckets

Question 95

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

Note: Firefighting Equipment. Section 3.37(2) FVSR

Exception

A fishing vessel that is not power-driven and is not equipped with an electrical system does not have to carry on board a portable fire extinguisher set out in paragraphs&nsbp;1(a), 2(a), 3(a) and 4(a) of the table to subsection (1)

Reduced number of portable fire extinguishers

(3) You may reduce the total number of portable fire extinguishers that must be carried on board a fishing vessel by one if you arrange the remaining fire extinguishers to be readily accessible near the equipment or locations referred to in paragraphs 1(b), 2(b) and (c), 3(b) and (c) and 4(b) and (c) of the table to subsection (1).

Portable fire extinguishers

Section 3.38 (1) a portable fire extinguisher required by these Regulations to be carried on board a fishing vessel must:

  1. Bear a mark indicating that it is certified for marine use by a product certification body; or
  2. Be a type approved by the United States Coast Guard

15: Personal life-saving appliances, visual signals and fire-fighting equipment-vessel hull length more than 6m but not more than 9m

Note: Please refer to the tables at sections 3.26; 3.27and 3.37 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations.

Question 96

A buoyant heaving line ‘Throw Bag’ example. A 15m x 7mm 300kg test braided polypropylene floating rope. Bright orange nylon and polyester complete with self-draining bag that comes with adjustable strap and retro-reflective safety tape.

A buoyant heaving line
A buoyant heaving line

Note: A buoyant heaving line must be fitted with a buoyant mass that will help carry out the end of the line when the line is thrown.

Or a Lifebuoy with a 15m buoyant line

Lifebuoy with a 15m buoyant line
Lifebuoy with a 15m buoyant line

Carrying a lifebuoy is the preferred option. It should have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Lifebuoys must be at least 610 mm (24”) in diameter. If it doesn't already have one, you must attach the lifebuoy to a buoyant line of good quality that will not kink and is at least 9.5 mm in diameter and 15 m long. Smaller lifebuoys and horseshoe-type devices do not meet the approved specification, but may be carried in addition to the approved lifebuoy(s).] [SOLAS lifebuoys are 762 mm (30”) in diameter]

When buying a lifebuoy, check to make sure it is approved by Transport Canada. It should bear an "Approved by the Department of Transport" marking and an approval number like this: "T.C.xxx.xxx.xxx."

Approved lifebuoys have colors that are easy to see. Don't paint them or do anything else that may make them less visible. You should mark the name of your vessel on your lifebuoys.

Horseshoe lifebuoys are not approved for use on commercial vessels.

Question 97

Marine pyrotechnic distress signals, must have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Pyrotechnic distress signals are only good for four years from the date of manufacture (not purchase), which is stamped on every pyrotechnic distress signal. Keep pyrotechnic distress signals within reach and stored vertically in a cool, dry location (such as a watertight container) to keep them in good working condition.


Rocket Parachute Flare

Multi-Star Flare

Hand-Held Flare

Smoke Signal

There are four types of approved pyrotechnic distress signals:

  • Type A: Rocket Parachute Flare
  • Type B: Multi-Star Flare
  • Type C: Hand-Held Flare
  • Type D: Smoke Signal (Buoyant or Hand-Held) - this type is excluded from the requirements.

Note: Section 3.27 FVSR Visual Signals

Exception

(2) A fishing vessel is not required to carry on board pyrotechnic distress signals if it is equipped with a two-way radio communication system that makes it possible to maintain communication and the vessel is operated;

  • on a river, canal or lake where it cannot at any time be more than one nautical mile from the closest shore
  • exclusively within the confines of a manned aquaculture facility; and
  • within 500 m from shore.

Questions 98, 99 and 100

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

Note: Firefighting Equipment. Section 3.37(2) FVSR

Exception

A fishing vessel that is not power-driven and is not equipped with an electrical system does not have to carry on board a portable fire extinguisher set out in paragraphs 1(a), 2(a), 3(a) and 4(a) of the table to subsection (1).

Reduced number of portable fire extinguishers

(3) You may reduce the total number of portable fire extinguishers that must be carried on board a fishing vessel by one, if you arrange the remaining fire extinguishers to be readily accessible near the equipment or locations referred to in paragraphs 1(b), 2(b) and (c), 3(b) and (c) and 4(b) and (c) of the table to subsection (1).

Portable fire extinguishers

Section 3.38 (1) a portable fire extinguisher required by these Regulations to be carried on board a fishing vessel must:

  1. Bear a mark indicating that it is certified for marine use by a product certification body; or
  2. Be of a type that is approved by the United States Coast Guard

Section 3.37(1) Firefighting Equipment – According to the table cited in Q.94 above.

16: Personal life-saving appliance and visual signals-vessels hull length more than 9m but not more than 12m

Note: Please refer to the tables at sections 3.26; 3.27; and 3.37 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations.

Question 101

A buoyant heaving line ‘Throw Bag’ example. A 15m x 7mm 300kg test braided polypropylene floating rope. Bright orange nylon and polyester complete with self-draining bag that comes with adjustable strap and retro-reflective safety tape.

