TP 14909E – Environmental Response Standards

The Environmental Response Standards relates to Phase I of the new regulations that were published in Canada Gazette Part II on July 10, 2019.

The amendments to Part 8 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 that came into force in 2014 increase federal oversight of oil handling facilities (OHFs), by adding provisions respecting the loading or unloading of oil to or from a prescribed vessel to specific classes of OHFs. It requires new OHFs to declare their operations to the Minister through a notification process. Additional requirements were introduced for the development of an oil pollution prevention plan (OPPP). The new standards will provide guidance to OHF operators and are intended to be used in the planning process in preparation for a response to an oil pollution incident.

On this page

1. General

1.1 Introduction

1.1.1 The Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (CSA 2001), Part 8, applies to all Canadian waters, which includes all inland waters and waters out to 200 nautical miles. It applies to vessels in those waters, oil handling facilities (OHF) engaged in or proposing to engage in the loading and unloading of oil to or from prescribed vessels and to certified Response Organizations (ROs), a RO seeking to apply for a certificate of designation and to a qualified persons who make an application to receive a certificate of designation.

1.1.2 The authorities [and jurisdictional management] outlined in the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources Accord Implementation Act (the Accord Act), vessels engaged in the removal of oil and gas from the Sea bed of internal waters, territorial sea, or the continental shelf of Canada do not fall under the purview of the Regulations. Rather, the Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (1985) governs these activities. It, As a result the Environmental Response Regulations do not apply to vessels engaged in the location and removal of oil and gas from the seabed of internal waters, the territorial sea or the continental shelf of Canada. The Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (1985) governs these activities, which is the responsibility of the Minister for Natural Resources Canada.

1.1.3 The Environmental Response Standards (referred to below as “the standards”) supports and provides context to the Environmental Response Regulations (referred to below as “the Regulations”.) that deal with matters related to the prevention and response to marine spills from OHFs of a class established by the Regulations that are engaged in the loading or unloading of oil to or from a prescribed vessel.  The standards also explain the types of vessels (the prescribed classes) that require an arrangement with a response organization.  This Transport Publication (TP) supports the Regulation and replaces TP 12402 (Oil Handling Facilities Standard, 1995).

1.1.4 Oil Handling Facilities: This section of the TP will provide additional explanation of the requirements found in the Regulations surrounding the details in the oil pollution prevention and emergency plans, exercises and training. It also explains the requirement for OHFs of an established class to have a declaration on site and for those OHFs located at or south of 60 degrees north latitude to have an arrangement with a response organization.

1.1.5 Vessels:  This section explains the requirements for prescribed classes of vessels to have a declaration on board.

1.2 Statutory Authority

1.2.1 As per the CSA 2001, subsections 35(1) and 182(1) the Governor in Council may, on the recommendation of the Minister, make regulations for carrying out the purposes and provisions of Part 8, including regulations:

  1. respecting the circumstances in which operators of oil handling facilities shall report discharges or anticipated discharges of pollutants, the manner of making the reports and the persons to whom the reports shall be made (182(1)(a));
  2. establishing classes of oil handling facilities and determining which of the requirements set out in sections 167.1 to 168.01 apply to the operators or, or to persons who propose to operate, oil handling facilities of each class (182(1)(d.1));
  3. respecting oil pollution prevention plans and oil pollution emergency plans, including the time within which the plans shall be submitted to the Minister and the circumstances in which up-to-date plans shall be submitted to the Minister (182(1)(d.2));
  4. respecting the procedures, equipment and resources referred to in paragraph 168(1)(e) and section 168.3 (182(1)(d.3));
  5. respecting the information and documents referred to in sections 167.1 and 167.3 and subsection 168.01(2), including the time within which the information and documents shall be submitted to the Minister (182(1)(d.4)); and
  6. prescribing anything that by this Part (Part 8) is to be prescribed (182(1)(e)).

1.3 Summary of Authority 

1.3.1 The Environmental Response Standards provides support to the Environmental Response Regulations as a tool to ensure prescribed vessels have an arrangement with a RO and a declaration on board the vessel.  The standards will also support the requirements of an OHF of an established class to have a declaration on site, an arrangement with a RO (where applicable), an oil pollution prevention plan and an oil pollution emergency plan, and the procedures, equipment and resources for immediate use in the event of an oil pollution incident.

2. Vessels

2.1 General

2.1.1 All prescribed vessels destined to a Canadian port must ensure that they have a valid arrangement in place with the certified oil spill response organization (RO) in their region prior to arrival in Canadian waters.

2.1.1.1 The CSA 2001 Part 8, paragraph 167(1)(a) states the following:

…every prescribed vessel or vessel of a prescribed class shall

(a) have an arrangement with a response organization in respect of a quantity of oil that is at least equal to the total amount of oil that the vessel carries, both as cargo and as fuel, to a prescribed maximum quantity, and in respect of waters where the vessel navigates or engages in marine activity

2.1.2 Declaration

The purpose of the declaration is to bring together a few critical pieces of information that are readily available in the event of an oil pollution incident. Experience has shown that the information supplied in this declaration can greatly reduce delays in mounting an effective response to an oil pollution incident.

In paragraph 167(1)(b) of the CSA 2001, every prescribed vessel must have on board a declaration, that:

  1. Identifies the name and address of the vessels insurer or, in the case of a subscription policy, the name and address of the lead insurer who provides pollution insurance coverage in respect of the vessel;
  2. Confirms the arrangement has been made (for vessels located in waters at or south of 60 degrees north latitude), and
  3. Identifies every person who is authorized to implement the arrangement (for vessels located in waters at or south of 60 degrees north latitude).

2.1.2.1 In addition to the above, the declaration also identifies the name of the person responsible for implementing the Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan (SOPEP) required by subsection 27(1) of the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations.

2.1.3 There are two declarations found in schedules 4 and 5 of this standard; one for vessels located south 60 degrees north latitude and one for vessels located north of 60 degrees north latitude.

  1. Schedule 4 - ER Vessel Declaration - South of 60 – Form 85-0490E
  2. Schedule 5 - ER Vessel Declaration - North of 60 – Form 85-0507E

3. Oil Handling Facilities

3.1 General

3.1.1 This Part provides further explanation and support to the requirements found in the Regulations as they pertain to OHFs of an established class.

3.1.2 Part 8 of the CSA 2001 outlines the framework for prevention and response for those who propose to operate an OHF and operators of existing OHFs that are engaged in the loading or unloading of oil to or from a prescribed vessel. 

3.1.3 The framework is built to ensure those persons who propose to operate an OHF notify the Minister of the proposed operations and to provide the Minister with the plans in advance of commencement of operations. 

3.1.4 For the operators of OHFs, the framework ensures that they have an arrangement with a response organization (where applicable), an up to date oil pollution prevention plan and oil pollution emergency plan on site and have procedures, equipment and resources available for immediate use in the event of an oil pollution incident. The Act also establishes a requirement that if the operator proposes to make changes to its facility that will impact the loading and unloading of oil to or from a vessel, then the operator must notify the Minister of the proposed change, revise its plans and submit those plans to the Minister in advance of the change taking place. 

3.1.5 The standards are intended to be used in support of the Regulations and where necessary, provide further information for those items that are “specified” in the CSA 2001. 

3.1.6 Each oil pollution prevention plan and oil pollution emergency plan will be unique, taking into account the geographic features specific to the facility.

3.2 Established Classes of Oil Handling Facilities

3.2.1 CSA 2001 describes standards as including “specifications and technical and operational requirements”.  The standards provide details to persons who propose to operate an OHF of a class established by the regulations and for operators of OHFs of a class established by the regulations, in developing their oil pollution prevention plan and oil pollution emergency plan.  These standards also provide details regarding the requirement for OHFs to have the procedures, equipment and resources required by the Regulations.

3.2.2 The classes of oil handling facilities set out in the Environmental Response Regulations are designed to be linked to the area in which they are located – at or south of 60 degrees north latitude or north of 60 degrees north latitude.  It also establishes levels based on the facility’s maximum transfer rate per cubic metres per hour, in respect of oil that is loaded or unloaded to or from prescribed vessels referred to in Part 1 of the Regulations.

3.2.3 Though many of the requirements for OHFs are similar irrespective of their location, some differ depending on their geographical location, thereby recognizing the flexibility to establish different requirements to account for practical considerations. For example, OHFs located north of 60 degrees north latitude are not required to have an arrangement with a response organization just by the mere fact that there are currently no TC certified response organizations that service north of 60. However, in order to cover for the lack of a response organization, additional requirements are set out in the Regulations to ensure that those OHFs have planned for, and are prepared to deal with a spill at the facility. The additional requirements include having the necessary procedures to respond to a discharge of the total quantity of oil that could be loaded or unloaded to or from a vessel, up to a maximum of 10,000 tonnes.  Additionally, equipment and resources are required to contain, control, recover and clean up the discharge of a quantity of oil up to the applicable threshold set out in clauses 11(1)(b)(i)(A) to (D) of the Regulations.