A buoyant heaving line
A buoyant heaving line

Note: A buoyant heaving line must be fitted with a buoyant mass that will help carry out the end of the line when the line is thrown.

And a Lifebuoy with a 15m buoyant line

A Lifebuoy with a 15m buoyant line
Lifebuoy with a 15m buoyant line

It must have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Lifebuoys must be at least 610 mm (24”) in diameter. If it doesn't already have one, you must attach the lifebuoy to a buoyant line of good quality that will not kink and is at least 9.5 mm in diameter and 15 m long. Smaller lifebuoys and horseshoe-type devices do not meet the approved specification, but may be carried in addition to the approved lifebuoy(s).

When buying a lifebuoy, check to make sure it is approved by Transport Canada. It should bear an "Approved by the Department of Transport" marking and an approval number like this: "T.C.xxx.xxx.xxx."

Approved lifebuoys have colors that are easy to see. Don't paint them or do anything else that may make them less visible. You should mark the name of your vessel on your lifebuoys.

Horseshoe lifebuoys are not approved for use on commercial vessels.

Question 102

Marine pyrotechnic distress signals, must have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Pyrotechnic distress signals are only good for four years from the date of manufacture (not purchase), which is stamped on every pyrotechnic distress signal. Pyrotechnic distress signals must be kept within reach and stored vertically in a cool, dry location (such as a watertight container) to keep them in good working condition.


Rocket Parachute Flare

Multi-Star Flare

Hand-Held Flare

Smoke Signal

There are four types of approved pyrotechnic distress signals:

  • Type A: Rocket Parachute Flare
  • Type B: Multi-Star Flare
  • Type C: Hand-Held Flare
  • Type D: Smoke Signal (Buoyant or Hand-Held)

Note: Section 3.27 FVSR Visual Signals

Exception

(2) A fishing vessel is not required to carry on board pyrotechnic distress signals if it is equipped with a two-way radio communication system that makes it possible to maintain communication and the vessel operate:

  • on a river, canal or lake where it cannot at any time be more than one nautical mile from the closest shore;
  • exclusively within the confines of a manned aquaculture facility; and
  • within 500 m from shore

Question 103

A signaling mirror: Self-explanatory answer. Yes or No.

17: Fire-fighting equipment-vessels hull length more than 9m but not more than 15m

Note: Please refer to the tables at sections 3.26; 3.27; and 3.37 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations.

Question 104

What does the 1A: 5B: C rating mean? The letters refer to the type of fire, and the numbers refer to the size of fire the extinguisher can handle. - According to table cited in Q.94 above.

Questions 105 and 106

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or No.

Question 107

Fire axes must be painted red and secured in a visible and accessible location.

A Fire Axe
A Fire Axe

Question 108

A bucket must have a capacity of 10 L or more and be fitted with a lanyard long enough to reach the water from its storage location.

A Fire bucket
A Fire bucket

Note: Firefighting Equipment Section 3.37(2) FVSR

Exception

A fishing vessel that is not power-driven and is not equipped with an electrical system does not have to carry on board a portable fire extinguisher set out in paragraphs 1(a), 2(a), 3(a) and 4(a) of the table to subsection (1).

Reduced number of portable fire extinguishers

(3) You may reduce the total number of portable fire extinguishers that must be carried on board a fishing vessel by one, if you arrange the remaining fire extinguishers to be readily accessible near the equipment or locations referred to in paragraphs 1(b), 2(b) and (c), 3(b) and (c) and 4(b) and (c) of the table to subsection (1).

Portable fire extinguishers

Section 3.38 (1) FVSR a portable fire extinguisher required by these Regulations to be carried on board a fishing vessel must:

  1. Bear a mark indicating that it is certified for marine use by a product certification body; or
  2. Be a type approved by the United States Coast Guard.

Section 3.37(1) FVSR Firefighting Equipment - According to table cited in Q.94 above.

18: Personal life-saving appliances and visual signals -vessel hull length more than 12m but not more than 15m

Note: Please refer to the tables at sections 3.26; 3.27; and 3.37 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations.

Question 109

A buoyant heaving line ‘Throw Bag’ example. A 30m x 7mm 300kg test braided polypropylene floating rope. Bright orange nylon and polyester complete with self-draining bag that comes with adjustable strap and retro-reflective safety tape.

A buoyant heaving line
A buoyant heaving line

Note: A buoyant heaving line must be fitted with a buoyant mass that will help carry out the end of the line when the line is thrown.

A SOLAS Lifebuoy with Self-igniting light
SOLAS Lifebuoy with Self-igniting light

Or a SOLAS Lifebuoy with a 30m buoyant line
SOLAS Lifebuoy with a 30m buoyant line

A SOLAS lifebuoy that is equipped with a self-igniting light or a buoyant line of not less than 30m in length. It must have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. SOLAS lifebuoys are 762 mm (30 in) in diameter. Smaller lifebuoys and horseshoe-type devices do not meet the approved specification, but may be carried in addition to the approved lifebuoy(s).