3.3 Declaration

3.3.1 In accordance with the CSA 2001 Part 8, section 168, every OHF of a class established by the Regulations, must have on site a declaration, in the form set out in schedule 1 of the standards, that:

  1. describes the manner in which the operator will comply with the Environmental Response Regulations and reporting requirements in Part 3 of the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations;
  2. confirms that the arrangement has been made (for OHFs south of 60 degrees north latitude); and
  3. identifies every person who is authorized to implement the arrangement (for OHFs south of 60 degrees north latitude) and the oil pollution emergency plan.

3.3.2 The purpose of the declaration is to bring together a few critical pieces of information from the oil pollution emergency plan and to have this information readily available in the event of an oil pollution incident. Experience has shown that the information supplied in this declaration can greatly reduce delays in mounting an effective response to an oil pollution incident.

3.3.3 There are two declarations found in schedule 1 and 2; one for OHFs located at or south of 60 degrees north latitude and one for those located north of 60 degrees north latitude.

  1. Schedule 1 - OHF Declaration - North of 60 Degrees – Form 81-0030E
  2. Schedule 2 - OHF Declaration - South of 60 Degrees – Form 81-0031E

3.4 Notification of Proposed Operations

3.4.1 Upon receiving Royal Assent in December 2014, Bill C-3, the Safeguarding Canada’s Seas and Skies Act brought forward changes to the CSA 2001 that introduced requirements for persons who propose to operate an OHF.  The Act sets out the timeframes for the submission of the oil pollution prevention and emergency plans (subsection 167.2(1) of the CSA 2001) while the Regulations stipulate the timeframe for notifying the Minister of the proposed operations (as required under section 167.1 of the CSA 2001).

3.4.2 Section 8 of the Regulations stipulates that a person proposing to operate an OHF must notify the Minister of the proposed operations at least 180 days before commencing transfer operations.  This timeframe is consistent with the CSA 2001 requirement (s. 168.01) for notifying the Minister when proposed changes are being made to the OHF’s operations.

3.4.3 Schedule 3 of these standards includes the information the person should provide to the Department when making such notification of the proposed operations (section 167.1).

3.4.4 This advance notice will provide the department with the time needed to prepare for the receipt of the plans (ss. 167.2(1) - 90 days prior to commencement), review the plans and schedule the necessary inspections.

3.4.5 The prescribed requirements for the oil pollution prevention and emergency plans that the person submits to the Department are found in Part 2 of the Regulations.

3.5 Notification of Proposed Change to Operations

3.5.1 The changes made to the CSA 2001 as part of Bill C-3, section 168.01 lays out the framework and requirements for operators of OHFs that propose to make a change or permit a change to be made to the facility’s transfer operations.

3.5.2 Section 168.01 of the Act sets out the requirements and the timeframe for operators of an OHF to notify the Minister, the timeframe for submitting revised oil pollution prevention and oil pollution emergency plans to the Minister and the obligation for the operator to ensure the plans meet the requirements set out in the Regulations before the change to be made.

3.5.3 Schedule 3 of these standards provides the information that the operator of the OHF should provide to the Department when making such a notification.

Schedule 3 – Notification of Proposed Operations or Notification of a Change to Operations – Form 81-0032E

3.6 Oil Pollution Prevention Plan (OPPP)

3.6.1 General

These standards provide supporting details for the requirements found in the Regulations on what must be contained in the OPPP. This plan is designed to ensure that the necessary planning is undertaken to help prevent a discharge of oil during the loading or unloading of oil to or from a prescribed vessel.

3.6.1.2 Each OPPP will be applicable to the particular OHF, taking into account the requirements found in the Regulations. The operator of an OHF or a person who proposes to operate an OHF, provided the OHF is of a class established by the Regulations, should take into account the specifics of the facility and its surroundings when developing the OPPP.

3.6.1.3 The objective of an OPPP is to help the OHF prevent discharges into the marine environment when loading and unloading oil to or from a vessel, by identifying the hazards associated with the OHF’s activities and to assess the risk to the environment from these activities. The desired result is continuous improvement towards eliminating discharges of oil into the marine environment. In order to minimize the risk to the marine environment, prudence and due diligence in maintaining an effective OPPPs and marine operations is essential to mitigate the threat and ultimately strengthen the existing marine oil spill preparedness and response regime in Canada.