Question 110

Marine pyrotechnic distress signals, must have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Pyrotechnic distress signals are only good for four years from the date of manufacture (not purchase), which is stamped on every pyrotechnic distress signal. Pyrotechnic distress signals must be kept within reach and stored vertically in a cool, dry location (such as a watertight container) to keep them in good working condition.


Rocket Parachute Flare

Multi-Star Flare

Hand-Held Flare

Smoke Signal

There are four types of approved pyrotechnic distress signals:

  • Type A: Rocket Parachute Flare
  • Type B: Multi-Star Flare
  • Type C: Hand-Held Flare
  • Type D: Smoke Signal (Buoyant or Hand-Held)

Note: Section 3.27 FVSR Visual Signals

Exception

(2) A fishing vessel is not required to carry on board pyrotechnic distress signals if the vessel is equipped with a two-way radio communication system that makes it possible to maintain communication and the vessel is operated:

  • on a river, canal or lake where it cannot at any time be more than one nautical mile from the closest shore;
  • exclusively within the confines of a manned aquaculture facility; and
  • within 500 m from shore.

Question 111

Signaling mirror. Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

19: Personal life-saving appliance, visual signals and fire-fighting equipment-vessels hull length more than 15m

Note: Please refer to the tables at sections 3.26; 3.27; and 3.37 of the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations.

Question 112

What does the 2A: 20B: C rating mean? The letters refer to the type of fire, and the numbers refer to the size of fire the extinguisher can put out. - According to table cited in Q.94 above.

Questions 113, 114 and 115

Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

Question 116

Fire axes must be painted red and secured in a visible and accessible location

A Fire Axe
A Fire Axe

Question 117

Each bucket must have a capacity of 10 L or more and be fitted with a lanyard long enough to reach the water from its storage location.

A Fire bucket
A Fire bucket

Question 118

A buoyant heaving line ‘Throw Bag’ example. A 30m x 7mm 300kg test braided polypropylene floating rope. Bright orange nylon and polyester complete with self-draining bag that comes with adjustable strap and retro-reflective safety tape.

A buoyant heaving line
A buoyant heaving line

Note: A buoyant heaving line must be fitted with a buoyant mass that will help carry out the end of the line when the line is thrown.

Self-igniting lights.

A SOLAS Lifebuoy with Self-igniting light
SOLAS Lifebuoy with Self-igniting light

And a SOLAS Lifebuoy with a 30m buoyant line
SOLAS Lifebuoy with a 30m buoyant line

A SOLAS lifebuoy that is equipped with a self-igniting light and a SOLAS Lifebuoy that is attached to buoyant line of not less than 30 m in length. They must have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Smaller lifebuoys and horseshoe-type devices do not meet the approved specification, but may be carried in addition to the approved lifebuoy(s).

Question 119

Marine pyrotechnic distress signals, must have a Transport Canada approval stamp or label. Pyrotechnic distress signals are only good for four years from the date of manufacture (not purchase), which is stamped on every pyrotechnic distress signal. Pyrotechnic distress signals must be kept within reach and stored vertically in a cool, dry location (such as a watertight container) to keep them in good working condition.


Rocket Parachute Flare

Multi-Star Flare

Hand-Held Flare

Smoke Signal

There are four types of approved pyrotechnic distress signals:

  • Type A: Rocket Parachute Flare
  • Type B: Multi-Star Flare
  • Type C: Hand-Held Flare
  • Type D: Smoke Signal (Buoyant or Hand-Held)

Note: Section 3.27 FVSR Visual Signals

Exception

(2) A fishing vessel is not required to carry on board pyrotechnic distress signals if the vessel is equipped with a two-way radio communication system that makes it possible to maintain communication and the vessel is operated:

  • on a river, canal or lake where it cannot at any time be more than one nautical mile from the closest shore
  • exclusively within the confines of a manned aquaculture facility
  • within 500 m from shore

Question 120

Signaling mirror. Self-explanatory answer. Yes or no.

Note: Firefighting Equipment. Section 3.37(2) FVSR

Exception

A fishing vessel that is not power-driven and is not equipped with an electrical system does not have to carry on board a portable fire extinguisher set out in paragraphs 1(a), 2(a), 3(a) and 4(a) of the table to subsection (1)

Reduced number of portable fire extinguishers

(3) You may reduce the total number of portable fire extinguishers that must be carried on board a fishing vessel by one, if you arrange the remaining fire extinguishers to be readily accessible near the equipment or locations referred to in paragraphs 1(b), 2(b) and (c), 3(b) and (c) and 4(b) and (c) of the table to subsection (1).

Portable fire extinguishers

Section 3.38 (1) FVSR a portable fire extinguisher required by these Regulations to be carried on board a fishing vessel must:

  1. Bear a mark indicating that it is certified for marine use by a product certification body; or
  2. Be of a type that is approved by the United States Coast Guard

Section 3.37(1) FVSR Firefighting Equipment – (According to the table cited in Q.94 above).

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