3.6.1.4 Examples of the type of activities surrounding the transfer operations include:

  1. Berthing and unberthing of vessels;
  2. Communications;
  3. Transferring oil in bulk to or from a vessel;
  4. Maintaining vessels at the berth;
  5. Emergency procedures;
  6. Maintaining critical equipment; and
  7. Assessing environmental conditions.

3.6.1.5 The operator of an OHF or a person who proposes to operate an OHF must have an OPPP, describing the preventive measures established at the OHF involving the loading or unloading of oil to or from a prescribed vessel. The OPPP requirements apply to all classes of OHF established by the Regulations (classes 1 to 4).

3.6.1.6 To minimize duplication of effort, if an existing OPPP has been prepared on a voluntary basis or in accordance with the requirements of other legislative requirements of another government, it can be used as long as it meets the requirements of the Regulations. If the existing plan does not meet all the requirements identified, the OPPP must be amended to be in compliance with the Regulations.

3.6.1.7 The OPPP and the OPEP are two separate plans. However, if the elements of both plans can be combined into one plan, it is acceptable as long as each component required by the Regulations can be clearly identified.

Sections 3.6.2 to 3.6.4 are areas that should be considered while developing the OPPP. Incorporating these areas will help to strengthen the OPPP and the effectiveness of the prevention activities during an oil transfer at the facility.

3.6.2 Environmental Policy

When developing the OPPP, consideration should be given to including the OHF’s environmental policy that:

  1. is appropriate to the nature, scale and environmental impacts of the OHF’s marine activities;
  2. includes a commitment to continual improvements and prevention of marine pollution;
  3. includes a commitment to comply with relevant environmental legislation and regulations, and with other requirements to which the OHF subscribes;
  4. provides the framework for setting and reviewing environmental protection objectives and targets; and
  5. is documented, implemented and maintained and communicated to all employees.

3.6.3 Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment and Mitigation

While developing the OPPP, it is encouraged to identify the hazards associated with the transfer of oil to or from a prescribed vessel, assess the risks with those hazards and highlight the measures that will be taken to prevent an incident from happening. This could include:

  1. the procedures identifying those activities undertaken at the OHF that may impact the marine environment, identify the hazards and when an event could occur.  Examples of such activities include:
    1. ensuring the OHF’s design capability, condition and water depth can handle the size of vessels transferring at the facility while;
    2. handling vessel berthing and unberthing;
    3. handling vessel mooring and maintaining moor;
    4. managing general tanker hazards while vessels are alongside;
    5. developing a joint, mutual acceptable (between vessel and OHF) plan for oil transfer;
    6. implementing and maintaining the oil transfer plan;
    7. suspending or completing the oil transfer;
    8. making a temporary or permanent change in the facility’s design, equipment or operating procedures is introduced; and
    9. describing the general operation of equipment.
  2. an assessment of the probability and consequences of an incident resulting from the identified hazards. 
  3. identifying the processes (measures) used to mitigate the risks identified through the assessments.

3.6.4 Risk Identification and Analysis

The OPPP should contain procedures that identify the environmental factors of the OHFs activities that the OHF can control, and over which the OHF can be expected to have an influence, in order to determine those risks which have or can have significant impacts on the marine environment.  The factors related to those significant impacts should be considered in setting its environmental protection objectives.

3.6.5 Duties of Operators

It is important that the OPPP describes those preventative duties that the operator of the OHF is responsible for and that are in line with the Regulations.  Some of those duties include:

  1. securing the vessel while taking into consideration the weather and the tidal and current conditions, and that the mooring lines are tended so that the movement of the vessel does not damage the transfer conduit or its connections. This is a shared responsibility between the vessel and the operator of the OHF where applicable.
  2. loading or unloading procedures;
  3. reporting for readiness prior to commencement of the transfer operation;
  4. communications between the vessel and OHF;
  5. readiness of equipment and procedures for the transfer; and
  6. attendance of competent personnel during the transfer operation.

3.6.6 Training for Operators

The operator of the OHF must ensure the personnel (including sub-contractors) engaged in the loading and unloading of a vessel are prepared for the responsibilities that they may be requested to undertake by receiving the appropriate training.

3.6.6.1 The training should include but is not limited to the following criteria:

  1. Equipment deployment techniques;
  2. Spill prevention, control, and countermeasure;
  3. Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS);
  4. Roles and responsibilities of various responders;
  5. Site safety plan;
  6. Transfer operations;
  7. Basic vessel information; and
  8. Vessel arrival /departure procedures

3.7 Oil Pollution Emergency Plan (OPEP)

3.7.1 General

The standards provide supporting details for some of the requirements found in Part 2 of the Regulations on what must be contained in the OPEP. This plan is designed to be used in the planning process in the preparation to respond to a discharge of oil during the loading or unloading of a prescribed vessel.

3.7.1.1 Each OPEP will be unique, taking into account the resources, equipment, procedures and geographic features used in the event of a discharge of oil during loading or unloading of a vessel at the OHF.

3.7.1.2 The operator of an OHF or a person who proposes to operate an OHF, provided the OHF is of a class established by the Regulations, must take into account the specifics of the facility and its surroundings when developing the plan.

3.7.2 OPEP policies and procedures

The OPEP must include the information set out in the Regulations. The policies and procedures that are important in the OPEP are those that the operator of the OHF will follow in the event of an oil pollution incident. Some examples of such policies and procedures would be:

  • a description of the activities (procedures) that will be carried out in the event of an oil pollution incident.
  • the procedures for reporting a discharge or anticipated discharge of oil, including the federal emergency number that will be used in the event of a spill (i.e. Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS)).
  • the procedures, equipment and resources that the operator of the OHF must plan for and have available for immediate use and will implement in the event of a discharge of oil during the loading or unloading of a prescribed vessel. The details are found within the Regulations including time standards that the facility must achieve in the event of a spill. These time standards are critical to ensure an immediate response is undertaken by the operator of the OHF.
  • to shut down immediately and not restart loading or unloading operations in a manner that would interfere with the immediate, effective and sustained response to the oil pollution incident.
  • to not restart loading and unloading operations until it is safe to do so.
  • the procedures which the operator of the OHF plans to follow  in response to an oil pollution incident.

3.7.3 Scenario development and Factors

As part of the OPEP, oil pollution scenarios must be developed that describe the incident and the proposed response to possible discharge.

3.7.3.1 As per the Regulations, the assumptions used in each scenario that is developed must take into account, at a minimum, the following factors.

  • the nature of the oil product;
  • the types of vessels that are loaded or unloaded at the OHF;
  • the tides and currents that exist at the OHF;
  • the meteorological conditions that exist at the OHF;
  • the surrounding environmentally sensitive areas that would likely be affected by a discharge, including but not limited to: fish and wildlife habitat areas, flood plain areas, intakes of drinking water systems and recreational water use areas;
  • the measures to be taken to minimize the effects of a discharge; and
  • the time necessary to carry out a response to an oil pollution incident in accordance with these Regulations.

3.7.4 Oil Pollution Incident - Priorities

As per the Regulations, the OPEP must contain information regarding the activities that will be carried out in the event of an oil pollution incident, taking into account the priorities listed below, the order and the time within which those activities will be carried out and the names or positions of the persons responsible for carrying them out.

3.7.4.1 The following are the priorities that must be considered:

  • the safety of the facility’s personnel;
  • the safety of the facility;
  • the safety of the communities living adjacent to the facility;
  • the prevention of fire and explosion;
  • the minimization of the effects of a discharge;
  • the reporting of the oil pollution incident;
  • the environmental impact of a discharge; and
  • the measures to be taken for clean-up following the oil pollution incident, including with respect to environmentally sensitive areas and surrounding ecosystems.

3.7.5 Exercises

The exercise program is an integral part of the OPEP. The primary goals of the exercise program are to evaluate, in a controlled environment, the effectiveness of all aspects of the procedures, equipment and resources identified in the OPEP, the capabilities of OHF response staff, and the interaction between the OHF, vessels, other government agencies and response organizations. Exercises are divided in four categories: internal notification, external notification, deployment and table-top (management).

3.7.5.1 When designing an exercise, specific evaluation criteria should be developed. The evaluation criteria should be based on the actions expected to be carried out as described in the procedures in the OPEP. A written description of any exercise must be sent to Transport Canada at least 30 days in advance of the exercise to allow the marine safety inspector sufficient time to review the objectives of the exercise, raise any concerns and to be prepared to attend and evaluate the exercise when it is conducted.

3.7.5.2 To test the interaction between various parties, exercises should be coordinated with Transport Canada Marine Safety and Security, and other players or interested parties such as vessels that could be used when responding to an oil pollution incident and vessels engaged in oil transfer operations, response organization(s), the Canadian Coast Guard, Environment and Climate Change Canada, First Nations and local communities.

3.7.5.3 As per the Regulations, if a gap is identified as a result of an exercise, it will trigger a review of the OPPP and OPEP by the OHF operator. If updates to one or both of the plans is deemed necessary, the updates must be completed within 90 days after the day on which the event occurred.

3.7.5.4 The following table lays out the objectives of the various types of exercises, a description of the exercises and the suggested frequency the exercises should be carried out.

Oil Handling Facilities - Example of Exercise Program
Types of exercise Description Frequency

Internal notification: 

Objective:  Verify the ability to contact, in a reasonable time, OHF response staff identified in the OHF's OPEP.

  • Notification of emergency call out
  • Activation of the OHF response/management team

Two (2) times a year

External notification:

Objective: Verify the ability to contact OHF authorities, company management, governments and other organizations identified in the OHF's OPEP within a reasonable time.

  • External notification systems – emergency call out to OHF neighbours
  • Mobilization of the OHF response/ Management team
  • Activation of ROs and contractors
  • Notification of government and non-government agencies
  • Notification of the federal emergency number found in the OPEP

Once a year

Deployment:

Objective: Evaluate the effectiveness of the OHF response team in following the procedures established to contain/recover a spill, using response equipment described in the OPEP within time standards.

  • Shut down procedures
  • Source control
  • Deployment of equipment
  • Containment and recovery activities
  • Site Safety Plan development

Once a year

Table Top - Management: 

Objective: Evaluate all aspects of the OHF's response management system by simulating an incident using a scenario with inputs.  Simulation of deployment of equipment and activation of personnel. Test the communication, briefing, reporting and data and records collection and management techniques.

  • Identification of the On-Scene Commander
  • Establishment of the management team
  • Understanding roles and responsibilities of mandated agencies
  • Situational analysis
  • Spill Trajectory
  • Environmental assessment
  • Site Security
  • Financial record management
  • Equipment tracking
  • Waste management (disposal)
  • Preparation of Incident Action Plan
  • Public Awareness/notification
  • Post incident de-briefing

Once every three (3) years

3.7.5.5 For those OHFs of a class established by the Regulations that have a shortened shipping season, for example, OHFs located north of 60 degrees north latitude, the suggested frequency noted in the above table, may not be feasible. As an alternative, a deployment and notification exercise should be conducted once each season, prior to receiving the first shipment of oil.

3.7.5.6 The operator of an oil handling facility must keep a record of the dates and results of each mandatory exercises to capture the lessons learned from each exercise and to ensure the results are taken into consideration in subsequent exercises.

3.7.6 Training

Training is an integral part of the OPEP. Training activities are a tool to ensure the knowledge, skills and ability of the personnel taking part in the response activities are current and correspond to their roles in an incident.

The following are examples of the type of training criteria that should be considered when providing training to personnel or other individuals who might be called upon to respond to an oil pollution incident.

3.7.6.1 Training Criteria
  1. Familiarization with the OPEP

    Goal: Each OHF staff member is familiar with the contents of the OPPP and the OPEP and is proficient in the functions that may be assigned to them.

  2. Training of the Notification System

    Goal: Members of the OHF response team are trained in the procedures on how to activate the internal/external notification system.

  3. Training for Response Managers - Roles and Responsibilities during an Incident

    Goal: The OHF response team managers are familiar with their roles and responsibilities during an incident (i.e. Incident Command Systems) and their interaction with other representatives involved in an effective spill response.

  4. Theoretical and Hands-on Training for Deployment of Pollution Countermeasure Equipment

    Goal: Provide the response team with the ability to effectively use the equipment to contain, control, recover and clean up after the discovery of the discharge, within the time standards found in subsection 13(2)(b) of the Regulations. It is important this type of training covers the handling of all response equipment described in the OPEP e.g., appropriate training for vessel operators, containment equipment (booms, absorbent material, anchors, etc.), recovery equipment (vacuum trucks, oil skimmers, etc.) and establishing temporary storage for recovered oil and oily waste, as required. If the OPEP includes other strategies, the OHF response team should know how to handle the appropriate equipment and the procedures.

  5. Training in the Safety component of the OPEP

    Goal: Each member of the OHF response team is familiar with the safety standards and relevant health and safety legislation. This legislation includes such things as federal, provincial and territorial occupational health and safety laws, such as the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) requirements, etc.

4. Schedules

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